Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995
File 024
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 024. 1995-03-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1995-03-03). Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 024. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/325

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 024, 1995-03-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/325.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date March 3, 1995
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 024
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE BLUE PAGES I MARCH 3, 1995 3B Unique, visionary drama set off Broadway bidding war Angels In America, Part II By JAVIER TAMEZ Houstot Voa (Editor's note: This is the second in - a series of articles focusing on Tony Kushner's history-making, multiple award-winning epic drama about gay life, "Angels in America," and its upcoming p Houston's Alley Theatre). The play has a special quality: "something magical and mysterious, which honors the gay community by telling a story that sets its concerns in the larger historical context of American political life." So proclaimed John Lahr, theatrical critic for "The New Yorker," of "Millennium Approaches," Ihe first part to Tony Kushner's epic drama of gay male America—"Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes." Lahr's opinion was shared by crilics everywhere, confirming ten-fold what had been largely predicted for the play's Broadway arrival months earlier after it opened at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles. There was at the Taper, however, a common qualifying verse in the reviews, plainly slating that further refinement, particularly of Pan 2, was necessary before a Broadway run could be realized, Gordon Davidson, artistic head for the Taper and other venues in the L.A. area, had been instrumental in the work's completion, providing Kushner all Ihe artistic latitude he needed while being generous with development funds and deadlines. Not willing to risk the work which he had nurtured, or the enlhusiasm of potential New York producers. Davidson, afler consulting with Kushner, announced that ihe New York production would have a different direcior and a different set designer, which meant, much lo Kushner's distress, that the clinic production would have to be built from scratch. And as if thai were nol enough to preoccupy Kushner, a venue also had to be selected, and that became the first step. Kushner had originally envisioned having the play performed at the Public Theater in New York, the home of ihe New York Shakespeare Festival. This venue had a patronage far more accustomed to new, experimental works, and Kushner fell il was belter suited lo the strong socio-p0|itjca| con[ent 0f the play, because there would be little temptation on the pan of the producers to interfere. Also, Kushner elieved thai having it produced at the Public Theater would make it far more financially accessible to ihe audience he was determined to include. But the financial success ai the Royal Theater in London in 1992 and at the Taper in s Angeles made Ihe possibility of more commercial venues a viable option. Fully aware of this, Kushner said he would discuss the venue for "Angels" with all inleresled parties. A virtual bidding war ensued, with the three largest Broadway theater- owning consortiums—ihe Shubert Organization- the Nederlander Organization and Jujamcyn Theaters—not to mention several independent producers, striving to get Actors in rehearsal for upcomtn Houston production of Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" uction at the prize. The Shubert group is the most powerful and successful entity in New York commercial theater, producing, on a seemingly permanent basis, ihe mega-bucks musicals of Andrew Lloyd Webber. It offered the Booth Theaier to Kushner, one of its prime houses on 45th Street, even though it would have meant moving a show under production there at the time to another location. But the Shubert Organization's Board of Directors also has an arguably undeserved reputation for being better business whizzes than (heater patrons and for booking highly profitable tourist attractions onto its stages, and this worked against Kushner's desire to retain the play's avant-garde purity. JoAnne Akalaitis. then artistic director of the Public, made an impassioned pitch to Kushner. citing the play's trenchant call to justice for an oppressed minority as emblematic of the works the Public had always produced. After all one of the play's fundamental tenets was its repudiation of the status quo. yet with finances being a constant consideration in any Broadway undertaking, the arbiters of that very same staius quo would be asked to embrace the production if it were first released on Broadway. Akaiaiiis' argument that the play should originate in the community which gave il birth weighed heavily with Kushner. but he wanted boih artistic and intellectual independence and a commercial venue. Rocco Landesman, head of Jujamcyn, thought "Angels" was perfect for one of his theaters. He had, in his very short tenure at the reigns of Jujamcyn, shaken the Broadway theater scene. Though his organization operated only five theaters, he and artistic direcior Jack Viertel's insistence on enlarging the typical Broadway audience beyond established, white middle- class patrons had forced other theater operators to reassess their marketing strategies. Landesman weni so far as to commission an audience survey while "Angels" was still running at the Taper, so he would be belter equipped to plan the show's pro mo lion in New York. Kushner took several weeks in making his decision, consulting often with his long-time agenl Joyce Ketay, his old friend James Nicola, artistic director of the New York Theater Workshop, and of course with Davidson. In the end. Landesman's savvy and Viertel's history of stylized productions won Kushner over. The ■lujamcyn's Walter Kerr Theater was chosen, bui not before Kushner had received assurances that tickets would be made available to subscribers, at subscription prices, of both the New York Theaier Workshop and the Public Theaier of New York. Furlher, Ihe producers guaranteed that balcony seats would be offered at reduced prices and one dollar from every ticket sold would go io Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights AIDS. And the focus now turned lo the selection of a director. (Continued on following page) fM CLUBi k ; 2205 FANNIN HOUSTON. TEXAS • -713- 659-4998
File Name uhlib_31485329_n749_023.jpg