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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
File 030
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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 030. 1982-09-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3367.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-09-03). Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 030. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3367

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 030, 1982-09-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3367.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 3, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript September 3,1982 / Montrose Voice 29 • NUMBERS 2-300 Westheimer-526-6551 See our ad elsewhere this issue • ONE ON ONE-1016 W Gray—528-8503 • PINK ELEPHANT - 1218 Leeiand—659-0040 See our ad elsewhere this issue • RASCALS-2702 Kirby-524-6272: with restaurant, live entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue •VENTURE-N-2923 Mam-522-0000 ORGANIZATIONS ACLU-1236 W Gray-524-5925 AMERICAN LEATHERMEN (social club)- meets at Different Drum. 1732 Westheimer— 528-8528: club night Wed. Houston's leading gay publication is the Voice Ihance—524-4793 (voioje & Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month in the Voice • RbCKYS-3416 W. DallM—8__e-M__2. Iwbian BERING Memorial Methodist Church—1 Hawthorne—626-1017 United Methodist v ship service 10:50am Sun CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FAITH—413 Westheimer— 529-6005: worship services Sun morning 8 evening & Wed evening. Bible study Mon. & Tues. evenings: choir practice Wed. evening The Voice has more news, more Houston advertising, more Houston readers CITIZENS~FOR HUMAN EQUALITY (CHE)— 609Fannin #1301-236-8666: board meeting 2nd Tuesdays CONG. AYTZ CHAYIM-meets al MCCR. 191 DBcatur—552-1340. 688-8997: service & soci Spm 2nd & 4th Fridays CONROE AREA Gay Women 756-0354 crisis HOTLINE—228-1506 Dateline S.F. Voice Comics Of course I'm squandering my youth- How else to avoid wasting it? Your Turn: Occupational Hazards ?-1982 by Randy Alfred Six weeks ago, I asked for your contributions to this specialized pun form. To wit, if lawyers are disbarred and clergy are unfrocked, what about...? Walter Ems answered: quiltmakers are dispatched, mathematicians disfigures or decimated, housing officials quartered, munitions makers canonized, undertakers decoffinated (ouch!), designers withdrawn, internists disorganized, surveyors distracted, psychics dispirited, candlemakers snuffed out, postal workers unzipped, fisherpeople debated, and travel agents detoured. Darryl Forman also checked in with those last two, as well as: poets are diversified, assesors defined, storytellers detailed, farmers unseeded, carpenters unhinged, teachers declassified, cashiers unchanged, mimes disquieted, collection agents debilitated, damage- claims lawyers distorted, prospectors declaimed, waiters deserved, judges disappointed, fraternity brothers dismembered, bobsledders deluged, and druggies both deluded and disjointed. Jim Thomas of Denver also though dope dealers are disjointed. He added: bookkeepers are discounted, accountants disfigured, mapmak- ers dislocated, musicians decomposed, and hotel managers dislodged. Neil Woodward of Denver seconded Thomas on hotel managers and Forman on deluded druggies. He added politicians are devoted, composers denoted, actors departed, elementary shcool teachers degraded, and drag, queens unruffled. Art Jusak doubled Woodward on politicians, and Ray Frisby thought the same of school teachers. Jusak added, magicians are disillusioned. Frisby also pointed out, electricians are defused. Charles E. Stillwell of Houston answered: grammarians are declined, ski instructors disinclined, cosmetologists defaced, and geologists defaulted. Stephan Martin thought cashiers are unregistered, orthodontists unbraced, and bag ladies sacked, of course. Mark Joplin noted, tailors are unsuited and male prostitutes hustled out. On the other hand, according to Arthur Morris, reformed winos are bummed out Tim Clow though archaeologists are deboned, and John Keenan figured truck drivers are downgraded. Stillwell expressed his hope that the inventor of this game, Laurence Urdang, "suffer great punishment in the hereafter for infecting innocent people with the sickness of craving specialized puns— preferably, he will have to listen to a recitation of all of them ever devised." That's unlikely, for, as Frisby wrote, joke makers go unpunished. Olympic irony 1: The same edition of the San Francisco Examiner which bore the page-one news that a federal judge had ruled that the Gay Olympic Games could not use the word, Olympic, carried on page two an item about the Fourth Intematinal Transplant Olympics in Athens. That event is for recipients of kidnty transplants. Organizers of the Gay Bleep Games had argued th I *he U.S. Olympic Committee discriminated in allowing such events as the Police Olympics and the Special Olympics, but not the Gay Olympics. Olympic irony 2: The Gay Bleep Games are insisting that photographer H. Grant cease sales of his Gay Olympic Games poster bearing a photo of a male torso wearing a T-shirt with the three-circle logo of the gay games. Michael R. Evans, attorney for the games, said that group commissioned and paid for the logo, and "if we own anything, we own the three interlocked discs." No so, said Grant. There is no trademark or copyright notice on the shirt the games people are selling: "It's in the public domain." Nonetheless, Grant intends to take the poster off the market and issue another poster as a response. Evans said the gay games people object only to the commercial use of the logo, since the poster sells for $10, none of which goes to the gay games. He said it's a good poster and they'd like to license it rather than stop it. Grant said the gay games peope went to their lawyer before going to him: "That's exactly what the U.S .Olympic Committee did to them. They used a hammerlock where a handshake would have worked. This seems so heavy-handed and without grace. I think they should have welcomed it as advertising for their event." Compounded irony: Grant, it so happens, is the architect of San Francisco's new Muni Metro subway stations at Civic Center, Van Ness, Church Street, and, yes, Castro Street. (When he designed the stations in the mid-60s, the Castro neighborhood was not yet out of the closet. "Neither was I," Grant said.) His Castro logo for the station has appeared on T-shirts. "I could have registered it, but the logo has passed into the public domain," Grant noted. "I kicked myslef for not seeing its potential, but I've got no hard feelings for the people who did." Compunded relationship: Grant is also the lover of Toby Marotta, author of Sons of Havard and The Politics of Homosexuality. The poster for and paperback edition of the latter feature an H. Grant photo of Marotta in the Castro Bubway station.
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