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Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995
File 025
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Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 025. 1995-03-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/326.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1995-03-03). Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/326

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 025, 1995-03-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/326.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date March 3, 1995
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 4B HOUSTON VOICE BLUE PAGES I MARCH 3. 1995 A Gay Fantasia on National Themes' takes Broadway by storm (Continued from preceding page) Due lo his success with the work's production in London, Declan Donnelan was initially approached, but he had a scheduling conflict and Kushner had still noi entirely forgiven the Briton for altering ihe composition of the cast so a woman in male drag did not have io play one of the characters, so the producers turned to George Wolfe, who was the writer/director of "Jelly's Last Jam'' and was a well-known quantity up and down Broadway. Later Kushner said thai his selection of the Kerr was in no small part because Landesman and Viertel had already indicated Wolfe as their preferred choice for director. But Wolfe too had already committed himself to another project, having agreed to direct a new work by Jose Rivera at the Hartford Stage. In what he later described as the most difficult decision of his career, he reneged on his obligation to ihe Hartford, even though sticking to it would have been the decern thing to do, and instead pursued what he knew would be the wiser action for his growth as an artist—accepting ihe offer to direct "Angels." Being gay and black, and wilh a reputation for inventive staging. Wolfe seemed predisposed to bringing the more off-center elements of the production io a palatable level for mainstream audiences, while not diminishing ihe play's piercing passage of judgment. Moreover, Wolfe was the first director whom Kushner found to be on the same interpretive channel. Given the obstacles oiher productions had to overcome in bringing Kushner's vision to the stage, the realization of the Broadway production weni rather smoothly. Dickering over casting choices was handled amicably enough, but there were still technical glitches to overcome, particularly with the descending angel, and Ihe first preview performance had to be delayed for five days. When the first preview performance was held, it happily coincided with the news that "Millennium" had jus! received the Pulitzer— news which was sure to fill the theater seals. Interestingly enough, that news was nol bright enough to allay the concerns of an increasingly jittery Landesman. Jujamcyn had already spent over $2 million mounting the production, and estimates now indicated that weekly production costs after the play's opening would be in the neighborhood of $175,000. Landesman became so preoccupied with the possibility of a financial flop (hat in early April, less than a month before (he scheduled opening, he asked Kushner to drop the subtitle. "A Gay Fantasia* on National Themes," from the produclion marquis. Kushner wouldn't budge thouch. reminding Landesman of the play's cutting edge quality which had attracted him in (he first place. The technical problems were corrected. "Millennium" opened on May 4, 1993, and the critical flood-gates were washed away by a tide of praise. The crown of the critics' endorsement was further bejeweled when the play received Broadway's ultimate imprimaiur-the Tony. There followed intense preparation for (he fall opening of "Perestroika"; Kushner revised and sometimes completely rewrote huge sections of the play. After another delay, "Perestroika" finally opened in November, and everyone seemed swept away. "Brilliant," ■•masterpiece," "genius" and similar terms of veneration were heaped upon Kushner, who now found himself compared to ihe greatest American playwrights of (he century. And Broadway's highest honor was bestowed on Kushner again. "Perestroika" was nominated for six Tonys and won three including Besl Play. Well before the Tony laurels for '"Perestroika," however, Kushner, Landesman. and Kotay began to review the options for taking the production on a national tour. And artistic directors and theater managers around the country were salivating at the prospeci of landing the prized Alley Artistic Director Gregory Boyd knew from the moment he first read a copy of "Millennium" that he wanled to produce the play in Houston. He and Associate Director Michael Wilson, whom Boyd had pegged for directing the pro- jecl at the Alley, had discussed the subject many times, justifiably concluding that the Alley would be a prime choice among regional resident theaters interested in staging a production if for some reason a national tour should not materialize. Though a national tour did develop, questions arose immediately from nervous backers about which cities should be included. After all taking the entire production on tour would be an even cosi- lier venture than the New York production, and Houston was deemed to be audience-risky (a well-founded assessment given the reaction of many HGO subscribers to the recently slaged "Harvey Milk"). Boyd utilized his well-placed associations with his New York colleagues, so when the directors of the NationsBank Broadway Series begin to indicate that Houston might be omitted from a national tour, Boyd was ready lo act. He maintained contact with Keiay. and in Jan. 1994, serious negotiations began lo bring "Angels" to the Alley. Kushner, as most play- wrighis are. was apprehensive about the numerous pro- | ductions that were unfolding of his creation. He was comfortable enough with the Alley's strong tradition of taking on texts that are more challenging and difficult in terms of subject matter, but he wanted to have approval over the entire production team. To make matters worse, Kushner was largely unfamiliar with Wilson and-the playwright was also somewhat put off by Wilson's relative youth (he's only 30). Things became even more complicated when Kushner learned that Boyd and Wilson wanled to stage "Angels" in the round instead of on a proscenium stage. Though Kushner had originally conceived of the play being presented in a warehouse, or some equally non— traditional space, he was decidedly unenthusiastic aboul developing another production from scratch. An attempt to bring Kushner to Houston for Wilson's production of Tennessee Williams' "Orpheus Descending" at the Alley in spring 1994 was waylaid by unforeseen events, but Kushner and Wilson exchanged numerous phone calls and continuing correspondence, culminating in a 90-minute interview that resulted in Kushner's blessing. By the start of the summer, the deal was set: "Angels in America" was coming to Houston and it was going to he an entirely new production. | Men charged for j beating gay man in | Wisconsin softball field Ice Picks skating; HMBL billiards MADISON, Wis.. Saturday, Feb. 25 <AP>—A stale law against crimes motivated by prejudice is being used to prosecute two young men accused of beating and robbing a victim identified as homosexual. The hate crime law allows judges to increase the penalty if an offense is influenced by reaction to a victim's race, religion, life style or disability. Ryan D. Meiller, 18, of Madison and Erik Jacobson. 20, of Waunakee were charged Thursday in Circuit Court with robbery and aggravated battery. Each was released on a SI,000 signature bond. In this case, a conviction could add five years to a 10-year sentence. The pair is accused of luring a 33-year- old man to a softball field early Wednesday. He said he met the pair at a pornography store and agreed to follow them to the field. The men kicked and beat him, breaking three ribs, a criminal complaint said. "All right. I did it," Meiller reportedly told authorities. "I don'l like homosexuals and anything like it." They robbed the man of $7 and his automatic teller card, "kicked and hit him until he revealed his personal identification number." the complaint said. Jacobson held the man in the park while Meiller went to use ihe card, it said. Meiller returned to say the card didn't work and the two kicked and beat the man again, authorities said. Sports Notes The Montrose Ice Picks Skating Club will hold its next ice skating get- together Thursday, March 9 al the Galleria Ice Rink. 5015 Westheimer. Admission is $5 plus $2 for skates, and the session runs from 8:00 p.m.— 10:00 p.m. The rink is also open to the general public. Look for the "Ice Picks'" sign inside the entrance. For more information or to get on the free mailing list, call Angel at (713) 629- 1432. HMBL Standings The Houston Metropolitan Billiards League reports the following standings for Week 7 of the Winter/ Spring '95 Season: (1) Coalition: (2) Jackson 5; (3) Oui. Cousins: (4) Knights; (5) Rip cord Rebels: (6) BP's Med Center Mob; (7) Crazy 8's; (8) Masters of the Mine; (9) 611 Slicks; (10) E.J.'s Misqued; (11) Tight Racks; (12) Suicide Squad; (13) Kissin" Cousins; (14) King's X; (15) Sioux's Boys; (16) BR. Bottoms Support the COLT 45's Trouble Fund HOUSTON'S NEWEST ADUL BOOKSTORE & VIDEO ARCADE 15 BOOTHS (each with) 16 VIDEO SELECTIONS SCREENS OPERATE CONTINOUSLY NO TOKENS or NO COINS NEEDED ADMISSION FEE STAY AS LONG AS YOU LIKE WE STOCK A WIDE SELECTION OF THE FOLLOWING: VIDEOS * MAGAZINES * PERIODICALS PERSONAL ITEMS * SMOKING ITEMS SWINGER PUBLICATIONS * and MORE!! WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS LOTS OF PARKING SPACE ALWAYS OPEN
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