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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 018. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3321.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3321

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 018, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3321.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME CHOSi SHINE Comedian Margaret Cho came through a difficult time and learned to love herself; now she's spreading the story with laughs in her one-woman show, 'I'm the One That I Want' that started its national tour in Houston last year by MATT MONTGOMERY Margaret Cho describes her nationally touring one-woman show, "I'm the One That I Want," as "still stand-up comedy above all else." "1 haven't changed the nature of what I do as a stand-up comic at all," she explains. Yet there's something different about this Cho show, coming to Dallas's Majestic Theater on March 4. While the Korean American funny lady has always had rave reviews, standing ovations, and leagues of loving fans, this show isn't just leaving them crying with tears of laughter. "It's about survival and self-reliance, self-love and self-worth," she said of the show, which opened its national tour in Houston's Aerial Theatre last July. The glowing reviews that have hailed her successful run off-Broadway at the Westbeth Theater in New York and are now causing her national tour to explode, are signaling the emergence of a Margaret Cho who has the kind of staying power of the best of stars. Audiences are not just being touched with laughter, but moved by the inspiration of her story of survival and recovery presented in her uniquely irreverent style. The irony is that Cho stands at the pinnacle of praise from her industry, her fans, and the media just at the time that she needs external praise the least. Overcoming the devastating effects of the cancellation of her sitcom, "All- American Girl," after one season and a battle toward sobriety, Cho has discovered a new sense of self, carved from hardship, heartache and a fierce sunival- ist instinct. After dealing with being pressured to lose weight and overcoming an alcohol problem, Margaret Cho has learned to love herself and is at the pinnacle of her career. "It wrecked my life," she admitted of the cancellation, the pressures to lose weight, and a problem with alcohol. She recalled that the transformation of her comedy club routine into a 90-minute show was something that happened seemingly on its own. "My act has a life of its own. It's always been organic. I had been doing a lot of comedy clubs and I felt like I'd gotten to a point where my act, independent >- Continued on page 21 IIGhair _ bigBREAMS In The Big Tease,' Craig Ferguson plays a gay Scottish hairstylist who comes to Los Angeles to match scissors and wits with the world's best beauty operators Craig Ferguson as gay Scottish hairstylist Crawford MacKenzie in The Big Tease' •TU "iAKIVMII by DAVID GOLDMAN Craig Ferguson moved from his native Scotland— where he's ranked among the top comics—to Los Angeles in 1995, and well remembers the shock of hitting the streets in rough-and-tumble Tinseltown. "I was kind of a big fish in a small pond in the U.K., and I decided 1 was going to share my genius with the world," he laughed. "Then I went to L.A. and found myself sitting in long lines of actors holding resumes and photographs. 1 started right back at the beginning. It was a humbling experience." But Ferguson's career didn't get bogged down in those lines: He landed the role of Mr. Wick, the boss on ABC's "The Drew Carey Show." Now Ferguson is mining comic material from his Scottish heritage and his first impressions of L.A. in "The Big Tease," which opens this month. Ferguson stars in the movie, which he co-wrote (with Sacha Gervasi) and co- > Continued on page 22
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