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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
File 011
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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 011. 1990-01-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3438.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-01-05). Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3438

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 011, 1990-01-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3438.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 5, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript The major concern in gay activist circles these days seems to be a matter of tactics with general agreement on goals—AIDS funding and gay civil rights. But there does seem to be a growing chasm within the community on methods. Increasingly, a more conservative approach rests on the belief that more can be achieved by working basically within the system, influencing local government and establishing coalitions with elected officials and with similar interest groups. At the other extreme are such national groups as ACT UP which practices confrontation such as the recent demonstration at St. Patrick's in New York. These two views dominate gay political thinking and, by their very nature, foster conflict within the community. Those believing in the "work with the system" can point to gay strength in the National Democratic Party as well as a prominent role in certain state and local elections. On the other side, ACT UP—in the words of The New York Times (not known as a friend of the community but often the target of ACT UP)—has been effective. Reported by Jason DeParle of that newspaper, "Pressure by the group has not only helped keep the epidemic in the news, it has also helped bring major change to the way the Federal Government tests and distributes experimental drugs, allowing patients to obtain them much faster!' Even New York City Health Commissioner Stephen C. Joseph, another ACT UP target, concludes that "there's no doubt (ACT UP) had an enormous effect" Here in Texas it is still debated whether the March on Austin helped or hindered the gay image and AIDS funding (the decision this week by Brad Wright, a leading AIDS funding foe, not to run for re-election could be interpreted as a victory). Unlike the March on Washington in 1987, the Austin event received wide coverage by the straight medi- a. But the very nature of bias of such coverage often creates its own negative imagery. More conservative gay elements contend that the Austin march stirred a backlash of calls and letters to legislators which further complicated the AIDS bill. Of course, this view puts responsibility for homophobic reactions on march organizers. As with any such difference within a political movement, our perception of this difference heightens our separation. Each side feels the necessity to increasingly defend its position, ultimately to the extreme: Seeing their position as the orthodox and only true approach to change. Any study of past social/political struggles illustrates that multiple tactics appear to offer greater success. In other words, if we accept more than one road to Rome and support each other we have greater hopes of success. There is even much to be said for coordinating diverse approaches. It is definitely time to put personalities behind us and seek ways to support each other. We must also accept the reality that a vast majority of gay men and lesbians will always refuse to involve themselves in their own liberation. But this has also often been a feature of previous struggles and not, in itself, fatal. In the case of the gay community it is much easier to hide or deny ourselves. Even AIDS does not always fling open the closet. This week a noted designer, Patrick Kelly, died in Paris at age 35 of a bone marrow disease and a brain tumor. Clearly a case of AIDS, there was no mention of it. In the Houston papers' lengthy obituaries even Kelly's partner and "long-time companion" went unnoted, although properly recognized by the Times. Equally unfortunate, many of the more successful gays are the very ones who are most prone to the closet. And they are also the ones who more readily accept straight society's projection of homosexuality as a simple matter of a sex act, with the logical correlation that it is a matter of choice—obviously if it's only sex you can always choose not to do "itV Until we win our point on inbred orientation we cannot convince even our own ranks of the legitimacy of our struggle. With a comprehension of this basic truth also comes a positive acceptance of ourselves and our rights. This is a difficult goal but it is achievable. Accept ourselves and then accept our differences—at that point we would be unstoppable. But until that day we must fight intelligently with the tools at hand. LOBO 1424-C Westheimer (at Windsor) 522-5156 Video Sales & Rentals • Swimwear • T-Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities / Lobo is \ / buying gay \ / material from \ K o £ After Dark to \ o I Drummer, videos \ a CQ / paperbacks and \ z o i hardbacks \ 5 z* / by or about gay and \ / lesbiapi. \ A SHEER INSANITY* I Wanted, collections large \ / or small. \ I ' I DAQUIRI FACTORY WE JTHE IMER
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