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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
File 003
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Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 003. 1990-01-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-01-05). Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 003. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3430

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990 - File 003, 1990-01-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3449/show/3430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 480, January 5, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 5, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript 2 MONTROSEVOICE/ RIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1989 Offbeat 'Reckless' is special offering at Stages Houston Live by NEIL BADDEHS Themost unusual holiday offering this theatrical season is " Reckless" at Stages. A play by Craig Lucas. "Reckless is the story of Rachel, a perennially perky woman who finds out, five minutes before it happens, that her husband has taken out a contract on her life. That it happens on Christmas is not incidental to the story, As Rachel flees into the night, and into aseries of ludicrous situations, we are challenged to look at our own Christmas memories. Sometimes funny, sometimes sad, these memories are often the most . potent because they happened at Christmas. Along the way, Rachel is befriended by Lloyd, a gentle man with a past as dark as Rachel's present. He takes her home to his wife, Pooty, a deaf-mute paraplegic who also carries a secret. These two take Rachel into their home, share their secrets with her . and assist her in putting her life back into shape, although only briefly. During this time Rachel al so meets a snooty, not-so-honesl computer operator at a firm where ,. Lloyd has found her work: wine .. $100,000 with Lloyd and Pooty on . a sleazy game show called "Your Mother or Your Wife" (the three are hilariously dressed as a solar system) and seeks answers from the first of many therapists for a bizarre tilt to her reality. This period of her life ends with another visit from her husband Tom, which sees Rachel once again fleeing into the night after a To make sense ofthe absurd progression of events in her life, Rachel turns to therapist after therapist for non-existent solutions, always insisting that "the past is irrelevant, something that you wake up from" As events further skew, Rachel retreats into a world inhahited on ly by her memories...where someplace it's always Christmas. Jolted into encountering reality once again by yet another act of violence, Rachel decides that no matter what we do to control our lives, "things just happen." In the ultimate absurdity. Rachel becomes a therapist. Wearelefttoponderthe question, what is it about Christmas that makes us remember painful things? "Reckless" is a comedy with an angry edge. The laughs here are generated by the offbeat situations, the kind of uncomfortable laughs that are offered when we learn a lesson form life the hard way and have time to reflect. However, many of the laughs in .Stages' production were also due to the skill ofthe fine ensemble, headed by Donna Whitmore as Rachel. Whitmore is a skilled actress and comedienne. The role of Rachel is difficult, requiring the actress portraying her to flip with believe ability from comedy to tragedy and back. It also demands extraordinary stamina. Whitmore makes her transitions warmth and intelligence that shines despite the paranoia and final sadness of her character. Stephen Pond as Lloyd and Ju- dv l-Vow as Pooty were outstanding Pond was endearing and ultimately moving as a man trying to live his life to make up for past mistakes by recreating the same situations and forcing a different ending. Frow showed why she is one of the most skilled character actresses around. She takes an outlandish role (deaf-mute paraplegic) and never once takes it over the edge. We never pity Pooty or laugh at her, only with her. Nice work and fun. Sebastian White as Rachel's husband, Tom, as the man in the ski mask and as Tom. Jr. was effective in all three roles. He was so convincing in each part lhat I didn't really make the connection that it was the same actor until I received the program later. Kevin Kinkade, April Sayre, Patrick McCord, Gary Scull in and Pat Mitchell were entertaining in multiple roles, making each a distinct presence. Mitchell deserves special mention for filling in on short notice lor Belinda Simmons, who was at home wrestling with broken water pipes. Direction by Joe Turner Cantu was particularly pointed, making imaginative use of the square playing area. Sets were minimal but effective. The lights and sound enhanced the piece. "Reckless" bothered me. It is a wonderful play, perceptive and witty, and it uniquely covers ground most "Christmas" plays would avoid; but I prefer to view the world less darkly. It wasn't a comedy for me so much as it was an all-too-true reflection of what Christmas can become. How this play affects you is in your memories of Christmases past. This work is highly recommended, —Goulet in TUTS' "Camelot" Robert Goulet, who burst into the national limelight by creating the role of Lancelot in Broadway's I960 premiere of "Camelot,' will star as King Arthur in Theatre Under the Stars' production of that Lernerand Lowe hit musical Jan. 23—Feb. 4 at the Music Hall. The very talented Alan J. Lerner (book and lyrics) and Frederick Lowe (scorel were responsible for such musical hits as '"Brigadoon," "Gigi," "Paint Your Wagon" and "'My Fair Lady'' The celebrated score includes such unforgettable songs as "If Ever I would Leave You," "How to Handle a Woman" "I Loved You Once in Silence," "The Lusty Month of May," "C'est MoiJ' "I Wonder What the King is Doing Tonight" and "Camelot." Based on T.H. White's 1958 novel, "The Once and Future King!' "Camelot" weaves the romantic tale of King Arthur, his beguiling Queen Guenevere, and Sir Lancelot, the bravest of knights whose illicit love for the queen finally brings an end to Arthur's age of chivalry and peace. An all-pro entertainer whoseca- reer has encompassed every stage, recording and film medium, Goulet excels in diversity. A worldwide concert favorite, he took the 1962 Grammy as 'Best Kaplan Thrat Happy Time" and was named "Entertainer ofthe Year" in Las Vegas in 1982. "Camelot" will be directed by Norb Joerder. who performed in the Broadway and national tours of "Camelot" with Richard Harris and re-mounted and choreographed Harris' production for three national tours and the Australian production. He has served as director and choreographer for a variety of industrials, as well as for numerous productions in regional theaters. Musical director and conductor will be John Visser, who served as assistant musical director and conductor for five tours of "Camelot" starring Harris. He served as musical director/ conductor for the recent national tour of "South Pacific" with Goulet. Performances are scheduled for Jan. 23-Feb.4,eightperformances weekly, Tuesday through Friday at 8:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 23- 24 are reduced price previews. Sunday, Jan. 28 and Tuesday, Jan, 30 are added non-subscription performances, —Kaplan Theatre "Dance Month" Dance Month will celebrate its 10th year at the Kaplan Theatre of ihe Jewish Community Center of Houston on Jan. 6 through Feb. 4. Originally conceived as a festival event featuring performers from JCC as well as several local dance groups, the program has now grown to include dancers, dance companies and master teachers with national and international reputations. To mark this "decade of dance," the project reflects on the past, celebrates the present and looks forward to the future. Deborah Hay will introduce the concert series on Jan. 7. Hay is an internationally renowned modern dancer. Mid America Dance Company of St. I-ouis will make its debut as a Dance Month event on Jan. 13- by local and nationally known ton Choreographers X &/.Z will be featured on Jan. 20. On Jan. 21, the annual children's program, "It's a Small World," will present the children's groups Acres Home dance Company, Fortune Cookies, Korean Folk Dance School, Savea South Seas Special and Yellow Rose Dance Team. "A Decade of Dance Gala I" on Jan. 27 will present City Ballet of Houston. Joan Karff s New Dance Group, Josephine John Generating Company and Several Dancers Core. "Gala II" on Jan. 28 will feature Academy Dancers, Cookie Joe and the Jazz Co., Diaeovery Dance Group and Shelley Power's Dancers. Appearing for the first time on the Kaplan Theatre stage is the touring company Dallas Black Dance Theatre on Feb. 3, in an exciting concert of spiritual, jazz and modern dance. "A Step in Time," Feb. 4, will feature the High School for Performing and Visual Arts Concert Dancers. Concluding the concert series, Bill Evans, Gus Giordano, Jazz Dance Chicago and Impulse Dance Company of Boston will perform selected works in the program "A Decade of Dance in Retrospect" on Jan. 10. An impressive lineup of master teachers complements the concert series. Classes in modern dance will be conducted by Hay (Jan. 6), Moliesa Fenley and David Parsons (Jan. 11) and Evans (F*eb. 16 and 181. Nan Giordano will lead a class in jazz on Feb. 8; Israeli Folk Dance classes will be held Jan. 6 and 7, conducted by Ruth Goodman. Dance Month at the Kaplan Theatre is funded in part by the City of Houston through the Cultural Arts Council of Houston, the Texas Commission the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Mid-America Arts Alliance, the Jewish Community Center's Patrons of the Arts Fund and the Endowment Trust Fund of the Jewish Community Center. For information concerning all events, call the JCC, 729-3200, ext 3224. Author of controversial book says he's a 'reluctant rebel' LEXINGTON, Ky. (APt—A University of Kentucky social scientist who has written a book an one of the Catholic Church's most taboo subjects takes issue with anyone who labels him a radical or rebel. James G. Wolf, author of Gay Priests, says, however, he may be "a reluctant rebel" His book has been hailed in Time magazine and The Washington Post as a ground-breaking sociological the subject of gay The book is based on questionnaires completed by 101 gay priests and includes a series of essays by four of the subjects. Il begins with premise that ho- l and of itself, a healthy and acceptable orientation. ial. > But even n spondents to the quet mated lhat one-half of all Catholic pnests are gay. If accurate, that represents big news for the Catholic religion that in recent years has called homosexuality an intrinsic evil. Wolf admits he hasn't relished an avalanche of hostility that he's faced on more than 30 radio call-in shows nationwide since Gay Priests was published last month. ConservativeCatholics who reject the book's premise and who. Wolf says, regard the very acknowledg ment of Lhe existence of gay priests as an attack on the church have made most ot tin- luss. Detractnrs call the work "yellow journalism" and say il is another attempt to attack the integrity of the church. Wolf, now with UK's Survey Research Center, denies the sccusa. "At times, 1 started losing my patience, and I'd ask the caller. Are you saying that you don't think there are gay priests?' One guy said, 1 don't want to think about it.' That's a pretty common reaction." Wolf said the main problem is un- familiarity with the subject. He said that while people know there are gays in the world, that's about all they understand. "All they've heard are the seamier kinds of stories, and that's all they really remember." he said. Wolf said it is difficult forthe aver age person, who's never thought about it. suddenly to consider the possibility that a man who is gay could also be an outstanding priest, because of his commitment to the church, his ability lo lead a congregation spiritually and do the things that priests are supposed to do. On the call-in shows, Wolf establishes quickly that he is not gay and tells callers that he's married and has two children. He's also Catholic The Montrose Voice (Commu it it{t |.luhl[»huli U'ntnp;iiur 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents COD,right 1990 Office hours: 9am-6pm ADVERTISING SALES D BETTER LA1DTIS & QARDEUS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential —Landscape —Lawn Care —Tree Service Free Estimates Best Prices 523-LALUn David Hi mux, M.D. Gary Treese. M.S.W., Ph.D Psvchiatry Psychotherapy JIiX) MONTROSE BLVD. SUITE 480 HOUSTON. TEXAS 77006 and nearly became a priest himself When he was 13, Wolf lived for more than a year in a seminary. But Wolf says that he's beginning to get an idea of what it must he like to be gay. "and to have to live your life this way, the sheer fear of making lhat step of coming out but hav ing no control over all this hostility and lack of information and being really helpless to do anything about There has been no official church reaction to Gay PrieBts bo far, although a representative of the National Catholic Conference of Bishops asked for an advance copy of the book. Wolf hopes it will help promote some meaningful dialogue. ■lake your reservations arly. Stretch Lincolns, Cadillacs and Sedans available. 24 how reservations Major Credit Cards accepted (713)461-5323 1-800-343-2949 We're working to bring you a real newspaper. The Montrose Voice.
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