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Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995
File 010
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Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 010. 1995-03-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/311.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1995-03-03). Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/311

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995 - File 010, 1995-03-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/331/show/311.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 749, March 3, 1995
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date March 3, 1995
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE / MARCH 3, 1995 'Three Tall Women' stands tall over other area productions By JAVIER TAMEZ Houston Voice/Houston In the preface to "Three Tall Women," playwright Edward Albee states thai he warned io write a play about the death of his long-estranged, adoptive mother because he was "touched by the survivor, the figure clinging to the wreckage only partly ol her own making, refusing to go under." His poignant and deeply pe account of ihis woman and the stock she takes of her own life is a masterful piece of work thai richly deserves its Pulitzer Prize honor and the Alley bonchos, who pulled oft something of a theatrical coup in bringing the play to Houston for its first production outside of New York or London, should be similarly lauded. Part of the play's strength comes from Albee':; brilliant Structure. In the first act. three women, labeled only as A (Nan Martin). B (Kaihleen Butler) and C (Tracy Sallows) seem caught in a pointless and constantly changing conversation. A is a querulous, 92-year old dowager waging unceasing war against ihe afflictions of old age—senility, incontinence and physiological decay. B is a 52-year old companion, nurse and secretary with a complacent, care-worn presence. C is 26. intelligent, ambitious and an attorney wilh a law linn handling A's affairs. Beyond the obvious personality traits of the characters on stage, nothing is learned. The dialogue is an endless repetition of A's cantankerous complaints, C's impatient and cynical responses, and B's soothing assurances to the former and gentle admonitions to the latter. The plot, as is typical of so many of Albee's works, is aimless and rudderless. Then, quite suddenly, though not altogether unexpectedly, A suffers a stroke, and Act 1 ends When Act II opens. A's *nen body -jcs Q0 the bed. an oxygen mask in place, while B and C stand vigil, discussing death and the absence of a living will. Surprisingly A enters the scene, striding zont\ dently, appearing resplendent. She looks directly at her likeness on the bed before her, and with one simple statement reveals the stunning transformation that has taken place on stage. "We're just as we were " The meaning is unmistakable While A has become a vibrant manifestation of herself at the same age, B and C have become A at earlier stages of her life! (It's an absolutely beautiful move on Albee's part). A is now completely rational and coher ent and begins a wistful recollection of times past, joined with reflective repose by B, while C waxes both curiously and anxiously. The memories become darker and the figures of the one woman's life begin to clash—a development sel further in motion by the arrival of the boy. The boy is a young man: he never speaks. He just sits at the bedside in a silent display of devotion, and it is here that Albee has thrust himself onto the stage. B is furious over his presence, at one poini streaming at him to leave. Though A asks for tolerance and forgiveness, and C is utterly captivated by the son she does noi yet know, B remains unmoved. "He doesn't love me." she spews, making reference to the boys (and Albee's homosexuality) with whom the son would rather spend his time. But B's intransigence is shown later to be partly because the son tells her, as he is being thrown out of the house, that he was witness to one of her sexual indiscretions (Albee himself was thrown out of his home when he was 18). "And so ir goes' is ■ |jne repeated in the play. And it could describe the general direction of the play in the Fast half of the second act. Albee winds things down, by re in lore ing the differing perspectives from different vantage points of the same life. It's a reassuring and hopeful resolution. The performances are outstanding from all the players. Nan Martin is near- perfect as A. She impressively captures the sardonic and bitter qualities of her character in the first act. Martin's portrayal of spiteful carping and unceasing demands contrasts won- drously with the sage demeanor and even temperament she exhibits in the second act. Kathleen Butler gives a stellar turn as B. She delivers a heart-aching gentility in the first act that gives way to an unbridled fury, a self-sustaining righteousness and a touching sensitivity. Tracy Sallows gives a flawless rendition of an impeccable yuppie with a screaming impatience made plain in a don't-have-time-for-this attitude. Later she demonstrates frightened bewilderment, heated rage, hysterical denial, comforting dreams, and she doea s" ^nvincingly. Director Lawrence Sachrow d,s- plays keen .nsight.nn, Albee's work. He evokes a large range of emotions from his cast and stages them with shatterins explosive effectiveness, "Three Tall Women" it a dramatic tour-de-force and reaffirms Albee's standing as one of the giants of American theater. 1919 Decatur Houston, TX 77007 713-861-9149 Rev. John Gill-Pastor Rev. Carolyn Mobley-Assistant Pastor
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