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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
File 004
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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 004. 1990-01-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3431.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-01-05). Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3431

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 004, 1990-01-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3431.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 5, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Caucus rejects 'openly gay' rule for officers Continued from page I On second call for self-nominations to HGLPC officer and board positions, Dennis Spencer, current vice president of the caucus, withdrew his name as a candidate for re-elec tion to his position and nominated himself for president. There were no nominations for the position of vice president, and no challengers to incumbents Hollier and Kevin Davidson for the offices of secretary and treasurer, respectively. Ed Barnes announced hi6 candidacy for vacant board of directors Position 4, a three year term, and David Fowler self nominated for board Position 6, for a term expiring in Jul Shai who had previously announced for board seat 8, withdrew her name from consideration because of a change in employment status. There were no second call nominations for board seats 8, 5 and 6. Brian Keever had announced on first call for re election to board seat 6. Third call for nominations and the election will be held Jan. 17 at the caucus' regular meeting location, Metropolitan Multi-Service Center on West Gray. In other business. Joe'["horn torn it the police advisory committee advised members of a hearing to determine the caucus' official responses to questions from Mayor Kathy Whitmire to minority groups represented in the coalition. The questions are intended to assist in the mayor's selection of a new Houston police chief, Thornton said. The meeting will be held at noon Sunday, Jan 7, at the HGLPC office at 900 Dara Bloom of the Coalition to End Clinic Violence asked caucus members for help and support with their efforts. The groupescorts women into abortion clinics through picket lines of protesters who are often physically violent, Bloom said. Chair Kay Hill solicited parlicipa tion for an inter-organizational "di rect action" planned for the opening of Randall's at Westheimer and Shepherd on Jan. 12. The groups will be protesting the recent firing of a gay man whose roommate was rumored to have AIDS, and continued defense by Randall's officials in court documents of the company's "right" to dismiss gays and people with AIDS from employment. Hill acknowledged several people in the room who had filed for positions within the Harris County Democratic Party. Seven caucus members were seeking election or reelection to precinct chairships, and Leslie Perez had filed as acandidate for party chair. conference declaring "the if the Committee to Re tire Brad Wright" was announced Wright, the conservative Republican who chaired the House public health committee during the 71st state legislature, did not seek re-elec tion to his seat in the state House of Representatives. Members of a statewide committee organ wed to oust Wright are claiming victory, saying their efforts made it difficult for the representative to raise needed funds for his campaign. Hill said Simultaneous conferences were scheduled in Houston, Austin and Dallas for Thursday, Jan. 4, he said. FRIDAY. JANUARY 5. 1989 . MONTROSEVOICE 3 re Back! Sex for Bisexual Men |L JJ Gay7l forgotten what youni to know . . . Monday, January Bth 7:00-9:30 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 9 0 0 Lovett, #203 52 9-0037 Fundamentalists plan conference on 'homosexual healing' ANAHEIM,Calif. (API^A fundamentalist Orange County Christian group led by one of the nation's strongest critics of homosexuality is planning a national conference this month in Washington on "homosexuality healing!' The Rev. Lou Sheldon said bee. 28 the conference sponsored by his Traditional Values Coalition will be held Jan. 26. The meeting's exact location will be kept secret to minimize protests by gay rights activists, he said. The conference will forts to persuade gay I bians to change their sexual orientation, Sheldon said. It also will consider ways to prevent gays from winning public approval through legislation, he said. Sheldon called the gay lifestyle and legislation favoring it "a threat to traditional family values set forth in every document of our government from the Mayflower Compact onward." Local gay rights activists said Dec. 28 they will protest the Washington conference, as they protested an Oct. 10 symposium held by the California Coalition for Traditional Values in Anaheim. That symposium argued that gays were a threat to family values. "I suspect we'll have a massive turnout to protest what he's doing" said John Duran, an Orange County gay attorney. "Everywhere he goes to spread his lies, we'll be there. He's so filled with hate he's lost all ability for rational thinking:' About 40 gay rights activists were arrested when they protested the Anaheim conference where William Allen, then chairperson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, angered gays with a speech titled "Blacks, Animals, Homosexuals: What is a Minority?" Allen resigned his post shortly after the conference when a public furor developed over his com- The conference could represent a move by Sheldon to take his movement national, said the Rev. Jerry Sloan, a Sacramento gay ac- "They're making us theobject of probably the greatest religious persecution since the Pilgrims came to this country" said Sloan. "It's an ugly form of bigotry" J TELEPHONE * » ANSWERING SERVICE 1 : ; * Beeper Sale. No Credit Necessary. * * Wide Area J Coverage. Call + Today for Prices. * Police harassing possible AIDS victims, say program director SAN DIEGO (API-Leaders of a federal program to combat AIDS among drug addicts say San Diego police are harassing clients and keeping them from coming for testing and counseling. Alfredo Velasco, director of Horizontes, said police have frisked and apprehended their clients, have been sarcastic, arrogant and accusatory of staff workers and have even arrested one staff member on suspicion of heroin use, forcing him to take a drug test. The test showed he was clean. "I don't give a hoot who they're after. We're doing them and the county a favor, preventing the spread of AIDS;' Velasco said. He said he wants officers simply to stay away from West Park, adjacent to the San Ysidro Park and Recreation Center, on Wednesday mornings when Horizontes workers wait for drug addicts to show up. A nurse with the county Health Department accompanies the group to draw blood for test- County health officer Dr Donald Ramras is considering formally requesting that the Police Department stay away from the park when Horizontes is there. "We would prefer that they do whatever they have to do, but not in conjunction with where (the program is operating)," he said. "There's no question that this impacts our activity and that of Horizontes in trying to educate this group of people." His staff has told him that the Horizontes program has made small progress in getting drug addicts to change their high-risk behavior. Police spokesperson Capt. Richard Toneck said police frequently are in the area because the park is a hangout for drug abusers. He said whenever officers see someone who is wanted for any crime, or apparently on drugs, that person will be apprehended. "I think we're going to run into loggerheads on this issue" Toneck said. "We can't just avoid going to theparkjust because they're there. That's not going to happen!' Velasco believes his program is dealing wilh far more life-threatening issues than the apprehension of a heroin addict who, in a worst-case situation, might be a frequent armed robber or burglar. The program, one of 60 similar federally funded programs in the country, is designed to communicate the dangers of AIDS virus infection to a group of people who may otherwise have no contact with health officials. The program pays addicts SHI to lie tested for exposure to the virus that causes AIDS and another$10 to return for their results. Six months later, the same addicts are sought out and again are paid $10 to be tested and another $10 to return for their results. Outreach workers also distribute bottles of bleach to clean needles and syringes and con- Velasco said meetings with police to resolve the situation have been friendly but unproductive. Because five percent of the 1,81X1 people tested so far haveshown infection with the AIDS virus, it is important that they all return for counseling lo prevent the spread of AIDS through sexual contact or dirty needles. The three-year program, funded by a $1 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, so far has paid more than 1,200 addicts to participate in the project. Alberto Mata. a senior adviser with the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA). said none of NIDA's other programs in the country has experienced such problems with police. "It sounds like the police are using Horizontes so they don't have to hunt people down" he said in a telephone interview from Washington D.C. UH begins AIDS prevention project for teens "You can get AIDS just by shaking hands with someone who tests HIV positive." "There's no way you can get AIDS the first time you have kcx'' These are two of many misconceptions teenagers hold about AIDS, according to the University of Houston's Psychology/Behavioral Medicine Research Group. The UH researchers have been awarded an initial two-year, $242,671 grant from the National Institute of Menial Health to uncover these misconceptions and examine how teenagers decide on sexual activity, in light of the growing threat of the spread of AIDS. Dr. Richard I. Evans, professor of psychology, directs the research group and its teenage AIDS pre vention project, which will collect data on more than 200(1 Houston area high school students. "We need to understand the misconceptions teens hold regarding AIDS so effective prevention programs can be developed and integrated into the high school curriculum," said Evans. The multi-faceted will research several areas. Key subjects to be included arc the amount of knowl edge students actually have about AIDS and its transmission; thede- gree that drugs, alcohol and emotions influence risky sexual practices among teens and whether gender difference relates to being at risk for AIDS. The project will also concentrate on developing a psycho logical-social profile of students who are at risk for contracting AIDS and determining the validity of various ethnic and racial stereotypes of those who are "at risk." It is possible lhat many misconceptions exist concerning teenagers who are believed to be at risk for AIDS, the researchers said. Following this initial two year study, the UH team has been encouraged to extend the project into the development and evaluation of a three year AIDS prevention program. Assisting in the project are Drs. J. Greg Getz, research coordinator, and Linda Jackson, community- relations coordinator. Also participating are the City of Houslon Health Department and local school districts. General results will be made available to the school districts, but the identity of each participating teenager will be kept completely confidential, the researchers said. Measure would close AIDS care house JACKSON, Miss. (API—A boarding house for AIDS victims may close because of increased monitoring and a proposed bill that would classify it as a hospice. State Health Officer Dr. Alton Cobb has instructed the Health Department's licensure and certification division to more closely monitor the Sandifer House. The house, named after its director, Eddie Sandifer, also could not continue to exist in that neighborhood under a bill proposed by si ate Sen. Wootsie Tate of Picayune. It would be classified as a hospice— and thus a commercial enterprise. The area is not zoned for commercial businesses. Tate told ihe State Board of Health, which met Dec. 15 in Jackson. "We have the authority to regulate health-care facilities," said Men da I Kemp, director of the licensure and certification divi sion, "The problem is fitting the home into a category we have for licensure. "We've been there three times. We've interviewed residents. We've determined it's a boarding house. Yes, the people there have a disease that will lead to death. But they are managing their own affairs. They come and go as they please. I know there have been deaths there. Periodically, people will be bed bound. If it does pass the threshold into some category that requires licensing, we will close it down." The Sandifer House will probably violate the department's licensing standards at some point, Cobb said. "I do not believe that house belongs in that area," said Tate, who told the board shemoved out ofthe Jackson neighborhood because of the 12-bed house. Tate has introduced one bill for licensing hospices and another to establish a 60-bed nursing home for AIDS patients. Currently, state health regulations define a hos- cept,r a Plat pice the programs for Medicare and Medi- The Sandifer House has provided help to a lot of people, Cobb said. "1 think we're going to need a lot more than the Sandifer House to care for these people," he said. "While we're busy trying to control this one, let's create an alter- "We're going to monitor it more often and keep it under closer surveillance." Sandifer, executive director of the Mississippi Persons with AIDS-HIV Project, was out of town and could not be reached for comment. The Board of Health tabled until its Feb. 14 meeting any action on legislation proposed by Tate or Sen. Barbara Blanton of Brandon. Health Department staff members maintain the only additional legislation needed is appropriate funds for the agency to provide AIDS education, counseling, testing, disease surveillance and partner notification. The department also supports a law prohibiting discrimination against people infected with the AIDS virus in employment, housing, education and access to medical care based solely on their infection status. Margaret Moize of Jackson, a chief opponent of the Sandifer House, maintained her Belhaven Heights neighborhood is severely affected by current AIDS policy. "I don't believe a neighborhood should be taken over and made to serve a purpose it wasn't meant to serve," Moize said. Tate's proposed AIDS bill, which the Health Department estimates would cost $3.3 million over three years to implement, deals primarily with legal issues about AIDS. Blantan's bill, which has a cost estimate of $9 million over three years, stresses education and testing. + Page Me!, inc. .•••••■A-******************** + Advertise in the Montrose Voice! iing Help Us to indoor Swir Pool Sauna Steamroom Whirlpool Wide Screen Television Private Video Rooms 4 video Channels Work Out & Weight Area Enjoy Our Newly Remodeled Sundeck Snack bar Expand Our Club We're adding on three new rooms and now's the time to show your DESIGNING TALENTS Here's What We're Looking For: 1) Leather Room 2) Mirror Room 3) Western Room Winners of This Contest Will Receive a Free Weekly Pass to Your Room(s) and a One Year Membership. Deadline: Jan. 19 Clubs Welcome to Enter Contest The Safest Place to Meet Men There's Always Something Happening • Monday: free video room upgrades • Tuesday: half price lockers • Wednesday: half price rooms • Thursday: half price lockers (for 6 month members only) Open 24 Hours 7 Days 3100 FANNIN HOUSTON, TX (713) 522-2379 When in Dallas Visit 2509 Pacific, (214) 821-8989
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