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Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985
File 012
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Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985 - File 012. 1985-12-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3303/show/3289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-12-20). Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3303/show/3289

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985 - File 012, 1985-12-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3303/show/3289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 20, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript DECEMBER 20, 1985/MONTROSE VOICE 11 Films Rounding out the trio is Lesley Ann Warren as the voluptuous and sexy Miss Scarlett who runs a "quiet"escort service. Spouting sexual innuendos and throwing herself at the men, Scarlett is a high class tramp somewhat in the Rita Hayworth mold. She meshes well with other women, forever throwing them off-guard with her off-the-cuff remarks. Clue is so funny that it catches us quite off guard and knocks us to the floor laughing. Unlike other movies of this type, about 90% of the jokes are really funny here. You almost want to go back a second time just to catch the funny lines you missed while watching the looney characters, or maybe just to catch one of the other two endings. Clue isn't just a game any more, because now it's been made into a crazy but skillful comedy that should be a Christmas smash. Don't miss it. d The Color Purple Steven Spielberg is probably a little edgy about the release of his newest effort. Unlike Goonies, Young Sherlock Holmes, and TVs "Amazing Stories," this film is his first seriously dramatic, adult effort in quite some time. Also, the movie is based on a beloved best seller that just happened to win the Pulitzer Prize for literature several years ago. It's nice to report that Steven gets a B- plus on his report card this time around. He has assembled a superb cast (mostly unknowns) and has a screenplay by Menno Meyjes that follows the book pretty closely (but has softened it quite a bit). It is epic-sized like the "Roots" mini-series, but also tender and warm like Sounder. With a universal theme of love and maturing, Spielberg probably has nothing much to worry about. The Color Purple is actually a very troubling tale that has been toned down for general mass consumption. There is adultery, incest and abuse, but it is rarely up front or forceful towards viewers. Not that life of young Celie in a 1906 Georgia town is very sanitized. The facts are there, but the film never dwells on the bad; instead we are always looking for a better tomorrow, just like in all of Spielberg's films. Our heroine is Celie (played by newcomer Whoopi Goldberg), who has two children by her father and then is given to a widower with four wild children. "Mr." (as she calls him) never marries her, treats her like low dirt, and keeps letters that are sent by her beloved younger sister. Celie plays the quiet wife who is obedient to her husband, but we know that she is longing to break out for the freedom that she deserves. Her husband (played gruffly by Danny Glover from Silverado) doesn't see any potential in Celie, and basically treats her like a slave. Various characters begin to drift in and out of her life. A dance hall singer named Shug Aver (played to perfection by Margaret Avery) is the woman that "Mr." always wanted to marry. When "Mr." brings her to the house when she is ill, Celie falls in love with her and the two have an affair, Their love is muted, but their revealing scenes together tell us a lot about these women and their problems. Other minor characters include Oscar nominee Adolph Ceasar as "Mr.'s" grumpy father, and Rae Dawn Chong as the girlfriend of Harpo—one of "Mr.'s" sons. Harpo (Willard Pugh) is first married to Sofia, a large, robust woman played by talk show host Oprah Winfrey. Winfrey's character is phenomenal, moving from proud to downtrodden, and finally— in the end—triumphant. As Celie, Whoopi Goldberg is very good. It is a quiet sedate role that requires deep feelings more than elaborate actions or speeches. Goldberg builds the character very slowly as she comes out of her shell, serenely revealing a strong woman who can finally stand up for herself. We don't Danny Glover and Whoopi Goldberg star as the ill-tempered "Mr." and Celie, in "The Color Purple" get to see a lot of the "strong" Celie until late in the film, but when she starts blooming we realize what potential Celie really has. The negative aspects of Purple are minute, but they downgrade the film to a sentimental level. Many scenes are overplayed to get some emotional reaction from the audience. Spielberg throws in unneeded comic relief (see people fall from the rafters unhurt) or tearful overtures at the drop of a hat. Not helping things is Quincy Jones' score, which rises to horrendously soaring heights at major dramatic points in the film. One thing that really annoys me is having my emotions artificially stirred up. I wanted to enjoy the simple and moving scenes by themselves, but the swelling music and the swirling photography really knock the wind out of the effect. It's as if Spielberg doesn't trust the power of the actors or the script and has to juice it up to make it effective. It will be easy for some to call this a "great" film just because there aren't very many black films made. Unfortunately, Spielberg's effort loses some emotional impact and intensity of the Alice Walker characters and scenarios because he overdoes it. The Color Purple is a very good effort and audiences will no doubt be affected by it. It's just that it could have been so much better with "less" instead of OPEN Christmas Eve uowi&> w vmtv Wis rtleiuf/ c_%ustma&'... ~)1Mumuu<! Fanny and Sam Ken, Dick, Red, Paul, Jerry, Adrian, Gene, Will, David, Chris, Pickles, Robin, Ron, Roy, Jim, Randy COMING FRIDAY DECEMBER 27th FULL MOON MADNESS STRIKES AGAIN! IN THE HEART OF MONTROSE ... mary*s BAR-GAINS GALORE! ON THE PATIO 9PM til closing. HOURS (HAPPY) 7am-2pm, 4-8pm, 10pm-12:30am OPEN SUNDAYS TOO! for your ADDED shopping pleasure! 1022 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 528-8851
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