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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
File 016
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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 016. 1982-09-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-09-03). Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3353

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 016, 1982-09-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 3, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript September 3,1982 / Montrose Voice 15 Sports Gay Games Open in San Francisco By Daniel Curzon International Gay News Agency It began with the crowd of some 11,000 chanting in their seats in the stadium for the sun to come out and bless the opening of the first Gay Games. Sure enough the sun came through, emerging bright and beautiful by the end of the day. But one didn't have to look for omens. The enthusiasm of the crowd was sign enough that a major historical event was taking place. Even though the U.S. Olympic Committee obtained an injunction to prevent the games from using the word "olympic," those involved with the event conquered the unequivocal homophobia of these officials of the sports world. The emphasis from the chairman ofthe games, Dr. Tom Waddell, a former Olympian himself, was on the games as a teaching experience, to show the world an image of gay men and lesbians that stressed "self-fulfillment and a spirit of friendship" instead of the beating of opponents. Master of ceremonies Rita Mae Brown told the crowd in her opening remarks: "The only people who are queer are those who don't love anybody." The crowd rose to listen to Pam Brooks sing the "Star Spangled Banner" and to the Rev. Troy Perry deliver an invocation. The San Francisco Gay Freedon Day Marching Band then took the field in Kezar Stadium and played while several baton twirlers performed, some more flawlessly than others. But the man who dropped his baton three times got a huge hand because he kept trying, with an especially high toss of his baton to complete his performance. It's not known whether the original Olympics (dating from at least 776 B.C.) had baton twirlers, but those of the past and those on this day both shared a dedication to encouraging peace and brotherhood. The present-day Olympics for gays also differed from the original, in that women were not only allowed to view the events, but actually were encouraged to participate. Flag corps and a women's band (Sistah Boom) next entered the arena, followed by dignitaries, including the program committee and members of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Then came the athletes themselves— some from countries far away, including Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and Peru. Some 1500 paraded past the cheering throng, smiling and waving, dressed in their colorful uniforms. Numerous American cities were also represented. Although there have been rumors that officials of the U.S. Olympic Committee had threatened to penalize or even ban any atheletes who participated in the Gay Games, there were 1500 women and men willing to march proudly into the arena and risk that wrath, truly a courageous act that more than matches any courage shown on any playing field in the world. Congressman Philip Burton was introduced to the crowd and won their hearts by stating: "As the official representative of this area in the Congress of the United States, I welcome these athletes to the first Gay OlympicsV Burton thus threw a punch at the Olympic Committee for refusing to allow the Gay Games to use the word, even though it allowB Special Olympics for the retarded and even a "Cooking Olympics." The bitter irony of any committee refusing to let gay people use "Olympics" can be best appreciated by recalling how much a part of ancient Greek life homosexuality was. It was not considered an aberation, but actually a part of the educational system. Congressman Burton presented an official Congressional award to Dr. Tom Waddell and led the crowd in a "Hip, hip, horray!" for the man who organized the event. GAY OLYMPIC GAMES NATIONAL TORCH RUN Jon Roberson (right), coordinator of the National Torch Run, and Harriman Thatcher, coordinatcr of the Cultural Week activities for the games The San Francisco Mounted Police did not appear as scheduled, and there has been conjecture that the failure to appear signals some surfacing of the continual conflict between the gay community and the police department of San Francisco. However, acting mayor Doris Ward (if not the regular mayor, Dianne Feinstein) proclaimed it to be "Gay Olympics Day," thus seconding Congressman Burton's challenge to the U.S. Olympic Committee. It wouldn't be a gay event apparently without the appearance of entertainers, and thus rock star Tina Turner made her appearance, dressed in a short yellow fringed dress, her hair piled high. In no time she had the crowd rocking and rolling, with such numbers as "Honky Tonk Woman" and "Proud Mary." A good many ofthe athletes, gathered in mid-field in front of the bandstand, got into the mood and danced and swayed to the music. Even organizer Waddell and publicist Zohn Artman were seen cavorting musically on the cinder track ofthe arena. Singer Meg Christian appeared, somewhat nervous about having to follow the high-powered Tina Turner, but she found her voice.and sang "Reach for the Sky," the official song written for the occassion. (Like most songs written for official occa sions it tended toward the safe.) But no matter, the day was a day to be proud, with a vengeance! Mass rallies like this one speak to some human need for public spectacle and affirmation. They depend on large gestures, almost simple- minded in their appeal to public emotions (here gay patriotism) and work out their effects by their very ostentation. The last event, therefore, must be a grand one—and it was pretty damn close. Two former Olympic athletes (Susan McGreivy and George Frenn) ran the length of the stadium carrying a lighted olympic torch. They ran between the rows of athletes and reached the official receptacle in front of the speakers" stand and there set the torch to the material within. It leapt into a large flame and at the same instant thousands upon thousands of colored balloons were released from a covered area at the other end of the stadium. Originally the Greeks sacrificed some animals and burned the offerings to the gods. The present-day gay olympians offered balloons. I think the balloons are better. Plans are underway to make the Gay Games an event every fourth year, with the next one likely to be held in Los Angeles. Results of the Gay World Series in San Francisco were not available at press time. Complete coverage will appear in next week's Montrose Voice. Tropical Fruit Sizzles Just Marion & Lynn'B Tropical Fruit, which bowls on Thursdays in the Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League, has maintained the top spot for quite some time now, and it looks as if there is no way to unseat them before the end ofthe season. On August 26, they expanded their lead even more. Four members bowled 200 games with two of them bowling two 200 games and one popping over 200, pins in all three games. Bob Akins scored 246, 223 and 214 that night-while Steve McConaughy racked up 246 and 200. Butch Irish's lucky number was two that night as he bowled 222 and 222. Paul Buenger hung in there with a 203. Rob Conners said, "They just went crazy." Their crazy bowling won them a new summer season record for high hanicap series with 3225. Actually, something must have been in the air because there were eleven bowlers that night who racked up a total of seventeen 200 games. Thursday Bowling Elects New Officers The MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League elected officers for the winter season on Thursday, August 26. Richard Dauchy who bowls on For a Few Daddies Moore was elected president. Dauchy is a former president of Monday Night Bowling. Vice president Kathy Winkler was reelected to serve in that position. Winkler has been filling in for Phil Blakeway who resigned as president of the league. The other officers are Butch Irish, Secretary; Mark Hall, Treasurer; and Bob Akins, sergeant at arms. The officers were nominated at a meeting on August 12 and all but Dauchy were unopposed, according to Rob Conners. Conners said that 44 out of 65 members voted in the election and that Dauchy won over Steve McConaughy by six votes. The officers will take over their duties on the first week of the winter season which will begin in about a month. MSA in Front of the Eight Ball The Montrose Sports Association is soliciting sponsers for MSA Pool, said MSA president Jim Reagan. "Plans are being made to set up teams." The teams will consist of a minimun four and a maximum seven players per team. They will play on a "rotation basis" with each team moving from place to place each week. Reagan thinks that most of the places will probably be bars, since bars generally have pool tables, but he does not feel that other options should be neglected. "We hope to have about 30 bars involved," said Reagan. "There are 14 or 16 now." He asked that people who are interested in playing please call him at 622-3304. The approximate starting time for the New MSA Pool is set for September 30. Photo Correction Last Week's story about the National Reno Gay Rodeo was accompanied by some wonderful photos. Unfortunately, we forgot to say who took them. Those photos were the work of Bill Hol- ton and Steve Yocum. Also, Walter Strickler is the owner ofthe Barn, not Walter Strickland.
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