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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 011
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 011. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3314.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3314

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 011, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3314.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE C-*uV j|y&0* C§£ eacaA, wi ceieowaA^ia <MM^ \^/HE STRONGEST IDEAS have always been the simplest ones. The ones that grow from vision. At Chase Texas, it is our vision to manage diversity as we would any other strategic resource. We have made diversity an integral component of our culture because we know that bringing collective experiences and skills to the table enables us to do things that none of us could do alone. A simple idea that inspires great rewards. 4*1 CHASE The right relationship is everything. Member FDIC Around the Nation For more extensive coverage: www.houstonvoice.com Gay couple, trans woman among victims of Alaska Airlines crash PORT HUENEME, Calif. (AP)—The search for survivors among the 88 people flying on Alaska Airlines Flight 261 ended Wednesday after 41 hours. Among the victims of the crash were Toni Choate, a Santa Cruz man who was living as a woman, and William Knudson and Bradley Long, who owned a bed and breakfast in Puerto Vallarta. Choate was returning to the San Francisco Bay area with his daughter when the plane crashed. Choate was a general contractor and cabinet finisher originally from Visalia, Calif He was formerly known as Larry D. Choate, but changed his name and started living as a woman in the mid 1990s, according to friends and relatives. In 1995, Choate bought the Savoy Bar in Santa Clara, Calif, and moved to San Francisco about a year ago. "He was an excellent father, as far as taking her places and showing her things," Elliott said. "They were real close." Knudson and Long were headed home after visiting their inn. They "lived life to the fullest," said Laura Lyon, vice president at Lyon & Associates Real Estate in Sacramento, where Long, 38, had worked for the past decade. "They were very much into boating and had a large hobby restoring old cars," Lyon said. "They were always entertaining, very, very generous, warmhearted gentlemen." Military services spell out training, gay discharges down slightly WASHINGTON (AP>—The U.S. military services for the first time have spelled out for field commanders a policy of ensuring that troops who complain of anti-gay threats or harassment are not themselves investigated. The intent is to allow such complaints to be aired without fear of being kicked out of the service for being gay, and to reinforce the idea that those who make anti-gay threats will not be tolerated. Defense Secretary William Cohen said Tuesday the new guidelines on how to investigate anti-gay threats are incorporated in updated training programs designed to ensure that the Clinton administration's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy on gays is enforced fairly and uniformly throughout the services. "These plans make it very clear... that there is no room for harassment or threats in the military," Cohen said in a written statement. The Pentagon also announced Tuesday the number of discharges from the military for being homosexual fell to 1,034 in the fiscal year ended Sept. 30 from 1,145 in the year-earlier period. 'Millionaire' quietly includes gay couples among game winners HOLLYWOOD—The game show "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" has garnered attention for more than its No. 1 ratings, according to a New York Times report. The quiz show has also quietly broken sexual and racial barriers, including among its contestants gay and racially mixed couples that in the past wouldn't have been aired. When contestant Rob Coughlin. of Shoreline, Wash., appeared on a show that aired Jan. 23, host Regis Philbin introduced Coughlin's companion, Mark Leahy, as soon as the contestant walked onstage. "Your partner, Mark, is in the audience, 'Hey, Mark,'" said Philbin, to audience applause. As Coughlin began answering questions correctly, Philbin asked Leahy what his partner should do if he won $1 million. "Get a new wardrobe," replied Leahy. When Coughlin won $500,000, Philbin said, "Hey, Mark, come down." Leahy bounded onto the stage and hugged Coughlin. "Hey, Mark, nice to see you," Philbin said. ABC executives, who admitted to some trepidation about the episode, said there was no reaction from viewers. Airing on ABC three nights a week, "Millionaire" has an average audience of 28.5 million viewers, the Times reported. Report says priests dying of AIDS at higher rate than general KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)—AIDS has become a serious problem among Roman Catholic priests and has caused the deaths of hundreds of priests across the United States, the Kansas City Star reported Jan. 29. The newspaper said the actual number of AIDS deaths is difficult to determine because death certificates are often altered, but that the death rate from AIDS appears to be at least four times that of the rate for the general U.S. population. Examination of death certificates indicated several hundred priests have died of AIDS- related illnesses since the mid-1980s, and hundreds more are living with HIV. The Star conducted a survey of American priests with a margin of error of 3.5 percent. Six of 10 priests responding said they knew of at least one priest who had died of an AIDS-related illness; one-third knew a priest living with AIDS. Asked about their sexual orientation, 75 percent said they were heterosexual, 15 percent said they were homosexual and 5 percent said they were bisexual. —From staff and wire reports Network executives were nervous about the Jan. 23 episode of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?' when a gay man hugged his partner after winning $500,000, but viewers didn't complain.
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