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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
File 002
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 002. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3305

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 002, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Derek Henkle claims negligence on the part of high school administrators cost him his high school diploma and the chance to be a teenager. Page 5 ISSUE 1006 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STVtf. FEBRUARY 4, 2000 Oral sex poses 'significant' risk for HIV CDC study released Tuesday shows 7.8 percent of participants infected through oral sex by LAURA BROWN Oral sex "contributes significantly" to the spread of HIV, although the practice is "too often regarded as posing little or no risk," according to a study presented Tuesday at the seventh C onterence on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, held in San Francisco. Almost eight percent of newly infected gay men in a recent study contracted HIV through oral sex, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, while 85 percent said they had oral sex without a condom because they believe it has little risk of transmitting HIV "For some, oral sex is equated with safe sex. However for the individuals in this study, and for countless others, this false assumption has led to tragic lifelong consequences," said Dr. Helene Cayle, director of the CDC's National Center for HIV, STD & TB Prevention. The study brought mixed reactions from those on the front- lines of public discussion of HIV—vindication from some, fear and frustration from others. Andrew Sullivan, the former New Republic editor and author who has written about his belief that he became HIV- positive through oral sex, said he isn't surprised by the new statistics. "When I told people that's how I got infected, I was treated with at best mild disdain and at worst with mocking disbelief," Sullivan told Houston Voice. "But I honestly never had unprotected anal intercourse before my infection, and the most I ever did was unprotected oral sex, and then not even to ejaculation. People don't want to hear this, but that doesn't mean it isn't true. "I think it's still a very small risk, but over time, small risks become bigger risks. The odds mount. I just hope people will believe some of us now," Sullivan said. While everyone should be aware of the risks they are taking, a new focus on the dangers of oral sex could have an unintended backlash on gay men weary of constantly having to struggle with safer sex issues, warned Jeff Graham, executive director of AIDS Survival Project. "It is important to point out to people that they do need to take [the new oral sex study] into account when they are considering how much risk they are willing to [take] for contracting HIV, but the bottom line is that it is unprotected anal sex and injection drug use that are fueling the epidemic," Graham said. Oral sex may be the cause of infection for 7.8 percent of the studies participants, Graham noted, but that means that the vast majority, more than 90 percent, contracted HIV from other modes. "My fear is that if people point their fingers at oral sex, some 'People don't want to hear this, but that doesn't mean it isn't true.... I just hope people will believe some of us now.'— Writer Andrew Sullivan, who soys he was infected with HIV through oral sex. people will take that as an excuse to engage in high risk behavior all the way around" because of a fatalistic attitude that everything is dangerous and AIDS is therefore somehow unavoidable, Graham said. 5s- Continued on Page 15 Rallying for Equality Some 70 people gathered in downtown Houston Jan. 28 to rally against Exxon Mobil for the company's refusal to odd sexual orientation to its non-discrimination policy and for ending domestic partner benefits for gay employees. Today is the start of a long fight. This battle will not be done overnight,' said Sean Carter, president of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus. After the rally, protesters marched several blocks to Exxon Mobil's headquarters, which company officials closed early and ringed with police for the event. Organizers plan another protest Feb. 29 to launch a boycott of the company. (More pictures, Page 14) KKRW apologizes owr 'inappropriate remarks9 by MATTHEW A. HENNIE A I Ibuston radio station issued a terse on- air apology to City Councilwoman Annise Parker Tuesday, though station officials have vet to talk with Parker directly about the derogatory comments a radio jock directed towards her late last month. And station officials took no action against Keven Dorsey, producer of "The Dean and Rog Show" on KKRW 93.7, for calling Parker a "dyke" and "carpet muncher" during a Jan. 21 broadcast Parker, the City Council's only openly gay member, has called Dorsey's comments "hate speech." The comments came during a discussion about Parker's involvement with the Westheimer Street Festival. lX>rsev has taken part in the festival for several years; last month city officials denied a permit for the annual gathering, which draws some 300,000 people to a 10-block strip of Westheimer. The two-term city councilwoman has said the (estiva! has grown too large and must address public safer)' concerns if it continues at its current location, which is in a rm idential area. In Dorsey's apology, ordered bv station management, he said the possibility of Ihe not taking place "is a matter very close to me." "I apologize for anv remarks that may have offended her or anv member i munitv," Dorsey said in the taped apology, which aired at 6:15 a.m. The apology which lasted less than 30 seconds, was sandwiched between the end of a > Continued on Page 14
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