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Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985 - File 001. 1985-12-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3303/show/3278.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-12-20). Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3303/show/3278

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985 - File 001, 1985-12-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3303/show/3278.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 269, December 20, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 20, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript A Classy 'Color Purple' and a Campy 'Clue' "The Newspaper of Montrose" Friday. December 20. 1985 Issue 269 (713) 529-8490 Scott Cutsinger Films, p.10 What's So Funny? Dr. Didato's Quiz, p. 9 Twelfth Night: Rollicking Good Fun Bill O'Rourke, 'Montrose Uve,' p.17 Fire Causes Minimal Damage at Jim's Gym News, p.8 For Black Males, Suicide Rates Peak at Prime of Life Feature, p.12 United Way Gives Funds for AIDS Victims News, p.6 Commercial Group Seeks to Open Nation's First AIDS Hospital News, p.6 Lower Westheimer Police Station Open for Business Mayor Kathy Whitmire and Police Chief ue Brown prepare to cut tAf! ribbon officially opening Montrose's own police station (Roger Lackey plwt-0) Board Favors 'ISOLATION' State and Local Groups Plan Response to 'Isolation' Ruling By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Managing Editor News, t>.4 State and local gay rights groups have been quick to respond to last Saturday's ruling by the State Department of Health that authorizes, under certain circumstances, the quarantining of AIDS victims. news, p.2 2 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20. 1985 Groups Plan Response to 'Isolation' Ruling By Linda Wyche Montroae Voice Managing Editor State and local gay rights groups have been quick to respond to last Saturday's ruling by the State Department of Health that authorizes, under certain circumstan­ces, the quarantining of AIDS victims. With one member absent, the health panel voted 12-5 to approve a plan that would give Health Director Dr. Robert Bernstein the power to order "isolation" for AIDS patients who pose a threat to public health. The health director or other high ranking state health official would be authorized to issue a warrant after being notified by a local official that the victim was engaging in or threatening to engage in reckless conduct. The ruling must now be entered in the Texas Register. After a 30-day public com­ment period, a final ruling will be made. Glen Maxey, spokesman for Lesbian and Gay Rights Advocates ILGRA), says the initial ruling means the board has "agreed to talk about it." LGRA, a political action coalition of gay rights groups based in Austin, plans to meet on January 4 to montrose VOICE AND TEXAS•STAR MONTROSE, TEXAS Pl>pulatlon last 1985) 32.000 c.n.u. tracts 401 01, 401 02. 40201 002 02. 405 02. <03 and '°" 01 Zip COClft lrOU11n1y1 nOOll 11011 tportJon!. n098 Boundad lrOUG"ly) Sllepnerd Or (wfllJ. AJi.n P""'way I"""">· Main St (easl) US 59 11ou!l!I L.atttude (Montrose BtYd at Westneuner Rd.) 29944·13'"N. Longitude 95•2751TW Attitude 4lT ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR ...oNTROSE 0oo<go a---. Hous10n C4Y Council I- C) II Frllt'ICO L•'°:..:ams~;/ ~(pct t) 1007 Preston (713} 22•~11, W•ller Rantlin. C:O..tllbfe (pct 1} 301 Sari JM:.tntO. (1'3) 221-5200 Debt• Oanburg Te:iias HouM of Aeptt'Mftlaltrt .. (OrSt 131) HH r $ W F•'I (713152fHIOIS8 Cta.g Washtngton, Texas Senatti (dttt 13) ml C.fO/i!te. (1'3} 459-4343 M di~ Letancl U S HouM al ReptesenlatNeS (dist t8) rg1p Smtlh •820. f7'3> 139-7339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 269th ISSUE, DEC 20, 1985 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 I.CDICISITOR-I_B,U.,T ION In -.Ston lhroug" 1"60 ma,or d•lritlutton potntl Wt tne MonltOM the Vt11ege the HelONs nt111Yt«I ,,..U'"°'1 r•t• tutor 2 8 eltun•~ re~p 25.200 WHlr!y 1 000 C:OPt• ~ty ............ through 30 otn.r distnbutton pomtt e1tt1Mted pa.u·on tat• l.aor 2 5 es11m•ted r~tup 2 . .SOO _... .. 1y TOTAL DISTRIBUTION 1GUARANTEEDI 10,000 cop ... •Mkfy 101.i Ht1mat9d r•Ml«shtp 27.700 wHkly Contents copynght e1985 Office hours· 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg puC/--od•tor l.Jnda Wyche/fMMgwtQ editor Roger Lackey orr1co trlMl- Oavid Aoumfort/prodllctH>ll directcx Marl< Blazek,..,.,,,,_ Scon Cutsinger 8111 O'ROUfke 1oco1 contnt>uton Steve WarrenlnMiona/ con~t ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere Te•as (800) 222·1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere US 1800) 225-0227 f)("I" 995220 Jerry MulhOlland -.,,,.<ng dlfo<:tor Rick Hillt-=coum •~.cut.,., Found ng Mtm"9tJ GrHl•r Montrose Business Gullo. Gay 1ncs Lesbian Presa Alaociehon Nt"'S SetYJC.S New.....c>ne Pacihc N4'WS S«vtce Synaicattd F .. tur• SemcH & Wnter1 Bnan McNilught. Uru­veraal Prns Syndate News America Syndteate POSTMASTER Send .sdreu correctiOnS to 408 A...ondale, -n TX 77006-3028 $uOKt ptlOfl r•re In US 111 H•led •fWelOIM $.ti per yNr (52 tuues1 S29pe1a • monthl mttsues) ors• 25per .. eett (less than 211 -> Bae• ....,.. '2 00 Heh N•hOnal 9dttet11#tttg ,..Pt'•unt•t1" Joe DiSabeto. Rivendetl M""'onng 666 Stl! A-..e. New Yori< 10011 (212) 2'2-6863 Athon ""fl dNdl•M Wednaday 5 30pm, for Issue released fl'IQy evanmg NCJb:U ro ~,.,. loe&J ad'rettiaing me schedule Seiven--A '*n effectrve Oct 12. 118A and Eegnt A• I t>eeffecuve-Jan 3 ,_ R•pona~ ;y ftie MontrOH VOtCe does not assume tltSPOf"i" lnlleMw t;tpya p.e.<. 1a0d vert>llng ""'""" - .. should -- ,,,. any_ ... ed-'5"'0 plan the strategy of public comment. Maxey feels that the lack of specificity in the language of the ruling will affect its chances for final approval. Unlike other quarantine rules, the AIDS regulation doeB not state exactly who will be subject to quarantine or the quarantining proce­dures. It also does not define the condi­tions of the quarantine or who will absorb the costs. LGRA plans to solicit legal experts to argue that the rule is incomplete and must be expanded before it can be legally app­lied. If it is shown that, in its present form, the rule is unsound, the full board muBt meet to author a new version. This would delay enactment of the law In Houston, Gay Political Caucus Presi­dent Sue Lovell recommends that those concerned about the issue contact state legislators to get their opinion. Lovell believes that voters should remember their lawmakers' stand on the ruling when making future electoral decisions. "Take that information and remember it in November," said Lovell. Lovell added that even Gov. Mark White should be polled on his position in ihe matter. Lovell agrees with Maxey in question· ing the lack of details in the plan. She explained that, as it stands now, the plan STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS/KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON. FRI 8:30AM-5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON:i. ~·· FRI. EVENINGS AND ::>l\1URDAV MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 ELI.A BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 ---"IN__,rnE HEIGHTS .. r:g:·1c~~ calls for a lot of trust. "They are saying 'trust us,"' said Lovell, "and we're not trusting them right now." The head of Houston gay political activist group added that the ruling places the burden of protecting civil rights on the individual and not the state. "We don't need to trust anyone. We need protection." Both Maxey and Lovell assert that Bernstein has already violated their trust. Earlier this month, after health officals, members of AIDS organizations, and acti­vists met with Bernstein, it was believed that the isolation/ quarantine issue was dead. It appeared at that time that Bern· stein was convinced that it was not a via· ble solution to the problems surrounding public health and AIDS. However, it was with Bernstein's recommendation that the board voted to approve the plan. Maxey cautions that during the public comment period, the board members are not looking for simple pro-and-<:on state­ments. They are seeking solid legal or medical grounds for objections to the rul­ing. Therefore, he advises that those wish­ing to become involved in the process contact J..GRA or local organizations that are coordinating the opposition to the rul­ing. Jim Beecher, president of the KS/ AIDS Foundation of Houston, called a meeting of that group's executive committee to for· mulate the foundation's response to the health panel's action. A public comment hearing will be held Jan. 13 at the Department of Public Health Building in Austin. Those wishing to address their com­ment directly to the board should write Dr. Charles Alexander, chief Bureau oflmmu­nology, Texas Department of Health, 1100 W. 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756. ~n ~nwriam OUR POLICY The Montroae VOtCe will commemorate the pau1ng Of Montrose rftldentl •nd Houlton gay community members Vrtith en 1nnounoement Friends or relatives of ttte deceaseel may provide us with facts about the person'a life. names of the ctolesl aurv•vors. and burial arrangements. Proae or verse can be Included P1cturM are appreciated and will be returned Name of ttie deceased ahovld be attactieo to the photo lnforrnataon •houk1 be provtded to the Monlrose Votee et the etr1~1 pou1bte datt and will be pubhshed m the neJtl ava1labfo ed1t1on Ttwre 11 no charge tor th11 aervice DECEMBER 20, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 4 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20. 1985 The Lower Westheimer Police Community Center officially 01xmed this past Tuesday with a celebration honorifll( the many neighborhood sponsorb who donated time and materials to make this one-of-a-kind facility posaible (Roger Lackey photo) City Councilman George Greanias (right) and John Daniel (center), project coordinator, prebent the "key" to the new police substation to Police Chief Lee Brown (Roger Lackey photo) Lower Westheimer Police Station Open for Business The new Lower Westheimer Police Sub· Station opened Tuesday, Dec. 17 with a special opening celebration and benefit. A crowd of approximately 200 gathered in front of the facility at 7;00 p.m. aN city officials arrived m a police paddy wagon. Robert Sawvell, president of Liberty Bank, introduced Mayor Kathy \\lhitmire, Councilman George Greanias and Hous· ton Police Chief Lee Brown. The city officials hailed the new facility as a vital part in the revitalization oflower Westhe1mer. After the ribbon cutting, those at the celebration toured the station. A lavish buffet waited at the end of the tour Repre­sentatives from area food establishments manned tables laden with examples of their wares. Entertainment included dancing girls circulating through the crowd and the Montrose Symphonic Brass Quintet. The opening celebration was sponsored by the Neartown Business Alliance to honor the many contributors to the pro­ject. The building and property were donated by Liberty Bank. Design and remodeling were donated by developerJ_R. Mc-Connell. Materials, labor and furnish· ings were donated by over 40 businesses and individuals in the Montrose area. Contributors are listed on a special sign ms1de the station. The principal project coordinator has been John Daniel, security director and community relations liaison of Liberty Bank. Daniel is also a founding member and past vice president of the Neartown Business Alliance. He has been assisted by Mark Schmidt of Metropolitan Devel· opment and president of NBA. Approximately 1000 square feet in size, the center is the first 24·hour operation police substation of its kind in Houston. It will be staffed by five full time officers and a sergeant, and three police aide11, part of the high school intern program. On premise assignment provides resi· dents faster crime reporting as well as an opportunity to provide information help· ful in the solution of crimes. It is probable that eventually patrol aRSignments be made for District 17 from this station. Dis· trict 17 covers the area bordered by Drexel on the weet, Bi•sonnet on the south, Allen Parkway on the north, and Main on the east. The substation telephone number is 529-3100. There are three computer terminals on· line to the downtown computer center, which provide instant information on veh· icle registration, arrest warrants out· standing nationwide as well as providing Jvferry Chris(!nas from KINDRED SPIRITS CHRISTMAS EVE - Stop by for a FREE cup of Christmas cheer - our delicious Hot Spiced Wine! CHRISTMAS DAY - Our regular Wednesday night party - all drinks half-price all night - MO COVER! The Life tit, R:"m' ood Plan~ Center BLOOD DRIVE Don't forget: Give the gift of life, give blood. Dec. 22nd Dec. 29th 4902 Ridlmond/Houston, T•xos 77027/(713) 623-6135 direct access to the downtown dispatching cent.er. An estimated $20,000 annual budget must be raised by the community io pay all operating expenses and upkeep on the property. Neartown Business Alliance and other area organizations will be con· ducting an ongoing fundraising cam· paign. Donations and pledges will be accepted by contacting Mark Schmidt at 4414 Montrose Boulevard, or calling 520· 6064. Volunteers wishing to assist in civilian operations and manning of telephones at the station may contact John Daniel at Liberty Bank, 529-4821. Beverage.; for the opening party were provided by the HouRton Organization of Bar Owners. Food was provided by over a dozen local restaurants and catering 11er· vices. ' ltousE of piEs-~ ~ AltDMKEal',.. "'--" 6142 WESTHEIMER 782-1290 Over 30 Pies. Cakes & Cheesecakes Available! Pumpkin & Apple Pies $4.95 Pecan Pie ........... $6.75 Call tor Your Holiday Pies & Cakes! 782-1290 r--------- 1ncredib1e BREAKFAST SPECIAL Monday thru Fnday­MIDNIGHT TO l lAM $1.90 Includes 2 eggs and choice of I) biscuits_ muffins or toast. 2) bacon. ham or sausage. 3) hash browns fries or grits (Not good with any other ol!er) Expires Jan 24 19W L 6142 We:.tt1e1m"r 1...J!Jy --------- Open 24 Hours. 7 Days a Week We will tx· closed from Spm Dec 24 to Spm Dec 25 VISO & Mastercard Accepted ,. DECEMBER 20. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 /If" ~·J ~ MONTE w ,/'..t> ~ I ---in Houston for--- ~ ~ ,~ ;. /If" ~ ,,,, ~ ~ ~ ~ ; Time & Date: Dec 31:fan 1 (8:00 pm - 10 am) The Place: Numbers 300 Westheimer Entertainment Special Effects Lights of Texas "'" ~ ' casino Royal (set design Arabesque Tents) Disco with D.J. Otis James Laser Show Laser Media of LA., Lone Star Laser of Houston Fireworks Pyrotechnics by Imcon Computer Graphics Spectra Images of LA. Video Show Promo Video Light Show Bill Tarabula Plus Free Champagne Celebration At Midnight, Continuous Variety Acts During The Festivities, 1986 PlaySafe Playmates Will Be Present Cash Bar Ticket Locations Union Jack, Appearances Jeans and Sportswear, and At The Door. A Sure Bet To Bring In '86 With A Bang Donation $20.00 Presented By •. ;) 7 I .. Proceeds Benefit KS. AIDS Foundation of Houston, Inc: ~ 6 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20, 1985 United Way ,----------------- Gives Funds for DING-A-LING AIDS Victims MONKEESHINES The United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast voted on Wednesday, Dec. 18, to award over $179,000 in grant money for AIDS information and AIDS victim assistance. According to Sunshine Overkamp, asso­ciate director of the agency, $50,000 of the one-time award will go directly to the McAdory House, a residential facility for ambulatory victims. Another $10,000 will be used for public education. The Visting r-;urses Association, a United Way agency, will receive$119,640 to expand its hospice operation to AIDS patients in the final stages of the disease. The public education grant will be used to develop a general information piece for broad distribution. Grant funding will begin this month and run through July 1986. Commercial Group Seeks to Open First AIDS Hospital From a report m thl' Hou.ton Post A private hospital management corpora· tion is negotiating with the University of Texas Medical School and M.D. Anderson Hoepital and Tumor Institute to open what may be the nation's finrt hospital totally devoted to AIDS patients and research. · American Medical International Inc. wanta to convert its 150-bed Citizens Gen· eraJ Hospital, located at 7407 North Free­way, to a facility where community physicians would admit AIDS patients. Members of the M.D. Anderson staff would oversee the clinical operations and conduct research M.D. Anderson is currently very active in AIDS research, but 88 the state's cancer hospital, it can only admit AIDS patients who have a form of cancer. Liberty Bank Announces New Owners From a Prt!H Rell'ase L. Robert Sawvell, president of Liberty Bank. announced Tuesday, Dec. 17, that Frances Tarlton Gordon and John R. Gor· don have purchaaed the controlling inter· est in the $75 million bank. The Gordons are the founder/ owners of Southwestern Surplus, a large exceee and surplus lines general agency. Gordon succeeds Charles B. Marino 88 chairman of the board and Mrs. Gordon has been named vice chair· man. The announcement, made at a special shareholders meeting, caps the program of changes inaugurated a year ago to strengthen the bank and reposition it for growth. That program includes the new management team headed by Sawvell, the former chief executive officer of Standco Industries and head of a multi-bank hold· ing company in Wisconsin. "We have embarked on an exciting new phase of development. With Frances and John Gordon holding the controlling interest and our new management team firmly established we have the eophietica· tion, expertise and strength to serve small and mid-sized companies," Sawvell com· mented. "Simultaneously, our commitment to the economic development of the Lower Westheimer area means that we take a special interest in the community. For that reason we are proud to have partici· pated in the creation of the Lower Westhei· mer (police) aubstation," he concluded. CHARGE BY PHONE Singing Telegrams Stuffed Animals Balloons NOW APPEARING Bearilyn Monroe Carmen Bearanda Scarlet O'Beara Humphrey Beargart Lauren Bearcall Elvis Bearsley Napoleon Beamopart and The Entire Vandibear Family 521-0565 MC. VlSA AMEX 1408 WESTHEIMER CoJ...- vc.ilt Blue Gloss Dried Flowers Christrnos Rottfe and much, much more! 521-2124 BETTER LAWilS & qARDEilS Total lawn maintenance including mowing. edging, trimming, pruning, fertilizing, sprdqing • 'Bed ffiulchmq • Az4(e<1 Feedmq • Debris Removul • Complete Tree Service • Slumps Removed • Total Fencmq Services (Ceddr notched Picket, Treated, etc) • Complete Sprinkler Sqstems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN ------------ 10%0FF PARTS • IABOR with this ad FOREIGN CAR SPECIALIST Semi-Trucks & American Cars WEST GRAY AUTO • Electrical Work • Converters •Mufflers • Tires • A/C Repair 8am-5:30pm MON.-SAT. L----------..J Counseling Services Loneliness/ Depression Personal/Family Problems Drug/Alcohol Abuse CALL DANIEL J. KUCHARS 529-9004 for an appointment SLIDING FEE SCALE -Founder & board of directors member of largest private drug rehabilitation program in Michigan -Former senior narcotics rehabilitation advisor, U.S. Dept. of State Washington D.C. ' ' -15 years expenence in personaV family/ substance abuse counseling -Certified social worker (formerly Michigan) -Certified drug abuse counselor (formerly Michigan) IN HEART OF MON1ROSE VISA. MASTER CARD. AMERICAN EXPRESS. CHECK or CASH GREENWAY PLACE APARTMENTS 3333 CUMMINS LANE HOUSTON (713) 623-2034 New Year's· Move-In Special 2 Bedroom I 2 Baths with all bills paid lease by January 5th and Receive 1 Month Free Office Mon.-Frl. 8:30-5:30 Houri Saturdov 10:00.5:00 Sundav i :00.5:00 DECEMBER 20, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 524-8601 Ill 11111 Ill BRECKENRIDGE Advance Travel takes you to new heights! From March 26-31 beginner to expert 8 mountains await you for your For delaHa can "'wnt•• 4 day, 5 night Colorado Ski Holiday. lncl~des round trip air on United Airlines, transfers, hit 10700 N 60 'orthwesi Frwy · . . od t. Suite I tickets and condominium accomm a ions. Houston, Texas 770'11. Other optional features are available. TRAVEL (713) 682-2002 ffiake Wa1J for neon Don't ffiiss Our BEFORE CHRISTffiAS LIQUIDATIOil SALE Sale Starting Dec. 20th 40o/o Off All qift merchandise (except neon) Euerqthinq ffiust Cio1 c rea ti ue neon. 1403 IDestheimer "On the Curve" 523r10783 8 MONTROSE VOICE t DECEMBER 20. 1985 An Announcement to the Montrose Business Community Changes at the Montrose Voice In order to better serve the Montrose business community, the Newspaper of Montrose•• announces the following changes. EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY ••. • Next Day Proof Service on All Display Ads 24 hours (including weekends) after you give your ad copy to your per­sonal Voice Sales Representative (either at our office or at your office). we'll deliver to you at your office a "proof." • Camera-Ready Ads for Other Publications If you are also running the ad with another pubhcat1on. we can provide the other publication with your camera-ready ad (and save you their production charges) At the same tome we furnish a proof to you. and after you approve, we can rush a camera-ready copy to any other publication In town. We will even make copy and size changes necessary for the other publication's format. • No Charge for Art Work through Christmas Ho! Ho' Ho' Through the end of the year, the Voice is not charging for art­work, halftones, typesetting or pasteup. You pay only for space, color (if desired) and special placement (if desired) And that includes artwork. typesetting, etc., for ads we produce for you for other publications • New Sizzling Artists We now have more artists and more art services available than ever Leave 1t to us to match your need with the right graphics-with the proof on the "proof." • New Columns and Features You've already noticed 1t in recent weeks The Montrose Voice Is brimming with ondepth invest1gat1ve-style articles. And they'll continue Our new "Montrose Crossword Puzzle.'' an exclusive puzzle with special words and clues relating to Montrose and Houston's gay community, ls returning (This popular feature originally appeared in the Voice in 1981.) Sponsorship of this feature 1s available Other new columns will begin In the next few Issues and revolve around (1) antiques (Montrose 1s the antique shop capital of the Southwest). (2) cars (after all. we are a newspaper and what's a newspaper without an auto section), (3) operating a small business (Montrose is also the small business, or entrepre­neurial. heart of Houston). and (3) travel (not your normal travel column you find In the dallies. which seem to be mostly written for little old ladies, but one written especially for the interests of our liberated readers) . Businesses and business services which appeal to these specific areas can have their ads placed in that section without a special placement charge EFFECTIVE FIRST ISSUE OF 1986 (RELEASED JAN 3) • Local Rate Schedule Eight This will be a more complicated schedule than our current one. In effect since October 1984 (These complications" reward advertisers for loyalty and frequency.) Our new rate structure will follow formulas used by mainstream newspapers The changes include 1. Year's contract. If your business is such where you can reserve your advertising space through a year (or even a few months). we can offer you our most favorable rates By 1nd1cat1ng your space requirements ahead, we can better plan our issues We'll reward you handsomely for that convenience. 2. "Advert1smant Averaging." If you don't want to plan your ads ahead of time-or you prefer not to sign a contract-we can still grant you a very favorable rate by looking at your past advertising in the Voice Each display ad you've placed tn the last 12 months lowers you into a reduced rate level for your present advertising. And it's cumulative. revised weekly Example: any ad you place today helps get you a lower rate for any ad you place through a year from today • New Higher Press Run The Montrose Voice will increase its weekly press run from 10.000 copies to 12.000 copies (a 20% Increase). This should increase our estimated readership from about 27.000 people weekly to about 33.000 people weekly (Even at an estimated 27,000 Houston readers weekly, the Voice is already thousands ahead of the other two gay publications ) • Regional Combination Rates Beginning 1n January, the Voice will offer regional combination rates with other gay community publications elsewhere on Texas plus New Orleans If you have a ma1or campaign that needs regional exposure. we can place you in several local publicatlons guaranteed to saturate the maier markets of our region. • New Features, Community Involvement The Montrose Voice has over the past 5 years taken the lead among gay community publications for community involvement We are part of the Montrose neighborhood and we work very hard to see that Montrose 1s a growing, vibrant, healthy area of the city 1 We will continue to cover and promote the worthwhile activities of com­munity organizations 2 We will continue to make financial contributions to many groups 3. We will continue to be pohtlcally active and endorse level-headed, non­react1onary, human-rights-oriented candidates 4 And we will continue to join and be active in our community's vaned social, pohticat, medical business. religious and sports organizations No one has a greater interest in you and Montrose than you and the Montrose Voice. Fire Causes Minimal Damage at Jim's Gym A midaftt>moon fire on Friday, Dec. 13, forced a Montrose health facility to close. Jim's Gym, 607 Westheimer, received minimal damage from the electrical fire which began in the attic. Anticipating new city permits, the gym scheduled itself to reopen Dec. 19. ~ EIGHT DAYS A WEEK Can Johnnie Ray Rousseau, a 22-year-old black gay aspiring nightclub singer, find happiness with Keith Keller, a six-foot-two blond bisexual football jock who works in a bank? Will Johnnie Ray's manager ever get him on the Merv Griffin show? Who was the lead singer of the Shangri-las? And what about Snookie? Somewhere among the answers to these and other silly ques­tions, Larry Duplechan has writ­ten the story of a couple as dif­ferent as - well, as black and white. And it's as funny, and sexy, and memorable, as any love story you'll ever read. ~ EIGU llD I WEEI EIGHT DAYS A WEEK by Larry Ouplechan $6.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Enclosed is $7.50 (includes postage and handling) for one copy of Eight Days a Week, by Larry Duplechan. name. ____________ address. ___________ _ city ----------state------zip _____ _ Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 DECEMBER 20, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Dr. Didato's Quiz: What's So Funny? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice If you have it, you're popular. If you don't, you're shunned! We're talking about a sense of humor-that distinctly human quality which gives encouragement tooth· era, keeps us sound in mind and body, and generally makes life easier to bear. To see humor in living is an innate capacity. Infants usually respond to a smile by the age of two months, and out· right laughter appears about a month later. Once we learn to chuckle, wedoit (or should learn to do it) for the rest of our lives. It's estimated that an average person laughs 15 times a day. But reactions to humor are highly variable and complex. &>garding specific jokes, what to some people is dull, to others is hilarious. Our quiz gauges your sense of humor. To find where you stand on this desirable trait of young and old alike, take it, then read on for explanations. Part 1: Rate yourself on these items as follows: 1-not true, 2-somewhat true, 3-very true. I consider myself to be: I. Fun-loving 2. Socially aggressive 3. Pl!'asure-seeking 4. Above average in sex drive Part 2: Now pick what you consider to be the funnier joke in each pair below: 1\.A. "Which animals can jump high!'r than a tree?" "All animals, trees can't Letters Agrees with State Health Board From Loran E. Doss When the State Board of Health puts forth a proposal to isolate AIDS victims, this certainly seems to be a positive approach to protect public health. It would be an unconvincing argument for gay rights advocates to say that it would hindt>r efforts to stop the disease. If AIDS victims were kept under close obst>rvation, more could be learned about this terrible disease and could possibly lead to future prevention. Items in the "Letters" section represents opinions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MONTROSE VOICE. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community. Please keep the letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," MONTROSE VOICE, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily jump." B. "Waiter, what's this?" "Bean soup, sir." "I don't care what it's been, I'm ask· ing what it is now." 6.A. "If you don't stop playing that horn, I'll go crazy." "Too late, I stopped an hour ago." B.J ane received three wrong phone calls in one afternoon, each asking for Joe Sanders. That evening, the phone rang again and the caller announced: "Hello, this is Joe Sanders. Are there any calls for me?" 7.A. "Tell me how long cows should be milked?" "They should be milked the same as short ones." B. "Do you know what happens to little boys who tell lies?" "Yes, Mom. They travel for half fare." 8.A. "A motorist who ran over a small dog tried to console its owner by saying: " I'll be happy to replace your pet." The reply took only a second: "Sir, don't flatter your11elf." B. After an astronomy lecture, an elderly matron asked nervously, "How long did you say it would take for the sun to burn out?" "Oh, about 5 billion years." "Whew," replied the lady. "I thought you said million " o Explanation There is not one satisfactory theory of humor today. Science is just about where it was centuries ago when philosophers tried to explain it. Sigmund Freud, the psychoa· nalyst, was the first to form the theory of humor. He finally concluded that humor serves two purpoi;es: 1. It is a mature ability used to repudiate oi le11sen one's suffering and 2. It is a rt>lease of pent-up or repressed drives and t>motions. o Score Part 1-The first four items in our quiz are traits which have been found to be associated ·with persons who have a high sense of humor. Total up your score for part 1. Part 2-Items 5 through 8 consist of jokes which wt>re rated high or low on funnint>ss by using a panel of psychologist judges (a common scientific method for judging wit and humor). Give yourself two points for all A answers and 1 point for all B answers. Now, add up your points from parts 1 and 2 to obtain your total quiz scorl'. Consider the following as a rough esti· mate of your sense of humor: 16·20 points. Keen as Johnny Carson. 11-15 points. Average as anyone else. 0.10 points. Move over, Count Dracula. HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 1985 Every year, it's the same ... "what to buy for Aunt Clara or Cousin Bill?" Tus year, bring your list of fickle friends and relative.s to Say Cheese. We have hundreds of gift ideas, from the traditional to the unusual. For starters, we sell over ()o varieties of cheeses, dozens of imported coffees and teas delicious hom~made ;:"' ! olates and candies, plus a wide variety of meats, from plain ham to proscuitto, sliced to your specifications. Look over our selections of imported wines and liqueurs, many in attractive gift packages. We've searched the world over for perfect gift items that will bring back memories, and put a smile on anyone's face ... even Aunt Clara's. , You'll al.~o find shelves 'stocked with rare finds, such t as Italian fruit cakes, real t Cajwi hot sauce~ (for those serious about their hot sauce), and real, honest­to- goodness jellies and preserves made b}' sweet litt.le-ole ladies from the hills of Tennessee. Don't forget to treat 1 yourself to our luncheon deli, serving sandwiches made to order, salads, and soup du jour ... good to the t. , last drop! You'll find something for everyone on your list at Say Cheese. Stop in soon before Aunt Clara catches on and buys out the inventory! 10 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20, 1985 A Classy 'Color Purple' and a Campy 'Clue' By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Fllm Critic Just when moviegoers were about to throw up their hands in disgust and give up on 1985, along comes two new films that spar· kle in the holiday season Those looking for classy drama will love Steven Spiel· berg's The Color Purple, and those looking ;for campy laughs and fun stars will defi· nitely revel in Clue. Clue sort ofresemble.' Murder By Death, although it's a lot funnier and the jokes fly by at a rclenUess pace. Based on the popu· lar board game, thi" film haR the added novelty of three different endings (A,B,CJ showing at different theaters. This is either to get you to see the film several times, or give you and your friends some­thing to argue about when you discuss whether Miss Scarlett or Mrs. Peacock really did it. The real surprise is Spielberg's dramatic adoption of Alice Walker's best seller The Color Purple. Featuring an almost totally black cast including Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover, and Adolph Ceaser, Spiel· berg has made a fairly faithful adaption of the book that should please readers and filmgoers alike. While it falls short of being a "great" film. Purple is a moving portrait of a struggling woman that could iust run off\.,; th n whole handful ofO,;cars next year. (From leftJ Eileen Brennan, Lesley Ann Warren and Madeline Kahn star, respectit-ely, as Mrs. Peacock, Miss Scarlett and Mrs. White, in thf' comic whodunit "Clue' o Clue If you're m the mood for something light and cheerful, check out the mysteries of Clue along with therestoftheall-starcast. · othing very deep or arty here,jui;t a fran· tically hilarious concoction of su~pects and potential victims running amuck. The butler(Tim Curry) greel.b each of the guests as they arrive at the lon g-dei;erted mansion. Each person is given a fictitious name, and they they are introduced to Mr Boddy (get it?). Right off, Boddy is bumped off when the lights suddenly go out. Whodunnit? Well, it could have been Mrs. Peacock in the hall with the candlestick. Or Colonel Mustard in the study with the knife. Or even Miss Scarlett in the kitchen with the revolver. And since there are three differ­ent endings to see, it's no telling who "really" did it. Actually, there are several people who get strangled, knifed, or konked on the head during the course of Clue. The ending I sow was so cluttered with murderers, it almost seemed irrelevant who killed ol' Mr. Boddy. Everyone in the movie is hav­ing such a great time camping it up and the dialogue is so brisk and snappy, we almost forget to wonder who really did do it. Director/ writer Jonathon Lynn is an THf-__ sEAsol[] GIFTWARE PARTYGOODS STATIONERY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 1. • • IPA PER, L --- __ ..:._ _ ETC Meme>nai a1J1 •arv ,....,. ~ ~n1 "°""" 0o>. c.• 1900 w Grav ~10 ~100 Golleno 203~ Pos10o>. eivo 901 110J FM well ll4! f'.! 1900 \·- '>M 991! Wl»l<.ll<J>e 1!!01 Weslhetmet 9:,2 551>6 English televiAion writer making a very su<·cessful debut in American film. Lynn obviously has a great love for this genre, and a very funny ~ense of timing and writ· ing His film editors, David Bretherton (Cabaret/ and Richard Hainei; (Bu/lit), are excellent, fast-paced splicers who keep everything zooming along at a precar· iously funny but even pace. Only Victer Kemper's fuzzy and dull photography seems to blemish the otherv.;se well made film. Of course, the spotlight must be turned to the cast, who play their roles to the hilt. The men's roles are written to take a back seat to the wretchedly funny women. Pro­fessor Plum (Christopher Lloyd of Back to the Future}, Mr. Green (Michael McKeon from This is Spinal Tap} and Colonel Mus· lard (Martin Mull) pretty u·ell stay in thf' backwound and let the jokes bounce off them. Only Tim Curry has a really meaty man's rolf' as the snide and tidy butler, who may or may not be thf' butlf'r. 'The trio of women is certainly a wild sight to behold, and really make the movie. Eileen Brennan makes her screen return (after her tragic accident) as the outlandish Mrs. Peacock, sporting studded cateye glasses and a quivering hat of ostrich and peacock feathers. Her charactf'r is a hilarious mess, complete with gold lame dress and bothersome fur that slides down her arm (not to mention some very rlassic lines). Moving in right behind her is Madeline Kahn as the heavily·t•eiled Mrs. White u·ho is "mourni11g" her husband's demise. "It u·as a case of life after death, "she says calmly. "Now that he's dead. I have a life." Wearing a black file suit (u·hich covers a .~trapless cocktail dre;;s) and with her hair rut "china doll" style, Kahn fits in great u·ith the rf'st of thf' farcial proceedings. '/Jou have ~omelhing lo ~a'I ... Sa'I ii with cf~~ ... in 14l We design and make our own jewelry. Custom work on request. CALL (713) 680.8286 or Send Order Form . - ~di~ ----- ~R~~~ - ~oo~ --1 Kenesco ltd. qty Pondent 75.00 ea I ;~?t~ P9~~~~ak Blvd. qty Tio tack 48 00 ea I Houston, Texas 77056 qty Collar pin 48 00 ea I qty 18" Herringbone chain 7500 ea NAME ADDRESS cnv. STATE. ZIP Check. Card No qty for post 39 00 ea I Money Order. M/C or Visa Exp Dote I I I I I I -~~~~~52'~~ ------------~ Rounding out the trio is Lesley Ann Warren as the voluptuous and .~exy Miss Scarlett who runs a "quiet" escort service. Spouting sexual innuendos and throwing herself at the men, Scarlett is a high class tramp somewhat in the Rita Hayworth mold. She meshes well with other women, forever throwing them off·guard with her off-the·cuff remarks. Clue is so funny that it catches us quite off guard and knocks us to the floor laugh· ing. Unlike other movies of this type, about 90% of the jokes are really funny here. You almost want to go back a second time just to catch the funny lines you misRed while watching the looney charac­ter11, or maybe just to catch one of the other two endings. Clue isn't just a game any more, because now it's been made into a crazy but skillful comedy that should be a Christmas smash. Don't miss it. o The Color Purple Steven Spielberg is probably a little edgy about the release of his newest effort. Unlike Goonies, Young Sherlock Holmes, and TVs "Amazing Stories," this fi lm is his first seriously dramatic, adult effort in quite some time. Also, the movie is based on a beloved best seller that just happened to win the Pulitzer Prize for literature sev· eral years ago. It's nice to report that Steven gets a B­plus on his report card this time around. He has assembled a superb cast (mostly unknowns) and has a screenplay by Menno Meyjes that follows the book pretty closely (but has softened it quite a bit). I tis epic-sized like the "Roots" mini-Reries, but also tender and warm like Sounder. With a universal theme of love and maturing, Spielberg probably has nothing much to worry about. The Color Purple is actually a very trou­bling tale that has been toned down for general mass consumption. There is adul· tery, incest and abuse, but it is rarely up front or forceful towards viewers. Not that life of young Celie in a 1906 Georgia town is very sanitized. The facts are there, but the film never dwells on the bad; instead we are always looking for a better tomor· row, just like in all of Spielberg's films. Our heroine is Celie (played by newco­mer Whoopi Goldberg), who has two child­ren by her father and then is given to a widower with four wild children. "Mr." (as she calls him) never marries her, treats her like low dirt, and keeps letters thatare sent by her beloved younger sister. Celie plays the quiet wife who is obedient to her hus­band, but we know that she is longing to break out for the freedom that she deserves. Her husband (played gruffly by Danny Glover from Silverado) doesn't see any potential in Celie, and basically treats her like a slave. Various characters begin to drift in and out of her life. A dance hall singer named Shug Aver (played to perfection by Mar· garet Avery) is the woman that "Mr." always wanted to marry. When "Mr." brings her to the house when she is ill, Celie falls in love with her and the two have an affair. Their love is muted, but their revealing scenes together tell us a lot about these women and their problems. Other minor characters include Oscar nominee Adolph Ceasar as "Mr.'s" grumpy father, and Rae Dawn Chong as the girlfriend of Harpo-one of "Mr.'s" sons. Harpo (Willard Pugh) is first mar­ried to Sofia, a large, robust woman played by talk show host Oprah Winfrey Win· frey's character is phenomenal, moving from proud to downtrodden, and finally­in the end-triumphant. As Celie, Whoopi Goldberg is very good . It is a quiet sedate role that requires deep feelings more than elaborate actions or speeches. Goldberg builds the character very slowly as she comes out of her shell, serenely revealing a strong woman who can finally stand up for herself. We don't -w ~ LJ1WI and ·Yri£w;~-~~! Fanny and Sam Ken, Dick, Red, Paul, Jerry, Adrian, Gene, Will, David, Chris, Pickles, Robin, Ron, Roy, Jim, Randy DECEMBER 20, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 Films Danny Glover and Whoopi Goldberg star as the ill-tempered "Mr." and Celie, in "The Color Purple" get to see a lot of the ''strong" Celie until late in the film, but when she starts bloom· ing we realize what potential Celie really has. The negative aspects of Purple are min­ute, but they downgrade the film to a senti­mental level. Many scenes are overplayed to get some emotional reaction from the audience, Spielberg throws in unneeded comic relief (sec people fall from the raf­ters unhurt) or tearful overtures at the drop of a hat. Not helping things is Quincy Jones' score, which rises to horrendously soaring heights at major dramatic points in the film. One thing that really annoys me is hav­ing my emotions artificially stirred up. I wanted to enjoy the simple and moving scenes by themselves. but the swelling music: and the swirling photography really knock the wind out of the effect. It's as 1f Spielberg doesn't truHt the power of the actors or the script and has to juice it up to make it effective. It .,.ill be easy for some to call thIS a "great" film just because there aren't very many black films made. Unfortunately, Spielberg's effort loses some emotional impact and intensity of the Alice Walker characters and scenarios because he over­does it. The Color Purple is a very good effort and audiences will no doubt be affecUld by it. It's just that it could have been so much better with "less" inistead of "more." COMING FRIDAY DECEMBER 27th FULL MOON MADNESS STRIKES AGAIN! IN THE HEART OF MONTROSE ... 21~:s BAR-GAINS GALORE! ON THE PATIO 9PM til closing. HOURS (HAPPY) 7am-2pm. 4-8pm.10pm-12:30am OPEN SUNDAYS TOOi for your ADDED shopping pleasure! 1022 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 528-8851 r 12 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20. 1985 For Black Males, Suicide Rates Peak at Prime of Life By LoW. Freedberg Pacific News Service Spttial to the Montrose Voice Soaring suicide rates provide graphic measure of the growing despair among young black men on the marginR of Ameri­can society. In general, blacks commit suicide far less than whites. But in the 20-34 age group for black males, suicide rates have risen dramatically in the past two decades and are now approaching the suicide rates of white males. Of lesser concern are suicides among black females, where, like white females, rates remain much lower than among males. trying to enter the job market. "All thoRe programs gave young people some hope that there could be a better life, that we could get educated and could get good jobs," says Dr Jewelle Gibbs of the School of Social Welfare at the University of Cali· fomia, Berkeley. She contends that only those blacks already in the middle class benefitted significantly. Left behind were the ''working poor" and the "poor poor." "Along with a gap between hope and aspirations, you have a group of angry, very depressed young people," says Gibbs. This development coincided with a surge of baby boomers entering the labor market. The net result, she says, hen been "fewer opportunities at the top for all tee­Figures from the National Center on nagers." Health Statistics show suicide rates for 20 to 24-year-0ld black males increasing from 5.8 to 16.7 percent per 100,000 between 1960 and 1983, reaching 19.l'lbper 100,000 among 25 to34-year-olds by the end of that period. For white males aged 20-24, suicide rates went from 11.9 to 25.5 per 100,000 during the same period. ~·If Among young bl.acks, Adams says, there is a ........ ~well-defined fatal-ism, a widespread belief that because the future holds little prom­ise, they may as well extract as much from life while they can. What gives cause for hope is that, in spite of increases, black suicide rates are still below those of whites. "Historically, blacks have been copers," asserts Dr. Diane Howell, a psychologist. "Blacks have developed the ability to cope with a great deal of adversity. And that strength has been pa88ed down from gen· Some psychologists say the increase eration to generation." among black males has come as blacks move closer to mainstream white society, but experience disappointment and des­pair at continuing discrimination in the labor and housing markets, and in other areas of social life. This view is reinforced when one looks at the difference in peak suicide ages between white and black males. Despite the current focus on white teenage suicide rates, whites are actually much more likey to kill themselves when they are 65 and over-the point at which they experience the loss of a job or the death of a spouse, and question whether or not they still have a productive role to play in society. For blacks, however, peak suicide rates are reached during young adulthood. as they march full-tilt into the realities of sur· vivmg in white society. Thereafter the rates decline dramatically. What this age differential implies, says Dr. Herb Schreier, chief of psychiatry at Children's Hospital in Oakland, Calif., is that "'Whites can postpone their disillu· sionment until a later age, whereas blacks discover in their twenties that it's not there for them." Hopelessness, he adds, is the single predictor of suicide. Mental health workers argue that sui· CJde rates among yoW1g black males (15-24 years of age) would be even higher if other causes of death-such as automobile acci· dents, drug overdoses, victim-precipitated homicides, and other violent accidents­were more accurately diagnosed or reported as accurately as among whites. Among young blacks, for example, the homicide rate is five times the rate for young white males. Many psychologists 1111Sert that suicde is simply the flip side of homicide: killing turned inwards instead of outwards. I I Says Dr. Craig Adams of the East Oak· land Mental Hl'alth Center, "So many of these kids get into situations that involve gun play, so it would be easy to put them­selves in a situation where they will get themselves killed." Among young blacks, Adams says, there is a well-defined fatalism, a wides­pread belief that because the future holds little promise, they may as well extract as much from life while they can. "If you plan to be dead by the time you 're 30, then you may as well live life to the fullest." AssertB Dr. Bill Smith, a psychologist at the West Oakland Mental Health Center which serves primarily black clients, "Self-dcstrictive behavior is the most per· vasive issae in the black community. In a minority of cases, it is expressed in suici· dal behavior0 Mental health workers speculate that traditional buffers against the effects of poverty and exclusion from the mainstream-like the extended family and the church-have eroded, leaving blacks more sUBCCptible to suicide. Ironically, as blacks move closer to what could be regarded as a white lifes· tyle, many built in protections within black culture are further weakened. "When you move from the protection of the black community, it shoots up your level of frustration," says Dr. Melanie Sweeney.Criffith, director of the East Oakland Mental Health Center. But by far the most important factor in precipitating suicide among young blacks, these professionals believe, is ris· ing expectations that can't be met. Sweeney·Griffith finds, for instance, that many blacks experience a sense of "false assimilation"-the belief that 808 Lovett ~\_,~~ 521-1015 ---~~~~CA~~~--~~~ Get Your Holiday Bang at the Boulevard Cafe Boulevard Big Bang Breakfast MondaV-frlday 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage Two Palcakes $1.99 We will be closed from 1pm 12/24 until 7cxn 12/26 ---- In addition, institutions that have helped to keep suicide rates down, like the extended family and the church, ere still powerful forces in the black community, in spite of setbacks. Black ministers report a recent upsurge in young black participa· lion their churches. And mental health workers say black families still rely on extended family members, even when they live in different parts of the country, to a much greater degree than whites. things will get better--0nly to encounter such traditional obstacles as housing and job discrimination. "It's almost like a dou· hie whammy," she says. "In addition to the BBBimilationist stresses, there are still the basic racial and demographic factom that contribute to an increase in suicide." In fact, those very forces that held out hope for minorities in the 1960s, while opening doors for some, may have added to the total level of stress for young blacks "There's an incredible amount of pres· sure released with the use of the extended family, even when family members arc separated by miles and miles," says psy· chiatrist Schreier "Sometimes even that doesn't work. Sometimes it works dramat· 1cally well." Happ~ Holida~s First North Houston had ·oNE• Then there was a *CHOICE• Now We give you the answer K.J.'s CLUB 11830 AIRLINE 2 blocks South of Aldlne-Bender 445-5849 HOURS: 6 PM-2 AM SUNDAY POOL T"""*'*1t $3.00 entry Wimer t91<H Pol MONDAY Hotel & RHtaurant Employ­ahoW proof of ....,..,yrMnt $1.00 bar drink• .. night WEDNESDAY TUESDAY Alr1lne Employaea ahoW proof of ~yment s 1.00 bat drink• .. night FREE CHRISTMAS BUFFET 3 PM THURSDAY Professional Male Strippers FRIDAY SATURDA y PARTY!!PARTY!!PARTY Miss Gay Texas Gulf Coast Pageant 10:30 PM, $3.00 Cover DECEMBER 20. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Fridays and Saturdays ,. ~ .,. I with Houston's Hottest After Hours plus . . . i/td /rom fi.eaven aturdays in December 1 Pacific at Grant 521-9123 me,.,." Cl..,.i~tma~ anJ W~l..ing Y,u J.Japp" ..JloliJa"~ :from '/jour :Jmn~ on Paci/ic S&-1 s 14 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20, 1985 Houston Tennis Party Sports Voice By R ich Corder Special to the Montrose Voice Last Saturday, the Houston Tennis club held its annual Christmas Party/ Meet· ing/ Installation of Officers at the home of Rick Hadnot and Warren Wellik. The "Christmas Gift Pass Along" was its usual success and lots of fun for members and guests. A buRiness meeting was held with reper· cussions that will be felt for some time. More on that next week. Tim Calhoun was elected to serve as treasurer since Armi Alabanza will be unable to assume the office in January. Tim and the other officers were installed accordingly. They will assume their duties in 1986. Hardy tennis players managed to get to the courts on Sunday and one new player broke into the ladders. Henry Eckhardt managed a 7~ (7-4), 3-6, 6-3 victory over D ladder No. 6 Rudy Garcia, bringing a stop to Rudy's winning 11treak. Randy Miller kept his intact with a 6-3, 7-5 win over Bill 'Baby Jane' League Elects Officers Billy Phelps was recently elected presi· dent of the Whatever Happened to Baby Jane Mixed Bowling League. He wm be assisted by Phill Blakeway, vice presi· dent; Randy Ell111, treasurer; Daniel Frausto, secretary, and Alyce Brown, sergeant-at-arms. Baby Jane bowls at Stadium Lanes at 8:45 each Thursday. Baby Jane welcomes all bowlers and has openings for substitute and perman· ent bowlers. For further information, call Billy Phelps, 993-0243 evenings. Santainti. Joe L. pulled a leap-frog, hop· ping the maximum four places, with a 6-0, 3-6, 6-3 win over Thomas Cortez. Thomas has been rallying for one set, but seems to play out in the third. The highest ranking match was Ronnie MauBS challenging Eddie Chavez for No. 9 on the Bladder. He beat Chavez 3-6, 7.f> (7-4), 6-1 as Eddie may have had his eye on his pending doubles match. Bearden and San· taiti defeated the new team of Chavez and Eckhardt 6-1, ~. 6-1. Barn Downs Ranch Hands in MSAPool The Barn and the Ranch Hands met in a battle of the undefeated first place teams in the fourth week of the MSA Winter Bil· Hard League. The Barn came away winners, easily defeating the Ranch Hands at The Ranch. Bacchus I took over the top spot in Div· ision A by beating The Galleon in the match between the second ranked teams. Four 611 and Mary's Naturally won their inter-divisional rounds and tied for second place in Division A. Following The Barn in Di vision Bis the 611 III, with Lipstick a close third. Both teams won matches against Division A nvals. On tap for December is theMSA Billiard League Holiday Tournament to be held Dec. 28 at The Ranch. Players may sign up for the 12:00 noon or 4:00 p.m. flights. Finals will be played at 7:00 p.m. All inter· ested league members a re invited to regis· ter for this tournament by calling Dennis Lord, league secretary. " . . . In the heart of The City" $44 00 · FRH AIRPORT SHllTTU • COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE • WINI • • COMPllMENTUY CONTINENTAl. IRLu:FAST (large single/double occupancy) • VALET SIRVICIE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Resarvatoons required p la,;ise c.a ll Toll Free 800-253-5263 (Nationa l) 800·521-d523 (Ca irl) (415)-4A1-5141 [Son Francisco) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 'flfE BEST LITilE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTIY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVATE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL ( 504) 566-1177 1118 URSCLINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 Sports Voice Calendar & Standings MSA Pool League Team Standings. Winter League. Week 2 TEAM Recent Weck. Total Matches. Total games DIVISION A 1 Bacchus I 2 Four 611 3 Mary01 Naturally 4 Ranch Hands 5 Bacchus II 6Too611 7 BAB ShOOtetll 8 Marfon & Lynn·s 90utl-s 10 Street Cats 11 The Hole &-6 3-0 12-3 4-0 10-5 4--0 &-9 3-1 S-7 3-1 1~ 2-2 11·4 2-2 &-9 2-2 13-2 1-2 5-10 1-3 S-4 1·3 DIVISION B 30-15 3~21 »21 3~21 33-27 35-25 3o-30 29-21 26-19 27-33 22·32 1 The Bam ~ 4-0 38-22 2 611111 H 2·2 33-27 3 Llpatock 10-5 2-2 32·28 4 Tho Galleon &-9 2·2 30-30 5 JA'I S-10 2·2 29-31 6 The 611 3-12 2-2 26-34 7 Kindred Splrots 11 NI 1-2 22·23 BLoneStars 0-15 1·3 1&-41 9 Kindred Spirits I 4· 11 0-3 17·2S 10 Hooters II 4.5 0-4 15-39 11 Hooters I 2· 13 o-4 14-48 Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten· nos Center Houston Tennis Club 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling league Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling league 7;30pm. Post Oak lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm. Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball league." 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool league plays 8pm. various locations THURSDAY: Fron1runners, Memorial Park TennJS Center Whatever Happened to Baby Jane· MSA Mixed Bowling League 8:45pm. Stadium Bowl ~ ~· ··•see the stars••···· Seasons Greetin8s Rent I Movie, Get lnd Half ~ice* MON.-THURS.: 10am-8pm FRl.-SAT.: 10am-10pm SUN: 1pm-6pm WE CARRY ADULT FILMS 2016 MONTROSE Ho us ton, Texas 77006 529-5544 0 Plus deposit. Does not include adult films Special Events Feb 14·16: IGBO·affoliated Bluegrass Clas· sic, Louisville Feb. 28-Mar. 2· IGBO·afllliated Spring Break Invitational, Ft Lauderdale Mar. 27·30: IGBO·aflol1ated Dixie Invitational, Atlanta Mar 29·31 IGBO·afflliated M.A.K.l.T., Kansas City June: Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas. competing with Hous­ton Tennis Club July 25-Aug. 3, 1986.· U.S. Olympic Festival, Houston Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Dec. 15 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Donny Kelley 6 Armi Albanza 7 Ron Bell 8 David Heiland 4 Rock Hadnot 9 Tony Tom 5 J C. Barrera 1 St8"e Bearden 2Sabe Velez 3 Oscar Martinez 4 Edward de Leon 5 Ron McCauley 1 Joe L. 2 Thomas Cortez 3 Larry Jar\'iS 4 Mark Deardorff SMr Biii 1 Steve Bryant 2 Roy Mendlora 3 John Murphy 10 Roch Corder BLADDER 6 Lou Garza 7 David Garza 8 Ronn Rodd 9 Aonnoe Mauss 10 Eddie Chavez C LADDER 6 Rock Knapp 7 Gabe Herp1n 8 A1ck Massey 9 Billy Green 10 Randy Moller DlADDER 6 Henry Eckhardt 7 Rudy Garcia 8 Joe D 4 Dalwod Hendrickson 9 J.v Klinger 5 Oscar Yaass1 10 Steve Chesney E LADDER 1 David Moskowitz 2 Howard Brown 3 Randy J11HSCheck 4 Boll Sar>taoto DOUBLES LADDER 1 Jim Kotch & Dock Cotten 2 Arml Alabanza & David Garza 3 David He1land & Rich Corder 4 Steve Bearden & Biii Santa1tl 5 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 6 Billy Green & Poul Brown 4. HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service General Contractor •Roofing •Remodeling • Sheetrock/Painting •Plumbing/ Electrical • Room Additions •Water Proofing 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 OPEN FOR BIJSINESS BEFORE AND AF'fER The Montrose Voice will be open regular business hours Dec. 24 and Dec. 26 Of course, we will be closed Christmas Day Our next issue will be released Friday, Dec. 27 Advertising deadline has been extended to 2:00 p.m., Thursday. For better placement, though, please give us your ad by 3:00 p.m., Dec. 24 ~'"'1n ~ q,.../intp from 1/u nw6par-r o/ mnlro# ~----------..., : s10°0 : ! off ! I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I any of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing• Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Errvelopes •Announcements • lrrvitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • I rrvoices DECEMBER 20. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 FS 1, GENERAL REPAIR l ~ SERVICE 561-7755 When it Leaks .. . Doesn't Open .. . Needs to be Wired ... Or Just Needs Some Paint ... AND HAD TO BE DONE YES TE RDA Y Call Us First Electrical, Plumbing, Appliances, A/C Repair *Cooling System check a flush $2795 * A/C Charge a Check $2695 * Oil, Filter a Lube $249~ ASK FOR CHIEF BUTTROCK rrne to check vour COOi ng systerr' SANCHEZ FINE AUTO REPAIR SPEEDY - PRINTING SERVICE OF Tll!'XA.S Fast Reliable Serv1Ce, Excellent Quality. Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. Convenient Southwest Locatoon I -k • ..,, of awm.y Rock .. 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Call 590-CRAB 16 MONTROSE VOICE DECEMBER 20, 1985 Gay and lesbian reading ======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS HOT UV1NG: Erotic stories about afc 'c:1, edited by John Preston, $8 00. The AIDS crisis bas closed off some forms of sexual acuv1ty for health-conscious gay men, but 11 has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression. Herc, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writer~ present new short stories that imaginatively erottcize safe sex. Contributors include Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Many Rubm, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T.R Witomsk1. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE MI: Confessions of a gay schoolteacher by Eric Rofes, $7.00. When Eric Rofe; began teaching stxth grade at a conser­vauve pnvate school, he soon felt the stram of a split identity Here he describes bis two years of teaching from w1thm the closet, his difficult decision to come out at work, and the conse­quences of that decision i SfCOilD CHflflCf S a novel bV Florine De Ueer SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00 Is u always harder to accept what is offered freelyl Jeremy, young and sull naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted fnend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark. ONE TEENAGER IN TIN: Writing~ by gay and le bian youth, edited by Ann Heron, S3 95 Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all over the US and Canada, mostly ID high school, share their coming-out experiences. STOLEN MOMENTS. by John Preston, SS.00. Who says heroes can't be gay1 In the fourth of the ·•Mission of Alex Kane" senes, Kane and his partner Danny Fortclh head for Houston. There, they take on a media baron who is intent on us1Dg homophobia to build his tabloid's circulauon. Also available: Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies, each star­ring Alex and Danny; $5 00 each. EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00. Harper KIDg has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order 1hcu namesakes were se­duced Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start! Enter Mick, a lover from the past talkmg about then furure; Garrick, a first-year teacher looklDg for conjunc­tton>, and not necessarily in the class­room; and young Dean, an oversexed Dennis the Menace making all A's ID some very advanced biology. IRIS, by Jamee Veto, $7 00 The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­tion and vens:cance - this time with a lesbian theme. REFLECTIONS Of A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4.95. The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, $7.00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attemptlDg to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who tS tbeu neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories THE LAVENDER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Marny Hall, $8.00. Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know how to go about choosing a therapist, and how to be sure we can get the most out of therapy! Marny Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, has written the first book ever to address this sub· )eCt. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4 00. Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Montauk, work, and the sea. She tells her story with a combination of painful innocence and acute vision, beginning with the man ID the fine green car who does not mourn the violent death of a seagull aga1Dst his windshield. The simplicity of Halegua's style is reminiscent of The Color Purple; it 1s a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patnoli, $13.00. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in wnich, since the beg1Doing of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. !Oversize paperback) I THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay; tram by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther •~ fifteen when he amves alone in the Berlin of the 1920~ . There he dis­covers the boys of Friedrich Street, and the men who stroll by and speak w1th them Soon he 1s ~potted by Hermann Graff, a sensitive and naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored w11h Gunther But love docs not fit neatly ID to Gunther's new life as a bustier. Gunther's story was first published ID 1926. For today's reader, it combmes a poignant love story with a colorful por­trayal of the gay subculture that thrived ID Berlin a half-century ago. DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6.00 A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roanng Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she writes a dozen more." "The book of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore News. ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love affair that ~hould have been simple - but wasn't EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7.00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau b a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of thetr love affair is one of the most engross­ing - and funniest - you'll ever read. ............ TO ORDER ............ .. Enclosed is$ ___ Please send the books I've listed below. IAdd $1.00 postage when ordering 1ust one book if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: 1. ~------- ------ 2. ___ _ 3._ 4. _ _ ___ ~ 5. Visa and mastercard accepted; please send acct. number, exp. date, and signature. name address cuy __ state ___ zip _ __ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P·S 40 Plympton St. : Boston, MA 02118 ········································· Kent Johnson, as Sir Andrew Aguecheek, woos Olivia, played by Vicki Luman in Main Steet Theater's production of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" Steven Garfinkle and Cathy Pisarski in "Twelfth Night" Twelfth Night: Rollicking Good Fun By Bill O'Rourke Montrost> Voice Theater Critic Tony Falcone's set-all sails and rigging- perfectly catches the mood of Main Street Theater's current production of Twelfth Night. This breezy comedy flies along under full sail. The pace slacks only for an occa­sional bit of romance. Suzanne Savoy is quite engaging as a girl who when cast upon a strange shore by a shipwreck disguises herself as a boy for safety. As the lady who falls in love with her, Vicki Luman is also sweet and winning. Many actre.sses in the past have played this role too imperiously, not the kind of woman one man would pine away for while another falls in love with her at first sight. Mrs. Luman beautifully sides· tepped that trap. I wasn't always sure that Jerry McCul­ley knew what he was saying as the loves· ick lord. Most of the time, though, he was quite pleasant. Gregory Ballard Ginther comes into the proceedings late in the play. He is a gor­geous young man and, though hesitant, is quite believable. He is quite prepared for T EXAS S T.ATE O PTICAL CEr. Dr. E. Burt Denton & Associa tes OPTOMETRISTS TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 TSO-South Main 4·114 Main 52.'1-5109 Both Offices l ' ndrr . ew Owm•r\hip and Manag<"mt:nt DECEMBER 20 1985 MONTROSE VOICE 17 experience to give him an air of self­confidence. Bruce Ellis, as Antonio, rounds out the lovers. A rough sea captain, some say pirate, Antonio drops everything for love of a boy he drags out the sea, even will­ingly following his somewhat capricious charge into certain danger. No one critic­izes his love, which is a lot to say when some of Shakespeare's best clowns are around, teasing everyone. However, at the end curtain he has not yet been saved from the hangman's noose, though we feel fairly certain that he will be. But this play is like Christmas fruitcake and the love stories are only the breading. They are sweet and occasionally funny but are really the background flavor. The colorful jewels, the nuts and the fruits, are many of the best comic roles Shakespeare ever wrote. Steeped in his port, Sir Toby Belch is perpetually three sheets to the wind. James Black is as excellent as usual, which is to say pretty near perfection. He and his girlfriend Maria are tricking nearly everyone, personally. Cathryn Pisarski plays her with style and gentle wit. She. is not as saucy a wench as some have been in this role. But then the only one in this play who is not gulled by anyone else's tricks is Steve Garfinkle as Feste the philosophical jes­ter. He manages to be sardonic without ever lapsing into sarcasm. Toby has been milking money from a foolish twit, Sir Andrew Aguecheeck. Ken Johnson has given us a fop with just a slight touch of butch to him. In a period where any true man of a certain fashion would remind us today of Quentin Crisp, it is fitting that this buffoon has just slightly failed at being femme, among other things. Bravo, Kent! Malvolio, that officious ass, becomes the butt of Toby's biggest prank. Tom Nichols is always interesting and is quite pitiable when we should feel that for him in the dungeon. He just isn't funny very often. A happy voyage like this shows a steady hand on the tiller. William Burford was our skilled captain. The beautiful cos­tumes were by R.W. Lyon, Jr. The set was lit effectively in Patrick Higgins' delight­ful manner. o Notes The HSO. ToRhiyuki Shimada conducting, will present a free Christmas concert for senior and I or disabled citizens this Sun­day afternoon. It will be held at a barrier free, wheelchair accessible facility with free parking. Advance reservations, which are necessary, can be had by calling Steve Lufburrow or Pat Collins at Good­will Industries, 692-6221. ... AT&T is giving HGO a grant for $50,000 for a performance on PBS in early Febru­ary. They will present Treemonisha by Scott Joplin. The famous pianist I com- Brownsville Write or Call for Brochure 120 E. Alo i St., P.O. Box 2326 South Padre Island, Texas 78597 512/943-3632 Winter Specials (including alf fare. transfers. accomodat1ons. and breakfasts} 3 day (Fri.-Mon.). or 4 day (Mon.-Fri ) . ... .•.... $189 00 Fly/drive option . .•••... . . $199.00 7 day (weekend arrival) .. . _ $219.00 Fly/drive option . ....... _ $259.00 Montrose Live poser was a native of Texarkana . ... Did you know that famed Broadway per· former Ben Vereen maintains his busi­ness offices in Houston? Seems he prefers Texas' tax rate• .. .. Celebrate a very Merry Christmas!' Lesser b' days: Howard Hugh es (24 ), and Virgil Fox (26). Enjoy• o Openings Messiah (Grace Presbyterian, 20 and Westbury Baptist, 21)-Houston Sym­phony Orchestra and Chorale under the baton of Miguel Gomez-Martinez. Pancho Claus (Woodland Park, 20 and Mason Park, 21, both 6:00)-Theatre Bil­lingue de Houston'" Richard Reyes has adapted The Night Before Chri.stmas. A low-ridding zoot suiter comes into homes via the bathroom v.indow to deliver pres­ents on Christma11 Eve. Children in the audience are taught self-identity, the importance oflove and ~haring, the mean· ing of Christmas and (sad, but often neces­sary) not to expect too much for Christmas. Freebies. The Boyfriend (Unicom, 21)-HITS, Houston International Theater School, kids in the roaring twenties. Messiah (St. Stephen's Episcopal, 22, 5:00)-The church'F choirs and orchestra with visiting soloists perform the Christ­mas portion of the oratorio. Freebies, but very limited seating. Call ahead for wheel­chair accomodations, 528-666.5. One Night Only! Susan Welby (center) stars as Anatou, an Eskimo girl born u.'ith pale skin and light hair Lang before any white man has been seen in arctic Canada in "The Ice Wolf," now playing on the Alley Theatre's large staRe through Jan. 4 GIVE YOUR FRIENDS A PIECE OF HOLLYWOOD ••• ••• GIVE THEM A VIDEO GIFT FROM VIDEOTRENDI • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE • SAME DAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL ORDERS • Ail TAPES GUARANTEED 18 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20, 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson "Igor! Gel that Woltman doll out ot his face! -· Boy, sometimes you really ore bizarre." NHeyl I can hear the traffic!" Early business fallures Shark nerds always ran the projector "Rusty! Two points!" Fortunes Season's Greetings are in the Stars By Mark Orion For Friday. Dec. 20. 1985. through Thursday. Dec. 26. 1985 ARIES-All of your psychic and intui­tive powers are at high pitch Christmas week. Dreams, visions, even a beautiful stranger, may be your presents. Don't be afraid of some crazy romance. TAURUS-Old fashioned dating gets Christmas week off to a spiffy start for you. And a special holiday project requires quite a bit of effort on your part, so roll up your shirt sleeves There's a fat and happy old man at the end of the line, going "Ho Ho Ho." GEMINI-First it's this, then it's that. Who's this? Who's that? Feeling a little overwhelmed by holiday possibilities? It isn't over yet so now is not the time to get dizzy. Stand still under the mistletoe and consider the possibilities. CANCER- You're in the driver's seat with Santa and your Christmas week is up to you. Make wise use of your talents and brush up on a few that are rusty. Even though it's Christmas, financial matters are highlighted, but the week comes to a wild close LEO- There's a tendency for you to want to pull back into the snowdrifts right now Don't. The need to be alone is a natural one, but you've got too much to give this Christmas week. You could mas­ter the meaning of of the holiday VIRGO-Still dancing up a storm and having a good time? Sure, but now there's a definite love object blowing in the holiday wind: someone who's solid and secure is getting your attention. You'll have to keep the promises you make! LIBRA-Look before you leap. Don't accept hearsay evidence; test it yourself. Rumors abound during Christmas. Financial propositions may be tempting; check with your budget first. Latter days bring news from a friend, maybe long­distance. SCORPIO-This Christmas week, you and another party may share the same goal. Though you two are quite different and may never become close, you can be of mutual benefit. Later, friends are full of good holiday ideas. Finally, don't hide your light SAGITTARIUS-All of that question­ing and wondering comes to an end You've finally figured it out, and you're a little surprised with what you've come up with. But then, you love Christmas sur­prises. don't you? Especially when it is somewhat magical. On dasher, on dancer. It ain't necessarily bad, is 1t? CAPRICORN- Put your talents to work for you and let your creativity shine Christmas week. Romantically speaking, a jolly ol' cupid in a red suit sits on your shoulder, and you can bet he won't steer you wrong1 The week closes with an 0 , for old-fashioned. AQUARIUS- It's almost too much to take in. The beauty you behold could be wonderfully overwhelming. While a rose 1s a rose, much of the visual stimulation is due to the fact that you're more open and receptive than usual. What you see is what's always been there. It's you that's changing Merry Christmas. PISCES- Oh oh. Family moves into the holiday picture right now, but in a very good way What the past has given you and where 11 has brought you is on your mind You can say the things you've wanted to say before without any prob­lem. You find 11 easy to show and share your love. •1H5 : .. . . ! ~ ; DECEMBER 20, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 . . :· :· .. ~ .... ,! ' .. .o.-."..i . .. .. _l ,. , .. ~- . ·--,-~;!f >..:.-: . 5rom Santa anJ hi~ efve~ anJ /,.om the ~1a// o/ the montro~e Uice UJe tot~ wort ~o ~arJ all 'lear long /or IJOU 20 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20. 1985 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose V0tce. a general circulation "9'N'Spaper having published continu­ously for 1 yeer or longer. Is qualll•ed to accept legal notices affecting the news· paper's c1rculat1on area of Montrose CARS & BIKES ---MERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING, L TI>. 1303 Upland. 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOT"'"O""R,,....,L-=EA-:-S""ING-,.-- 10100 Richmond •100. 781-8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE WeotwoodM'iii:° 3-2-2. $49.500. 10'h~ foxed. $100 down payment, low closing costs, easy quahf1cat1ons, foreclose­below marl<et 524~12. Roommate for cute house near Northwest Mall. off 290 $150 and 113 uttlotoes 524- 6312 MONTROSE AREA APARTMENTS Eflll bdr/2 bdr From $225 thru $350 Calf 527-8305 NO;;:imol<•"9 WM wants same 25-40 to st>are nlce 3 bdrm house In near NW close to 610 Washer dryer, 25" color TV, VCR and cable Interests on theater and the arls helpful $250lmo plus~ ut1h11es and cable Call Aon ~ Need roommate to snare 3 bdr house 1960-Joneo Ad area Call 890-4676 ;:or;;,;i Moni;O.e Remodeled cottage. 1 bedroom, 304 Bomar $325 $150 deposol 526-8790 Small quiet Montrose complex New paont, new double door ice boxes $100 depas1t. 1 bdrm$285pluselec Also avail­able 2 bdrm 52~8178 MONTROSE OASIS Ouoet 1dul1-only bu11d•"9 deep on the heart of Montrose Free gas heat for win­ter. swimming pool for summer Central AIC, GE appltances. mono blonds and more 1BA at $325. 2BA at $395 plus security dapos•I & electnc 30I Slf911ord at Tall lly Appoln-t. - 523-1109 ~ - HEIGHTS ON THE llLVO. Lovely. ll)ac1ous garden apt , adult. qu•et, pool, covered parl<•ng 1000HeoghtsBlvd 862-1013 2007-Brun, 1 bedroom apts w•lh study and 2 bedroom apts now leaso1l9 1 month FREE rent L1m1ted ofter New security and new swimming pool Newly redone complex Onty 1 few units left Dori'I miss your ch8nce 861-5556 ---VO.CE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Classofoed Call 5~8490 ~~:e~~ac:ru~.' ~~J~a;:~~~~~:e:-:.; or Visa Luxury Condominiums Now Leasing with option to purchase. Great location Large beautiful swimming pool & Jacuzzi Controlled entry security Remote controlled garage entry High efficiency AC & heating Free cable TV One bedrooms from $375 ($150 deposit). Two bedrooms from $650 ($2SC deposit). 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED ii8rteiid8ri'"'8nd cocl<ta I personnel needed 1mmed1atefy at Aosl<y Business Cell Andrea at 528-3e11 No ••perienc• nKnuryl Fu•/ part-Un;; $150,000 yearly! Need 8119rAUIYe Inde­pendent llnanclal conaultanlll A-table ._H NqUlred: $100. (113) 52~9029 (2• hrw.) PERFORMING ARTS Tocl<et office peraonnel sought full/part tome Excellent verbal sl<llls required Base plus commossoon Call Ms Knopp after 11 am 528-5323 (MISC.) FOR SALE Man·s lull length raccoon coat S~ 40. Call Jay 783-84-21 .- ------ E::.'e S :~:; ~~~r.~~r W.~=~0c~~- trol. 5~1122 FOR YARD SALES- - - ­See ads under ''Yard Sales" at the end of the Montrose Classol•ed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS Z-MAGIC TOUCH llY David of ET (713)622-4530 Great, real masaage , Hour long In/Out Randal 526-3147. ---------- 110 DY MASSAGE full body massage Hot 011-•n or out. Bruce 622-0370 MASSAGE THERAPY Healthful and Aelaxong 523-2281 Rubdown. your place $20. $25 Call Van. 556-8912. &-11·30pm WM only PERSONALS -ci'AY/lESBIAN RELATIONSHIP B•WM. 45. blonde/blue. emotoonally sta­ble. profess1onaf. financially secure. seeking relat1onah1p with 81WF who wants a secure home life Must be attrac­tive. educated. non-smoker. and 1ntersted in 1 rel1tion1h1p based on some tradt-­toonal values Reply Blond Box 269-S c/o VOICe SAFE HOT DAYTIME ACTION I'm versatole. toys. FF, light s&m Seel<ong same. Jay. Box 20000. Houston 77025 GIW!f, 29. protesaoonal, shy, soncere. honest. sense of humor. teeks to meet same Reply Bllnd Box 265-T cto Voice PfOfWtM:-34'. 5'8", 175. stocky, haory. Love to C/W dance. grve massages. share quiet tomes Seekong haory W•M. 35-50. non-smoker with same hkes Lee 713- 468-1563 GBM. 32, tall and slim. well educated: seeks tall - m80CUlln•. tun lovong GBM. for friendship end/or intimacy Must be responsble, mature and f1nanc11lly secure Reply P O Box 53781, Houston. TX 77002 CAN WE TALK? Looking for thenght m•nfora 1-to-1 ret•­tionsh1p No femmes Masculine only Must be d•screet Come ahare my hie. love. home and busonesa I'm WM, mod 40's Greenspoont area Reply Blond Box 26~f clo Voice GIUM. 33. brown. brown. 138 Iba, aver­age looks. clean shaven. witty, nice built, protessoonal, healthy. en1oys restaurants. sct-11, movies. weight training, wrestling. bocyclonQ. folklore. pets Looking tor aom- 1lar 1nd1v1dual for friendship. maybe more Send photo and short letter Photo woll be returned No lats. femmes druggoes Reply Blond Box 26~G cto Voice G·W1M, 30. see•ong gay Hospanoc-;;;;i;' ~~7;... ~~i~==·~~~· 4,~h~~~~31oi~ Box 267-L cto Voice Soncere G/WIM. 37, 5·10~·. 165. moust­ache. (mainly top. Greek-versatile. con­doms). Seekong non-smoking. mostly bottom, 27-37, white boyfnend(s), 1nsode Loop. who likes disco dancing dancing John (713) 52C>-9029 (SM Help Wanted Ad.) Get Visa. M&stercard' No credit neces­sary• Collateral deposot requored Also 32 signature loan and 60 free grant loca­tions• (713) 5~9029 (Also Agents Wanted.) ~~~~n~s~·i:~~\~':;'~'~~~~~~de, over Bearded tight end, 34. raady to receive quarterback between 25-35. and thick POB 7111. Houston 77248 GWM. 35. 5'11" 170. professional. edu­cated. stable. non-smoker, hate bars. Seekong dark-haired and ha•ry GWM with similar feelings and stats tor lifetime shar· ong Wrote J Normandy. 7302 Westv1ew No 233 Houston 77055 PHONE SEX Truckers. cowboys. Jocks. Mannes. cops. 1eathermen are yours by dialing (713) 526-4739 24 Hours Cred•t cards Adults only Safe Sex IS but a call away. - PHONE FANTASY - ~­Lone Star 1ocks 1s Texas· newest phone fantasy Get off with the best athletes 24 Hours (713) 5~6915 Credo! cards Please be over 18 -----~- PHONE SEX Our service connects Horny Guys 24 hrs a day Do 11 now for less than $3 50 an hour (415) 346-874_7_ _ ____ _ OUR POLICY on Sexually-Explocot Adver· t1Smg The Montrose Voice does not believe that humans engagong on consent­ing sexual acts with one another 11 immoral Our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relat1onsh1ps. encounters. adventures, etc. All advert1S~ mg should, however. not contain lan­~~." J: ~hat would offend an unsuspecting A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new book. "Classol oed Affairs." they'll tell you how 10 wrote an ad that really stands out, what to expect when you place or respond to an ad, and even what all those funny lollle abbrev1a11ons mean Send $8 to "Class1f1ed Affairs: Aly­son Pub.. Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St , Boston. MA 02118.(Also included will be a coupon lor $5 off on your next Personals :~cr~ci'1~:~~~c~o~tr~~eg~~igeur11cat1ons. YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce II here then stand back for the crowd Call 5~8490 orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale announcement 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DEC DEC 20 21 DEC DEC DEC DEC DEC 22 23 24 25 26 Cnter•a ror 1nclu11on u"I 7-0•y C.lendar and MontroM RnourCH t Event or group must 1~1t1c1lty pertain to netghborhood of MontrOM °' Hou1ton·1 gay community uni ... m11or c1ty,1111e or n1t1on11 hohday or mator n1t1on11 gay event 2 Strictly commerc1el events not included 3 Bus1MU. c1..,1c and social groups and their events ere generetty quahhed ~ Potit1cal events where only one view or a klb,ect. candidate or piny 11 dominant not qual1hed For 1dcht1on11 intorm11t0n °' phOne numbers. look tor the sponsoring org1n1za11on under Resources " Typestyles indicate events' location: Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. E~ of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS • FRIDAY: "Brealrthrourih" 1 .. bian·femini1t prolll'am. KPFI', FM-90, 8:15-llam •FRIDAY: Montroee Country Clo(Jgmi meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur llSATURDAY: KS1A1DS Foundation meeta 3'100 Montroae, no, 501, llam llSUNDAY: Houaton T•nn;. Club playa 10:30am·l 30pm, Hornor Ford Tenn;. Center llSUNDAY: Frontrunnera run from Memorial Park Tennio Ctnter llSUNDAY· Women'• bowlina leagu• playo, 3pm, Stadium Bowl llSUNDAY: W.W.B Bowlin11 League, 7:30pm, Poat Oak Lant8 llSUNDA Y: Ov•ttalero Anonymous meet 8pm Montroe<- Coun .. lin1 Center, 900 Lovett •MONDAY: lnteanty me.ta 7,'IOpm Dec. 23, Autry Houae, 6266 Main •MONDAY: KS/AIDS Foundation & Monlr<llle Courwelin11 Center AIDS Riak Reduction (Saf• Sexl Work.ohopa. 8pm Dec.23 •MONDAY: MSA Bowhn11. 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8~ Braeemain WJ"UESDAY: Frontrunneni run from Memorial Park T•nnia C•nter WJ"UESDAY: MSA "Fun Volleyball Lea11ue" playo, 7pm WJ"UESDAY: Montroee Symphonic Band meeta Dignity Center. 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm WTUESDA Y: Lutheran• Concerned meeta Dec. 24, GraCf' Luthtran Church, 2516 Wau1h WJ"UESDAY· Houll10n Atta Gay & Leabian Enjpn~n It Sci•ntiata meet 7pm Dec.24 WJ"UESDAY: Montroee Civic Club (N•artown) meeta 7pm Dec.24, 1413 Weoth•imer llWEDNE!DA Y · Chrlllmaa, Dec:. 25 • WEDNESDAY: Houlton Tennia Club playo 7:30pm. Homer Ford T•nnia Center •WEDNESDAY: Greater Montroee Bulin ... Guild meeta 7pm Dec. 25, Brennan'• Restaurant, 3300 Smith •WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeaterw Anonymoua meet 8pm Berinir Church, 1440 Harold llTHURSDA Y: Frontrunner• run from Memorial Perk T•nnia Center llTHURSDAY: "Wild• 'n Stein" aay radio ohow 7:30·9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM·90 llTHURSDAY: Clei•. Lesbian Mothen Group, open meetinir Dec. 26, Dignity Ctr. llTHURSDAY: Mued Bowhna Leagu•. 9pm. Stadium Bowl, 8~ Br&Mmain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN 1 WEEK· Baytown Lambda meets 7~m~c.27 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Alliano & Fri•nd. meet 3pm Dec. 29 mlN 1 WEEIC: NM Year's Eve, Dec. 31 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucuo meeta 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm Jan. I •IN 2 WEEKS: Houston Gay Health AdvocaU. meet 7:30pm Jen.4 •IN 2 WEEKS: Houston Bar Ownen Aaan. meeta 2pm Jan.8 •IN 2 WEEKS: Neartown Bu•in°"" Alliance meeta 7pm Jan. 8, Li~rty Bank, 1001 Weetheimer • IN 2 WEEKS: Cle,., Leobian Mothera Group, clooed meeting Jan.9 • IN 2 WEEKS: Avondale Aaoociation mffta 7:30pm Jan. 9, Chriatian Women'• Center, 310 Pacific •IN 3 WEEKS: Houston North Profeeaionala meeta 7:30pm, Jan.11 • IN 3 WEEKS: Monlr08e Art Alliance meeta Jan. 13 • IN 3 WEEKS: Gay & Lesbian Hiopanica Unidoa meet Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, Jan.13 • IN 3 WEEKS: Citizen• for Human Equality meeta 7:30pm Jan, 14, Houaton HoWll!, 1617 Fannin, 9th floor • IN 3 WEEKS: Houston Data Prof-ionalti meeta 7:30pm Jan. 14 • IN 4 WEEKS: Choicea meeta lpm Jan. 19, Mutenon YWCA, 3615 Willia •IN 4 WEEKS: Parenti FLAG meeta 2pm, Jan.19, Prftbytenan Center, 41 Oakdal• lllN I WEEKS. IGIC><lllfllated llUMgrau Claulc. Loulwllle, Feb. 14'16 • IN 8 WEEKS: Houston Liveat.ock Show & Rodeo opena, Alltrodome complex, F•b. 15-Mar 2 mlN 10 WEEKS IGIC><lllfllated Spring Ir-lnvKatlonOI, Fl. Laudefdale, Feb 28-Mar. 2 lltN 11 WEEKS Natlonol L .. blan and Gay Health Foundation preoenll 7th NatlonOl/1.eoblan Goy H-.i Cont.fence and 4th Natlonol AIDS Forum, ''MoYlng Leeblan and Gay Health Care Into Ille Molntlream." Mor. 1~16, George WOlhlngton uni-.1ty, WOlhlngton, D.C mlN 1~14 WEEKS: IGIOallllfoled Dixie lnv11atlonat, Allonlo, Mar 27-30 •N 14 WEEKS: IGIC><Jllftloled MAJCJT., ICCllllOI City, Mar ~1 lltN AllOUI 16 WEEKS: 11th annual Southeoal•n Conference lo< Leoblana and Goy Men, spring 1916, NM Orleanl lltN AllOUI 25 WEEKS; O<* Lown Tennll Aaloc. hoots T•oo Cup Challenge, Dolloo, compeltng with Houslon Tennis Club, June lltN 27 WEEKS 17th ann!Yerlory o1 St~ll Riots, NM York. June 21 •IN 32 WEEKS: U.S. Olympic Featival opena, Houaton, July 25-Aua. 3 •IN 33 WEEKS: Goy Gamet II, '1rlump In '16," Aug ,.17, 1916, Son Francisco •N 34 WEEKS: 4fh annlYerlOI'( of -al ruling ogolnot TexOI' "~uol conduct low," Aug 17. 1982 Montrose Voice Classified Advertising 'Thes y ly to ltd'l•rtJ '9Ct1on ol th• '"' ,., r-r1uJ•r ctdPl•Y ~rtdlftQ r•tes lay Ad11ertdlr rtmffflt 5n- 4 THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered, are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also appear w1th1n the text or at the end of the ad. and are also $1 per word. with a minimum of $3 per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40¢. (Add1t1onal regular words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each. Add1t1onal BOLO WORDS 1n all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each additional word like this 4!X THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 4!X THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD, $9.00 Then each additional word like this is 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55¢ EACH. Addttlon1I bold words Ilk• thl1 In text ore 55C .. ch. ADDITIONAL BOLD, ALL CAPS. WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, make no copy changes during the run. pay for the full run in advance, and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25%. BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll conl1denllally forward all responses to your ad to you by mail or you-can pick them up at our office. Rate 1s $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone it in You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard. Visa, American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper. Ads received tater will be placed in the following week's newspaper. ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, Clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028. It will be for· warded. unopened, to the advertiser. Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A "word" 1s considered anything separated by "spa· ces "except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment is a recognized word 1f ti stood on its own. A complete phone number, including area code, 1s 1 word. City, state and zip 1s 3 words bold line bold line ~--------- text words:---------- bold line------------------- Use additional paper 1f necessary CATEGORIES: 0 Announcements 0 Accomodations (lodging for Houston visitors) 0 Cars & Bikes 0 Commercial Space 0 Dwellings & Roommates 0 Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale O Models, Escorts, Masseurs O Personals O Pets O Aides D Travel O Yard & Garage Sates PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER ~-IN THE 'GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY," OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line)· regular words in text at 40¢ each: -- ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each: ----Bold words In text at 55¢ each: ---BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 1t mailed to me, $1.25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times ___ weeka: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) 0 Also, I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an add1t1onal O $29 for 6 months or 0 $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged -----­METHOD OF PAYMENT; 0 Check enclosed o Money order enclosed 0 Cash 0 VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge O Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge 0 Amercian Express charge O Bill me If charging. card expiration date ___ _ __ _ Credit card number ----~ Signature Name --­Address Phone(s) for verification of ad, 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am·5 30pm DECEMBER 20, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 MONTROSE RESOURCES SELECTED STATE. NAT ORGANIZATtONS Sar Owt'*S Aan ot T• cBOAT)-720 Brazos~. Al.ISUn-(512~ 472-3333 AIDS ActlOn CoundVFecterak>o ol AIDS ReWed Org•l"l•z1tlona 1115.,. lnde~ndence Av SE Wu.h1ngton 0C 20003 (212) 5>47-3101 Gay & Lesl>lan ..... Assn-PCB A.. 0., Chelsee SIA New Yon. ~ 10011-(212) 969-662? Gay Rights Nat LObby-POB 1892 Wastungton DC 20013-(2021 ~1801 Ht.man Jbghtl camp.tgn Fynd-POO 1396, Wash­ongron oc 20013-(2021 !><&-202S Umbd• leoaf Oefenle-132 W '3rd. New YOfk N'f ~12'2)- LeatMantGay Rtgl'ltl Actvocatn .P()B 822 Austin 78767 Medla Funcftor Hi.matt Rightl-POB A OkJ Ctletne Sta IWw Yon. NY 1001t-{212) ~ Nllt Assn of BualneA Counc1ta Bo• 151'5 San Francsco CA 9'115-(415) MW363 Nat Ann of Gay & lesb4anOemoCtubs-1742Mass A" SE. Watungton OC 20003-(202) ~7-3104 Nat Gay Heafth Educ Foundition-POB 78' N&w Yc:k NY 1003&---{212) !1&3-6Jt3 or [)f Gfftflberg (713) 523-5204 Ntl Gay R91ts Advocates--640 CHtrO San fran­ClKO, CA 94114-(415) !63-3624 Nal Gey Tak Force !NGTFl-80 5th Av Nt>w YOl'll NY 10011-(212) 741-5800 NGTF's Ctilisline-f800) 221·7044 Coutildt New Yorti. Slate) Rural Ca.lltan, Clo Watler-Zanghi Box a11. Slum, TX 76&Z7 Tk Gay/l..otan Tak Force-POB AK Oeriton 16201-te1n 391..e21s US Tr.,...¥4!S!ite-Tra~u.t Contact S...C-1011~8 E P•k• SNttle. 98122-1206) 824-8286 ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your lost1ng We list here each week name of organization, address. phone. regular meeting dates end times, and ~n~~~r~~t~~l~o~;~tt~nf~r~a~~~~s:~"fh'! Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY A.dlor J;li)S:.poe6&11• 77266 526·6077 An A CApelle Cflorue. Church of Chf11t -POB 66730. 77266 A Place m the Sun 522-789S Ac'W-1236WGr'0~25 AIDS Holline-529-3211 (Gay i. LMb1•n Sw1tchbOl~rdc'l----=~--­Amencan Gay Atneists POB 66711 77268- 527-9255 Astro Rainbow Soc ety f0flti80eat-S20-0732 (TTY) A'tonda.18 Assn-POB 86064 n26fx rn.ts 7 30pm 2nd Thun Wornen·a Chrtst1an Ctr, 310 Paci he Azulao Womyn·s M.gazine-8130 SW Fwy •335-26&-5237 ~r~~~.:Rot>en Moof\ dir,20Q 8M1ng Memor11I United MethOdist Church- 1440 Harokf-526--1017 ave 10 50am Sun Cho1cea Unhmrted-POB 70996. 77270-529- 3211 (G1y & Leab&l.n Sw1tchbo1rd) meets 1pm 3rd Sun. Masterson YWCA. 3615 Wtll••- .. Social Mu(.r° 1·30pm alternate Fridays. Sunday brunch 12 30pm 3rd Sun Chrrst1an Church of the Good Sh8p~1707 Montrose svc 1pm Sun. Bible sludy 7-'.M)pm Thu,. Church of Chnsllan Faith- 18'0 Weath•imer- 529--8005 1¥CI 10 451m Suft. Bibi• study 7 30pm Wed: Rev Chrd A Rice. pastor Ctl1Z9nS for Human Equahty (CHEl-POB 3045. 77253-680-3346. 937-3515 meet2ndTuea. Hou Ho!Jse. 1617 Fannm. 9th floor act1>11ty room Cl••· Lesbian Mothers GrCM.Jp-Sarra 47~3708 meets 2nd & 41h Thurt. 0.gMy Ctr Cloppers-302-6502 COit is;;-=n;eta ltsr~er8otiom2400 Brazos-528-9192 Commlttee-to_r_Pu_b_llc:_Hea ,t_ h_A_w_a__ren_ess _PO _e 3005. 77253-5211-6333. 522-5080 "Sllarlng Group for lhe WOfried WaH meet Frt 7-8Pm. MontrOM Counaehng C1t Comm1.1Nty Political Act.on Committee (C­PACl- POB 2005. 77252-236-3666 Community Go.pel Ctr-3207 Moritroae 521~ 0!>11 s.,.ca t1am Sun. 7 30pm Thurs Congregation Aytz Chayim-1840 Westheimer-68&-8997. 728-6181 S\l'C & eoc1al 6':1:::~1~:~~&--,-~.,.------ oemocomm1ttee of GPC::s-~8834---­Dhllrmi StudyGroup-406A'tOndllte-524·955i O.anifo~ndatJOn-2700 Mason-524·5791 ~2t'Q7,'1~~~3-W/.c ~':~~;2s':i Fann1n- ESOPS PrtVate Prof .. ional Soct11 Club-961· ll876 F'.OMation of Chllnt1• Uruted tor Social Servi· ~t!:.~~!~~~~u~~t,'011F~~~ Montroae Clime, Montro1e CounMhng Ctr 1st Unit8":ian Cf\urch 5210 fannin-526-1571 IVC 11 lS.rn Sun frontn.mnera-Joe S20-&019 or SltvadOr 529-- 1288 runs Sur\. TUM & Thurs M~~ Park Tennll Ctr ?3~.~~~Nn~ Expenenut (GASE)-528 Gay & L•b11n Areh1~• of T. -afflli•t~ Gi; & Lftb11n MO'rmons 1713 Westhelmer •6040. 77098--66&-1413 Gay & Lesbian Student A15n-1t UOtHio;3'1.f ,900 Calhoun-529~3211 (Gay & Leab11n Sw1tchboerd) ~&~Sw1tchboefd-POB 86591. 77266-529--3211 1nform1hoo. counae11ng. ,,, .. errats. TTY. AIDS Hotline Ga;-Aa11ns & F~,-,..,-.-,---.26-15-W-aug-h-Dr #289- 523-6769. 785-3633 mee11 3pm 2nd & 1111 Sun Ga~ Fathers-3211 F1nn.n~2&=0111_ __ Gay H1spen1c Caucus-~5252 G1Y Nuiin-Au1ance~86 ----­Gay Peopte in Christian Sdence-Box 113 894- taire 77401~2642 Gay Pot,tJtal Ca~ucu-.-,G=PC~)--PO~ 77266-521·1000 meeta 3217 Fann;n 1st & 3rd Wac! 1Hou) Gay F'fic19 Week COmm11tee-P08 66821 7728&-Stan Ford 523--76" or Cathy L9"anan tlS&-8258 reet~rG;. Business Gwkt-M4ke Netson 630-0309 Of' Bruce Woolley 529-&164 meets 7pm, .flh Wed. Btennans Rest. 3300 SmHh The Group theater •Otklhop-Joe Watts 522-- 2204 meets 7pm Thurs, 09"1ty Ctr 3217 Fann n Hazefwrtch Procructions-2615 Waugh Or •266. 77006 lesbaan concerts, free ma111ng 1t11 Homophde ln1erfa th AnJ&nce:-729 Mlit'90r- 523-8Q69 Hou Arel GAy -& Lesb.;n-Eng.ne;;;-& Scient1s1s-POB 66631 77(K)6~1819 meets 7pm•lh Tues Hou U.r Owno,. Assn (HOBOl~N 2923 Marn- 522-0000 Hou eommuni1y Ctowns-862-831• Hou Council of Clol>l-526-8050 Hoo Data ProresstOfliil=-62~22 ~9 me-ets 7 30pm 2nd Tues Hou Gay Hea:tth Advocares-7SCMM"8 Meet; 730pm 1si Sot Hou Gay Students Assn· 747-3098 Hou n"'tir-Fa1th Alliance con°'t-1c""t-,th_ro_u_g.,.h lnt90rity!Hou Hou Motorcycle Club-do Mary'a 1022 West· hetmer-52&-8851 Hou North ProlesstOnf;ts-POB 3840 Humb .. 77307-B.U at 821-7126 ,,_ 7.30pm 2nd Sot Hou OutdOOr Gl°C\lp fHOG)-52'·36'1 0, Jim 680-31 .. llH lne-POB 16CM1. 77222-684-1732. 529-7014 aff1hated groups are Interact B uamo'1 A Place 1n the Sun. MontroM Art Alltiince. Gay & le&btan Archlv• of Tx. Gay & Lesbian Sw1tehboarcl MontroH Symphomc Sand. board meet 7 30pm 1st Thurs (varied IOCat1on1); eduC8tionat forum 7 30pm 3rd Thurs 1ngeOOI Speakers' Bureau-POB 391. 8eUa1re 77<01- lntegr1ty1Hou fEP11COpl:lian)-P08 66008 77266-62 .. 1489 meett: 7 30pm 2nd & 4th Mon A.utry HOUM. 8265 Main ini«WSCt-POe 1ec:Mt n222:..s29--101.c-i( pn RaO.o. FM-~9LoVOn B~ 4000" Breaktl'\rouoh" le&bta~femrnist pgm Fri 8 15'-11•m. 'Wilde n Stein'" gay pgm Thun 7 »- 900pm KS/AIDS FoundabOl\=3317 ~OM"iOJt 11~ 77006-624·2"37 A.IDS R11k Reduction ISafe S..I W0r1<1hop18pm 2nd &<th Monexcol)IOec, In COt'IJunction •Ith Montroae Couflleflng Center .;.rr.; K;iffmen Cancer Fund-i7•i1os In Montcose, Neady Evecyone Reads the Votie Lambda Ctr Gay AScohollCS & Alanon-1214 Jo Al"lnfe--621"'9772 Letbt41n1Gay Rnource Svc:-UnlY9f9ffy of Hou. 4800 Calhoun, bo• 309 77004-749--,253 meets 2 30pm 1nemate Tue1. Sptndletop Room 2nd floor Un1Vet1ffy Ctr Lel1:iS~;:nyc;;j""W eekentJ-prqect or Hou Council of Clul>l-52fHI05• Lutherans Concerned-meets at Grae. Luthe­ran Church. 2515 Waugh-521--0863. 4$)..1143 meet 2nd & 4th Tu• eveii1nga McAdOf)' Houae-c..io KS/AIDS Foundation. 3317 Montrose Box 1155-524-2437 Men Against Deception Coortesy Cl\.lb-POB S41871. 772S4-529-32t\ tGay & LHblan Switchboard) meet• b1--wMk!y =~tacnc~;';;~~~;~'~4~~ tuck dlnfHM' 1 30pm 1st Sat monthly s ... ca 10 •Sam & 7 15pm Sun & 1 15pm Wac!. member· lh'P IOqUiteB t.... 7 .30pm Mon aduca!IOn clasH9 Tuea & Wed 8\1• tHou) Metropolitan Wind Ensemble-6~1~ Maots St Stepl>ens Eposcopal Church. 1 30 Wod MontroM Art Alkance-69' .. i732. 888--9314 869- 5332 art1hate 11H Inc, meets 2nd Mon Montrose But1neu Gutkl .. GrN1er Montrose Bus Gutld Montrose- CtunhOt ChriSt-1700 Montres&- 777-9286 S\l'C: 11arn Sun M'OOtrOH C1v1c Club aee NNrtown Assn Montrose Climc:-803 Ha~2&-i531 open Mon, Tue. Thurs 6-9pm _____ _ Mon~ountry Cioooen-45&-8861 meet 7· 10pm Fn MCCR Church. 1919 O.C.tur Montro"ae Counseling Ctr-900 Lo~•n •203· 529--0037 AIDS v1ct1m support group 4;30pm Mon. Women's Suc>Port Group 7pm TUM AIDS R11k Reduction (Sate $ex) WOrk1~pa &pm 2n<l & 4th Mon e•cept Dec. in conJUnebOl'I w11h KS,.AIDS Foundation Moni70Ms;nge;:;g;y men'• chot'"ua-~ 3810 MOntroseSottball L•ou--POB 22272 77227- 524-31 .. Uontrose Sports Aun t MSA) raee apec;hc IUbgrQW> Mont-ro_s_e_,,S-ym-ph_o_n_ic_B_a_n_d __ POB M613. 772!16--527-905< ..- 7.30pm T- Dignity Ctr. 3217 Fannin. affd .. te Ii H Inc MORE-=s>e. MORE. 529-0037 pro'"",.c1~"'~on1.-.-... c°'·"' .. "na Center MSA Mon N ~ iii-play Stadium Lane1 8200 8rHSma1n-_.eve 692-t597 MSAlTl'luf"I Nl;f\t-~ League 8owt1ng Mike w. .1 ;en at 973-1358 play &pm Stachum Lanes 8200 Braesmam MSA POOi IB larasl L.eague---Oebb<e Scott 973- 1358 °' Oennos lord tlro-6752 iASA/vot1ey1>a• Mar11 522-1.eg oarr. .. 1pm Tues Gregory-LlnCOln schQol 1 101 Taft Mont:f'OM' Watcn subgroup Neartown Assn Mustangs-meets at the Barn. 110P.c h.c-528- 9427 club night Tlluro Nati.onal Gay Health Education FoundatlOn- 523-520< National Organizet.On_fOr _ wOfnen ("ii6'W)IH­bian R.ghb Task F orce-P08 440&22 m" Nea'10wn Aun (M ~MC Club i"..c13 Westheirner- meet 7pm 4th Tua Neertown Business A iance-529--7010 meets 7pm 2nd Wac! l l>erty Ban• 1001 Westhetmer ~ Fteeoom ChriStian Church- -829 Yate eE;HS377 1WCO 10lm Sun Overeaten An00YinouS~o MOt\tTOie cOun- ::...~-=';::~=t ~~:O:...~ Ba<1ng Ch....:h 1 .. 0 Harold Parents & Frtendl or Lesb ana & Gays cPmients FLAG)~ ,,_.. 2pm 3rCI Son P.Hby­tenan Ctt 't O•kd&te Park P.opte-c o p.;aartown Community Firenoute-7,1·252• Paz y Ube10Coon-K>B 600063 77260--862· 1476 PrnbytertaM IOf t.eabi'VIGav Concerns= Presbyterian Cit •1 Oakdal&- ·526-25&< meets 1 30pm 2nd Tues ~CiUb(poi1 pn,.;diiniSGPC)-POB 1568<• 7726&- 523-eo2• Recreational Lind F"'Und_Com_m_ou.--.-- Mus-ta_ng_ Club project A.Ce Untv Gay~esbian Support Group-S29-- 32'11 (Gey & Leatuan 5..., tctlboarcf) Ro•n•o Chlpot-1<00 Sul Ross-52•-11839 Sha!'Jt1 ot Tx counseling iOf'ife:dlreetening ·--522-5080 Society tor 2nd 5&tf (Tn-Ess). Gulf Cont Tr.,svestlte Chapler-POB 90335. 77090 Soctety tor the Promotion ot Amazon Sac»­Maoclltsm (SPASM)-POB 70996, 77210-Gay & Lesbian Switchboard 521-3211 iUnoance C.ttle Co social club--c/o The Barn 710 Pldt.c:-52&-9427 Tx Gay ROdeO Assn-Or1wer 1194 P08 reg73 77006-526-50()1 T• Gay Rodeo Nov 1s.-17 ~m~'=ttr!f:2!~~ound1t1on 1915 T• R;oer.-clo Rrpcord 71' f&H''VteW-521·2792 ~rsdr!~t~~ =.,.,~~~-=~ 541- WWBBowtong-Mtrt 723-1•55 bcwts 7 JOpn°; Sun, Post Oall Bo...,.1 ng Lanea :1:r63~5~'f".J Arta Aan-1001 W•ll'l .... What E'ter Happened to Baby Jane" Bowhng League see ThurWOly eowr ng Women't Bowling lMgue-OebtMe 91~ 1358 6pm Sun St8dttsm L.,.... 8200 Sraesma•n women·a LObby A liance--4 Chetsea-521..Q439 Women's Softbett LMg;_-6431 PiNlhlde 77008- .C.ttly °' Carolyn 116_8-62_56 ____ BAYTOWN----- 8aytcwn Lambda Group -427 1378 meets 1 30pm Odd Ffi CONROE-Conroe ArH lambda Ga) M--i<O!ll 3"-6470 Conroe Ar:.. lesbaalll-Kathy •t t409J 75&-90M meet epm 2nd & •m fr! GAlVESTON-LambO• Ak:OhOlk:s ,,_nonymous-763--i.-Ot Metropolitan Community Church ol Ga vntOn '11 .... ··~~ R-"l(lway-765--7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Teer Out & Post by Phone) Ai05~29-3211 AMBULANCE=-222-3434 Gay & Lesbian S.,.,,tcn.bOard-529-3211 KSIAIDS Foundanon--52•-2'37-­L° awYer-... adl Of 529-3211 l..1brary-2'24-SU1 ~Clinte-~1 Monll'OM Counsebng Cen~-52!Hl037 MONTROSE VOICE-5~90 POLICE-222·3131 ~5-4--..0CO or T.M>-1111 Tll'ne, temp weatt'l•-644 11n ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word." you can purchase space here "by the inch." When buying by the inch, you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2· $39 3• $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 22 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20, 1985 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To odllertise IT' lhJS page. co I 529-8490 dunng business hOurs ADULT VIDEO WE DELIVER VIDEOS Your gay video service 1420 Wosthe1mer 522 ..... 85 ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep It hsted here In the Montrose Voice where morally thousands turn each week ---vofcE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your proress1ona1 service through a Voice Class.tied Call 529-8490 Pay by cneck or charge II on your American Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard, VISll or Carte Blanche AUTO SALES LEASING - - --aiERIDIEN LEASING Lee Borba 97~ 1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING L TO. 1303 Upland 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEAS~ 10100 RlcllmOnd •100, 78Hl566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also see Cars & Bikes--·= --o-n- .M"'o-n-tr_os_e Class1f1ed" page AUTO REPAIR Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed MaiorlMinor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electflcal Repalf 526-3723 2110 Fa1rv1ew Road Service ALL PAINT I aODYS HO_P _ _ 1510 Leeland 65~3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE - - - WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray. 528-2856 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE __ _ 1411 Tall, 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOIC-E - - NEARTOWN KARS 1901 Taft. 528-1901 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAiR I aoD_Y_ SH_O_P __ 2001 Harold. 522-5255, 52&-1~ BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Tommy's ~Shop, Ha" cuiSS9iiQ House calls $15 00 & up For info 528- 8216 COUNSELING ---DANIEL J. KUCHAR_S _ _ 529-9004 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appomtmenl (713) 524--0538 EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL m~ ~~·the~~rn ci~e~J9 528-1589 & SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eyeglass frames repaired. NewtrameS'i(); your old lenses changed wtu!e you wait Eyeglass prescriptions hlled Many, many frames to choose from Come see us at Smith Opticians 4313 Austin, Auslln & Wheeler Mon ·Sat 7 30am-6 30pm. 524· 8884 FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOuTtiWEST FUNERALolRECTORS 1218 Vlelch. 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GIFTS. PARTY GOODS TIS THE SEASON __ _ 1966 W Gray (R1over Oaks), 52<>-5700 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GOURMET SHOPS SAY CHEESE 3626 Westhe1mer (Highland V11fage). 621 · 1825 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS OLYMPJA FITNESS & RACKETaALL - CLUB 8313 SW Fwy. 988-8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPa CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10, 661·2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e HOME AIR CONDITIONING TIME FOR AIC REPAIR? $25 p!;;I p1ttl. CALL 643-0398. JANITORIAL SERVICE PLUS 528-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Cleaning at its best fori'8SS1 S22-6967 JEWELRY KENESCO LTD. 1101 Post Oak Blvd. ~558. 680-8286 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEDICAL CARE STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D-:- - 2801 Ella Blvd , suite G, 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOVING MOVEMASTERS Boxes. too1 Visa. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 630-6555 PARTIES Experoericed bartenderwd food,.;:;;;; ~~~~~~~r ~~~~tecf'~:!· ~~ ~,~\;,:'~ Village Shopping Center 621·1825. PICTURE FRAMING Custom framing with metal moldings at wholesale prices 527-0111 PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOS I VIDEOS Internationally pubhshed proless1onal photographer now available 1n Houston for private shootings Very reasonable for great quality 523-4340 Head ahota, portraits and parties PRINTING ---- -~- SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd, 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TIRES ••• ••• 529-1414 ~THE 11tlf •t.ACl ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West of Montrose TRAVEL --TRAVEL CONSULTAN-,:S­Complete travel arrangments. All services FREE. Open Monday through Friday 9am-5:30pm. 2029 Southwest Fwy , Houston, TX 77098 (713) 5~8464 - ---- VACATION IDEAS? See •vacations" following •on the Town·· on the previous page TROPHIES ACF ENGRAVl"iG & TROPHIES Plaques • Awards • T- Shlrts •Name Plates •Lapel Pins Serving the Montrose Community Downtown Location 2200 Main Houston. Texas 77002 655-9230 M-F 9· 530 or by appointment VARIETY WHOLE EARTH PROVISIO~ Alabama at Shepherd. 52&-5226 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VENDING VIDEO VIDEOSCOPE 2018 Montrose, 52~5544 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE VIDEOTREND 1401 California, 527-0656 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Ai'So"aee "AduiiV;;;eo::Cateqory Keep your working parts in order. ft American Heart V Association 'v\IERI FIGHTINS rm ~LIFE (Photos by Roger Lackey) Montrose Soap Christmas and Parties- the Montrose Way By L' Angelo Misterioso, Esq., M.8 .E. 'Tis the season to be jolly, and with all the great parties, it's hard to be any other way. - o- Carl (right) and friend lap ti up at TNT's Christmas party Last week TNT Shirts/ Pluccus held their Christmas party. With food catered by The Chafing Dish, over 200 people packed TNT during the course of the night. Even with the new expansion, the crowd prompted me to think that now they need a bigger store! Seriously folks, this is the third year for John and Richard, and they thank the whole community for their support. They also wel­come new neighbors Pluccus to the corner. Keep up the good work guys. And Merry Christmas to youl On to the next event of the night· -a- Kody and Chops celebrate the g rand opening of Cousins Cousins officially opened last Thursday night with a big celebration that included complimentary drinks, a country and west­ern band, and dancing. What a festive place. We all welcome Counsins to the Montrose life. Who says business isn't alive and well in Houston? -e-later that night Dirty Sally's crowned Gary Lingenfelter the 1986 Miss Avondale. What a looney bin. Fun and craziness reigns on Avondale. Gary, thr beautiful new MISS Avondale, and hr.r lady·in·wa1tmg, and waiting and u·a1tmg, Miss Prycenc Last Sunday, The Ranch held a benefit in memory of Fabian Palas1os, who passed away last week. The benefit netted over $3,000 which will help pay family and fun­eral expenses. It's so nice to see a major business reaching out to help in time of pain and sadness The spirit is alive at the Ranch. - a- Wholo Earth Provisions held a Christmas Party at the Houston Guest House. The place was simply filled with people. food and good cheer. Even a band belted out the sound of Christmas Gordon. you sure must have your hands full. -o- And they say politics makes strange bedfellows? End of discussion, now we'll take a uote The Mining Co. held its annual party last Tuesday This year 1t all came together at Biiiy and Mark·s new house in the Heights. (Another great looney bin in the making!) And to the guest who's name I can't remember, thanks for the compliment on my taste in men. We know, don't we Billy? -a- The Heaven, Mining Co., JR's party pre­ceded that one by one night. Heard it was quite festive. Can't wait for next year's -a- Mary's employees party was definitely the most interesting It was held at Fannie's. What an inspiring place! -a- Mary·s will be holding an after-Xmas Sale on Dec. 27 with all the tips going to help the fight against 21.06. And this word from Mary's: 2106 is not an old bath house on Gennesee. - a- Looks like the landmark Pet Shop and Bird Cllnlc may be reopening soon Much work has been done and they are hoping for a January opening of the unofficial Mont­rose Zoo. Hope so. -a- Dnscoll St. Cafe is zooming towards their reopening with work progressing at a fever­ish pace. -D-Oid friends inform me that The Kr- of Olympus is holding its annual Mardi Gras Ball (Yes, that magical time of year is approaching.) on January 12. Therw1ll be a bus departing for New Orleans. More on that when information Is released - a - 'Warm 11 up In Arizona." The First Annual Artzona Gay Rodeo will be held January 17 1n Phoenix. Any of you cowpokes Interested can contacl the AGRA. P.O. Box 16363, Phoenix, Arizona, 85011 or (602) 279-0795. DECEMBER 20, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 23 Here's a little tinkle for ya! Happ)' New Year, Nathan! - a- Met the legendary Frank Collins of Encore at JR'•· He informs me that Encore will be presenting another one of those great fundraising parties at Numbers on New Year's Eve. I know where I'll be ringing in the New Year- at Numbers with everyb­ody else. -a- Colt 45's had their Xmas Party at the Carousel Skating Rink on December 17 Many roller derby queens skated to their hearts delight. Star performers Included K.B Smith and Keith of Fox Photo. -a- My gosh! The Ajar turned marigold! This Sunday, Heaven will present "While Christmas Party" with free well drinks 7- 9pm. Performing will be comedian Alan Lozito, better known as the Drag-goon This should prove to be a most entertaining evening. I'll be there, laughing it up with the other 30 million that are sure to be there! -a- You may have noticed a new contender In the race for fast food prominence in Mont­rose. It's McDonald's now open and vying against fast food heavyweights Wendy's and Church's. May the best burger (or chicken) win! -a- L'Angelo would now like to take the time to wish everyone in Montrose a very Merry Christmas. May 11 be a safe and happy one. Look out next week, New Year's is coming Merry ChristmtUI _ naturally! .Ar~~ ~:f'/ ~ COUSINS Christmas Day Buffet 2pm WEEKLY NITE GOING ONS!! Fri. & Sat. Nltes: Country Express Band 817 Fairview 11am-2am 528-9204 MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA 325 309/mo 190E 349/mo Accord 159'mo 52k 395/mo 300E 498/mo P~lllM 17'.l·mo 735i 569/mo 560Sl n51mo '86 CADILLAC '86 PORSCHE '86 JAGUAR Dt'Villr 329/mo 944 398/mo XJ6 569'mo 944 Turbo 498/mo '86 MAZDA '86 BUICK RX-1 20'Jlmo '86 TOYOTA Sliylart. 17'.llmo &26 178/mo Carrwy 1n1mo Elf'Clra 279'mo Crliu 185/mo ~~ CALL LEE BORBA ~ (713) 975-1986 __......_ l';Q ()()WI'; PAYME"IT • LO\\ER t..'IONHilY PA\ MENT • CASH FOR YOl:R RADE .. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 20, 1985 -611 B TOYS FOR TOTS HOT MEN STIFF DRINKS ICE COLD BEER 13. Adam§~ Ltd. Dec.23 7pm-till Special Guest Apperance by Santa Claus direct from the North Pole D.J.'s MARDI COLEMAN & DOUG SUMMERS ALWAYS: 50¢ DRAFT BEER Bloody Marys & Screwdrivers 75fl: 7am-2pm Mon.-Fri. 611 Hyde Park 528-9079
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