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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 022
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 022. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3325

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 022, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 CIWSSSIK > Continued from page 17 of what 1 was doing, changed and grew into something that had too much emo- tion.il weight and was too long, too big for comedy clubs," she said. The tour started out with just a few cities and has grown to include 25 stops. New cities and shows are being added every day. Cho has presented her personal life in her comedy from the start, poking fun at her Korean family and her childhood in the f laight of San Francisco of the 1970s. "My philosophy is that truly nothing is really personal. We are all living experiences that are universal, and to show them you do people a great service," she said. Cho, who began performing stand-up comedy when she was a teenage high school dropout, confesses that "1 started so young that I didn't have a clear perception of who 1 was, and 1 said yes to a lot of stuff and that caused problems." "All I knew was that 1 wanted to get out of school and out of my family and out of where I was living. I wanted to change my life," she said. Saying that "my sense of humor has helped me to survive," Cho explains that when she presents images of Asian culture, it's less about making fun than just presenting it to the world. "There's a lot of love in everything 1 do. I have respect and love for [my parents] and for my culture," she said. "Throughout my career, I've been pulling out my culture and presenting it." Cho says that when she first started performing she just did what she knew—her mother. "I began doing my mother. There has always been truth in the way that I show Asian culture," she said. Her mother takes it all in stride it seems. "She loves it. She feels like a star. She's just so happy about my career," said Cho, who was the first Asian American to be the focal star of a sitcom. "I never saw people representing me, so I always had a slight inferiority complex about what 1 was doing. For me, personal: ly, I want to inspire a younger generation of people who want to do better than me. Not just Asians, but anybody who feels that they're not represented," she said I ler performing has brought her closer to some women who she considers inspirational. She recently performed for First Lady Hillary Clinton. "We first met at the White House and she asked me to come to New York for a benefit for a fund-raiser for her Senate race. We've been acquainted for a while, and she is a hero for me, so brilliant and so lovely," said Cho. "Her and Madonna," she added. "It's sort of a joke about gay men and Madonna, but it's really not a joke. She is a cornerstone. For me and my friends, everything that she does is really important," she said. Despite her admiration for other intelligent, creative women, there has not always Ready willing and very able... to give highly skilled, professional insurance service in your neighborhood. She's an expert in planning all your insurance- auto, life, home and business. And she may save you money, too. Come in and meet her and take advantage of her broad insurance experience. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Katy Freeway @ TC Jester * Houston.Texas 77007 713-961 -9455 fax: 713-850-0856 Margaret Cho hit it off big with the audience at a gay bar in Atlanta last Sunday when she contributed live broadcasts from the bar for 'Politically IncorrectY post-game Super-Bowl show. been love in the way she looked at herself, she says. "I used to cringe and be sad about myself, but now I'd want to be my friend if 1 didn't know me. That's pretty cool," she said. She explains that an active spiritual life of meditation, healthy living and good friends has helped build this empowering self-love. "It's not about really valuing mvsel! over other people but about not being negative of myself," she said. She doesn't let the road keep her from staying in touch with all of her friends. "We hook up all over the world, and e- mail is an amazing thing," she said. These friendships and relationships provide the foundation of Cho's beliefs about her own self-love. The key to finding love for yourself comes from giving it to others, she says. "It you believe in world loving, then you can't help but to also include yourself in that, and love yourself," she said. "Once I made the connection that I had to be my own support system, sobriety was an outgrowth o\ that. It grew from that thinking." While Cho says that she would consider another sitcom if she were to have more control, for now her plate is more than full. "Everything I'm doing now is self-generated," she said. She just finished the filming of her show for cinematic release this fall. She's writing a book, working on a new show and considering a European tour. "I find it very joyful. My life is full of love," she said. I'm the One That I Want March 4 Majestic Theater Dallas www.margaretcho.net engage Chat | Personals | News | Travel | Entertainment | People # PlanetOut.com vvwvv.plarietout.ccKTi ] AOL Keyword: PlanetOut engage •* enjoy
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