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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 001. 1982-09-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3338.

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(1982-09-03). Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3338

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982 - File 001, 1982-09-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3371/show/3338.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 97, September 3, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 3, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Inside in Sports: Gay "Olympics" underway; as is Gay World Series; & Galleon wins Houston bowling trophy v 0 I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #97, Published Weekly Friday September 3 1982 Good EveninJZ GPC Decides 'No Endorsement' in Governor's Race By Johanneo Stahl Houston Gay Political Caucus decided not to endorse a candidate for the governor'• race aft.er a heated floor debate on the isaue. The debate, at the meeting Wed.nee· day, Sept. 1, lasted we11 over an hour amidst motions, substitute motions, points of privelege and points of information. Many GPC membera felt that Mark White, Democratic candidate for governor and current state Attorney General, could not be endoraed because of his reported intention to file an appeal to the recent federal decision declaring Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code (the "Homosexual Conduct" aection) unconstitutional. It was rePorted that a representative from Mark White's campaign told a Cau­cue screening committee last weekend that White would initiate an appeal if the ruling was interpreted that only he, and not any local District Attorney in Texas, could initiate an appeal. rt was also reported that White was oot seeking GPC endorsement and would point that fact out if it became an issue later in the campaign. GPC members who favored White'a endoraement.. said encouraging no vote in the. governor's race would hamper GPC'a in·roada into the Democratic Party • because the n~mber of delegates to party state conventions are determined by the number of votes for governor on the pre­cinct level. One substitute motion called for an alteration in the GPC push card. The motion caned for no actual endorsement on the card, but the wordo, "Increaoe GPC • strength-vote Democratic," instead. The motion was defeated after much debate on the grounds that GPC is a non-partisan body. GPC president Larry Bagneris Jr. otepped down from the chair and spoke on the i11ue. He said he hoped that party poli­ticti would not cause the non-partisan body to endoroe White because he felt it inappropiate to endorse aomeone who would help deny gay righta. In the end, a decision for no endorDe­ment was pa88ed. Debra Danburg, Democraticincumbent for State Representative from the greater Montrose area, <'&lied a point of privelege after the motion for no endorsement had pa88ed and the agenda had been moved. When it became apparant that she was going to discuBS the governor's endorse­ment, she was ruled out of order by Bagne­ria. He pointed out that the only recourse for her was to chalJenge the chair's ruling, an action which did not carry. During the controversy, a group of Democratic faithfuls gathered in the mid­dle of the room and held discussions while the meeting wa1 in seasion. A total of 44 candidates spoke before th• Caucus asking for endorsement. About BO peop)e attended the meeting. A list of GPC endorsements and party affiliations follows; State Senate District 11-Chet Brooks (D) District 15-John Whitmire (D) State Representative District 131-Ron Wilson (D) District 132-Paul Colbert (D) District 135-No endorsement District 136-No endorsement District 137-Debra Danburg (D) District 148-AI Edwards (D) District 147-Larry Evans (D) State Dietrict Court.a l 13th-Geraldine Tennant (D) !25th-Michael O'Brien (D) 182nd-Rkhard Trevathan (R) 184th-Carrol Weaver (0) 185th-No endorsement 208th-Thomaa Routt (D) 209th-Michael McSpadden (R) 228th-Richard Moore (D) 248th-Woody Denson (D) 257th-Sam Emieon (D) 262nd-Doug Shaver (R) 270th Ann Cochran (D) 28lat Louis Moore (R) 295th Sharolyn Wood (R) Family Diatrict Court. 308th-M.D. Leal (R) GPC president Larry .&gneris Jr. with GPC·endoraed state representatiue candidate Debra Dnnburg at Wedneaday's meeting 309th-Brent Burg (R) Comptroller County Criminal Courts -Bob Bullock (D) No. 1-Bill Ragan (D) No. 2-Don Hendrix (D) No. 3-Jimmy Duncan (D) No. 6-No endorsement No. 9-AI Leal (D) County Courts at Law No. 1-Ed Landry (D) No. 4-No endorsement Harris County District Clerk - No endorsement U.S. Senate -No endorsement U.S. Con.greBB, Representatives District 7-No endorsement Diatrict 8-No endorsement District 18-Micky Leland (D) District 25-No endorsement Governor -No endorsement Lt. Governor -No endorsement Attorney General -No endorsement Treasurer -Ann Richards (D) Land CommiBBwner -Garry Mauro (D) Agriculture CommissioMr -Jim Hightower Railroad Commissioner -No endorsement Justice of tM Supreme Court Place 2-Bill Kilgore (D) Court of Crirrunal Appeals Place 2-No endoreement Associate Justi«, Court of Appeals, Diatrict I Place 3-Walter Boyd (D) Place 4-Murry Cohen (D) Place 5-No endorsement Place &-Frank Price (R) Associate Justic•, Court of Appeals, Diatrict 14 Place I-Robert Scott (R) Place 2-No endoraement Place 4-Joe Draughn (D) Place s--Jimmy James (R) Fire Official Says Gay Bar Fire Was Arson Arson has been biamed for the early morn· ing fire last Friday, August 27, at the Hole House, 109 Tuam. The contents and struc· ture were determined to be a "total loss," according to a report from the Houston Fire Department, but there were no injuries. Arson division spolesmen said thatthe incident is "under 'investigation" and robbery appeaTs to be a motive. The fire department received a call from a citizen reporting the fire at5:41 a.m.and the fire was brought under control at 6:15, the report added. The club was owned by Joe Anthony, who also owns Happy Trails, another gay bar. Anthony said he thought he could rebuild and be open in a few months. Many of Anthony's personal .belong­ings were stored in the building ahd were lost. Also destroyed was the organ used by entertainer Keoki Kona, who played nighily at the "Top of the Hole," the club's upstairs entertainment bar. Public Defender Quits Over Anti-Gay Remarks International Gay New• Aaency An assiotant public defender for Alameda County, Calif. (encompassing Oakland and San Jose), resigned August 18 after he was sharply cri ticized for making deroga· tory remarks about San Francisco's gay community. George Benetatos, 37, was quoted in the San Francisco Chronic/.e's Question Man column about what he was "mad as hell about." He replied: "The homosexual problem distorts the character of the city. Some are probably nice creative people, but San Francisco is imbalanced. It's changing from a family town to some· SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Fire officials say arson was the cause of a blaze that destroyed last week the Hole, a gay bar on Tuam thing bizarre." His statement infuriated many in the gay community and also angered Public Defender James R. Jenner and many staff attorneys. It appeared that public defender Benetatos might not defend any gays who might come within his jurisdic­tion. Smoking Linked to Loss of Hearing, Sexual Drive Pacific New• Service More bad news for smokers: A pair of new studies have linked cigarettes to loss of hearing and sexual drive. In Egypt, cancer researchers say they found some degree of hearing loss in 70 per cent of the smokers they tested, compared to just 17 per cent in non-smokers. And while they're not sure why smoking might affect hearing, the speculation is that nicotin'e may reduce the blood supply to the inner ear. Meanwhile, a psychologist at Florida State University says smoking may be harmful to your sex life. Dr. Richard Hagen says males who smoke high­Dicotine ciga~ttes show decreased sexual response. Treasure Hunt: As Good as the Real Thing A millionaire Texas oilman who financed an unsuccessful search for the Titanic last year is building a solid gold replica of the ill-fated ship for other treasure hunters to track down, reports the Washingu:m Post. Jack Grimm says the $25,000 model will be hidden next month somewhere in the United States OT Canada. Clues to the "Titanic" treasure will have to be deci· phered from a forthcoming book called Beyond Reach: The Search for the Titanic. Montrose Mouth Fred Paez Community Center sign brightly reflects-and attracts The new sign outside the Fred Paez Community Center, corner Taft and Avondale, glitters boldly in the light-so boldly, says George Barnhart, that within an hour after 11 was up, dozens of police cars started driving by and glaring. By the next day, George estimated that "every police car from every precinct must have been by looking at this sign." "Even the Park Police started coming by," said George. Why, you ask? Well it was Fred Paez-gay activist-who was killed from the gun of a drinking off-duty Houston police officer Ir. 1980. Only witness: Another off-duty drinking police officer Well, the sign-and the community center-shows that we're proud of Fred and will continue to remember him. Says Ray Hill, 'We appreciate the extra police presence in the neighborhood. There's a lot of 'queer bashers' out there preying on gay m-en a-nd lesbians." The new general manager at Mary's is Bill Pierceall, who's been a bartender there for two years. --- Those inserts last week in the Voice for the Advocate's sweepstakes were part of a campaign where the national gay magazine selected leading local gay publications. "This is surely the most ambitious ;;weepstakes ever mounted in the gay community," said the publicallon's marketing director. John Knoebel. If you missed your's, we've got the forms here at the- Voi-ce's office. The Fred Paez Community Service Center could use a few items, if anyone has them laying around: folding chairs, tables, refrigerator, stove and white paint, suitable for outside trim. George Barnhart says call him or Ray Hill at 523-6969 o-r 5-21-0196 to donate. Some birthdays of famous and infamous people this weekend and the following week: Jesse James and Bob Newhart Sunday: Grandmas Moses. Peter Lawford and Buddy Holly Tuesday; Richard the Lionhearted, Sid Ceasar and Peter Sellers Wednesday; and Colonel Sanders and Leo Tolstoy next Thursday. -·- New advertising sales rep here at the VOICE tS Gene Nygaard. -·- First issue of Dallas Gay News comes out next week-and that city 1s excited about it. So are we 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 We wish to thank all our many friends and supporters who have stood by us after the loss of the Hole The Hole will reopen in early October Come celebrate witn us this Labor Day Weekend Friday night 9:30-1 :30, The Happy Trail Riders Saturday and Sunday 9-1, Bourbon Street comes alive with the Dixie Kings Monday once again, The Dixie Kings for a fun-filled afternoon of Dixieland music 5-9 Continuous hors d'ouevres, snacks, buffet and party favors served throughout the weekend Join Dee every morning at 7 a.m. for 50¢ Amaretto and Schnapps Now open daily 7-7 for Happy Hour Saturday 7am-2am with drink specials Sunday Happy Hour noon-3 The Hole Is holding court at the Happy Trails, 715 Fairview 1 YearAgo &pt. 3. 1981 Few surprises at McCoy's trial Th~ i;><>liceman accused in the killing of gay acbvtet Fred Paez took the stand and revealed little additional information not already discussed prior to the trial. Houston police offi?er Kevin McCoy, a ~our-~ear veteran, testified that he was not intoxicated on the night of the killing, June 28, 19~, and that Paez had struggled ae he w~e being arres~-~ struggle that, McCoy ~id, caused his pistol to accidentally d1scharl(e. Sept. 4, 1981· Texas Gay Thsk Force conference opens TheY came from all over the state-and beyond-to atU·nd the eighth annual Texas convention of gay activists Th~ Texas_ Ga~ Confel'f'nce VIIJ Opt>nd at the First Umtanan Church building. S"pt. 6, /9HI : Conference reported life is improving Three hundred partidpantsto the Texas Gay Conferen~ VIII concluded their three days of workshops and heard lecturers say life for h~mosexuals wa_fil improving. 'The ('ommumty at large is becoming less homophobic," fo:dra Bogle of Denton a North Texas State University profe880r, .;.id. Sept 9, 1981 · The 'Hot End of Westheimer' heated up Gey ban feJt the heat of the law. Po1ice arrested over a dozen customers of the Differ­f;;.. tthr~;ub':~. 1732 Weatheimer, 8 gay male Sgt. P.M, Hogg of the Houston Police Vice Squad's night crew, which supervised the raid, eai_d th~y arrested 1.8 men and charged them with hquor violations, possession of narrohcs and public lewdness. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright •1982 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg pubJ1•~'ed1tor Johannes St1hl IMWI editor Billle Duncan Mt•r111nm«!tllp0ftsedttor Ed Martinez -· Nick Fede ff'l/1-WI Acel Clark graphict WllUam Marberry kNMialng director David Petluck ~t111ng Lyt Hams o.,'"'"9 Gene Oliver MlvMllt"1J Gene Nygaard ~ri.1t1g Chuck Oberg D1llu.Ov.,111111g f2141 52e-1193. 5'1-3310 Fourtthng M•m1-r G1y Pr•H Auoc••tion N1w• 5.,.,1CH. lrit•F'l•l•ori•I G•y New1 Aget1<:y. P1c1loC N-1 A-u·.ttl~n 8 1J1.,t1 C1pilol New1 SlfV1ce Synd1c1ted , .. ,vr• S•n11CH' w,.,.,,. (S•n FflF'ICllCO) Chro-­ntcl• FHIUrM, UF'l1l9d FHl'lr• SyF'ldlUlte. Jellrey WlllOl'I. Randy Alfr9d. Stonew1H FHtur• SyncltUI•. Br11n McN1ught POST,..ASTER Send 1ddr•u COl"fKl•Ol'll lo 3317 Montrou •306. Homton, TX 71008 SubaCtlption ,.,.,,,/JS l'9 '* YHf (52 IS.SIM), $29 per It .. montht f2e ... ...,,,Of St 2' per wel!k 1teu than 2e 1Mu91) N•titJneJ kN•rt11mg r•.«Nettlef,..., J(>9 O&bl.to, Riv•ndeH M1tk9ttng, 866 8lt'l A~•,.,u• ~-York 1001 1. \212) 2A2-15833 ,t.r;..,rt,.ing dflMIJIM T•M9d9y. 5 lOpm lot ISIU9 ,...Md Fr.­dey~ tng ~;c.~~dw«fJllnilr1tescheduleFrw.,..Aw lll go SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 Candidates appear before Gay Political Caucus Photos by Johannes Stahl Dozens of political candidates appeared before the Houston GPC last Wednesday. See story page I. John Whitmire, Democratic candidate state senator District 15 Wilm?t McCutchen, Republican ~~r1date state reprt>sentative District Michael O'Brien. Democratic candidate 125th State Di•trict Court Paul Colbert, Democratic candidate atate representative District J 32 Sharolyn Woods. Rt>pubUcan candidate 295th State District Court That's No Downstream Breadline Busine~s is sagging in the 1'High Coun· try," reports the Denver Post. Coors brewery has announced it's laying-off' 500 people-7 percent of its entire work force. Company spokesman Whit Sibley says the mass firings are unprecedented in the company's 109-year history. adding. uwe didn't even have any during the prohibi­tion." The move comes amid rumors that the firm io being sold to Coca-Cola of Atlanta. although Sibley dismisses that report as "hogwash." Coors beer sales have been sliding for some time now, and are currently running 13 percent below a year ago. 6 MONT!lOSE VOICE I SEPTEMB!'R 3, 1982 Lease Signed for Gay Alcoholic Recovery House By Johannes Stahl A lease was signed Sunday, August 29, for a residential recovery facility for gay male and lesbian alcoholics. Organizers plan to open the house at 2222 Chenevert 0.C..mber I, after the building has been renovated. The facility win be known as the Mon· troee Guest Recovery House (MGRH) and Will provide live-in accomodations,includ, ing three meala a day, for up to 14 recover· ing gay alcoholics at one time, ,said Patrick, treasurer of MGRH. (People involved with Alcoholic's Anonymous and related programs, by tradition, perfer not to have their full name in the media.) Patrick stressed that the MGRH would not be able to provide an alcohol de­toxification program and such treatment would be done at an allied health care facility. MGRH will provide a supportive atmos­phere for individuals to re-adjust to society and obligations in Jight of their sobriety, said Patrick. The recovery house grew out of an idea conceived at the Lambda Center for Alco­ho1ics. an affiliated but independent group of AA whoee membership ie predom· inantly gay, said Patrick, and the plane were 11ent into motion last May "with a handful of people and we've gone from there. We got our incorporation charter on June 21." Jeff, who has been involved in the AA program and specifically with gay groups within AA since 1976, said that a gay rec· overy house was attempted once before in 1979, but did not last very long due to lack of support from the community. Operating costs for the firat year have been estimated at $73,000 which will include physical operating cost.a and two salaries for experienced and professional managers. Patrick said some of the money needed will come from within the gay AA , community and through a series of fund· raising activities. He added that four accredited counselors who specialize in alcohol and drug abuse therapy have volunteered their time, for the first year at least. Some Politicians Support Controversial Gay Center in London By Lindoay Taylor International Gay New• Agency At a meeting in London July 27, members of the ruling Labour group on the Greater London Council made clear that they strongly supported ihe establishment of a gay comunity center in the capital. righta service and a resource cen~r. for gay social, cultural, and pohhcal activities. A steering committee w~s set up, with six of the 12 places reservM for women. A full-time development worker was to be appointed. . . Moat of the city's gay orgamzations seem enthuaiaatic about the propoaal, though some have expressed reservation& about the ability of lesbians and gay men to share the building without friction. 0th· era have worried about the establishment of such center& consuming an inordinate amount of activists' energies. All agree, however, that it was vital to take advantage of this rare commitment to the gay community. Don't Spread It Around A Massachusetts entrepreneur hopes to take the worry out of being close with a new dating service, for herpes victims. New York magazine reports that Brent Deck, who suffers from herpes himself, sent flyers to physicians around the counr try describing his .. New Day Introductions." Says Deck: "The service is to help people with genital herpes meetotherpeoplewith it on a confidential basis." He thinks the match-ups wilJ eliminate lhe anxiety herpes victims have about exposing others to the disease. The costs of setting up such a center are eetimated at around $400,000 in the first year. Since Conservative opposition on the Greater London Council has in the DecksaysheneedslO,OOOsubscriberato past strongly opposed granf:B 1? gay show a profit. So far, only 40 people have groups, it is intended that a capital mves~- agreed to ~hell out the fee: $75 a year, or ment be made in the center to helpsecurett $20 for a single date. against possible future changes in the But ~th_20 million victims ~fthe fast-city's administration. !Pread1ng, mcurable venereal disease, you At present plans are for a building for ·~ight say deck has latched onto a growth meetings, plus an information and gay industry. LABOR DAY WEEKEND AT 0us~ 21 QO \'o\ ·71006 p..\b'3f''J • Open Daily 10am Sunday at Noon • Happy Hours Mon.-Fri. 4-8pm Free Hors d'oeuvres • No Door Charge No Dress Code • Open to the Public (Lockers available for swimmers) Monday Nite Maneuvers 15¢ DRAFT 9pm till Closing FRESH FRUIT DRINKS By the Pool 8 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 A Hot Time in the Old Woods this Deer Season Thia year's deer hunting season could be a lively one in Northern California, reports the San Francisco Examiner. About 70,000 hunters were expected to take to the hills when the season opened August 14-right in the middle of Califor­nia'• marijuana·growing heartland. law enforcement officials fear the ille­gal grower1 may take a few potshots at encroaching outdoorsmen, and a major gun batUe could erupL The feds have promised a CTaclr:down on pot plantationa, but local authorities have been noticeably reluctant to curtail a multi-million dollar industry that has pumped much-needed bucks into an ec<r nomically depressed timber·growing region. Biker War With Mob Predicted Federal Bureau of Investigation officials say four outlaw motorcycle gangs are moving in on an underworld operation for· merly controlled by the mafia, report& the New York Daily Newa. And with auch lucrative activities as druga, loan sharking, ma888ge parlor• and erotica shops at stake. the Feds said they were predicting a biker-mob war. The four gangs were identified as The Pagani (whoae turf includes New York and Pennsylvania\. Hell's Angels of Cali­fornia, the Banditoe of Corpus Christi, and the Outlaws of Chicago. FBI organized crime expert Sean McWeeney aaya the gangs are moving into areas of the country like Arizona and California where the mob has been wea­kened by federal prosecutions. E.T., Please Call Your Agent Paci.ftc New• Service Have you ever fantasized about being lov­able E.T., dodging the FBI and munching Reeee'• Pieces? U you have, then Atari wants to make that fantasy come true arriving in the atores by Chriatmaa: "E.T.-The Home Video Game." According to Atari. the game's format will cloeely follow the plot of Steven Spiel­berg'• movie. The alien will be deposited on earth by a apace ship, only to be chaoed by the FBI and a scientist. Along the way, he may even find aome Reese'• Pieces to eat-but Atari says it'• atill working out the licensing agreement with Hershey Candies. Patricia Anne O'Kane Attorney at Law • Criminal matters • Estate planning • Corporations • General civil practice • Seven years experience 3323 Yoakum 526-7911 SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 As Traditional As Labor Day ... The Copa Presents A Special Labor Day Show Sunday Night, September 5 Starring Hot Chocolate, Naomi Sims, Donna Day After-Hours Friday, Saturday, Sunday DANCE ALL NIGHT SUNDAY In the Piano Bar ... Richard & Dana Wednesday-Saturday With Special Guest Mr. Michael Andrews Coming Events at the Copa ... Sylvester, Sept. 10 Divine & T-Dance Kick-Off, Sept. 12 ($2 cover) "Dream Girls," Sept. 17 Letters . 10 MoNwosE vo1cE 1SEPTEMBER3. 1902 -=~=======!!!====================· .... Cancer Prevention Director Has Advice on AID Diseases From Pc•er W.A. Mansell, Al D. A.saocl4lt' dfrtttor, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor l1Ut1Wt~. Depcrlmt'nt of Cancrr Prt>v,ntlQn AB you know. there l8 a great deal f specu· lation as to the cause of the epidemic of Kaposfs sarcoma and infectious disea"es. The anxiety and apprehension is certainly undentandable but there is a great deal of rrusunderstanding and misinformation around ae well. From the very beginning of the problem, about tv.·oyears ago, it was felt that some infectious a gen i might be one of the causa· tive factors. A virus called cytomegaloVl· rus has always been and continue~ to be a prime suspect. However, there is no hard and fast evidence even yet to incriminate this, or any other virus or other infectious age~t. Many of the features of the disease eug· gest that it may be tranemitted from one indivtdual to another but this is by no means proved and there is also evidence which would argue against that. Even if a virus were to be one of the causes there are almost certainly other factors at play as well, for instance possibly the influence or dnJgs, other infectious diseases and their treatment, and the immunological depres· sion which is such a common feature of the syndrome. amongst other!". The sobering truth at present is that no one has any final facts on the cause of the epidemic. Many people have their own pri· vate theories, some more plaUBible than othen, but to base one's opinions or deci· sions relating to behavior on these theor· iea would be wrong until the proof is definitely established. For the time being, therefore, until thia proof arrives, I would like to suggest the following points which I have called "Grannie's Advice:" I. Moderate your lifestyle, particularly with regard to avoiding multiple anonym· ous contacts. 2. Eat a proper balanced diet. 3. Get enough sleep. 4. Reduce exposure to drugs of any kind and avoid infections. 5. Remain calm and logical, do not allow every rumor and sarre to send you into a panic. 6. Continue to enjoy life, but observe moderation in all things. I hope these few comments will shed some light. Rem em her, there are people in the community who are knowledgable and prepared to assist you all. Allow them to help. TROT4 Tournament is This Weekend From Niclt Esco~do TROT 4 Tournol'M!"nt Dlrtttor Bowlers from aC?088 the state: FL Worth, Corpue Christi. Dallas, and from as far away as Washington. D.C. and Hawaii, will converge in Houston for the Texas Roll Off Tournament 4 this weekend. Registration begins Friday, September 3 at 8 p.m. at E/ J's Watering Hole, 1213 Richmond. Saturday the tournament begins at Stadium Lanes, near the Astro­dome, with team event starting at 12:00 noon and doubles beginning at 3:00 p.m Sunday the singles event will begin at 12:00 noon and will be a no-tap tourna· ment, which ia nine pins knocked down on the first ball considered a strike. The banquet and awards ceremony will be held at the Brazos River Bottom, 240C. Brazos, beginning at 8:00 p.m. Over $3800 in prize money plus trophies will be awarded to the winning persons. 1~) Saturday, Sept. 4 I. .I The Montrose Sluts Labor Day Spectacular Thursday, Sept. 9, 9-1 9 00 t"ll The Trail Riders Band : i • • • Watering Hole Tuesday· Steak Night Thursday· Pool Tournament Wpm Movies nightly on the patio OPEN 7AM-2AM NEVER A COVER CHARGE Sunday, Sept. 5 8-lOpm John Day & Company 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 Extra parking on the comer o( Mt Vernon I: Richmond HAWAII s100 906 Westhe1mer at Montrose 527-0188 Labor Day Buffet Monday, Sept. 6 ll:JO to J:OO $J.50 per person, plus ... Half Price Drinks Now Appearing Sheila Ceasar and foe Thalken Tuesday thru Saturday beginning at 9:10 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 4-8PM Seroing Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE l:f, ~!lLL ~·.• . ~ Housto_n's Oldest Wine & Spirits Merchant · ".: Serving the State of Texas Since 1933 I .~. ""' -~ co a: Oe Westheimer Liquor J&B Scotch 1.75 L .. . ... . ...... . ............... $17.99 Smirnoff Vodka 1.75 L .... . •..... . .. . . . .. . ..... . . 11.19 Gordon's Gin 1.75 L ...... . ........•. . .. . ...•.... 10.49 Bailey's Irish Cream 750 ml . . . ... . . .. ........ . ..• 13.39 Natasha Vodka 750 ml (Great Value') ••..•.•....... 3.99 Canadian Club 750 ml . .. .... . ........ .. . . ........ 7.69 Jack Daniels Green 33.8 oz . •. . ................... 9.19 Wine Robert Mondavi Table Wines (Red-Rose-White) 1.5L .............. . ...•..•.. . .• . ....• . .......•.... . . $5.29 Pouilly Fuisse LeDaux 750 ml . . .•.. . •..•..•..•..•. 6.99 Turner Cabernet Sauvignon 750 ml 1980 .. ... . ... . . 3.19 P1esporter Gold Treppchen 750 ml 1981 OBA ..•. . . 3.29 Dourthe Blanc de Blanc 1.5 L ..................... 4.99 Freixenet Cordon Negro Champagne 750 ml . . ..... 4.99 Chateau Rose Blanche. Grand CRU Classe 1976 750 ml . . . ... . ... .. .. . .. .. ... . ...... .. ...... .. . . . . . .. . .. . 5.99 Macon Blanc Lugny, Cuvee St. Denis 1980 750 ml .. 5.29 Heitz Cabernet Sauvignon 1977 750 ml . . . . ........ 8.99 Beer Heinekens (light or dark) from Holland 6 pk .. . . . .. $3.69 Budweiser in cans, 6 pk •.......•. . • . ........ . .. . • 2.29 Budweiser Light in cans, 6 pk .. .. ...... . .. ....•... 2.29 Samuel Smith Ale from England 6pk •. . . . ..... . .... 6.29 Tsing Tao (Chinese) 6 pk .. . ...... .. .. ..... . . ... . . 4.29 St. Pauli Girl (light or dark) irom Germany 6 pk .. . . 3.69 3268 Westheimer-523-7 405 OPEN MONDAY LABOR DAY Come celebrate with us and take advantage of these Low, Low Prices! ~I -----------------,I : Bring in a copy of this ad and I 1 receive an EXTRA 5% : I DISCOUNT on any purchase 1 I I ~--AL-L -M-A-JO-R- C-R-ED-IT- C-A-R-DS- -~ ACCEPTED 12 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijr--..--iiiii~ Women's Softball League to Hold Fundraiser From Women'• Softball Leag!U! Spokesperson It's all over except the party as we prepare for the final event of the year-a variety show at Numbers Disco, Tuesday, Sep­tember 14 at 8:00 p.m. An "all star" line up of male and female entertainers will be on hand to provide the finishing touches to MSA's first year of women's softball. We invite the entire community. including members of the men's softball teams, to attend. Advance tickets to the semi-formal affair can be purchased for $5 at the fol· lowing locations: Sept, 3 & 4, !J. l 0:00 p.m .: Kindred Spirit&, 5245 Buffalo Speedway. Sept. 7, all day: the Barn, 710 Pacific. Sept. 10. 7-9:00 p.m/· Dirty Sally's, 220 Avondale. Sept. 10, 10-11:00 p.m.: Twins, 535 Westheimer. Sept. 11, 7-9:00 p.m.: Kindred Spirit&, 5245 Buffalo Speedway. Ticket& sold at the door on the night of the performance will be $6.00. Montrose Guest Recovery House to Hold Garage Sale From Montrose Guest Recouery House Spokesperson The Mon tro8e Guest Recovery House will be holding a garage sale Labor Day Week­end. Sept. 4 and 5, from down to dusk. The sale will take place at 2222 Chenevert, the lOj:Btion of the recenUy leased facility, to h.Mp raise funds for the needed rennova-tions on the house before it can be opened for operation On December 1. Items for sale will include furniture, clo­thing, kitchen items and lots more. Dona· tion of goods will be gladly accepted on both days. Texas Volunteer Workers Wanted From &b Hamm WicJuto FoU... TX The Gay Righta National Lobby (GRNL) is looking for volunteers to serve as "Field Associates" in all areas of Texas and sur· rounding states. Field Aasociates are a vital part of GRNL'a effort to promote and protect gay righta on a federal level. Field Associate volunteers help by being local organizers in their areas. by keeping track of their local congrenman and senators positions on gay rights and other civil right.a mat· ters. by distributing information to area gays about current matters of national concern such as the Gay Right& Bill and the Family Protection Act. Field Associates alao help organize peo­ple to contact and lobby their local con· gressmen on these issues, and to make sure that local area gays let theircongre&8· men know that there are gays in their dis· trict who are registered voters and taxpayers, and what their concerns are. Other projects Field Associates are involved in include getting signatures on petitions against the Family Protection Act, helping organize a GRNL presence at local Pride Week and other gay functions, and generally help make GRNL a national organization reaching to the grass roots. Persona interested in volunteering to help, 1hould contact either Susan Green, GRNL, P.O. Box 1892, Washington, DC 20013. or m state, Bob Hamm, P.O. Box 4602, Wichita Falla, TX 76308, phone (817) 691-0706. OPEN Monday­Saturday llam-2am, Sunday lpm-2am Gay hours Monday­Saturday 4-7p-m ---- Rita "Poppa Bear" and Bird 5731 Kirby, 521-1444 Parking in rrar Special Labor Day Show Sunday, Spm Watch for Grand Opening professionals In piano moving, crating and climate storage, since 1943 presented by TEA FOR TWO THOUSAND benefiting the KAPOSI'S SARCOMA COMMITTEE and the MONTROSE COL'NSELING CENTER at the MIDTOWNE SPA (Elgin at Fannin) on SATL'RDA\', SEPTEMBER 4, 1982 from 302 E. Rogers St. 694-8956 9:00 p.m. till Dawn Guice Bar after 2:00 a.m.) Dance to State of the Art Music by DJ Ken Alan TICKETS $12.00 in advance and $15.00 at the door (limited capacity) available from: Jim's Gym, Fitness Exchange, TLC, Sports Locker and Sponsors Look what "Houston City" magazine said about us INTRODUCING HIM Vitamins, Minerals and Herbs for the Sexually Active Male lCW 1el • Mo• mwng he - 'Wne syttem 1u tigt,IJNedlOl'I • M'.nnta1rung If -"·JCJl Vitality and ~ · Ald~prw9flll0n ~Vin.II '"""""'· · ~ng1henen"(,,,4syste::'lanCI canbaflrr;il!TessmallitslormS • ~ Vld!nJ numtinnal wuranoe ogalnlldlt<J«'tetot1ved1teOSe · ~11ng1tie-7,,1,ngp"OCessa1lh9 ce .alal level A COmpl•t• Nutr1t1011.a1 SUppl•m•nt H:M ;S U'le CT90tion or me<l•MI pro 1esaona11 who 5~«:1oh.z.e m nutnllonal U'leropy as pl'e""l'\ll._.. mamienance tor loday1 Wuty\M Their tugf1 qual Y lonn.llcrllon 01 au nutural 1uslml'lltd rttlea•lnQredle'nt111:icomp1e1en'lln tlOflQI 1uppien.an1that11 hyro aller Ql'~and oNa1ntncwtwa1sa:t1ugc• ar\lflaol p~h'OhY&S eoion 'lg or ntr,oon POcltaQOd .r. a r-r ~ .. ive N~plaSl.lc:"bQllH:M l -a monlh- S\.tP llY lO kelS -'Pl svr .,, Herpes Y\NS 11 IOlten ftN..ii<lr!y ~ bl-rat amoun1s Further 11~ doc olTMH'J •he eaecttvr..css ot Zinc and .moon bo~ With tvspec110 HefpM c >nd1!1ons H M 11 IM only mulliple IOrmlJlaTioneorn.buuno;;itllese unpo11an1u.gredl91\IS °""lop Streu lui.stooce HIMhelp$prt:.>Y9nlstrtoU ."XNeed nutnllorwll depebon by prnVldlng hrgh poJenc:y B <lnd C ccm~x·n lusta•ned release k;,rm H!M contalf\I Eleuthflrococcustet1t1COIU110mttt1me1 called S1botnari Ginseng 01111npot1an1 b'.llOl'llCCI 01.r!f:I having docu~er.ted :r.· tl r&s;;.p~ o ..,rhel Slr.nvfbe11lmtl)Ullltf Tile IC. nee 01 m!TIIJno -'OY II rapidly bec0m1ng the rno1or 1ror,11er ;i! medical mv.n11gahon Th:-ougl". IM ,plLmtll !..incborung or our 1rrm ne Syttems ._rm, pl°t!'VWll dlseaw lCludmg the <'egenerahve d1l9Clset ""'31 ore The number one klllerl bda, o:ktitlOO IO :ugh polenc1es 0 .M :~;!um<JI wamin and rruMra! ingre 1..m. H:M eonlC'_ru :J remorkabJe Wb c!led Ect. • - We koow:'\ Xllt~Yeneu IQ? ng JK t. ~ ~ -ieucme ec:: ig; balance 01 eur -..mal~)l'~"l!Jrsyslitm O!Vl\alr.:~ laer-a .. SHUGI VllC1l.lll The H: M ':irmiua cr:nams IE!Yero '"IQ~ IO actlMYe hormonal bo;, once and WilNOI r~ in the ~• gerub"'nnory IY!letn n. com­:> U'GboO O! treeze-One<I gl!'lndular ~ ~te hMua Saw !'\:Jimeno and 5anospanlkl aid In !he nonnollUrtlOn 01 natut'll W.,JOI •unc om-.g HIM Now .bollob .. ,'1 .... n1:11: ,....,. ,, H:M• a~b'9nutr11 ·.nt i;IWCJkltll'oUQ!'I MW ~l'IQ lf)trod1J<'9d thr..r.Jgh ir.&'11cal praet1!1onen. hea!lh !ood OU!Jotl health ctubs and selected re1c111en in Y")l.lr community And tor a .;.'Tiiied 1 me you11 ~an U\drrJffldl <'Olorpmtt11o.i lhe HIM rnen nm:wrttiyour P'.Jf'dtn• 'bur body needs all tieht!;:>tloan :191 GetH!"A HIM'" Health and lmmwutyb Men SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 ELECT A MODE RA TE REPUBLICAN McCUTCHEN Yes, It's the true Italian restaurant in town. You never had such good food since your last trip to Italy. The elegance and simplicity of the decor together with the friendly atmosphere is exquisite. Our 4-star chef, Luciano, will offer you the best specialty of our country. You will travel from Vencie to Florence, from Milano to Rome, enjoying the different dishes of our regions. And our pianist entertains during dinner. Open for Lunch and Dinner & After-Theater Late Dinner Special Business Lunch for Two: Salad; Pasta, Veal or Fish; Fresh Fruit & Coffee, $18.00 2907 W. Alabama, between Kirby and Buffalo Speedway For Reservations call 522-8852 14 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 U' l WESTHEIMER INTERIORS 1727 Westheimer •Houston 71.3/520-1.357 Optn JO A.M. - 6 P.M •. Monday thru Saturday MRS. GRAY '""'"'~""''' Unlucky? Unw1nted1 Unloved? FAST RESULTS to HAPPINESS and SUCCESS on problems with Marriage, Job, Health .. Love.and Business. One readina will convince you. 2119 S. Shepherd 528-9675 MSA WOME,. "S SOFT­BALL PRESENTS VARIBTY §HOW ' Tuesday September 14, 8pm NUMBERS 2 DISCO 300 Westheimer $5 advance tickets from Klndrid Spmt.s Sept. 3 & 4, 9-10pm, and Sept. 11. 7-10pm The B11n Sept. 7, all day Dirty Sally" Sopt. 10, 7-9pm Twins Sept. 10. 10-11pm Double R Salpon Sept. 11, 7-10pm $6 at the Door ~DD.... ..... Caps for Fall Leatlier-$21.50 Satin-9.00 Army-6.50 Navy-5.50 BASIC BROTHERS 1220 Westhelmer 522-1626 Open 11-7 M-Sat Vlsa/Most..Cord/NrExpess Azygos-Coming Soon Serving Montrou ind the Southwnt Arn Playgirl Follies This Saturday, Sept. 4, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover, starring Laura Lee Love with special guests Dietra Allen and Madelynne Garrett Mitchell Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-Bpm Open 10am Mon-Sat. Noon Sunday NOW OFFERING SUNDAY AFTERNOON I MONDAY NITE FOOTBALL A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland 659-0040 r---------~-------------, SAVE WITH THIS COUPON LADIES' or MEN'S PANTS Regular $2.40 Laundered or Dry Cleaned Special $1.90 One HOUR ''flllllll/D.. ",.l.. l/DG_" . THE MOST Ill DRY CLEANING Coupon expires October 1, 1982 COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED WITH GARMENTS (NO LIMIT) Good only at 1224 Westheimer location L-----------------------J NOW SHOWING Exclusive Houston Engagement Free Validated Parking Greenway Plaza Underground Highway 59 at Buffalo Speedway 626-3339 SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Gay Games Open in San Francisco By Daniel Curzon International Gay New• Acency It began with the crowd of some 11,000 chanting in their seats in the stadium for the sun to come out and bless the opening of the first Gay Games. Sure enough the sun came through , emerging bright and beautiful by the end of the day. But one didn't have to look for omens. The enthusiasm of the crowd was sign enough that a major historical event was taking place. Even though the U.S. Olym­pic Committee obtained an injunction to prevent the games from using the word "olympic," those involved with the event conquered the unequivocal homophobia of these officials of the sports world. The emphasis from the chairman of the games, Dr. Tom Waddell, a former Olym­pian himself, was on the games as a teach­ing experience, to show the world an image of gay men and lesbians that stressed "self-fulfillment and a spirit of friendship" instead of the beating of opponents. Master of ceremonies Rita Mae Brown told the crowd in her opening remarks: "The on ly people who are queer are those who don't love anybody." The crowd rose to listen to Pam Brooks sing the "Star Spangled Banner" and to the Rev. Troy Perry deliver an invocation. The San Francisco Gay Freedon Day Marching Band then took the field in Kezar Stadium and played while several baton twirlers performed, some more flaw­lessly than others. But the man who dropped his baton three times got a huge hand because he kept trying, with an espe. cially high toss of his baton to complete his perfonnance. It's not known whether the original Olympics (dating from at least 776 B.C.) had baton twirlers, but those of the past and those on this day both shared a dedi­cation to encouraging peace and brotherhood. The present·day olympics for gays also differed from the original, in that women were not only allowed to view the events, but actually were encouraged to participate. Flag corps and a women's band (Sistah Boom) next entered the arena, followed by di~itaries, including the program com· m1ttee and members of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Then came the athletes themselves­some from countries far away, including Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and Peru. Some 1500 paraded past the cheer­ing throng, amihng and waving, dressed in their colorful uniforms. Numerous American cities were also represented. Although there have been rumors that officials of the U.S. Olympic Committee had threatened to penalize or even ban any atheletes who participared in the Gay Gamee, there were 1500 women and men willing to march proudly into the arena and risk that wrath, truly a courageous act that more than matches any courage shown on any playing field in the world. Congreesman Philip Burton was intro­duced to the crowd and won their hearts by 1t.ating: "Aa the official representative of this area in the Congress of the United States, I welcome these athletes to the first Gay Olympica!" Burton thus threw a punch at the Olympic Committee for refus­ing to a llow the Gay Games to use the word, even though it a llows Special Olym­pice for the retarded and even a "Cooking Olympics." The bitter irony of any committee refua­ing to let gay people use 0 0lympics" can be best appreciared by recalling how much a part of ancient Greek life homosexuality was. It waa not considered an aberation, but actually a part of the educational system. Congressman Burton presented an offi­cial Congressional award to Dr. Tom Wad· dell and Jed the crowd in a "Hip, hip, horray!" for the man who organized the event. GAY OLYMPIC NATIONAL TORCH RUN Jon Roberson (r~ght}, coordinator of the National Torch Ran, and Harriman Thatcher, coordmatcr of the Cultural Week activities for the games The San Francisco Mounted Police did not appear as scheduled, and there has been conjecture that the failure to appear signals aome surfacing of the continual conflict between the gay community and the police department of San Francisco. However, acting mayor Doris Ward (if not the regular mayor, Dianne Feinstein) proclaimed it to be "Gay Olympics Day," thus seconding Congressman Burton's challenge to the U.S. OJympic Committee. It wouldn't be a gay event apparently without the appearance of entertainers, and thus rock star Tina Turner made her appearance, dressed in a short yellow fringed dress, her hair piled high. In no time she had the crowd rocking and roB­ing, with such numbers as "Honky Tonk Woman" and "Proud Mary." A good many of the athletes, gathered in mid-field in front of the bandstand, got into the mood and danced and swayed to the music. Even organizer Waddell and publicist Zohn Artman were seen cavorting musi­cally on the cinder track of the arena. Singer Meg Christian appeared, some­what nervous about having to follow the high-powered Tina Turner, but she found her voice and sang "Reach for the Sky," the official song written for the occassion. (Like most songs written for official occa-sions it tended toward the safe.) But no matter, the day was a day to be proud, with a vengeance! Mass ralliea like this one speak to some human need for public spectacle and affirmation. They depend on large gestures, almost simple­minded in their appeal to public emotions (here gay patriotism) and work out their effects by their very ostentation. The last event, therefore, must be a grand one-and it was pretty damn close. Two fonner Olympic athletes (Susan McGreivy and George Frenn) ran the length of the stadium carrying a lighred olympic torch. They ran between the rows of athletes and reached the official recep­tacle in front of the speakers· stand and there set the torch to the material within. It leapt into a large flame and at the same instant thousands upon thousands of colored balloons were released from a covered area at the other end of the stadium. Originally the Greeks sacrificed some animals and burned the offerings to the gods. The present-day gay olympians offered balloons. I think the balloons are better. Plans are underway to make the Gay Games an event every fourth year, witit the next one likely to be held in Los Angeles. Results of the Gay World Series in San Francisco were not available at press time. Complete coverage will appear in next week's Montrose Voice. Sports Trop~cal Fruit Sizzles Just Marion & Lynn's Tropical Fruit, which bowls on Thursdays in the Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League, has main­tained the top spot for quite some time now, and it looks as if there is no way to unseat them before the end of the season. On August 26, they expanded their lead even more. Four members bowled 200 games with two of them bowling two 200 games and one popping over 2001 pina in all three games. Bob Akin• scored 246, 223 and 214 that night while Steve McConaughy racked up 246 and 200. Butch Irish'• lucky number wae two that night as he bowled 222 and 222. Paul Buenger hung in there with a 203. Rob Connere said, "They just went crazy." Their crazy bowling won them a new summer season record for high hanicap series with 3225. Actually, something must have been in the air because there were eleven bowlers that night who racked up a total of seven­teen 200 games. Thursday Bowling Elects New Officers The MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League elected officers for the winter sea· son on Thursday, August 26. Richard Dauchy who bowls on For a Few Daddiee Moore was elected president. Dauchy is a former president of Monday Night Bowling. Vice president Kathy Winkler was re­elected to serve in that position. Winkler has been filling in for Phil Blakeway who resigned as president of the league. The other officers are Butch Irish, Secre­tary; Mark Hall, Treasurer; and Bob Akins, sergeant at arms. The officers were nominated at a meet· ing on August 12 and all but Dauchy were unopposed, according to Rob Conners. Conners said that 44 out of 65 members voted in the election and that Dauchy won over Steve McConaughy by six votes. The officers will take over their duties on the first week of the winter season which will begin in about a month. MSA in Front of the Eight Ball The Montrose Sport.a Association is solic· iting sponsers for MSA Pool, i:1aid MSA president Jim Reagan. "Plans are being made to eet up teams." The teams will consist of a minimun four and a maximum seven players per team. They will play on a "rotation basis" with each team moving from place to place each week. Reagan thinks that most of the places will probably be bars, Bince bars generally have pool tables, but he does not feel that other options should be neglected. 11We hope to have about 30 bars involved," said Reagan. '"There are 14 or 16 now." He asked that people who are intereeted in playing please call him at 622-3304. The approximate starting time for the New MSA Pool io set for September 30. Photo Correction Last Week'• story about the National Reno Gay Rodeo was accompanied by some wonderful photos. Unfortunately, we forgot to say who took them. Those photos were the work of Bill Hol­ton and Steve Yocum. Also, Walter Strickler is the owner of the Barn, not Walter Strickland. 16 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 Lowest Prices on Alterations HOUSTON 1ST RUN TROUSERS: Waist . .. ............. $3. 75 Langth .................. 3. 75 ~~~;ci":.::::: :: : : : : : : : : :~:~ Add Cuffs .............. . 4.75 COATS: Shorten Sleeves .............. · ... · $10.00 Lengthen Sleeves . ............ · .. · · · · 10.00 Raise or Lower Collar •••••.... . ..... . 12.50 Shorten Coat ........... . ......... .. 25.00 'THE DIARY' 2ND BIG WEEK 'SCORPIO' Take In or Let Out Sides .......... . .. 10.00 Narrow Lapels ................. . .. .. . 35.00 VEST: Chest or Waist .......... 4.50 THE DESIGNER'S ROOM 224 Westheimer 522-7106 Open 8 to 6 Tuesday-Friday 10-3 Saturday (closed Monday) Our Price $350 Our Price $275 Our Price $700 Reg. Recail 5700 Reg. Recail 5550 Reg. Recail SHOO FREE! l:Yn-t a.tOISI designnt ptttr indudn • frtt IS-point diamond durin~ Stpttmbtr Gita's Jewelry tb~=~~vn;:n;::g r.::~n~';;_try Only 15 minutn from Montrosr W4£ Qf)alkon 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 Open 2pm-2am Happy Hour Daily 2-8pm Buffet Thursday 8pm Monday, Sept. 6, LABOR DAY OPENING 7AM, with ... 11AM DRAG BRUNCH Wear your favorite daytime (drag) or Cocktail Dress 75¢ Bloody Mary's, Screwdrivers SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 /,MONTROSE VOICE 17 Galleon One Rolls to Top Spot for Summer Mondays By Billie Duncan "Everybody wanted me to mother them all the way to stardom. And I did," said Rich Corder the day after the Galleon One bowling team won the roll offs to clinch the first place in the MSA Monday Night Bowling League's summer season. The people mothered to stardom were Rich Ryan, Mike Rush, Bobby Hopkin• and Randy Templet. This was their first time to bowl as a team. At the end of the season, they were not even in first place in their division. Happy Trails was the first place team and Gal­leon One was second. That did not deter them. But they felt that their toughest round in the roll offs was when they faced the Happy Trails team. "Once we beat them," said Corder, "We knew we would win." "Rich was the one who suggested we start a team," said Hopkins, who had not bowled in a league for five years. Hopkins, Corder and Rich Ryan are all tennis play· era also. The difference between the two sport.a said Hopkins is that "tennis is a much more strenuous sport." But playing tennis aided his bowling because "it helps to be in shape.'' Bobby Hopkins is definitely in shape. Besides the fact that the team is in good shape, Hopkins cited a more important reason that they won the roll offs. ''We had five guys who liked being together. Who liked bowling together. It takes a team effort" He also said, "It takes a lot of confi· dence." That motion was seconded in example by Mike Rush who not only was sure that they would win the summer league roll offs, but ia hoping that they win the Texas Roll Off Tournament (TROT) this w .. k­end. 0 1 think we're going to win on Satur· day." When asked how long he had been bowling, Rush replied, "I think the ques­tion is how long I've been trying to bowl." At age 16, "I picked up a ball when I was with the Job Corps." He refused to say how many years ago it has been since he was 16. Randy Templet has been bowling for 22 weeks. "It's the first time I've had a ball in my hand," said Templet. His average "was l 12, but it jumped to 120." Templet loves to bowl, but there are things about playing in the league for which he does not care. '"The thing I hate the worst about it is the hours. I get up at 5:00 a.m., then I bowl to 12 (midnight) on Mondaye." "We've also bowled on Sundays all sea­son long." The practice really helped them to improve their games and go on to win first place. But Templet said, "I wasn't trying to win, I was trying to keep up." About TROT, he stated, "I'm ready for it. Galleon One bowllnll team It won't last long enough, I'm sure." Then he added with a smile, "If we don't win, we'll give 'em a damn good game." Rich Corder put it a bit more simply. "We're gonna win." Corder is the captain of the team and the spark plug. He demands concentration and dedication from the other members, but he does not lose sight of the fact that the reason they got together to bowl was to have fun. Another thing that he insists upon is honest and fair play. He has no time for people whomanuever their play in order to get better handicaps. "I hear about bowling guys who bowl poorly at first, so they can win later." 11Wedon'tdo that. When we bowl, we try to get every pin." Corder gave an example of how dedi­cated the team wae. "Rich Ryan one night had no shoes to fit him-there were no rental shoes to fit him, so he went and paid $35 for a pair of shoes so he could bowl." This was just before the roll offs. Rich Ryan is dedicated in just about everything he does. He holds a doctorate in music (he is a pianist) and he is the top ranked player in MSA Tennis. He has been bowling for 12 years and has a 172 aver· age (two pins below Corder's 174). "Rich (Corder) just asked me onedayif I wanted to bowl," said Ryan. "I had no thought.a o.f winning." Corder chimed in, 0The only reason he got in it was for the glory." Ryan j ust la'.thf:· •• the TROT, Ryan said, "!do well under pressure. If it comes down to that, I can h old my end up." Ri<h Corder •howing off his bowling 1tyle on the pool table TROT aside, the whole team is looking forward to playing in the winter league. Racquetball Assured Acceptance IntoMSA The racquetball league that is now being formed has applied to the Montrose Sparto A.aeociation for acceptance as an affil­iated sub-group, according to Jim Reagan, MSA president. Said Reagan, "There won't be a problem with that at all. In the meantime, they have elected an interim president and secretary. Ray Hub­bard was chosen as president and Don Rodriquez as secretary. Reagan said that about 25 people showed up at the Barn last Tuesday (Auguot 31) for an organizational meet­ing. "So, it'e got a nice start to it." Reagan asked that anyone interested in the new league please call 432-7851 in the evenings. The next meeting will be Tuesday, Sep­tember 7 at 9:00 pm at the Barn, 710 Pacific. Another View of the Rodeo Bruce Woolley of Travel Tech contacted the VOICE because of an article in last week's issue about the Nation Reno Gay Rodeo. The article stated that several peo­ple who attended the Rodeo felt thatit was not well organized. "I thought it was down coverage," said WA~e,;'i Phil Ragsdale'• organizing of the Rodeo, Wooley said, "He's done a W?D~~­ful job for what he's got to work with. Woolley added, "I don't think anybody had a lousy, rotten time." MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES HIGH GAMES Don Helhng Harley B•dde Gerald Hagan Mond1y._ Augutt 30 H4GH SERIES 225 Harley Badde 223 Gweld Hagan 223 Rich Corder ROLL OFF RESULTS 608 579 576 First Piece- G•llaon One !Rich Corder. capt, Rich Ryen. Mike Rush. Bobby Hopkins Rendy Templet} TOTAL PIN HANDICAP TOURNAMENT RESULTS 1 Cherry P1~ers 8705 3 Eurotan lnternat10nal 2 Next· T-Last 8665 8658 .. 69ers 8634 WINTER LEAGUE START iA ~ ~.i SUd.., Bc>w~ l200 8,_l Mondey. September 20 Regular compet1hon begins 9pm MSA Ed.die Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS wtEKS' GAMES Thursday. Sept. l Results next week Thursday. Augu.st 26 HIQHGAl.IES Bob Akins 246.223.214 Steve McConeughy 248.200 Mike Foster 223.201 Butch lri•h 222.222 Richard Cauchy Terry Wolber Phll Howard Glen Ba•ley Paul Buenger J1ck Gilbert Kevin Hull STANDINGS 1ThfDU9h Augl,!St 26) 215,204 213 211 205 203 201 200 1 JustManon&Lynn's 7. Thursday Knights Tropic.ti Fruit 8. Chases 2. For a Few Dadd•• 9. Thursday Night More Tr+c:Ks 3_ The Rockettes 10 4 to 1 4 Kindred Spmts' 11 . Gutter Sluts Aces High 12 Kindred Spmts 5. Hang 10 Leather & L9Ca es Sain & Peppet' II THIS WEEK'S GAMES 1Ar g-91 Stad-.m 9owt, l200 8•->n) Thura<My, S.pt9111bef 9 Regular compet1t1on. 9pm Texas Roll Off Tournament REGISTRATION 8pm Fnday, Sept. 3. E/J's, 1213 Richmond SCHEDULE OF PLAY (All gam• et Stedium Bowl, 8200 Breeama1n} Team events Seturday. 12 noon Doubles: S.turday. 3pm Singl• Sunday, 12 noon BANQUET & AWARDS 8pm Sundey. Sept 5. Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Mond•y. S.,:.t~ 8 K•ndrM Sp•frtl (!245 SuffelO ~y. 165-975e) M 1:30pnl ••"G4 eillnHWtlOtl. $2 entry . .....,"'* take .. RMch (9820'4 M••n. 53-97301 M 9 pm, ·~ eilsn1n11tion. $2 emry . ...,,....... take ell ($50 11U9r..,I•) TllNdey. S•pl-b« 1 Utrpo1t (2417 Tm"IM BIWI 521-8121• M lpm. airigte .. •m•nMlon. $2 .,,try won,.,. tau .u e,,,.,. .... .,,..,..,.t- s:.pt.,,,., Patc:h (2294 w Holcombe. &e6-9S71) et 9t:wn. aingte eliminehon. S2 entry. S.50 pnu a e 1_ 1u19 Richmond. 521-89031 et apm, ,;1191e el1m1Mtion. S2 er,itry. w!Met takll ell end new pool cue Thufld•y. S1pt.,.,,,_ 9 Bwn (710 P1e1flc:. ~IM27) .t. 9prn. double el1m1n11bon, $2 entry, S25 11,.1 round prtze, $15 MCOnd round pnze .hat Marion Ind Lynn·• (117 F•niew. ~9110) Mlpm., $2 entry tee WlMef tH• ell EJJ'1 (1213 Richmond. 527·9071) at 10pm double ••'l\!Mtlon. S2..-.try. Wlt"IMftakeall MSA Tennis LAST WEEK'S MATCHES Sundty. August 29 Rich Ryan O'ier Jtm Kitch &-2. &-0 Fred Lopez O¥er Jim Kitch &-2. &-2 Jim Kitch over Aon Lendrum &-0. &-2 L•tre Vela ovw Geno &cemiU• &-2. 4-6. &-0 Bobby Hopkins over MichMI Houston (default) Bobby Hopkins over Jon Colbert 6-1, &-2 Ry1ntAyan over KrtchlColbart &-1. &-0 Robet Arri~• cwer R1Ct1 Corder 5-7. 6-2. 6-2 Dl'lid Geru cw• Thomes Cortez &-0. &-3 STANDINGS TOf' TEN I LAOOCR 1. Rich Ryen 1 Geno Escamill• 2. If red Lopaz 2. Donny Ketty 3 Jim Krtch 3- Mike Green ' Aon Lendrum ' Robert Amage 5 John Ryan 5. Rtch Corder e_ Oevid Robicheaux S David Geru 1. i:estar Vet• 7. Denny Cu1iles 8. Bobby Hopkn\I 8 Peter Lea 9 Jon C<>'bet'I 9 Eddie Chevez 10_ M1Chael Houston 0. Thom• Cortez THIS WEEK·s MATCHES (Couni loUltd t..t.:0'990' Plf1I lenr'/119 c.nt.' TUI Gu# F,._.., IOUlf'I. 11nt c.t"°"" JUlt PM1 UH c.!IP<'I on ~ S4.Jnd1y. SeptfHJlber 5 ~egu1ar competrt10n. 10:30am 18 MOlllTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 Books 'Spartan' is Fun to Read THE SPARTAN by Don Harri1on. Alyton Publicationa, $5.~- A\>ailable through Wilde & Stem, 802 Weetheimer Reviewed by Daniel Curzon International Gay Newa A1ency .A. I write Ulla review, the Gay Games of 1982 ia about to be held in San Franciaco, but the U.S. Olympic Committee won't allow the use of the word "Olympica" is this gay event. How dare anyone refuse to let gay people \Ille the word when gay peo­ple were a major element in Greek life? Well, times certainly change. It's these bomophobea who should read The Spartan. It's an easy read that make ancient Greek c~stoma come to life, no small accomplishment. Sometimes historical n~vel~ can be crammed with far too many h1sto~cal facts for their own sake, but Don Hamson does a good job of taking us on a tour of ancient Sparta, Bellas, and other parts of the past without forgetting his main purpose-to tell a story. The tale traces the ep1sod.1c Jlte ot a young wrestler, Pantarkes, as he strives for glory in the games. The writer is espe­cially good at de-mystifiying the glamor of sports, 1howing the tears, the tom ten­dons, and the transitorineu. He doesn 't idealize the put either. Loeers are treated with contempt; women have no rights, not even the right to attend the Olympics. If you think that sports are pretty trivial preoccupations for grown-ups, as I do, you may not like the focus of this novel. Yet there is a coarse narrative vitality to the wh ole book that keeps one reading. The sexual behavior of the characters ie treated intelligently. Some of the charac­ters are homosexual, some bisexual, some heterosexual. Pantarkes, the hero, likes men, but he knows that he must eventu­ally marry and produce offspring, in accordance with his society's expecta· tions. The occasional sex scenes are natu· ral, thank God, not the usual panting disproportions of most gay magazine fiction. The weaknesses of the book include rushed clusters of dialogue that do not read like anything any human has ever said, as well as a tendency to rush dra­matic moments. There is likewise a certain pulp flavortoitall, with the author having his wrestler-hero crack a neck whenever the action is about to st.all. Nevertheless I would recommend this novel. It has a good story, with a twist at the end; it teaches something about gay history; and it's just long enough. It may not be arl, but it's enjoyable for its own sake. MONTROSE CLOGGERS LABOR DAY SEPTEMBER 6th at 8:30 &c&w DANCE LESSONS .•• OF COURSE 5245 Buffalo Speedway at Bissonnet 665-9756 UNDBTBCTABLB With your natural weave-you 're going to look better, feel better, and act better. You'll be a winner. And everyone loves a winner. What arc you waiting for? The Hair Weavers, Inc. Houston Office 1200 S. Post Oak Rd., Suite 420 Houston, Texas 77056 (713) 622-3290 Call our Representatives Call tomorrow for a no obligation personal interview. r----------------------- 1 THE HAIR WEAVERS I Suilt 420, 1200 South Post Oak Rd., Houston 77056 I I [ ] Pleast send Crtt liltratu rt on your hair weaving ttehnique. I I Nam< I I Address Phon< I II c;· ty State __ ZIP----- I ---------• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ~--.. ~ ~-~ ' ~\ ~ :t ~ ___.~I"""": SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) j Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ... Only $3.75 (plus drink) Buffet served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** NOW OPEN! MIXED DRINK BAR All Types of Mixed Drinks Served Happy Hour 4-7, $1.00 Bar Drinks OYSTER BAR: 1 DOZEN OYSTERS $2.95 DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY 4 to 10:30 pm * * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * Chief cook with 20 years experience-just came from China * We will prepare for you a very special Chinese dinner 20 MONTROSE VOIC6/ SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 Montrose Art Dale O'Dell, silver pr mt Pop Art: Fashionable Images, Fashionable Techniques By Steven Cuniberti Two Houston artists-Dale O'Dell at Toni Jones Gallery, 1200 Bissonnet, and Mar­git Ilika, upstairs at The Drawing Doom, 3209 Montrose, are simultaneously exhib­iting eimilar work. The images are not the aame~ the tech­niques are not the eame; the presentation ia not the same. What they share is a pri­mary concern with media compatible fashionable commercial products. O'Dell's collection of photographs of murals, walls and people have a postcard spirit-terse. direct, concise. The scale of the foreground humans to the painted walls emphasize the alien environment; but the scrupulously formal composition' legitimizes that world in which man exists as a slave to the larger-than-life mass com­munication media. Except for the particularly subUe and complex narrative pieces-the ten-print Clothing Series portfolio of type C color prints and six-print Sheet Series in black and white, all of the photographs in the one-man show are elementally comparative. Even Cloth.mg Series includes a com­parison of warm and cool sunsets among its other element&. Technical element& such as positive/negati"M! printing, left/ right axis reversal, hoVcool color varia­tions and differences of the subjects' · poses-standing/walking, in bed.lout of bed, glaeRes onlglauee off-overcome any qweter me88ages in the work. What r~mains are graphically intense images whose design expreBSea a ai.ng1e idea. The delicately evocative Sheet Series ls a short story composed ·with three ele­ments: a figure, a sheet and a landscape. There is ll sense of both motion and emo­tion in this narrative that is not found in the artist's other work. Emotion for Margit flika's mixed media paintings ia an external element, a viewer response to the unemotional abuse of the human form for mass consumption. Using magazine photographs, acrylic paint and color xerography, the artist performs anti· cosmetic surgery on commercially palata­ble images. The toothpaste smiles and Maybelline eyes of the subjects of the Miss Houston Series are further emphasized by the whiting out of the rest of their faces. The trendy alaahea, splashes, spot. and marks of added acrylic paint in fashiona­ble colors highlight the models' hair and background. Marilyn Monroe, a quinte88ential fashion image of the 1950s, revived in the. 80s along with other pop culture from that decadP, is similarly treated. Ilika's techniques deftly handle the problem of adding an artist'• comment to existing media. She makes a sta~ment about the billboard images we accept as real. An edition of color Xerox prints of a collage underacore• the possibility of per­petual media degradation where the objec­tion to a fashion becomes the new fashion. ••••••••••• GRANT STREET STATION Barbecue Saturday, 1pm $1 per person NOW OPEN AT 7AM KRAZY HOUR 2377 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 A People Place T-SHIRT NIGHT for Cocktails with Lulu 7 days • week. 9-IOpm. 75C Well Dr1nks Tuesday, with 2SC Krazy Hour Poces L A SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 CALLING ALL WOMEN COME SEE WHAT WE'VE DONE AT THELAMPOST Same atmosphere-newly remodeled all over­u pstai rs, downstairs, patio Same crowd-new friendly management RUMORS OR No RUMORS, THE LAMPOST IS STILL THE LAMPOST SPEND LABOR DAV WEEKEND WITH US REDUCED PRICES ON ALL DRINKS Live Band, Wednesday thru Sunday Cookout on the Patio, Monday Nights Steak Night, Wednesdays Watch for our New Weekly M Schedule of Events POST Under New Management 528-8921 2417 Times Blvd. 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 8th Anniversary, Oct. 1, 2 & 3, $169 (based on double occupancy) Includes round trip air fare, 2 days, 2 nights, French Quarter hotel, round trip transfers, cocktail parties, poker walk, Cajun brunch, pins, trophies, banquet, and drink and discount tickets for bars, restaurants. DENVER WEEKEND 654-4040 UNITED CAB CO. 3 days. 2 nights, hotel and round trip air fare, welcome cocktail, many other special attractions. Hosted by Charlie's Bar of Denver $249 based on double occupancy. Call for details 2506 RALPH, 522-8747 MONTROSE TRAVEL EXPRESS Y.. OURSELF FRANCISCO'S 901 RodM\ond JERRY'S INFLATION Fl&HTER PRICES HaircuVblowdry or haircut & set. $10 Permanent wav• $35 men or women 523-0438 ) New Hours 11 to 2 New Happy Hours 11-7, 90¢ drirks Late Nite Happy Hour \ midnrte to 2 __\..) 90¢ drinks ' (/" THE DEEP \ I I Specials for Labor Day Weekend Grant at Jackson 528-8234 TBI BARN \ . ,,.._,;f' /,'i/,..: If ~ I j f,j ~ Houston's Friendliest Countrv &. Western Bar Serving Breakfast 7 30-10:30am Mon.-Sat. SUNDAY: Buffet for MDA. KON-SAT Open 7am. lCONDAY Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY; White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Welcome Back Dirty Sally's Party 8-12 Thursday, Sept. 8, sponsored by The Barn's softball team, with food, special drinks and entertainment. Guest bartenders, the Floor Whores. Welcome TROT IV Bowlers & Good Luck to the Barnyard. Biddies and Hoers in the TROT IV Tournament BIG LABOR DAY BBQ MONDAY with entertainment by the Montrose Country Cloggers & Ab & the Rebel Outlaws SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Bill Silva Fred Greenlee Steve Moore Commix Annex: Serious Comedy By Billie Duncan ''We need the laughter so much, it sears our eoulR to get it." With that comment, Steve Moore summed up the attitude (off· stage, at least) of many of the comedians who work at the art of stand-up comdey, One of the main stages for stand-ups is the Comix Annex, 2105 San Felipe, where comedians and people who desperately want to be comedians try their skills on a small but drinkin& audience. On Sunday and Monday nights the stage is open to anybody with five minutes of original materiel or for professioanl comedians who want to try out new material. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, the comedians who have proved themselves on audition nights have the opportunity to present expanded routines. The best of the crop sprout up on Friday and Saturday nights. Most of the comedians who work the Annex are such performance junkies that even the weekend pros will come in on audition nights just to get their audience fix for the day. On a recent Monday night, the regular mixture of decent humor, trite garbage, embaraSBing idiocy and brilliance trouped across the stage. Steve McGrew (who is a regular) informed the audience, "Mothers are like yankees. They te1l you things you already know.'' John Reed got off to a shakey start, but had some good material. Then he entered the quagmire of the same old ugly women jokes that have not changed except for punchline variations for years and years. Disc Jockey Tim Badore (who just moved to San Francieco) had some sur­prise Jines, including, "Kids will do exactly what you tell them. Never tell a kid to cut the crap." Intelligent humor and a wonderful sense of physicality were evident in the act of Steve Epstein (another regular). Steve's impression of a wrestler running for presi­dent was not only a funny visual, but a delightful concept. He handled the audience well, without attacking or being ru~~ve was working out new material for his act. Dave Lampe of the Comedr Workshop Touring Company got on, tned and left early. It was not hie night. A guy named Joe Rock basically freaked out on stage. . . Then the nightmare of the audition night appeart"d. She was introduced as Kim and ehr <'ame on stage \\--ith r.oideaof what a t1tand·up routine was and did such an embarassmg act that she was politely escorted from the stage by the emcee. The next comic had a tough spot after that me88. His name was C.J. Bertran and it was his first time to do stand-up. He was excellent. His sense of self was sure with­out appearing egotistical and his material was insightful and weB timed. After C.J., a regu.lar, Jack Mayberry, took to the stage. He had come in late and just wanted to perform. Jack's basic stage persona is that of an arrogant s.o.b., but hie material smacks of genius. A lot of his humor is based on cheap shots taken at women and at gays, but there is also a sense of truth in what he present.a no matter how irritating the jabs may be from an emotional standpoint. The man is very, very good. After the bar closed, C.J. Bertran explained what got him to take to the stage that night. "My sister and brother­in- law talked me into il They to)d me, 'You're better than most of the people up there. Why don't you get up there and try it?'" So C.J. left them a note saying that he would do it that night. They did not show up. But he went on anyway. "I don't like saying I'm going to do something and then not doing it." He explained why being in front of the audience did not bother him all that much. "I'm a lieutenant in the U.S. Army and I'm used to being in front of troops who are a little bit hostile." His experience at the Annex turned out to be a pleasant one, however. "It was like I was suspended in space. I was oblivious to everything- except the laughter that emanated from the darkne88." Steve Moore, who runs the Annex with the help Bill Silva, explained what he looks for in a fledgling stand-up. "If there is a sense of writing, then I can teach them to perform." He also said, "You cannot teach the craft of writing." About performing he said, "There is no slack time. If you stumble, you better have stumbled on purpose or have something funny to say about stumbling." Hie opinion of women in comedy was that women are a novelty and there are very few women who have the writing ability to do good stand-up. He likened women stand·upa to dancing bears, say­ing "It's not how well they dance, but the fact that the're able to do it at all." Sinre then. Stevl' appeared on a local television show and said that any woman with 20 minutes of material could make a living at doing comedy. The aBSuption j,.. that the material must hl' damn good. Onre a comedian has run the audition gauntlet shown writing promise and develo~ enough material, he or she is given a regular spot later in the week. Sometimes the regulars are very deserv­ing of the consideration. Other times. they should be sent back to square one. One regular show recently featured a pretty good cross-section of what could be expected on a regular night. Conrad Lawrence did Mexican humor, telling the audience that he cou.ld always tell when there was a Mexican jockey in a race because "the horse is real low to the ground." He was followed by Bob Barber who was introduced as having recent1y been out in Los Angeles at the Comedy Store. He started out in a rude and overbearing manner which caused the audience to fight back. Perhaps thinking that a good defense might be a further offense, he attacked the audience with "If I were five foot eight with a mohawk, I could say, 'Fuck you!'" He turned to another member of the audience. "Fuck you!" Again he picked out a person sitting at a table. "Fuck you, you dyke bitch!" None of the people at whom he shouted had heckled him or even been talking during his set. He seemed to think that the audience found his height to be intimidating. He was wrong. It was not the tallneSB of his frame but the smallness of his mind that irritated the crowd. Thankfully, he was followed by Steve McGrew whose wacky inner eye provided some delightful moments. Among his gems was, "When they got married, we gave them towels marked 'his and herpes.'" Next Alex Garza 8ftuntered onto the etage, wearing a pink beret, blue shirt and grey pant.a and carrying a bag of props that he used for eight gags. His humor is full of self-depreciating jokes based on Mexican stereotypes. His subjects cover theft, wife-beating, pom­pom decorations, wetbacks and low riders. There must be some secret society of Chi­cano comedians that requires that they must do at least one low rider joke per set or face certain death. Fred Greenlee, a Comedy Workshop actor, entered stage right and proceeded to have a great time. He was warm and per­sonable with a delightful sense of the hum­orous twist. "I'm no Albert Einstein. but I'm no Jack Heard either." The evening was finished off with the comic geniua of Ken Polk, whoisoneofthe few people who can get away with what might})(> called "stand-up improvisation." Montrose Live Jack Mayberry He is a member of the Comedy Workshop also. He told the audience, "Realism has never stopped me." He then launched into his absurdist humor and asked for sub­ject. a from the audience. Some of the sub­jects were aardvarks, Kafka, and the guy who snuck into the queen's bedroom. It was a very nice end to a basically enjoyable evening. One of the things that keeps the shows moving is the use of the emcee. Bill Silva explained, "If a comic dies or gets in trou­ble, antagonizes the audience, the emcee gets them back. We've made it an art form." Bill was excited about a new regular named Cheryl who had walked in about a month previously. He said that he and Steve Moore were both so impreBSed with her that they made her a regular immediately. "She'll start working weekends when she gets 20, 30, minutes of material," Bill said. A abort time later a woman mentioned to Bob Barber that she did comedy. He shot back, "Yeah. But do you do senous comedy?" Perhaps the only problem with a baei­caJly enjoyable show put on at the Comix Annex is that some of the comedians are too serious to be funny. •Duncan's Quick Notes Busy Beee Make Montrose Music: Andy Mills has lined up an incredible bunch of musical endeavors and events for the coming months. With the able assistance of Penny Peavy, the Montrose Chorale will go into rehearaal on September 15. Penny and Andy are hoping that they will have a good turnout of women for the first night. "We've been getting lot.a of calla," said Andy. The first concert that the Chorale will perform will be at Cullen Auditorium at Christmas time. Meanwhile, back with the Montrose Symphonic Band, rl'hearsals are going great guns for their September 25 concert at the Tower ''This will be our latot concert at the Tower," said Andy .. We've gotten too big for the Tower stage. ' There are now 75 people in the band. The concert has a lot of surprises for fane, including out&ta"lding and outra· <!4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 geous viaual1. "Concerta need to be fun,'' said Andy. "If people want to go hear the Houston Symphony and get no communication­go do it. If you want to come and be a part of, and laugh, and sing, and cry, then come to hear us." Rumor has it that the music from Star Wara will be conducted by a Wookie. Broadway Come• to Houston: The Alley Theater opened Home on August 31. The Negyo Ensemble Company of New York City had a hit with the show on Broadway and they are the ones doing the play here in Houston. Home looks at 15 to 20 years in the life of Cephus Miles, a black farmer in North Carolina, who is a teller of tall tales. Chocolate Bayou Working on Season Opener: The Chocolate Bayou Theater is opening its ambitious new season with A Flea in Her Ear Directing the Feydeau farce is Breton Frazier, who was a special a88istant to Jean-Pierr Granval of the Theatre de France during the 1966 American pre­miere of Barrett Shaw's translation of Feydeau'a ecript. The theater is buzzing about frantically Breton Frazier after fim"hing up their subscription and fund-raising drives, but hopes are high that the new season will really come through both critically and financially-a dream of theaters everywhere! A Flea in Her Ear will open on Sep­tember 24 and play through October 23. The Continuin& Lyric Lungs of Gene Howle: Sometimes all I want to do is hear some mellow music sung by someone who loves it. That oomeone for me lately has been Gene Howle, whose smooth tones can be Gene Howle heard at the Copa Quiet Bar on most week- The Negro Ensemb~ Company day nights. Gene has an easy style and a professionally relaxed presentation. And, of course, if you get too soothed by his aound1, you can always hop into the next room and disco your butt off. Mary Hooper Perks Up Rascal Mon­days: Who says that Monday nights are not good nigh ta to go hear entertainment? Not the people who have been going to Rascals to hear Mary Hooper. Mary is eimply wonderful. She has a good voice, an excellent stage persona and an over· coating of charisma that would carry her even if she were not as talented as she is. If your Mondays need perking, remember Mary Hooper. Oh. And don't fol'llet Bill Hudson, her accompanist and vocal coach. Sometimes we do not give enough credit to the power behind the throne. Marquerite Returns Again: Sounding pretty 1trong and full of plans for the future is a recently overhauled Marquerite who ia once again performing in Montrose. She is sometimes at Bacchus and will be at several other club1 around the neigh­borhood soon. Our Lady of the Blues never seem1 to rest even when ahe has just been unplugged from the hospital. But with her ma88ive medical bills, she feels that that she just has to go right out and start working. A very aucce88ful benefit was given for Marquerite Marquerite several montha ago, butitdoes not cover her recent expenses or pay her rent now, Perhaps when you go to see her this week, you can make another or a firat donation to a woman who has donated her time and talents to help so many others. Linda Petty Shines Again: The woman is incredible. Linda Petty has a voice that could knock down the Rice Hotel at 50 paces and she couples that with a genuine sense of caring and communication. Linda is at Rascals for two more nights this week (Friday and Saturday) and then she will skip up to Dallas to appear at the Uptown Dallas. Her Houston appearencee are much too few and far between. Linda is ably backed by Larry Petty on piano, Le.nee Wright on drums and Ron White on ba88. They make a wonderful team. Larry (who just happens to be married to Linda) said of Lance and Ron, "They both 1uper·reepect her." Who wouldn't? Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose !Fridly. S.pl9f'lbet"3, tl'lrOl.lgh Tl'lurt<tay. Sept9f'lberlll • ptANO Linda Petty 9pm Friday & Saturday; Mary Hooper & Bill Hudson 9pm Monday: & Montgomery, Mayes & Slnlch 9pm Tuesday-Thursday at Rascals. 2702 Kirby. 524-6272 Jim Cater & Tom Williams 8pm Fnday & Saturday: Greg Oa¥118pm Sunday & Wednesday; Tom Williams 8pm Tuesday: & Mickey Rankin 8pm Thursday at Keyboard. 3012 Milam. 528-6988 Richard Askm & Dana Rogers 10pm Wednesday· Saturday at the Copa (piano bar). 2631 Richmond 528--2259 Sheila Ceasar & Joe Thalken 9pm Tuesday through Saturday & Lionshare 9pm Sunday & Monday at Ba1a·s. 402 LO¥ell. 527·9866 Alexandra Haas & M1chtet Bailey Fnday, Saturday Wednesday & Thursday at Arno's, 4002 Montrose. ~28-2993 • COUNTRY I COUNTRY/ROCK The New Happy Trail Rldel"I Country-Western Bog· gle Band 9 30pm Friday & Saturday at Happy Tra11S, 715 Faif'Vlew. 52l-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outl1Ws 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & 8·30pm Thursday at the Exile. 1011 Bell, 65~53; & 8 30pm Sunday at Brazos R1¥er Bottom. 2400 Brazos. !528--9.92 Flying Bllnd Band 9pm Tu .. day·Saturday & Te•us 4pm Saturday & Sunday at Min Charto11e·s. 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mustang Band 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & 8:30pm Wedn•day & Thursday at Brazos RwerBottom. 2400 Brazos. 528·9192 •GUITAR "L 9pm Fnday & lnsh Folk 9pm Wednesday at the Partour, 2402 Mandell. 529-8069 Su.an Chnthan 5:30pm Frtday: Reynolds & Rand 5 30pm Monday: Rawalyn Ruffin 5 30pm Tuesday; & Lyra 5 30pm Wednesday & Thursday at Kindred Sp1r· •ts. 5245 Buffalo Speedway. 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Doue Kmgs 9pm Saturday & 8pm Sunday at Happy Trails. 715 Fa1Niew. 521-2792 Mata Har• 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & Lee LaForge. Kim Yveue & Dianne Cha11ton gpm Sunday at Bae· chus. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 John Day & Co. 6pm Sunday at E.'J"s. 1213 Rich· mond. 527-la071 •JAZZ The ADO Jazz Quartet 8pm Sunday at Harrar"s. 428 Westhe1mer, 526-2895 Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday & with Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday, Wednesday & Thursday at Laa Bnsas. 614 W Gray, 52&-9959 W1ndrose9 30pm nightly (except Sunday & Monday), & Horace Cnsby 9.30pm Sunday & Monday at Bird· watchers. 907 W•lhe1mer, 527·0595 • COMEDY The B•t of Comedy Worksh1p Volume 118.30 & 11 pm Fnday & Saturday & 8:30pm Wednesday & Thursday Manuef Labor " the Not the Pr•1dent of Mexico e·30pm Sunday & Monday at Comedy Worltshop. 2105 San F.,11>9. 524-7333 Stand-up comics nlghtty at Comm1xAnnex. 2105San Felipe. 524-7333 • IMPRESSIONISTS Donna Day, Naomi Sima & Hot Chocolate Sunday 8\lentng at the Copa, 2631 Richmond. 52&-2259 LIHle Bobby. Tracey, & guests Sunday evening at Exile, 1011 Bell, 659--0453 " Ptayglrl Follles" 10 30pm Saturday at Pink Elephant. 1218 L"tand. 659--0040 • NU WAVE Skunka & The Zealots 9 JOpm Friday; The Utt & The lncredlbles 9 30pm Saturday at Omni. 1540 Wee!· he1mer. 528-4230 • MISCELLANEOUS Montrose Country Cloggers 8pm Monday at Kindred Sp111ts. 5245 Buffalo Speedway. 6f>S..9756 NTalent thows Tuesday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528--2259. Wedn•day evening at M1dmte Sun, 534 Weethe•mer. 52~7519. & ThurMtay evening at Tw1n1, 535 W•the1mer Sro-0244 Laura Branigan Laura Branigan at Numbers By Nick Fede When you 're a doe-eyed young singer with a number one hit called "Gloria," your life can become one of sparkling stardom. The singer is Laura Branigan and she floored a receptive capacity house at Numbera in her first Texas appearance on August 29. Strong vocals throughout her 30 minute performance complimented her. outfit of taut black leather pants and boots­contraeted by a zebra-print top. While singing "Cross Fire/' Laura pranced and her soft, translucent eyes ohone direcUy into the crowd. After a•king the crowd to move in closer and "Spend All Night With Me," she sang and lithely danced across the stage. Then she told the crowd "a story about a girl I know, who keeps following me." That girl ie the fictional song heroine of her internationally-known dance hit. She said, "I know you know her name. Let's hear it!" The crowd shouted, "Gloria!" "You feel it in the studio when it's a hit," said the singer in a poet-show interview. "Gloria fever," as Laura deecribed it, was born five years ago when Italian songwriter/ singer Umberto Tozzi sold 30 million copies in Europe of his version of the song. Producer Jack White first brought the song to her attention after having expe­rienced the "fever" himself when dancing t-0 the original Tozzi vereion in a European dieco. Laura "grew up around doge, cats and chickens" at her parents home in Brews­ter, New York. She talked about her love for "anima1a, people and performing," but not neccessarily in that order. "I want to sing, do theater, films and everything because I want to run the gamut," she said about her career plane. Laura sang on tour for three months, and that included, "three television shows and a special in Germany," 8.8 well aa a performance in London. "It's a completely different market in Europe.'' she said, because, "Talent there is major if played (on radio) more than three times a week." Laura has begun choosing material for her album to be recorded in October follow· ing her impreeaive first effort titled simply "Brani&'an." She describes her music as ''Branigan Rock," and said, "The emotion is very important in my singing and I want to really reach out and grab the people." She did grab them as performer and crowd became one, dancing, unified body. "The audience is the other half," she said, and "It's just like being in or making love; it takea more than one." You may admire a performer who says of her career, "Everything has it's time, but I will do it all." Strap on yourseatbelts now because rock sung by Laura Brani­gan is one incredibly musical flight. BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! Simmons Beauty Rest Discount Center Kings, reg. $600.00, now s19soo Queens, reg. $400.00, now s199oo Full Size, now s12900 Other Sizes Available 2115 Norfolk, 10-7 M-F 10-6 Sat 523-8278 SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659- 8 join Me ... The Water's Fine EiC 26 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 Do you know where Advertising in 1982 in Montrose has changed from the days of 1979 and before. The switch is to the Voice because we don't play games with your advertisements by limiting the number of copies we put in circula­tion. We saturate Houston's gay com­munity every week-with news, entertainment, and the ads of commu­nity businesses that are getting ahead. Call your Voice advertising represent­ative (David Petluck, Gene Oliver or Lyt Harris) or advertising director Bill Marberry, at 529-8490. We'll show you a difference! If your advertisement is in the Mon­trose Voice, you can relax. Your message is appearing in over 7700 copies (guaranteed) being distributed through 110 Montrose clubs, restau­rants, shops and stores, and it is getting into the hands of an estimated 21,600 readers! On the other hand, if your ad is elsewhere . .. well, you're reaching far fewer people-and paying more money to do it. The Voice brings results for its adver­tisers because we saturate the com­munity every week with more copies through more distribution points. In fact, the Voice now circulates about twice as many copies each week in Houston as does the other publica­tion. Surprised? You shouldn't be. After all, the Voice has better commu­nity news, sports and entertainment coverage, nationally syndicated wri­ters, great comics, a professional attitude-and thousands more copies distributed each week in Houston through dozens more distribution points. FULLFILLMENT vs STRESS-PAIN-FEAR Hypnosis can change your life today. Rid yourselfof nega­tive thoughts and habits. Private and Group Sessions. James D. Kristian, Ph.D. HYPNOTHERAPIST / PSYCHOTHERAPIST 14 yt:an ol experience, co-founder of prc\uiption HypnO\iS and accelerat ion Therapy We kno..., Phy\ical and Emotional Pa in can he hcl~d. VOl CA' OVERCO\U Weight • Smoking • fears • Am:icly • Guill • IXpre\\IOn • Drua Abu\c • Alcohol Abu\e • Anger • Loncline~\ • Strc\S • Nen·ou$ncss • Pain • Problem\ lOV CA"llMPROV ESclfConfidcncc • ~II Worih • ShynC"is • Mcmorv • Concentration • Rclation\h1Pf> • LO\.'C Emo1ions • \take friend\ • Be A Sui.:~s~ in Rclation~hir\ • Sport\ • Bu\incu. We'll \how you hO\ .. ! LEARN SELF-HYPNOSIS 250 CALL TODAY 977-2485 Nerd a Guest Spaker for your g roup? Call for information \11:.MBER HOUSTO~ PROF-ESSIONAL HYP"lOTJSTS ASSOCIATIO!'i Sometimes you get more than you're itching for. . Intimate moments can make for pleasant memories, but occasionally, something a lot less pleasant lingers as well­crabs, for example. Now there's RID,• a liquid treatment that kills crabs in 10 minutes and provides rapid relief of 1tchmg. RID contains a safe, medically proven natural ingredient at al­most twice the concentration of the leading non-prescription product Each package also includes an in­struction brochure and fine -tooth comb for lice and nit removal. You can buy RID at your pharmacy without a prescript ion and begin treatment at once. But remember, 38% of the people with crabs have been found to have something worse, like VD So if you think you may have been exposed to something more than crabs, see a doctor. RID ~Safe, effective treatment for crab•. Pflpbamacs. Owt.ton ~ Plzl'r Inc N .. 111 'l'Ol'k. :-.i~111 Yo.ii 10017 SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 For six centuries, witches have withstood fear, misunderstanding and persecution. We have developed spells, potions and meditations that have helped us to survive and to be proud. Bell, Book and Candle offers a wide variety of candles, incenses, potions, books, cassettes and classes, plus personalized instruction that have helped many to stand tall and to be happy. You are invited to stop and browse, to ask questions and to pick up a free love spell. We accept Visa & MasterCard. Another Woman's Alternative 523 Lovett, Houston Maryanne Mahoney and Mata Bari Entertaining Every Fri. & Sat. Evening SPECIAL GUEST APPEARANCE MARTHA TURNER S unday, S ep t. 12, 8 to 12 HAPPY HOUR 4-7 TUES-FRI WELL DRINKS 2 FOR 1 BEER 85~ Live DJ 4 nights a week Marquerite at the piano for Happy Hour Wednesday-Friday We're open 6 days a week for your rinking & dancing pleasure (closed Monda (713) 523-3396 28 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat SEPT SEPT 3 4 SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT 5 6 7 Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: lnteract's Commu­ruty Coffeehouse 7::J0pm· midnight. 3-105 Mulberry •FRIDA Y:~ontroae Sports Bowling boats Texas Roll Off Tournament registration at El J's, 1213 Richmond, Bpm •FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •FRIDAY-SATURDAY: Gay Softball World Series in San Francisco continues •SA TURDA Y-SUNDA Y: Montrose Sports Bowling hosts Texas Roll Off Tournament at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain, etarting noon. both days •FRIDA 1'-SUNDA Y: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Franciac-, .o::ontinue •FRIDAY-SUNDAY: lntei<­rity International Convention in New Orleans continues •FRIDAY-SUNDAY: Texas Gay Conference in Houston •SA TU RDA Y: ''Tubs for Two Thousand" benefit for Montrose CoWlseling Center and Kapo­si's Sarcoma Committee at Mid· towne Spa, 3100 Fannin •SUNDAY: Montrose Sports Bowling hosts Texas Roll Off Tournament banquet & awards at Brazoo River Bottom, 2400 Brazoe, 8pm -SUNDAY: Montrooe Sports Tennis, 10:30am, MacGregor Park 9MONDA Y: Labor Day 9MONDA Y: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain •TUESDAY: Montroee Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, llOl Taft •THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain 8 9 •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm·midnight on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN I WEEK: Midwest Gay & Lesbian Convention in Chi· ca go. Sept. I ().11 •IN 2 WEEKS: .3rd Annual Gay American Arte Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, la•ting to Oct. 10 •IN 2 WE."EKS: Colt 45s hold Country/Western. Carnival. Bpm. September 18, 2400 Bra· zoa, a benefit for Gay Switch board, Neartown Association, Autistic Children and Kapoai's Sarcoma Committee •IN 2 WEEKS: Montrose Sports Association Monday night bowling league begins winter aeuon Sept. 20, Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmam •IN 6 WEE'KS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference and "Discover "82" exhibition and workahops Oct. 8-IO, Con­rad Hilton Hotel, Chica~o •IN 6 WEEKS: !st Annual Conference of National Lesbian/Gay Pride C<'lehmtion Coordinators in Boaton, Oct. 9-11 9/N 6 WEEKS: Columbus Day, Oct. 11 9/N 6 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America' national convention in Houston, Oct. 15-17, Americana Hotel, 3301 Southwest Fwy. •IN 8 WEEKS: Weatheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 •IN 8 WEEKS: Halloween weekend, Oct. 29-31 ~~~ ~ WEEKS: Elections, Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 Murphy's ManoruyKuurtErichoen BUSI Ness oWNiAS t t) w. 1111 ''"-=~ wee11 in th .. drrectooy (•) bu.,~ •lllbl,.htner1t1 ..,....,ng a dis..-.ibuhon pomt:a tor lhe ""*AP•P91', (b) current d1Splay adv9rt~r1, (Cl •II Houston gay bats I pttHleciuM (lo rt he benefit of Ollt-OI· '"""'" v•s.lor.~ and (dl no.,...ptolrt community Ol'Q.ll'llHllOf'IS e1i1dk'it .. MontroM Y01ce d61h1buUon point. DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Heights duplex, large 2 bed­room, cent air, security. Available 20th on 1st come basis. Call Jenny, 880-1869. Responsible GWM 30+ tL share Med Center area $200, bills paid, dep­osit. Call Tony 523-2372 noon~ 10pm R<nPoM• e roomrn11t• ••ntad IO share k• 2 =bed:ro com::.: 2 Datht apt 10 m•""1ft 'rom dov<n· "Z':.~~':"1~;,11~Tr:. IOPf*', 622-0868 I-eave "*Mg(! I "lO ilf'llW., Memorial/Shepherd. Furnished small efficiency. $150 and electric Modern. beautiful furnished effl· ciency $250 with bills paid. 861- 3030-Morada. Gay ma1e exec Jt1ve ptof"' >flat ..,.1y 30s, d•ir• IUCCftalul 19&biain profe111on.t c.'"' woman 10 share lu11urtOUI 2BRl2-ctr ~1ge town"°""9 near SW Fwy & H1llcrott & Loop Root>, POB 36174. ti<>ust?n.. TX 7"'231 North MOti1rote - 111•Pllol' ..... 1n 4ple• near WauQh & W oaitu Nal remodeled $375 mo 111 moNh 1 r•rtl 112 lul IN>f'llh 1 & S 187 50 NCU~ depos11 C.U 01v1Ci, 529-0142 =OM~rose~ ~~ .': ':'b.7.:'i~li mo 1stmonrtf1r.,,1 i'?1a11monlft1&S28750 security deposit C1ll D•vtct 526-0142 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Pianist needed: mature, over 40? Who knows how to tickle the ivory from the or dAys w1thg love. Call 757-9978. Leave message. Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 GAY BARS IA I HOUllOll T1Vem Qi. ~ ~mbeo" no_ p11c.<t 1n tr><S directory •I """r req..-1 •aACCHUS -SriiM1.:52>3iee-JWW.1., t1•nment See our ad elsewhere this issue eaAJA'l~lf~- ..... ,,,.; rntau· rant. 11'19 entert11nmen1 See our ad elsewhere this issue The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice e ABA .. N-710 P1crf1e-5:z&.-9'°27 coun~ See our ad elsewhere this issue Montrose Classified Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 1°' P9I" regu11r word or t5C PER ALLCAPi'TAL WORD trt &-paint type. H lhoW!I h9fe. Ill u11ng few wordl Jn this s•ze 0< 11 eent1t1ng on 1 hl"I• compute 1180$1 hne. using maximum 7 regul1r WO<dl Of 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to I Im•) 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in ·~-point type, as shown here. {If lJslng few words 1n this !!lize or if centering on a hne, comp1..1te at $1 50 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a lino.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10--point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) SOC per regular word or 75¢ PEA ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, aa 30C per reguter word or 45• PER 1hown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8--polnt word• In this size or If cen­~ d type, H shown here. (If using tewwordslnthlulzoorlfconterlng terlng on a line, compute at on 1 line, compute et $1 .50 1 lino, $2.00 a line, using maximum u1lng mHlmum 4 regul1r words or 3 regular word• or 2 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to 1 llno.) CAPITAL WORDS to a llne.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the ~r line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lowf'r case words, and regular and bold "°ord.8, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each wurd individually. You may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $.1 per claasified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can ht> a88igned for $2 per week extra. Run the acme claasified 4 weeks in a row and dedurt 15%. I.f rour c.~assi~ is lengthy. you may want to consider running a . display. ad imotead. Call our advertising sale8 dt!partment for mformahon. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sh.et of paper. Include your name, atJd.ress, check and SJgnature, and mail or brmg it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #.106, Houston, TX 77006. Ads received by 5:30pm Tuesday will be in that week's newspaper ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. Sorry, but we cannot bill and cannot accept cla88ifieds over the phone. •BRAzoS RIVER BOTTOM Z•OO BratOI 52&-9192· country eBfUM PATCH--mi W Holc0mbe--il8$. .. ,. See our ad elsewhere this issue e CHAsEs---1•16 Aocnmotid-5~1&48.- d..co •CHICKEN COOP -filWelihe<rner SM- 22'-0 See our ad elsewhere this issue •COPA -ze31 -R,chmo~2si" diaco With ahoW$ See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~~:=Ni2 s stieP"h.d-52.i:0i70 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations e THE DEEP-2212 Converse-528-8234 •DIFFERENT DfltUM - 1732 W9lthe1mer- - 52&- 8528 MN!ther See our ad elsewhere this issue • ~DIRTY IAlLY'I 220 Avond111e 629--7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue eDOUBLE flt SALOON--5731 Kirby·-521-1'-« See our ad elsewhere this issue e l/J'1-121J Rictirnortd-527-9071 See our ad elsewhere this issue e i"eX1iE= 1011- Ben-es.0.Si c®nt-;;-- Support, join your community organizations •OALUON =-230:3Rldimond-522---:Js18 see our ad elsewhere this Issue e GAv-aOY1NTERNATtONAL (G B.1.)-1411 Rlchmond--528-8903 eQRANT-ITRHT ITATION-11_1_ Fli,.;1ft...: 52&-8342 See our ad elsewhere this Issue •HAPPY TRAILi -115 Fairvlew-521-2712 See our ad elsewhere th is issue •HOLE HOUH- 108Tlnm-=s22-e11e See our ad elsewhere this issue • JR.,_ -aoe Pacitie·-521-2511 e JUsi MARION & -i:-v-NN~FlirYiew-= 528-1110 laiabolrt e KEYBOARD- 'i512 "4111m--521-e988 P•ll'IO 9"1191"1•• _., Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice •K INDRED IPIRITI 5245 Bullalo Speeewey 665-9756. preoorrun1ntty lelboan See our ad elsewhere this issue e ;.AMPOST 2417 T1met Blvd -52a-iw2 .... boan • LAZY J :-312 Tuam- sl&-9343 • LOADING DOCK- 17~ wffth11mer-S20- 1018 IH!net" OliteO • •MARY'S 1022 w .. ttistmet-528-8851 See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice e,"'41D~1TE Sl!N 534 W•tne1mer-l.26-7S19 (11~1nowa e MISS CHARLOTTE'S-911 W Orew-52&­,=.~ .~.f ~Ml~N~IN~G~CO~_..,.=.~.~ .,~ ,~--~,,._~ • NuM•E"I 2 3oO Wnth11m1r 52e~551 ·-See our ad elsewhere this issue e OFFICER'l°CLiJe -2101 Albliny_:523:.o&;i See our ad elsewhere this issue e0Ne0N0NE'--10li""w Gray- -528-8503 ePtNK t:LEPHANT-=1218iee1aiid--65S:00..0 W1lh,'10- See our ad elsewhere this issue •RAN-CH- --6620• t Mll(l-528-8730 • RASCALS :-2702 Ki"rbv-524~72: -.,..,th r•­t11. ir1n1. live entertamment See our ad elsewhere this issue Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month in the Voice e TWINS-535 W•lhtltm« 520-0244 '-tM•n "i"V"E'N rURE~-2923 M• .... -s22-0X1C1 ORGANIZAtlONS A CAPELLA Chorut part )f (MonttOM) Church olChr11t AClU--1236 w Gr1y~s24="5925 AMERICAN-LEATHERM6i(.oc11I club)~ meet1 II Orf19fe<'ll Orum. 17:}2 W•theomer- 528-8528 c 1b night Wed Houston's leading gay pub­lication is the Voice ~~fo R••n~ A•l••nc•-52•-4793 '"°'qe & eERi"NG M1inor1at Metf'lod'lt -Ch°U•cn-1..ci Hawthorn9--~1011 Ur11ted Methodist wOf­• h•p Hl'VICe 10 50am Sun BElWEENTWOWOtlcil- -52j::-19-13 mMtl~ other Thllfl BLACK &-WHITE MEN Together jBW"4Tl·-52i- 5008. 14Mll12 fMot!lrOM) CHURCH OFCHRIST-~K W•t ~;--m-9298 w0f"Sh1p Mr'YlOM 12 30pn- CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FAITH-413W•thet- ~.z~:=n-:e: ~~ndy" ::'"J ~.,,'~!: chotr P!'._Kll09 w~ ev~~- The Voice has more news, more Houston advertising, more Houston readers C1r1zeNSFOR- HUMAN eOUAL1fY cHE:1. 609F11nmnl1301-230-9666 boardmMfi~2nd Tu•day1 COLT-45--:S (1oc11TC~bT-meet1 •I Braz.ct Royer Bottom. 2400 Brazo•-528-9192 •C6MMUN1Tv------COFfEEHousE--proiect ol l/H Im;; 7 30pm frld1y1 II 3405 Mulberry CONG AYTZ CHAY1M-m .. 111t MCCR. 1iii Oecalur-552-1340, 8N-1997 IMfVk:tl & IOC•ll 15Pm2N:I &•th fri01y1 CONRoiiREA G.V-wOmen-:7~ CArS1SHOrLINE:.:..22a-1506 --- ~:~~ff_z~~l;;f;:222 Pfoieci oi (fay Voice Comics - Just don't let the lasers hit you SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 29 Dateline S.F. Your Turn: Occupational Hazards Cl982 by Randy Alfred Six weeks ago, I asked for your contributions to this specialized pun form. To wit, if lawyers are disbarred and clergy are unfrocked, what about ... ? Walter Ems answered: quiltmakers are dispatched, mathemati­cians disfigures or decimated, housing officials quartered, munitions makers canonized, undertakers decoffinated (ouch!), designers with­drawn, internists disorganized. surveyors distracted, psychics dispi­rited, candlemakers snuffed out, postal workers unzipped, fisherpeople debated, and travel agents detoured. Darryl Forman also checked in with those last two, as weH as: poets are diversified, auesors defined, storytellers detailed, farmers unseeded, carpenters unhinged, teachers declassified, cashiers unchanged, mimes disquieted, collection agents debilitated, damage­~ laims lawyers distorted, prospectors declaimed, waiters deserved, judges disappointed, fraternity brothers dismembered, bobsledders deluged, and druggies both deluded and disjointed. Jim Thomas of Denver also though dope dealers are disjointed. He added: bookkeepers are discounted, accountants disfigured, mapmak­ers dislocated, musicians decomposed. and hotel managers dislodged, Neil Woodward of Denver seconded Thomas on hotel managers and Forman on deluded druggies. He added politicians are devoted, com· posers denoted, actors departed, elementary shcool teachers degraded, and drag queens unruffled. Art Jusak doubled Woodward on politicians, and Ray Frisby thought the same of school teachers. Jueak added, magicians are disillusioned. Frisby also pointed out, electricians are defused. Charles E. StillweJl of Houston answered: grammarians are declined, ski instructors disinclined, ooamet<>logists defaced, and geologists defaulted. • Stephan Martin thought cashiers are t111ttgistered, orthodontist.a unbraced, and bag ladies sacked, of course. Mark Joplin noted, tailors are unsuited and male prostitutes hustled out. On the other hand, according to Arthur Morris, reformed winos are bummed out. Tim Clow though archaeologistsaredeboned, and John Keenan figured truck drivers are downgraded. Stillwell expressed his hope that the invenl<Jr of this game, Lau· rence Urdang, "suffer great punishment in the hereafter for infecting innocent people with the sickne88 of craving specialized puns­preferably, he will have to lieten to a recitation of all of them ever devised." That's unlikely, for, as Frisby wrote, joke makers go unpunished. Olympic irony 1: The same edition of the San Francisco Examiner which bore the page-one news that a federal judge had ruled that the Gay Olympic Games could not use the word. Olympic, carried on page two an item about the Fourth Intematinal Transplant Olympics in Athens. That event is for recipients of kidm.y transplants Organizers of the Gay Bleep Games had argued th t t'1e U.S. Olym· pie Committee discriminated in allowing such even'-lll as the Police Olympics and the Special Olympics, but not the Gay Olympics. Olympic irony 2: The Gay Bleep Games are ineilSting that phot<r grapher H. Grant cease sales ofhia Gay Olympic Games poster bear­ing a photo of a male torso wearing a T-shirt with the three-circle logo of the gay games. Michael R Evans, attorney for the games, said that group commissioned and paid for the logo, and "if we own anything, we own the three interlocked discs." No so, said Grant. There ie no trademark or copyright notice on the shirt the games people are selling: 11It'1 in the public domain.'' Non­etheless, Grant intends to take the poster off the market and issue another poster as a response. Evans said the gay games people object only I<> the commercial use of the logo, since the post.er sells for $10, none of which goes I<> the gay games. He said it's a good poster and they'd like to license it rather than atop it. Grant said the gay games peope went to their lawyer before going to him: "That's exactly what the U.S .Olympic Committee did I<> them. They used a hammerlock where a handshake would have worked. This seems so heavy-handed and without grace. I think they should have welcomed it as advertising for their event." Compounded irony: Grant, it so happens, is the architect of San Francisco's new Muni Metro subway stations at Civic Center, Van Ness, Church Street, and, yes, Castro Street. (When he designed the stations in the mid-608, the Castro neighborhood was not yet out of the closet. "Neither was I," Grant said.) His Castro logo for the station has appeared on T·shirts. "I could have registered it, but the logo hao passed ink> the public domain," Grant not:ed.. "I kicked myslef for not seeing its potential, but I've got no hard feelings for the people who did." Compunded relationsb ip: Grant i• also the lover of Toby Marotta, 1uthor of Sona of Hauard and The Politics of Homosexuality. The :>08!.er for and paperback edition of the latter feature an H. Grant photo of Marotta in the Castro aubway station. 30 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3 , 1982 " Do you know me? I have to deal with lion1, wolves, and 1aber toothed tigen ... That's why I carry one of THESE." " Uh-oh, Lonaine . . . Someone Hem• to be checking you out." Gary Larson \ Thing• that go bump in the night. " Hey! Hey, you idiolll The train has stopped! ... COme on down from there!" " Mom! Dadl ... The nose fairy left me a whole quarter!" DIANA ffiuNOAT10N· -2700 Muon-=S2•-s1i1 01GN1TY----ai"Caih011c-St~ 1703 Bolao'ltef-520-9209. 52&-7844 meet•ng• ?£"IS.~".~ Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 FAMIL v & -FR1ENDSOt il9Y•· -464-6e63 meets 2pm 3fd Sunclllyl •I Community CollMhoUM ~Mui~,,, _______ _ FIRST UNIT ARIAN Ctlurcti-5210 F•nnln-526- a~-~E:;;JT~~~~;~:-;;; F•~Awuy Fnen0.-821-9681 GAY! ALIVe-·stiar.nQ-bperi9nce (GAsf) 528-1311. 528-0891 The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice GAV ARCHIVES ot"'T. ..... pro,.ct oflrit9'iet Gi.ft A.THEisY-(Ngi;.0t-An-1ce-5.24-i'222 n•hort•l convention Oct tS-17. Amencan11 Hotel. 3301 Southwest Fwy . Houston GAYH1sPAN1CcAucus-=-2122Ne;m•"112:= 52Hl037 ~· lfd Tttu™'ey1 GAYfTAltANGroup-526-9844 ___ _ GAVNURsES & PHvsteiANS-01Hou1!0n-<IO GPC-521-1000 J 0Av POliriCALCAuCusfoPCi-roe '56684 j':;; ~:11~r w':-'~4 eOO Mein #217 ONLY the Voice saturate~ Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations GAYSWITCH80ARD-: :s~ --- ~~~='~:-~~~~~~?r~~P~:~=~ MonttOM VOIC:e. SpMOy Printing. Spud-LJ...llh, Tr~ITedltr.....i~ HEPATirus HOTL1NE:Pfoitct of GPC"• Medt­cal Commrtt....-621-1000 HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Alll1nc• 729 Manor --523-e918 Support, join your community organizations Hau11on ArM GAY& LESBIAN~ Sc11n11111- ·52fl-73H· m11tt 7pm 4th WedM9drf9 HOusrON COMMUNITY CL6WNS-=i62=--e31· HOUSTON oATA-PROFess16NA.Ls-mMtlln EHi Room. Hohd1y Inn Centr1I, 4640 South M11n-S2J-t922 meithng 7 30pm 2nd TuMday1 .H.o.U. sroN HUMANFffoHTSleAGUE-= :S23= HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CL"l.1e-c10 M1,Y·l- 1022 W•IMl~-528-8861 HOu11on-rAviRN-GUil6:-·m;,t*i ,;-, aliri Dirty S1lty'1. E•1!1. fobry'1. M1dn111 Sun l/H Tnc.:-3'os Multi.rry-~~694-1732 Comrnur11ty CotteehouN 7:~pm-midmght Fr• bo1rd meeting 7 30pm 111 Thur1day1 (v1r~ 1oc1uon1) , educ111on11 lorum 7 30pm 3rd Thurtdl~ fNTeG"AlrVIHou1ton (formerly EP'ilcO'P11 ~~'lJ-.:~·~~~ ~~~u.=:4•'"­~~? t!w;~~~~f~~~i ~H Inc: Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice . K-PFfR1d•o. fM-~-<t19 Lo....tt-B!vd :SM. 6000 ""W•lde 'o 61 .. 0· gay radlO snow 10pm­mtdo1~ Tho!! LAMBDA ALANON~-1~ Church. ~10 F•oo10-52Hl772 meetmg Fri. ewn1ng l-ESBIANS-a GAY p{QP\..f In Medici~- 4790 meeting 7 30pm 1st S11urd8ys LUTHERANS-CoNCERNEo---::----;-; Grsc• Luttlersn Church. 2515 Waugh-521--0863. 453- 1143 meehng 2nd & •th Tu• evening• METROPOLITAN CommuoliYChufch 01-ttle Ruurrecuon (MCCR)-1111g Oecstur-881- !1!! ro'4~~ ~~::>~n S~t j ~~1 ~:;-, membenh1p ~oquirers cl.UI 7 30pm Mot\. , Al1noo meel1og tlpm Moo. Alcoholics Anonym­ou1 meet•rog 8pm Mon & Ttlurs There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice MONTROSE CIVIC C...b INMrtown)· -ll'IMI• II a.mg Churdl. 1440 H1w1t1Qrne- -s22-1000 l'IMtltlg '30pm 41h Tu.d1y1 MONTROSE CllN!C 04- Wntheom.r:...m. ~ ~ !10pm Fri f·~ Suo . 8-10pf"I\ lr.40NTR0Sf. COUNSELING Ceriter- -9001.ove« • 102- -529-0037 MONTRQC E SINGERS- -"'"'•It MCCR 111\i Oee.lur---.AaS.'>!>50 MONTROSE SPORTS ASsc>CiATION-tMSAl­"' 2_.,.. MonlroM Sl)OfU BOWLING- pl1ya 11-Slldium Be>wl, S?OO Bf161m11n-960-1518. 981-1523 g1m• MOtl & Thurs (l'leo1no~_ Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month in the Voice t.A<)rltroM Spotll SOFTBALL ·5n-aeoi eta-ii ~)-0413 ...,. G1y Sotlbell World Ser• 1t1 Sin Frl!lClSCO Aug 31 · S9J:il 4 ~.:~·~:Cf7~1 WOMEN 5 SfilTBALL MonttoH Sports 'if.NNIS ---624-2151 ""'on-,ro..- s.;or1-. VOilEve-... u- --881)..293Ci gamee 7 lOpm Tu. Gritg0ry-Lmco1n tcnool. 1101 hft M0NTR0sESYMPHi5N1C blind- m.ets at S­ing Ct'lurch. 1440 Hawttlome--527-llM8 !TIMI· 1ng 7 30pm Tuet MUSTANGSj;(;;1al club)-meelS 1t the Barn 710 Ptc1!1c-528-9427 club night Thurs OPERATION-- oocuMeNrArtON Pro"teci of GPC RECREATIONA-l.""'lind .. Fund Comrnlltff- ~~~~:v~ri~1:1:~~~-..- ,-....-G-,ou- p--524- 0724 rEXAs BAY~ ARE.i Gays- 332-3737 mHttng Thurt ftlnlng lei<A5GAYC6NFERENCE IX- eei-7231 con­lerence S9pt 3-5. Agnet Ar~ Hall, UnW.rslty ol Houston teXA!foAYrASKFORce s21t-ro1•_s22-1_&59 TEXAS "1-ti.JMANRIGHrs Found11i0n=1s1ii Maryland-·526-9139 TeX.AS FuDERs- c:10 Mary·•. 1022 W•lhet­,,,. _~1951 UNITARIANIUNIVeRSAL1Sr Gay Caucu1-c10 11! UMafl1n Church, 5210 Fannin- 520-9787. 52&-5&4? mM!tng 3td Sun. afternoons wESlAYAN_F_ELLOWSHIP-184-1819 WESTHEIMf:11fC6i:'6NY AAi~ llOI WHthelmer- 521-0133 laU l•tv•al Oct ,. 17 PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS W•nt 1 tut, dirk tin? It's as easy as taking a plll. Safe, non­toxic 80 tablets, $29.95 ppd. Check, MC, Visa MAIL WAREHOUSE PO 8011 53395 (713) 523-6927 Houlton. TX 77052 13305 Vupon, suite 54) Tired o.f being overweight? Lose it once and for all with a complete & affordable diet, exercise and counsel­ing program I guarantee will work. Call Jim at 552-1641 for details. Sweetish massage in your home. $25. Call Tony 523-2372 noon-8pm. Rubdownlnyourhome. even1ngs~ .oos (10em-1am), S20 Rubdown at my pt.ce. deys (10.m-3pm) , $15 Cell Ven, 493-4860. B10lh)'lhm Ch1rU Plan your deity acti'lrti411 In hetmony w•th your b10rhy1hm1 to ev01d human errors end confrlct• on crltJc.111 blof')'lhmlc d•Y• each month Ch•r1• show p.-.c1H blOrtl)'lhm =u-:"'~::l~~r1J~~~~fOfYEll~~~to~:: ctlert S7 50 100 d•Y• $12.50 s.t1d name eddr ... dliteof blr1h (1ndt1meofblr1h II known) with en.ck or mOMy order to DataDey ComPIJ· ter SeNICel Co . P 0 Box 27845. Houston. TX 7722.7 CLASSICAL PIANO/ SINGING. Professional teacher. 723-3254 OWM. warm. pro1.•2: "1:iolb. a ......... GWM 25-'4). OP. FA Send pox, pMn4I number. ed 47·A. clO MonltOM Vo.c. L.lt~ J;:u~uatom made F1mng1 by app01ntment C.JI ~ FOR- AN~ iTM6PSHEREOt 90C•ll variety and :!n":'tf.p~~~=!\.=~~~-:~1;.~~ "" BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 Relax and enjoy the BodyWorks massage. Gitt certificates. Call Bill, 526-2470 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e BOX OFFICE· ·1825 RtehrtlOn<l · -$22-1825 m11e _ --~· ___ _ •e c•lu ,e., .iHeO UITON Bath•-2205 ,..,,,..,n--&50-­See our ad elsewhere this issue. 9 FRENCM OuARlfR Thell!•- -32ill LOU .... ena - 521-<1782 rnaltl __ _ eMIDTOWNE. IPA -3100 Fannill- 522-2319 '"8~ our ad elsewhere this issue • zJOeClue 2106G.,....H. :52a.&15. ma1e RESTAURANTS e•AJA'I 402 Lovett ·· 527-lil868 See our ad elsewhere this issue e 8RA55ERtf T00--:.-1322-w•i.;;.Mr.-5~ Q365 -·- i CHAPui.TAPEC-: s13 Richrnond- 522-~ ,• .., ,... .. N KIE"l - MQl'lt r";". . -.. we.fhe,n:;- 5No See our ad elsewhere this issue e GREEK 1SlAN0-002iuaM~~-7o.W° •OYRO OYAOI Sa"CIW •Cll s 11o p--1-SJ W•l'-'met· ~41M See our ad elsewhere this issue e HARRAR I -£ ih1op1en Cu1s1ne- • 21 W• th.,rner-526-2895 See our ad elsewhere th is issue e H0NG- THON0· ·•2• W•IN•rnet-528-8275 e HOu SE6F -P IES~:..3112K,r bv - 52&-3a1s - • INTERNATIONAL ·cr~b Reste UITTi~ ~.3 Westh.,mer- 523-27116 See our ad elsewhere th is issue • JADE DRAGON-: ·224 WestM•mer= 5:z&:M83 e KOUNTI'IY KITCHEN -Kirby itS vi Fwy.::. 52().7248 See our ad elsewhere this Issue • il"ERS~ ~1303 W9.th81mef::52&-8823- . 0M ... R·s-=-s0e LMtt:..=-5-J"a.-3569 - e JiOoR DADOY'l -·3'1i w-o.tti.~52&-8922 See our ad elsewhere this Issue eRAICALl- ·2702 t<•rby - 524..f.272 See our ad elsewhere this issue e RA UL·s· BRASS- RU·B~4W Alabllme· -5~27 • sPVO:-U..l1t<E-_.1s-w.91"9ime7-=5~4 e siAR i'tUA -2111 NorlOiil=i~- See our ad elsewhere this issue. e sTEAt< N' EGG-4231 Mon1n»e-52'r-1135 e TIM·s cOttM-sh";:,~Uth.-;;r;--52&- 22911 e w1Ni sELi:ER :-'." 1'°9 W•lheo'"8'" 52&-3871 SERYICES LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nonette Bruct<ner, P1ychotogl1~ 523-2180. ...,I! Rul-ty- 330Fiiurv'iew ·-524-1171 See our ad elsewhere this issue Dl!:LUll AENOVATION-524-0038 See our ad elsewhere this issue OlllONEA'8 ROOM afte'fe~• W•lt181met- -522-7108 See our 1d elsewhere this issue • FITNESS EXCHANGE ht,,... C..01 ... - 3307 Alcilmond-524-1932 5'M...N..C.,1.1 CO'i ~ selon-·901 Rdirnond- See our 1d elsewhere this issue HAIRWU.Vl!Rl- -12005 P0.10aiitRd M20: 522-3290 See our ad elsewhere this issue e HAUtLINIRI ha ir repla cement- ·7 10-A Hawthorne-520--7730 See our 1d elsewhere this Issue eHooSToN GUEST HOusE lodg•ng-1oe A'londele- 520--9787 e lcfNH(fwER euuty s c h o ol-"327 W•ttleun.,- 52().7972 e Kw1K-KALl Mail8011e.-331~ 522-1198 I iiiG!N01 · Heir - 69S1Dt1- 90e weiihe+mer 52NJ188 See our ad elsewhere this issue .iL..i.o. Nf:L Ha. r· O..ign· l220 V011ku"' -:s2&= There's more Montrose sports covqrage in the Voice •MONTROH TRAVl!L ·2SOI Aalph -·522· 1747 See our ad elsewhere this issue •MONTROll:. VOICIE- rwwspaper-J3!7 M0n­lroH •306· ·5a-M90 more Houston advertising, more Houston readers PATRiCiA ANNE" o:~f ... ,:.j[ •ttorneY=m3 Yoakum- 52&-71111 • PRIVATE .. POSTAL svsiEMS-;;;;r-bOkft' 1713 WMthelmtr--529-3020 ' ow.i1n-DENTAL- CA-Ri --2315SW F w;-- 523-2321 See our ad elsewhere this Issue JIM REED, locksm•th- 1820 CornmonwMith- 523-29:27 .R,IV.l!.R_ OA KI O"ICAL..:1'47w Grey 1101- See our ad elsewhere this Issue e SALONDANiEL heor care-1629 Cher,:Y: hur.t- 520--9327 Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month in the Voice Houston's leading gay pub­lication is the Voice ~VIEL TIECH tre~e11gency . ·5719t<l;by .. 522- See our ad elsewhere this issue UNITED CAe .. 6$4."404Q =See our ad elsewhere this issue "J,~~t~~:~~••I•. ad.,.er1°;1ng See our ad elsewhere this Issue SHOPS & STORES UA,URt~ITURf Cet !tll' 11J16 W· 531'9600 See our ad elsewhere this issue 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e AlL·S:fAR Adult News 1407 R1cilmond 528-8400 i AlL THAT G LITTER S g 1 1ts-432:5 ~tr0..- 522--8976 e RtCHARD ALLEN F.0r111- 1MS W•lheirne;_:_ 5~-- The Voice has more news, more Houston advertising, more Houston readers e AQUATIC 1SLE pet shop-2011 SW Fwy.­ ·- e ASYlUM Adult 8ooht0t...-1201 Richmond • BALL PA-RK- M~ti -eoOklt~l~WA:i;: bom• e BASIC BROTHERS cloth lng - 1220 Wlalharner - 522-1628 elED HOUU-~2-11~5~N-o<l-olk---,-n-.1278 See our ad elsewhere this issue 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e BLUE 1RIS-361S S. Shepherd- 523--1827 e BOOM TOWN BLOOMS nower.-3210 S SMpherd-5~110 -----~ ~u~~~~'~':~~.,~~ Fine e CAAGO HOUSE- 1802 Park-~ e CONE OANCEWEAR-4704 ~ 1973 e COMPANV 8 military wur- 5386 W•lheimet-IM-1753 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 e..D..IN ER"S Adult ~-240W. .l hllunet· ~5* • DOUBRAVA JONES. thre Manhole clotM1g- 1ae3 w Grey-522-1Cll8 e OOWNBEAT Reoords- 2117 R~ 8348 e ciRAMATIK/. g.~, Voekum- 528-5457 e FACETS g1 rtl.:.:..1412Wnth-..~- S23="1•12 The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice • FRAME OF REFERENCE fram lng-1533 W• tn.tmer-S20-0710 .e.F.R. IOAY'S Flo,.•t- 1338 Westhelmer- 524· iilTA-iJ-91-;y:.-N0-3579 See our ad elsewhere this issue e t<IRBV Newstand-3115 Kirby- 620--0246 • MONTROSE JEWELRY end Loan- 1211 ~e:i~-~5841 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations • OH BOYi Leet.her Goodl-t12 wl91heiwMr- 524'7959 e ONE MORE TIME reseJe bout1cp. .1 e-140S Cehlom•e-523--5551 e Pl.ANT HOUSE-112 W•tJte•mer-~7715 ~~W .. theomer- 527-9044 Suppolt, join your community organizations e RECORO RACK mus•c- 31095 SnePh«d­' 24-3802 •JtOUGH CUT Jewelry-520 WMU\e1,M;:...5zo,. 1000 See our ad elsewhere Ihle issue e52lH._O..E.. WAREH0\.11(:...2024 Westhelm..-- See our ad elsewhere this issue • SPORTS LOCKER clothlng .. 311 wt..t•hit. mer-520--6655 e STUOZAdurt News- 1132W Alllblll'le e TEXAS CARAVAN I ArmMfi lo Flowft._2115 Dunllwy- 520--7019 • T1MELESs TAFFETA C10lh1n 8 .- 1isii w.1,,.,,,.,--52t-e298 itTOTAUTYSTORE=-1121 w- Gr.Y~11IO Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice • TREYMAN g•tt•~ WHttte.mer--~~~­. e.U.N..tO.N.- JACKCiOtfuri'Q-12;2- w•t"'•rner­. -WESTH-fiMERFLii MARl(Ef - 1733 WMll_l!t_~ There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ewiLoE_&. STEI N- boci"-;;---eo2W •tn;.. 52t-7014 gay TRAVEL KNOXVILLE WORLD'S FAIR Eleanor Guest House. rooms from $28.50. (8151 523-5831 SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 I MONfROSE VOICE 31 Fortunes By Tycbo F<N Fridq •VMin9. September 3, through Ffldey ltv'en ing. September 10. 1982 The Moon 1s in PISCES as the weekend ODens. enters ARIES at 6:25 p.m a.m. Saturday evening, passes into TAURUS at 12:28 a.m. Tuesday morning and f nlers _GEMINI at 4:58 a.'!'. Thursday morning, staying there until the following Saturday morning, Sept. 11 ARIES- Your fantasies are fantastic, and that can be fun. But don't try to tum a very real pedon into one of your dream figures, just because that's what you think you want. Concentrate on seeing others as they really are. TAURUS-Go for it! An unusuaJ combination ofbUBineBB and p)ea. sure could create a situation that gives you what you strive for. Don't let your stubborn streak cause unnecessary problems, though. Be kind to Virgos and Scorpios. GEMINI-You're going to find out what friendship is for. Whether it's an old friend or a new one, a casual or a best friend, something special is gOing to happen for the two of you together, and bring you closer than you've ever been. CANCER-Those new beginning• th'a t were getting under way last month are causing some unexpected. changes in the way others see you. A feeling of confidence, suttty, and down-right sexiness could make some of your dreams come true. LEO- Jn your sign thi1 wttk: Vtnua (leaues Tuesday afternoon). Expectation breeds fruetration and forgetfulness. Calm down, cool off. The summer heat is really getting to you. If you don't take it as it comes, something too weird for words could happen. VIRGO-Jn your aign this week: Venua (enters Tuesday afternoon) and the Sun. It's your party, and you can cry (or la uah) if you want to. In other words, you're going to be the center of a Jot of attention, and emotionally, that could be a topsy.turvy time. Cry when you're aad, laugh when you're happy. LIBRA-In yor:.r sign this week: Mercury, Saturn and Pluto. Your mind is working overtime on all those pieces you have to put together. Just when life is feeling like the world's biggeBt jigsaw puzzle, eome­one or something from the past shows up to point out the miaing part. SCORPIO-Jn your sign thiau;eek: Mar•ondJupiter. You are ambi­tious, aren't you? Join that ambition to a powerful creative urge, and the sky's the limit. Travel could be a partof thi• high-powered picture. Be sure to take you lover along! SAGITTARIUS-Jn your sign thi• week: Uranus and Neptunl!. Just when you're (eeling playful and romantic, your partner has important busine88 and very serious matters to work out. Both of you will have to do a lot of bending and some listening to get through this. CAPRICORN- Work it out! Work it in! Work is definitely the key word. Don 't let your concern with detaile blind you to the fact that there are people who can help. If you remember that. something important can be done. AQUARIUS-It's your move. Someone expects you to make the next one, too. Don't let all of life's busy stuff getin the way of what's most import.ant. Take care of business, then tak~ care of that next move. Make it! PISCES-Do it at home! Whether it's homework, housework, or home-style cooking, what you do there will turn out right. In the out.aide world, things are a bit strange. It'a a jungle out there! Be a homebody. •1•2 STONEWAll FEATUFIES SYNDICATE Last Word Labor Day Weekend 1ly Henry McClurg '~ell. It's Labor Day. That dry spell the last two months with­out any holidays nearly drive me crazy. (Don't listen to those comments that I'm Rlready crazy.) . This Labor Day, we've got the Gay World Series and the Gay "Bleep" Games going on in San Francisco. And here locally we have the big "Tubs for Two Thousand" Saturday night at Midtowne Spa. But you know what the best thing there h; about Labor Day? Yes, that's right. It's J'USt two months to Halloween . 32 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 3, 1982 THIS MONDAY SEPT. 6 LABOR DAY! VIOLA ILLS= IN CONCERT! THIS TUESDAY SEPT. 7 STRAY CATS IN CONCERT! NEXT TUESDAY SEPT. 14 MSA SPORTS ASSOC. BENEFIT l'fUI" o co c IL1Ltl -' 300 IJE5THE/l11ER HOUSTON
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