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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
File 005
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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 005. 1990-01-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3432.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-01-05). Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3432

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 005, 1990-01-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3432.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 5, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE I FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, 1 " I GOT THIS ONE FOR GRENADA, THISOMe FOR PANAMA, ANPTH.S ONE $0$ NINTENDO! Ck>@&®g7ff^ Qt \MmW ROfcOTS OW bOiMONO PttlS DON'T MIX, Cathedral protesters: No regrets By K1LEY ARMSTRONG NEW YORK (AP)-AIDS and abortion-rights activists say they have no regrets about the demon stration they staged interrupting Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral. "We did not go to the cathedral outof hatred," said Tim Powers, an AIDS patient and member ofthe AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, at a news conference Dec. 13. "We had exhausted every other possibility;' Some 4500 people marched outside the cathedral Dec. 10, hand' ing out literature protesting (arm nal John J. O'Connor's lobbying efforts against abortion and safesex education. Police arrested ta people outside the church and 43 inside, where dozens lay in the center aisle, several chained themselves to pews and some threw condoms in the air. The activists at the press confer ence—three from ACT-UP and two from Women's Health Action and Mobilization—dismissed criticism by politicians, religious following the protest. "We meant no harm or insult to worshipers," said Mary Anne Si a Olszewski, spokeswoman for WHAM! "It was not an attack on the Catholic religion." "The Mass was interrupted for 15 minutes. We regret it had to come to that, but people are dying," said Gerri Wells, a Catholic who was arrested inside the cathedral. One protester threw a consecrated communion wafer on the floor. "That was an individual protest and we can't speak for that person. He was a Catholic and was part of the group, but it wasn't a planned action," said Wells. Politicians—including Mayor Edward I, Koch, Mayor-elect Da vid Dinkins and Gov. Mario Cuomo—criticized the protest as an infringement on worshipers' "Any religious service by any group ought not to be desecrated this way—no matter how severe the provocation. And the provocation is great especially for people who have AIDS," Cuomo said in an interview on WAMC-AM, an Albany public radio station. "No one in this country is more sensitive to the needs of people with AIDS than Cardinal O'Connor" Cuomo said. "When we couldn't find beds for people with AIDS, he gave us St. Clare's Hospital. He goes to the hospital himself. He has cleaned the sheets of the beds where people with AIDS The Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights issued a statement from Milwaukee on Dec. 13, saying the protesters* ac tions "constitute gross violations ofthe cardinal's First Amendment rights to freedom of religion, freedom of speech and freedom of assembly" On Dec. 11, O'Connor denounced the demonstrators as misguided and harmful to their cause. "If the aim is to change church teaching, they can't accomplish that," he said. But activists complained that O'Connor used his position in the church to advance a political agenda, including lobbying to keep public schools from offering safe-sex education and saying that he wanted to join Operation Rescue, an anti-abortion group that blockades women's health clinics. "The great act of worship that occurred... was by those 5,000 peo- ple on the street," said Staniszewski. "I believe if Jesus were with us now, he'd be on our side." AIDS groups oppose 'hypocritical' immigration questions Researcher's spirit keeps patients' hopes alive NEW ORLEANS iAPi—The ie nacity and spirit of a 42-year-old researcher has brought to life a new vaccine that may he a shot in the arm to despairing victims of AIDS. On Dec. 7, Dr. Michael Murphey- Corb. a Louisiana-trained researcher, took the spotlight in the war against AIDS with this announcement: Her team has developed a vaccine that has protected eight of nine monkeys from what ought to have been lethal doses of the virus that causes the simian equivalent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "Mickey was the spark plug that kept the enthusiasm up and kept these people driving, not because she was pushy but because of her enthusiasm," said Peter Gerone, director of the primate-center where Murphey-Corb works. "She kept spirits up and kept talking about how important this was. It spread." This is a vital attribute, said Ronald C.Montelaro.chairofLouisiana State's biochemistry de partment and one time co-worker, because too many AIDS .scientists are convinced no one will ever de- Hui her success and the attention she received haven't been enough to take Murphey-Corb's mind off one disturbing fact: Although the vaccine killed otf the virus in eight rhesus monkeys, one was nonetheless infected. That irritates her. "Among researchers, a 90 percent success rale is line for preliminary work," she said in an interview last week. "But my nueslion So, she has relumed to her lab at Tulane's Delia Regional Primate Research Center in the woods near Covington to find out why. Gerone is sure she'll find out. "She's got persistence and tenacity, lie said. "'When shewants something, she goes after it and works very hard lo do it. She has worked very hard." Murphey-Corh was born in Greenville, Miss., and received a bachelor's degree in medical tech nology from Northeast Louisiana University in Monroe. She received her doctorate in microbiology in 1980 and started work at Tulane's primate center in 1984. In between that time, she married her college sweelhearl and had two sons, now in their For the past three years, she has led the center's effort to find the Holy Grail of AIDS research: a vaccine to ward off the disease that, so far, has no cure. This part of the quest has taken 2 1/2 years. The scientists gave each monkey three shots, one month apart, of killed whole virus. And, a year later, a booster. And. two weeks later, a dose of simian AIDS virus 10 times the amount needed to infect. Accompanying the injections were the vast stretches of ordinary watching and record-keeping, the grind-work of research. Even though it may be years before scientists develop a vaccine against human immunodeficien cy virus, which causes AIDS, the compound Murphey-Corb's team produced will be a sort of gold standard against which others will be measured. Gerone said. "You have to remember that until recently, we've had nothing but failures," said Dr. Dani P. Bolognesi of Duke University Medical Center. "Now we're beginning to see some successes. ...There's a mountain of work to be done, hut it's all doable. I'm very encouraged by these experiments" "She really has the right moti vation: Anything can be done," Montelaro said. "That's important in this field You have to go in hopeful and optimistic." Dr. Jonas Salk, creator of the polio vaccine and now at work on AIDS, is a collaborator who talks with her regularly. "1 like the way she thinks," Salk Dr. Robert Gallo, one of two men credited with discovering the AIDS virus, says Murphey-Corb is the scientistto watch in AIDSvac- cine research. Hy HARRY K. ROSKNTHAL WASHINGTON (AP)-AIDS groups around the country are applauding a recommendation that the Bush administration stop screening international visitors for the AIDS virus "The HIV policies now enforced by the Immigration and Naturalization Service are hypocritical, racist and homophobic and must he abolished" said Pal Christen. executive director of Ihe San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The National Commission on AIDS made public a resolution Dec. 12 urging the government to stop asking visitors to the United States if they are infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV], which causes AIDS, and to quit marking the passports of those who art. At least 36 national organizations, including the American Bar Association, the American Civil Liberties Union, the American Red Cross and the National Lawyers' Guild endorsed the new immigration resolution. Current policies infringe on human rights and dignity "and they reinforce a false impression lhat AIDS and HIVinfection areagen- eral threat," said Dr. June E. Osborn, who chairs the commission. "In fact they are sharply restricted in their mode of transmis- "This policy is discriminatory, it is unjust, it violates basic human rights, it inflicts unnecessary hardship and embarrassment on an already suffering community.'' said Charles Carman, president of the World Federation of Hemophil "For too long irrationality, rather than public health, has governed in this area," said Chai R Feldblum, legislative counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union's AIDS project. The commission said the Immigration and Naturalization Service routinely questions some U.S. visitors to learn if they are infected Censorship flap ends after a month at state museum By DAVID BAUDER ALBANY. N.Y. (API-The New York State Museum has quietly reached a compromise wilh an artist who accused the institution of homophobia and repression for putting a "warning label" on sexually explicit vide- The agreement with Buffalo artist Julie Zando, announced Dec. 29. ended a month-long standoff with artists reminiscent of the national controversy over public funding of Robert Mapplethorpe's photos of homosexual acts. "I'm really relieved lhat we got it done and dismayed that it Cook so long to get together," said Martin Sullivan, state museum director. Zando's four videotapes are part of an exhibit on New York state ts that is ; the until the end of January. Since some of the videos discuss sexuality and contain full frontal nudity, the museum wanted to warn parents the works might not be suitable for children, Sullivan said. A sign warning "parental discre tion is advised" was placed outside of the room where the videos were displayed and shown on the screen before the program started. Zando's videos were shown once a day. Zando accused the museum if stifling a free flow of ideas, saying museums aren't like movie theaters with "PG" and "R" ratings She demanded her videos he pulled from the exhibit after the museum refused to remove the warning labels. Five other Buffalo artists also threatened to pull their art from the show in sympathy, "1 reallj had the sense that they were going out of their way to prevent people from viewing my work," said Zando, a 28-year-old video art- Sullivan said the responsibility to protect parents, since 60 percent of the museum's 1.2 million yearly visitors are children. He said the controversy was partly a response to lasl fall's Mapplethorpe Congress reduced its appropriation to the National Endowment of the Arts after learning federal mon- "This is a difficult lime lor artist--, said Sullivan. "There is a heightened sensitivity to censorship. But this situation is quite different from Mapplethorpe." One of the videos, entitled "Hey Bud," intersperses si-L-nes ofthe 1987 public suicide of Pennsylvania state treasurer R. Budd Dwyer with those of a woman unzipping the dress of another woman. Zando said she tried to convey her feeling that the shooting was the more pornograph- Two of her other short films deal with seduction between women. "Ifindthecontextualiiationofmy work as being unsuitable for children is reprehensible," said Zando. Much of her work deals with grow ing up and the discovery of sexuality, she said. Zando said she thought museum officials were queasy about the videos because, in part, they depicted lesbian sex. Sullivan denied this. He said graphic images of nudity and violence could be upsetting to children if they're taken out of context. Curator Nina Felshin. who selected Zando's work for the show and acted as an intermediary during the dispute, said she was surprised the museum had a problem with the vid- "Nudity just didn't seem like it would be objectionable m an artistic context.' Felshin said. "I was really stunned, quite honestly, when I first got word that there was going to be a problem. It just had never occurred to me. I certainly didn't do it to try to be confrontational." Sulhv i the ii state Council on the Arts leaders were ordered to testify at a hearing alt'- the New York Post reported state grants were used to support arts projects on transvestism and homosexuality. Under the compromise reached Dec. 29, the maseum has agreed to get rid of the parental discretion warning shown at the beginning of the video and Zando has agreed to accept the warning sign outside of the small theater. "I was more interested in letting the museum know that artists have rights and they also have a certain amount of power." said Zando, whose by HIV and that this has already caused several international groups and agencies to boycott important conferences to be held in the United States n Unless the eased, said several spokesmen for groups concerned with AIDS, many international participants are expected to stay away from the 6th International Conference on AIDS, in San Francisco June 20- 24, and the 19th International Congress on Hemophilia, scheduled for Washington in August. The commission called for immediate administrative steps to end questioning ot tourists, students and temporary visitors about their HIV status while applying for visas. "Tins would eliminate the current practice of stopping travelers who are carrying AZT, the only licensed anti-HlV drug, and blood products such as clotting factor used by hemophiliacs," the corn- Travel restrictions for people with HIV began two years ago when Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., succeeded in adding HIV to a list of dangerous contagious diseases considered by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. A waiver process was instituted a year ago for professional conferences, business travel and medical conferences, hut a code is placed on the passports of those who re- Dr. Mervyn Silverman, president of the American Foundation for AIDS Research, said in a telephone interview from San Francisco that the rules should be changed because "the policy is not going to serve any significant public health service but the potential for discrimination is significant with a code in your passport known to everybody" The resolution called for a comprehensive review by the Departments of State, Justice and Health and Human Services of immigration policies on communicable diseases, especially HIV infection. We're working to bring you a real newspaper. repressive instil ution. We don't pull works of art from a show because we don't like them." At the same time, he said, it's not a gallery that regularly features contemporary art. "We don't want to get people turned off because we hit them over the head with something they don't expect to see" he said. State officials may simply have been trying to prevent aeon troversy from boiling over. In March 1988, a day. think that's something that they completely underestimated when thev first attempted to censor my work." Felshin said that, ironically, the material in Zando's videotape is relatively mild compared to what can be seen on television these days. "Quite honestly," shesaid. "I think if some kids walked in (on the videos) they wouldn't know what all the fuss is about." The Montrose Voice is the First Choice!
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