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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 019
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 019. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3322.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3322

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 019, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3322.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE SOCIETY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Bringing tht World's But to Hoof loo presents Arvo PART - Fratres (1980) Ottorino RESPIGHI - Sonata (1916-1917) Sergei PROKOFIEV - Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 94bis (1944) Maurice RAVEL - Tzigane rapsodie de concert (1924) Wednesday, February 16, 2000 8:00 p.m., Jones Hall For program notes visit our website at www.spahouston org Iutrs TALK 30 minutes prior to curtain 713-227-4SPA wvm.ticketmaster.com FIESTA ■ FOIFJTS ■ KHOCtlt ticK&tmaster Locke LiDOELL8tiApt> l.i.p KITIF88.7FM ZjC Anders) £i Consultm Fun -TheAdvocate Cool Site!"-Vahoo ist inline matchmaker" -HX Magazine On Stage Shakespeare's greatest hits by D.L GROOVER Sometimes, it just doesn't pay to be the world's most famous dead dramatist, except that Shakespeare luckily doesn't have to see what contemporary playwrights do to his work. Case in point: Joe Calarco's adaptation of Shakespeare's most accessible play," Romeo and Juliet," now titled SHAKESPEARE'S R&J. The conceit in this version is that it's set to tell the story of four male students in parochial school. We know this because they wear matching school uniforms, genuflect before they begin, and recite by rote some catechism precepts and rules for living well. What we don't know is why they do this, or who they are in a poor introduction to the new setting. Calarco doesn't give his new characters any dialogue to let us know what's going on. He doesn't even give them names, only numbers. The four slink into the room almost on tiptoe, warily looking over their shoulders and putting fingers up to their mouths to shush each other, and then proceed to make enough noise to be heard in a neighboring diocese. There's much back-slapping and youthful playing in this forced dumbshow, but strangest of all, none of them seems concerned that this particular play might dredge up sexual stirrings and forbidden feelings. To say nothing about having to kiss a Juliet who needs a shave. Once you realize that Calarco's contemporary subtext is under-realized and haphazardly draped over the play like a wet shroud, a remarkable thing occurs: Shakespeare takes over, and we get a surprisingly splendid rendition of "Romeo and Juliet," albeit in zip drive and reduced to a Greatest Hits. Nimbly directed by Rob Bundy, the play survives and generates real thrills and heat. James Lee Burke makes an impetuous Romeo, and is matched by the distinctive clear-eyed Juliet of Dustin Ross, who rounds out this maiden with new-found edges. John Raymond Barker, a sharp-tongued Mercutio and meddling Friar Lawrence, is least successful as a surprisingly fey Lady Capulet. Drake Simpson shines as the Nurse, imbuing her addled but loving speeches a special depth that only a trusted member of the family could impart. If you think glaciers move slowly, you haven't heard the justly famous prelude to Wagner's masterwork, TRISTAN UND ISOLDE conducted by Maestro Christoph Eschenbach. Furtwangler sounds like Toscanini at this dirge pace. As those chromatic waves of sound lumbered through the Wortham, I flashed forward to the end of this production—sometime in 2003. But once this impediment was hurdled, this glorious opera—a musical hymn to sex— turned out splendidly. Even the maestro fell under Wagner's magic spell, conducting this ultra-Romantic masterpiece with fiery passion, meticulous care, and loving speed. "Tristan" is not for the faint of heart, nor the novice. If it's not sung with conviction, if the singers look like sideshow attractions .it Drake Simpson and Dustin Ross in an all-male adaptation of 'Romeo and Juliet' in 'Shakespeare's R&J' at Stages. Barnum and Bailey (see the Metropolitan Opera), if it lacks the magic-realism, it can fall apart with a deadly thud, By all accounts, HGO's rendition of Wagner's titanic opus came very near perfection. Visually stunning, this production, designed by the artist David Hockney, is a child's pop-up storybook realized in pulsating colors where psychedelic neon meets the medieval: emerald next to orange, ruby next to lapis. This hot scheme, complemented by hallucinogenic lighting, perfectly captures the seething, throbbing emotion in the music. And what music they make! Renate Behle is a powerful Isolde: haughty, spurned, humiliated, then transfixed and ultimately transfigured. Her dark lustrous voice, befitting her early days as a mezzo, wraps around Wagner's soaring dramatics with flawless diction, pitch and control. Stig Andersen fills out the heroic Tristan with great sense of character and intelligence. He looks the warrior prince, but seems slightly overpowered by the tempestuous orchestra. the veteran mezzo Horence Quivar with her burnished seductive voice proves how beautiful the role of Brangaene can sound, and Carsten Stabell's sonorous bass and commanding presence as King Marke is regal dignity personified. Any production of "T&l" is fairly rare, especially one like HGO's with such outstanding musical caliber, so this production is your chance to set sail Shakespeare's R&J Stages Repertory Theatre Through Feb 13 3201 Allen Parkway 9 Waugh 713-52-STAGES www.stagestheatre.com Tristan und Isolde Houston Grand Opera Wortham Theater Center Through Feb. 11
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