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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
File 024
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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 024. 1982-09-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3361.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-09-03). Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 024. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3361

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 024, 1982-09-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3361.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 3, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 024
Transcript September 3, 1982 / Montrose Voice 23 Montrose Live Bill SUva Fred Greenlee Commix Annex: Serious Comedy By Billie Duncan "We need the laughter so much, it sears our souls to get it." With that comment, Steve Moore summed up the attitude (offstage, at least) of many of the comedians who work at the art of stand-up comdey. One of the main stages for stand-ups is the Comix Annex, 2105 San Felipe, where comedians and people who desperately want to be comedians try their skills on a small but drinking audience. On Sunday and Monday nights the stage is open to anybody with five minutes of original material or for professioanl comedians who want to try out new material. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, the comedians who have proved themselves on audition nights have the opportunity to present expanded routines. The best of the crop sprout up on Friday and Saturday nights. Most of the comedianB who work the Annex are such performance junkies that even the weekend pros will come in on audition nights just to get their audience fix for the day. On a recent Monday night, the regular mixture of decent humor, trite garbage, embarassing idiocy and brilliance trouped across the stage. Steve McGrew (who is a regular) informed the audience, "Mothers are like yankees. They tell you things you already know." John Reed got off to a shakey start, but had some good material. Then he entered the quagmire of the same old ugly women jokes that have not changed except for punchline variations for years and years. Disc Jockey Tim Badore (who just moved to San Francisco) had some surprise lines, including, "Kids will do exactly what you tell them. Never tell a kid to cut the crap." Intelligent humor and a wonderful sense ofphysicality were evident in the act of Steve Epstein (another regular). Steve's impression of a wrestler running for president was not only a funny visual, but a delightful concept. He handled the audience well, without attacking or being rude. . Steve was working out new material for Dave Lampe of the Comedy Workshop Touring Company got on, tried and left early. It was not his night. A guy named Joe Rock basically freaked out rin stage- Then the nightmare of the audition night appeared. She was introduced as Kim and she came on stage with no idea of what a stand-up routine was and did such an embarassing act that she was politely escorted from the stage by the emcee. The next comic had a tough spot after that mess. His name was C.J. Bertran and it was his first time to do stand-up. He was excellent. His sense of self was sure without appearing egotistical and his material was insightful and well timed. After C.J., a regular, Jack Mayberry, took to the stage. He had come in late and just wanted to perform. Jack's basic stage persona is that of an arrogant B.o.b., but his material smacks of genius. A lot of his humor is based on cheap shots taken at women and at gays, but there is also a sense of truth in what he presents no matter how irritating the jabs may be from an emotional standpoint. The man is very, very good. After the bar closed, C.J. Bertran explained what got him to take to the stage that night. "My sister and brother- in-law talked me into it. They told me, 'You're better than most of the people up there. Why don't you get up there and try it?'" So C.J. left them a note saying that he would do it that night. They did not show up. But he went on anyway. "I don't like saying I'm going to do something and then not doing it." He explained why being in front ofthe audience did not bother him all that much. "I'm a lieutenantin the U.S. Army and I'm used to being in front of troops who are a little bit hostile." His experience at the Annex turned out to be a pleasant one, however. "It was like I was suspended in space. I was oblivious to everything except the laughter that emanated from the darkness." Steve Moore, who rune the Annex with the help Bill Silva, explained what he looks for in a fledgling stand-up. "If there is a sense of writing, then I can teach them to perform." He also said, "You cannot teach the craft of writing." About performing he said, "There is no slack time. If you stumble, you better have stumbled on purpose or have something funny to say about stumbling." His opinion of women in comedy was that women are a novelty and there are very few women who have the writing ability to do good stand-up. He likened women Btand-ups to dancing bears, saying "It's not how well they dance, but the fact that the're able to do it at all." Since then, Steve appeared on a local television show and said that any woman with 20 minutes of material could make a living at doing comedy. The assuption is that the material must be damn good. Once a comedian has run the audition gauntlet, shown writing promise and developed enough material, he or she is given a regular spot later in the week. Sometimes the regulars are very deserving of the consideration. Other times, they should be sent back to square one. One regular show recently featured a pretty good cross-section of what could be expected on a regular night. Conrad Lawrence did Mexican humor, telling the audience that he could always tell when there was a Mexican jockey in a race because "the horse is real low to the ground." He was followed by Bob Barber who was introduced as having recently been out in Los Angeles at the Comedy Store. He started out in a rude and overbearing manner which caused the audience to fight back. Perhaps thinking that a good defense might be a further offense, he attacked the audience with "If I were five foot eight with a mohawk, I could say, 'Fuck you!'" He turned to another member of the audience. "Fuck you!" Again he picked out a person sitting at a table. "Fuck you, you dyke bitch!" None of the people at whom he shouted had heckled him or even been talking during his set. He Beemed to think that the audience found his height to be intimidating. He was wrong. It was not the tallness of his frame but the smallness of his mind that irritated the crowd. Thankfully, he was followed by Steve McGrew whose wacky inner eye provided some delightful momenta. Among his gems was, "When they got married, we gave them towels marked 'his and herpes.'" Next Alex Garza sauntered onto the stage, wearing a pink beret, blue shirt and grey pants and carrying a bag of props that he used for sight gags. His humor is full of self-depreciating jokes based on Mexican stereotypes. His subjects cover theft, wife-beating, pompom decorations, wetbacks and low riders. There must be some secret society of Chi- cano comedians that requires that they must do at least one low rider joke per set or face certain death. Fred Greenlee, a Comedy Workshop actor, entered stage right and proceeded to have a great time. He was warm and personable with a delightful sense ofthe humorous twist. "I'm no Albert Einstein, but I'm no Jack Heard either." The evening was finished off with the comic genius of Ken Polk, who is one ofthe few people who can get away with what might be called "stand-up improvisation." He is a member of the Comedy Workshop also. He told the audience, "Realism has never stopped me." He then launched into his absurdist humor and asked for subjects from the audience. Some of the subjects were aardvarks, Kafka, and the guy who snuck into the queen's bedroom. It was a very nice end to a basically enjoyable evening. One of the things that keeps the shows moving is the use of the emcee. Bill Silva explained, "If a comic dies or gets in trouble, antagonizes the audience, the emcee gets them back. We've made it an art form." Bill was excited about a new regular named Cheryl who had walked in about a month previously. He said that he and Steve Moore were both so impressed with her that they made her a regular immediately. "She'll start working weekends when she gets 20, 30, minutes of material," Bill Baid. A short time later a woman mentioned to Bob Barber that she did comedy. He Bhot back, "Yeah. But do you do serious comedy?" Perhaps the only problem with a basically enjoyable show put on at the Comix Annex is that some of the comedians are too serious to be funny. ■ Duncan'8 Quick Notes Busy Bees Make Montrose Music: Andy Mills has lined up an incredible bunch of musical endeavors and events for the coming months. With the able assistance of Penny Peavy, the Montrose Chorale will go into rehearsal on September 15. Penny and Andy are hoping that they will have a good turnout of women for the first night. "We've been getting lots of calls," said Andy. The first concert that the Chorale will perform will be at Cullen Auditorium at Christmas time. Meanwhile, back with the Montrose Symphonic Band, rehearsals are going great guns for their September 25 concert at the Tower. "This will be our last concert at the Tower," said Andy. "We've gotten too big for the Tower stage." There are now 75 people in the band. The concert has a lot of surprises for fans, including outstanding and outra-
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