Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 016
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 016. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3319

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 016, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 NEWS 15 'For some, orol sex is equated with safe sex. This false assumption has led to tragic lifelong consequences/—Dr. Helene Gayle, director of the (DCs National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention Successful HIV drugs prompt risky behavior 'Receptive' partner in most danger >■ Continued from Page 1 The CDC study—conducted by Dr. Beth Dillion in collaboration with the University of California, San Francisco's Options Project—surveyed 102 gay and bisexual men who had recently become infected with HIV Using a new testing technology developed by the CDC, researchers pinpointed those with recent infections, enabling them to then conduct Intensive interviews with the HIV-positive men to determine risk factors near the time of infection. Of the 102 participants, eight, or 7.8 percent, appeared to have been infected through oral sex. "If any other risk behaviors were identified by the infected individual or their partner, oral sex was excluded as the route of transmission," according to a CDC summary of the study. "Because of these stringent requirements, 7.8 percent may be an underestimate of transmission through oral sex in this group." The receptive partner in oral sex is at the most risk, said Dr. Richard Valdiserri, deputy director of the CDC's National Center for HIV, STD & TB Prevention. All of the men in the study believed to be infected through oral sex were the recepbve partners, Valdiserri told Houston Voice. "For the individual who became the oral partner, with either semen or pre-ejaculate in their mouth, that is where the risk is," he said. "If the receptive partner is HIV-positive and the insertive partner is negative, the risk is not as great of transmission to the inserHve partner." Simply abstaining from ejaculating into the mouth is not sufficient, Valdiserri said, because pre-ejaculate also contains HIV. The new study "is perhaps the most definibve to date" on the risks of oral sex, "and the most important message is that most of these men reported they really didn't think much risk at all was associated. Irtey thought low risk means no risk," Valdiserri said, noting that risk appears to increase with repeated exposures. "Oral sex is lower risk than receptive anal intercourse, but because it is low risk doesn't mean it can't result in infection. You can't put oral sex on the same level as mutual masturbation, for example," he said. The study focused on men having oral sex with men, but the results could reasonably be expected to apply also to oral sex performed on a man by a woman, Valdiserri said. As for cunnilingus, oral sex performed on a woman by either another woman or a man, "what we have said is it is certainly possible [to transmit HIV], but we don't have a lot ot ^ood data about that," he said. g 11IV can be present in vaginal secretions ,md menstrual blood, making transmission theoretically possible, he explained. "Abstaining Irom vaginal, anal ,m<.\ oral sex is the most effective way to prevent the sexual transmission ot HIV," the CI HC's summary of the study concluded. "Individuals who choose to be sexually active can protect themselves b\ having sex with only one uninfected partner who has sex only with them, or using a latex condom with all forms of sexual intercourse—anal, vaginal and oral." According to Valdiserri, individuals need to understand the nsk associated with oral sex, know their partners' HIV status, a^uhn^e^.on^ by LAURA BROWN The success of new treatments for HIV/AIDS has led some at-risk individuals to take fewer precautions to avoid becoming infected, according to another CDC study presented at the seventh Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. The study, led by CDC epidemiologist Stan Lehman, confirms the results of several smaller surveys that have reached the same conclusion: New treatments may be leading to complacency about HIV prevention. Lehman and his colleagues studied 1,976 HIV-negative or untested individuals in seven states who are considered at risk for contracting HIV: 693 gay and bisexual men recruited at gay bars, 600 street-recruited injection drug users, and 683 heterosexuals recruited at STD treatment clinics. Overall, 31 percent reported being "less concerned" about HIV infection because of the new drugs, and 17 percent reported being "less careful" during sex or drug use. Among gay men, 25 percent said they were less concerned and 13 percent said they were less safe; 30 percent of heterosexuals reported being less concerned and 15 percent reported being less safe; and among injection drug users, 40 percent said they were less concerned and 25 percent said they were less safe. While gay and bisexual men had the lowest numbers in the study, that doesn't necessarily translate to mean this group is the least complacent because of the new drugs, Lehman told Houston Voice. As a* group, gay men showed the highest correlation between saying they are "less safe" and reporting engaging in specific risky behaviors, Lehman said. Even gay men who answered "no" when asked if they were "less safe" still reported engaging in specific high risk behaviors at relatively high numbers. For example, while 71 percent of gay men who said they were "less safe" acknowledged having unprotected receptive anal intercourse in the last year, 43 percent of those who said they were not "less safe" still reported engaging in the activity. "When it comes to stopping HIV, nobody knows as much—from a personal perspective and just because it is important to the community—as what gay men know, ... so possibly the lower reports [of being less concerned and less safe] are based on the higher levels of knowledge," Lehman said. "But people are apparently not translating that knowledge into action, or they are putting too much faith in the efficacy of treatments," he said. Study participants were recruited from Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oregon and Texas, including Houston, where gay men were recruited in the Montrose district popular with many gays. Weighing the relative risk Most early AIDS prevention programs focused on the message delivered in the CDC's study summary: Practice abstinence, or use a condom every time, all the time, for every sexual act that involves any contact with another person. While that remains sound advice, many AIDS educators say they have realized that such simple, forceful approaches can end up alienating the very people who most need to get the message. Instead, they advocate a "harm reducHon" or "negotiated safety" model of safer sex education. Such programs focus on encouraging people to make decisions about their sexual boundaries thoughtfully, before they are confronted with a sexual situation, by weighing what is known about the relative dangers of particular acts and considering how much risk they are willing to take. Compared with acts like unprotected anal intercourse, unprotected oral sex has generally been considered relatively low risk, and some men have considered it as a good compromise when deciding on their own sexual behavior, said Tony Bras well, AID Atlanta executive director, especially because many men consider oral sex less pleasurable with a condom. "Most folks believe that oral sex is their best trade off— you are crossing the line just a little bit, being physically intimate without the barrier of a condom, but in the minds of some of our clients, you are not putting yourself at as great a risk," Braswell said. A harm reducHon approach to HIV prevention, he said, "is all about negotiating in your own mind what you will absolutely never do, what you will do only if the person is really hot as a one-time thing, and what you will do all thehme. "For people who felt secure in unprotected oral sex, this study will probably rattle their cage and cause them to think twice," Braswell predicted. He called the new studv "alarming." "I think the value of this study is it gives us one more opportunity to scare people into a little more responsibility," Braswell said. "I think it is one more warning sign that we cannot guarantee you won't catch any infectious disease if you engage in a sexual act with another person, although you can take steps to limit your risk." Some people avoid brushing or flossing their teeth before performing oral sec to try and avoid opening an easy route tor HIV to enter the blood stream, Braswell said. Dr. Richard Valdiserri, deputy director of the CDC's National Center for HIV, STD & TB Prevention, declined comment on the efficacy of such measures in preventing HIV transmission. #w «0i visit us on-line today at: to sign up for a weekly email preview, send your address to ed.tohahoustonvoice.com W" www.houstonvoice.com
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1006_015.jpg