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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 027
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 027. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 027. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3330

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 027, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 027
Transcript 26 COMMUNITY FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Patricia Salvato, MD Medical Director For more information call (713)349-9750 Ed Kinser BSMI, CRS Director Kinetic Sports Our Reputation is built on OUR MEMBERS! Fimess Voted * 1 in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713)524-9932 MONTH BY MONTH NO CONTRACT! Monday to Friday 5 am - 10 pm Saturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm M Flexology EjB I byGREGHERRIA A GUIDE TO BETTER HEALTH Are you over-training? MEMBER ANTHONY RAMOS BODY BUILDING CHAMPION The body has limits. No big surprise there, right? Everyone knows that the body can only be pushed so far before something has to give. The body will often send alarms out to the brain when it is being pushed too hard: shortness of breath, intense sweating, cramps, extreme thirst and loud beating of the heart. Most people heed these warning signals and stop exercising, as well they should. Pushing your body beyond its limits can frequently cause heart attacks or strokes. Since the purpose of exercising is to improve your health, you have to know your limits, which is why aerobics instructors frequently stop at some point during the class to measure your heart rate. Ideally, when exercising you never want your heart rate to go above 70 percent to 80 percent of its maximum working capacity. Usually, if you go above that, your body will send out alarm signals. Yet there's another form of overdoing it where the body's alarm signals are not as obvious. Over-training almost seems like an oxymoron. How can you over train? The more you exercise, the healthier you'll get, right? The better conditioned? So how can you overtrain? To understand this better, it's necessary to understand a little bit about the muscular system and how it works. To simplify, muscles are made up of proteins. When you exercise the muscle, the body pumps blood to the muscle working. The blood carries oxygen to the muscle, which will convert to energy to do the work. The object of the exercise is to fatigue the muscle so much that the body will work to repair the muscle, have it grow and become stronger so the next time the work will be easier. In order for the muscle to grow and become stronger, it needs an'adequate recovery time. Working the muscle again before it has recovered from the stress of the previous exercise is counter-productive. When the muscle is in a state of recovery, it is not as strong as it was initially. The body is focusing on healing the muscle, so it is vulnerable. Putting stress on it again could easily cause an injury, like muscle fibers being torn or pulled to the point of severe pain. If you've never experienced the pain of a pulled, strained or torn muscle, consider yourself lucky. The recovery time for an injured muscle is a great deal longer than the exercise recovery period. The traditional accepted amount of time in the industry is 48 hours—two days between working out muscle groups. When you are just starting out, most trainers will put you on a full-body workout and recommend three days a week, like Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. The intensity of your workouts should also-He-token mte eotwrtlerntion. Some peo Over-training can lead to strained muscles, loss of flexibility and even reduced strength. pie exercise one or two body parts per workout; since that workout is more intense, the recovery time needed is longer, generally three days to as long as a week. ' How can you tell if you're over-training? It's actually pretty simple. The first sign is soreness and pain. The day alter a good workout, the muscles worked should be fatigued, but able to move without pain. If the muscles cannot be moved without a feeling of tightness, soreness and even pain, they've been over-trained and you need a longer recovery period. (Over-training also inhibits the flexibility of the muscle, which is also self-defeating because the tighter the muscle, the less opportunity it has for growth.) A second sign is an inability to get stronger. If your muscles aren't getting stronger, you are possibly over-training. Sometimes, over-training can cause a loss of strength, like when a weight you used previously is too much for you to handle again. A proper period of rest is crucial. You have to take care of your muscles and your body daily. I always recommend that someone who is starting an exercise program should increase their protein intake; protein is what the body uses to repair and rebuild the muscles. Massages are also important, as thev help force the lactic acid built up during exercise out of the muscles and help to keep the muscles relaxed, flexible ami supple Herren is a certified ' i professional He can be reached at ftrrfthUltiltwLciw
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