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Montrose Voice, No. 138, June 17, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 138, June 17, 1983 - File 001. 1983-06-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3277/show/3248.

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(1983-06-17). Montrose Voice, No. 138, June 17, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3277/show/3248

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 138, June 17, 1983 - File 001, 1983-06-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3277/show/3248.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 138, June 17, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 17, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript INSIDE THE MONTROSE VOICE It's Gay Pride Week • 1n Hous­ton Remember Thelma 'Don't Leave Me This Way' Houston? A 'Hot Wax' interview, page 18 The Newspaper of Montrose June 17, 1983 Issue .. 138 Published Every Friday Houston Gay Pride Grew From National Awareness A riot broke-out in 1969 in New York fol· lowing the arrest and harassment of homosexual1 in Greenwich Village when police raided the Stonewall Inn and since that time gay pride8eemed to say, I've had enough, it'• time to fight back. In 1970, a "Remember Stonewall" vigil waa organized in Los Angeles, and has become a yearly event. In 1975, the first gay march in Texas wae held in Dallaa as a part of the Stone· wall remembrance. Community activit· ists in Houston held a widely attended news conference that aummer which announced, among other events, the for­mation of a political action coalition that has become th• Gay Political Caucus. In 1976, an estimated 200 people held a march in downtown Houston to commem· orate the Stonewall riots, which wasapon· sored by the fledgling Gay Activists Alliance of the UniverBity of Houston. Singer and former beauty queen Anita Bryant's appearnace a1 featured enter· ta1ner for the Texas Bar Association con­vention in 1977 brought an estimated.6000 angry gay women and men down Hous­ton '1 street.a in protest. The heavily public· ized march, headed by such notables as gay publioher David Goodotein and the Rev. Troy Perry ofMCC, was in vivid reac· tion to Bryant's active a nti-gay state­ments and work to succesefully overturn the aay right. ordinance then in effect in Miami, Dade County, F1orida. A few week• later, Houston's gay com­munity held its firat Gay Pride Rally in Chel'T)'hurat Park to eelebrate what had become a national holiday for leabians and gay men. More than 4500 activists met at the Astroarena in 1978 for Town Meeting I, the firBt organizational gathering in Houston that included gay men and women from every aspect of Houston society. Former 1tate legislator and vice­presidential nominee Frances "Sissy" Farentho1d waa the keynote speaker; the meeting waa chaired by Virginia Apuno, a leading gay activist who is now the exec· utive director the National Gay Task Force in New York. Many of Houston 'a gay services, including the Montrose Counseling Center and the Montrose Clinic were founded at thi1 meeting. The tint full week of events commemo­rating (ay pride Wlll held that year. Since 1979, the gay community of Hous· ton has celebrated Gay Pride Week with a full schedule of events spanning 11 days in late June. More than 67 gay and lesbian-related organizations sponsor a variety of even ta for the entire community ranging from juried art shows to athletic eventa and everything in between. Thi1 year'• Gay Pride Week theme, chosen by the community, is "Unity Through Diveristy." The theme recog· nizea the many different segment.a of Houston'• aociety which have worked together to build one of the most socially and poltically influential gay communi· ties in the nation. Gay Pride Week Features Many Events Several thousand gay persons-and others-are expected to participate in this year'• Gay Pride celebration which began Thuraday, June 16 with the anniversary of a police raid on Mary's Lounge, 1022 Westheimer, and will continue to the cul­minating event, the Gay Political Caucus' Summit Rally starring Tina Turner on June 26. A Spokesperson of the Gay Pnde Week Committee aupplied the following infor· mation: On Friday, June 17, a salute to gay busi· nesses ia planned. Gay-owned and oper· ated busineS1e1 are the economic backbone of our community. For many years a variety of establishments with gay clientele have contributed beyond their 1hare to the political, social and cultural activitiee of our community. Thia day of the calendar recognizes that steadfast support. The Tavern Guild conducts a Gay Pride continu«l page 6 2 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 17, 1983 We hope that you will plan to celebrate your Gay Pride Week with us lJNIT Tlil\OlJC.1.....__ .... DIVE .S. ITY 110USTON -CJ-A-Y- -P-R-ID-E- -W-E-E-~-- -1-9-8-3- ~ WE SUPPORT UNITY THROUGH DIVERSITY Are Gays Leaving Montrose? By Hollio Hood Gay flight, is it fact or fiction is a question that is facing residents of the area. Rents in Montrose are higher than any· where else in town, and those rent prices are driving some persons away in these stressed economic times. "Why ohould I pay a high price when I can go just beyond the loop and get a real nice house with a roommate for two to three hundred dollars Jess," asked one per­son. "I'm atil1 just minutes from Mont· rose." "I still come back to Montrose to play," •aid another person, "but it just cost.a too must to live here anymore." Almoot every block of the area hao either a for sale or for rent sign up some­where, yet new townhouse construction flourishes and the townhouses are selling. "I don't think there are enough houses on the market in Montrose," said one local real tor. "Not for the number of agents try­ing to make a living from selling them. But you have to keep in mind that not all these places with a for sale sign are really inter­ested in selling. Maybe they are just test­ing the market to see what their house would be worth right now. I'd say just 30 per cent of the houses for sale in Montrose will ever actually close." Real estate, because of it's location to downtown, shopping and cultural activi· ties, in Montrose is undoubtedly the high­est in the city. When one young woman was asked if her new townhouse was in Montrose, she replied, "Gracious no, I couldn't afford to buy here." The dicatomy of housing starts versus occupancy will result in a changing demo­graphics look for Montrose in the coming years. JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Interferon Used for AIDS International Gay New• Agency A skin cancer common among patients with AIDS sometimes can be treated effec­tively with a form of interferon, a new study indicates. The cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma, afflicts about one-third of all victim• of AIDS. Doctors at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York gave geneti­cally engineered interferon to 12 homosex­ual men with KS. The disease completely disappeared in three and partly in two. Three patients showed minor, temporary responses. The researchers cautioned, however. that the treatment seems to have little sig­nificant effect on the AIDS itself. Without an effective immune system, AIDS patients remain easy prey to other oppor­tunistic infections. Dr. Susan Krown, describing the study in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, wrote: "Although interferon treatment does appear to res­tore some aspects of immunity in some patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, we do not have evidence in this study that interferon consistently or permently reverses the underlying immunologic defects that characterize AIDS." Interferon is a disease-fighting material produced natural1y throughout the human body. Recovering large amounts of natural inteferon from the blood is a slow and difficult process, so scientists have used genetic engineering techniques to insert human interferon genes into bacte­ria to manufacture the substance. Th experimental technique has also been used with AIDS patients at San Francisco General Hospital The doses vary from 50 million units to 1.9 million units. Those receiving high doses have experienced fever and chills for a time fol­lowing the injection or intravenous treat­ment. The latest study tested a bacteria-made form of the chemical called recombinant leukocyte A interferon. The long-term effects of the interferon treatment are still undetermined, and a cure for AIDS itself remains a mystery. Montrose Mouth Gay Pride Week Underway This is Gay Pride Week and the Mouth would like to take a moment out to explain to our straight friends. briefly, why we have it at this time of the year-and where it came from During the 50s and 60s-and continuing today-gay people. among other groups, have been victims of society's prejudices. This espe­cially extended to police officers who looked on homosexuals as ··fair game_'" Police around the country in the 50s. 60s and 70s, routinely invaded gathering places of gay people and arrested them en masse_ What they were charged with was unimportant. Gay people were easy to arrest. they didn't fight back, and no one came to their defense. So all of these arrests made police departments around the country look good, statisticalty Well, during late June in 1969 at a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn in New York, during one of these routine police raids, gay people had had enough. They fought back_ They rioted! They forced the police to barricade theiiiselves inside the bar while gay people controlled the street outside The riot went on-gaining and losing steam-over a two day period. It's that riot­that statement of "I am not going to allow your bigoted prejudices to be the cause me being arrested I am going to make you answer for your abuse of your public trust It's gomg to be you gomg to court (eventually)-not me· Yes. Gay Pride Week grew out of militancy, out of necessity. In recent years. because of better public education. we have become less mihtant We have changed the system around Gay people are no longer routinely being sent to court simply because they're gay. But law enforcement officers who abuse their public trust are today forced to answer for their actions -o- Family and Fnends of Gay will host a reception for the gay community at the Liberty Bank Community Room Saturday from noon until 3:00 p.m. (The group expresses appreciation to Gene Howle and Disco Granny for their assistance at a recent FFG benefit at the Copa) -a- ''Who Took the Boom Out of Boomtown?." Comedy Workshop's most recent production will premier June 21 at 8 30pm Tuesday through Saturday with 11pm performances on the weekend For a smorgasbord of wit. music and satire make reservations by calling 534- 7333. Tickets are $4 weekdays. $6 weekends -a- The Montrose Singers will perform as part of this year's National Day of Remembrance Memorial Service. The service, to include a special memorial to AIDS victims, will be held at MCCA, 1919 Decatur, at 7:30 p.m. ·next Thursday_ The theme will be "Unity Through Dtversity-Past, Present and Future" and is sponsored by the·Houston Homophile Inter­faith Alliance -o- A Big Montrose Mouth Kiss (mmmmm-smack) to Kris Brown. who was selected the Volunteer of the Month for May by the Volunteer Advi­sory Council at the Montrose Clmic. Also. the Clinic will be offering classes m sign language to communicate with the deaf m the near future. -o- Apolog1es to Choices for the tyPo in. their Mouth entry last week. They D8\ter have beei't and never will be embarassed by their meet­ings, and needless to say the Voice is not embarassed to print any mformauon about the club they wish to submit Choices for Lesbian Mothers. a subgroups of Choices, will have a picnic and pool party at Memorial Park on June 18 beginning at 3:00 p.m. for kids and moms The pool is located at Schuler and Haskell in the park The area will be roped off for the party_ A BBQ grill will be furnished but bring your own fixin's For more information call 699-0085 Chocolate Donna 528-2259 2631 Richmond Patrick Cowley Album Profits go to AIDS Victim Services By Jeffrey Wilson In the autumn of 1981, nearly two years ago, an independent record label dedi­cated to keeping the disco/dance music craze alive was formed in San Francisco. It was the incredible union of a near-East Coast disc jockey who knew his way around the keyboards, Marty Sleeman, and a musical genius who would relaunch the career of Sylvester and launch the careers of the yet unknown Paul Parker and the Patrick Cowley Singers. The genius was the late Patrick Cowley. Patrick spent two years during the mid- 70s emen;ed in the phenomenon of syn­thesizer music and several more years writing music. The drive to develop and improve these talents resulted in a string of chart toppers including "Do Ya Wanna Funk," "Hard Up," "Right On Target" and Cowley's own "Menergy" and "Meg­atron Man." Little more than a year after the initial successes Cowley became another victim of the AIDS disease. !\1egatone Records' Marty Sleeman, Michael Bailey and Audrey Joseph (preei dent, vice-president and general manager, respectively) have set out to raise money through their company for the AIDS cri sis. Megatone has released a special med· ley of hits by the late co-founder of the label bearing a prominent sticker which reads, "ATTENTION: 100% OF MEG· ATONE'S WORLDWIFE PROFITS FROM THIS RECORD WIL BE DONATED TO THE G.M.H.C. TO HELP FIGHT A.l.D.S." Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright • 1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg pubi••het1.c!•tor Wiiliam Msrberry bu.,,..,,,,.en~ Acel Clartt greph•c. Sonny Davis .coountmg Holht Hood "'eneg•ngeclitor Edd•• Chavez •pom.cJttor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee conlflbut<ng wril•ri Bob Jon ... Mary Cadena, Julie Holtlngsworth, John Cooper, Larry Popham Conlfll>Ullng pho/og1epn.t• lyt Harris ecitt.,ti.1ngd1rector Mark Drsgo edvert11111g Jon Cheetwood ctut1f1«JetJo,eTfrf11Jg Foumbng Me~ Grtieter MOfllroM BUl•i:- Guild. Gey Pr991 AMOdehon Newa SetvfC9S· lr1ternet•on.I Gey News Agency. Pacilic New• """""' Au•lm ButHU C.Pltof N-• Ser\ttce Syftdrc:et«I FHt"'9 SwvtON & W11f•• (S.n FrenoaooJ CNon1c1t1 F"tur• Un•led fMlur9 Syndicete. Jeffrey Wollan Randy Allred. Stoneweu FMturet Synd•cete. Bnen McNet.19ht. Joe B•i\t POSTMASTER 5-rid eddrHI correctt0nt 10 3317 MonltOM •308. Houlton_ TX 77008 SuO.cop/ron 1•t• In US ,,., fff/.cJ Mtttelop9 $49 per )"Mr (52 IHUM). $29 pet IUC: month• 12e IMUH),Ofl1 25perWMk (!en lh•n 2e 1 .. o••l N1llOfll/ «l"*'"'"'Q flptHMlll/r .... Joe OiS1blto. R•"""'dell "41tkellng_ 868 8th Awen~. New York 10011. (212) 24:iHiM3 Adtf•lllmg dHdl>M Toeadey. 5 30pm. lor lttue relHMd F1~~1ng NoltC• IO ~·m·•·• LOCel 1dYer1•••"G rite 1ched111e F•v•A w• ellec::ltve Oct 1. llMl2 Loe.I *1vert111ng rat• schedule Sui·Awdl Metlactiv1J11ly 1. 11113 RNtJOIMlbilltr MontrOM Voice do. noc 1uume r9&P0N1bll!ty lol advertllioO Cll•tnl R..oert ~Id 1'9r1 MotilroM \'01C1 · 101ny dilcepl•v• *1v1tr1i11ng G.M.H.C. is the Gay Men's Health Cri· sis, a New York-based group whose pro­jects included the recent Gay Night at the Circus, a sold-out affair at Madison Square Garden thatraieedabout$250,000. The funds raised by Magawne will go w the much in need patient support services as well as education and public aware­ness. Additionally, the aforementioned staff at Megatone Records are seeking foundation grants that will match efforts dollar for dollar. I hope that all reading this acroBS the country wiU go out en masse, buycopieaof this very special record and give it to all your healthy friends to serve as a reminder to get involved. Tell these friends to be thankful they're well and to also go out and purchase the record to give to someone else. Let's start a new craze in the music world under the heading of caring and involvement. Thanks! Dallas City Council Passes AIDS Resolution The Dallas City Council unanimously passed a resolution June 1 urging signifi· cant new federal funds be allocated for AIDS research. City Councilman Craig Holcomb intro­duced the resolution The Dal1as Gay Alliance had cam­paigned for the resolution and had cited to councilpersons similar resolutions in Boe· ton, New York, Orlando and San Fran­cisco, plus a state resolution for New York State. The DGA had previously presented the City Council with a petition signed by 6000 urging Dallas to help fund AIDS research. ~ill Nelson, vice president of DGA, and Mike Stewart, president, addressed the Council. The resolution passed by a unanimous voice vote JUNE 17, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Part of a previous Houston Gay Pride Parade New Trial Sought For Dan White lnternationaJ Gay News Aaency District Attorney Ario Smith of San Fan· cisco has urged U.S. Attorney Joe Russo­niello to prosecute Dan White on a different charge from the one he received a lenient sentence for-this time for violat­ing the civil rights of the two men White murdered, Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. "Such a short sentence for two political assassinations does not serve the interests of justice," Smith wrote. "The request is being considered seriously," Russoniello said. "We're not treating it frivolously." Atwmey John Wahl, a lawyer for the Milk estate, said he would submit legal briefs on why White should be prosecuted within the next two weeks. Wahl said that he was enoouraged by a response he received when he queried the attorney general's office in Washington, D.C. Lowell Jensen, an assistant attorney general, wrote: "We certainly can under· stand your disenchantment with the state sentence imposed on Mr. White and we are appreciative of your interest and concern that justice be rendered in this case." Ario Smith said that "U.S. Supreme Court decisions make it clear that the pre­vious state prosecution would not be a bar to a federal prosecution." Smith added that a federal prosecution for Dan White "would serve a compelling public interest." Unchained A year ago, two St. Louis tire salesmen were braggin1 about "putting more people in chains than the KGB." That was after the big anow of '811'82, when Barry and Ricl<y Decker sold more than 2000 pairs of tire chains. The Deckers expected another severe winter in '821'83, reported the St. Laius Post Dispatch, and stocked some 3000 pairs of chains. But the snows never hit and the Deckers have a problem. "Maybe we could start a fad," says Barry. "People could wear tie chains around their necks!' 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 Gay Pride Week: Day by Day Continued from page I Week decoration contest among partici­pating bars and clubs. and gay men and women are encouraged to visit their favor­ite businesses to say "Thank you for your aupport." On Saturday, June 18 the Houston chap­ter of Family and Friends of Gaya will salute and be saluted by the gay commun­ity in a reception at the Liberty Bank Com­munity Room, Westheimer at Montrose, nooon to 3:00 p.m. This organization brings together th~ parents and children, friends and co-workers of gays in efforts to better understand each other. Also on Saturday, beginning at 3:30 p.m. at Levy Field on Eastide St., the Montroae Sporta Association (the largest gay community organization) all-star aoftball team• will play the Oak Lawn Softball As•ociation 's All Stara of Dallas. This organization involves participants who aren't involved necessarily in politics or a gay church, and thus reaches a cross­section of the community, said a represen­tative. Juneteenth, June 19, is Texas Emanci­pation Day. The heritage of black gay m~n and women will be celebrated at a special gathering sponsored by the Houston Chapter of Black and White Men Together at the Catch One, 4965 Martin Luther King Blvd. at 9:00 p.m. Admis•ion is $6. .. Men and Women Together: An Even­ing of the Arts·• is the focus for Monday, June 20. An " Evening of the Arts" salutes the contributions of gay male and lesbian artists at the Tropicana Swim Club, 2114 Peckham al 7:00 p.m. for $5 admis~ion. For the paat three years Gay Pride Week ha,.; included art exhibitions, poetry read­ings and photography diaplays. This year'• event has generated unprecedented interest thanks to the work of the Mont­rose Art Alliance. On Tuesday, June 21 the Montrose Sport& Association Variety Show at Numbera. ,'JOO Westheimer, at 7:00 p.m. should draw a crowd. The women and men of the sports association will present an entertaining evening of song, dance and comedy for the community for just $3. An educational forum is planned for Wednesday, June 22 at 9:00 p.m. in Chan· mng Hall. First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. Gays had to educated to their own self worth, ihe information on the forum 1tatea. and now it is to the community to enlighten the rest of our ~ociety to dispel the myths about gay stereotypes. Proceeding the forum at 8:00p.m. will be a production by the Montrose Counseling Center. Gay Switchboard and Montrose Clinic ''Clap-Shtick or Everything You Always Wanted to Know About the Coun­seling Center. Switchboard and Clinic but Were Afraid to Laugh." Theplayettedeala with sexually transmitted dieseases and other maladies and problems with great wit and zest. Thursday, June 23 serves as the National Day of Remembrance and the Texas Bay Area Gay Day. In remember­ing the gay men and women who died in the Inquisition and the Holocaust in Europe~ simply because of their homosex­uality, the Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection, 1919 Decatur, will hold a special aervice at 7:30 p.m. Gay Latin Day is Friday June 24 with a fiesta and sharing of the rich Latin herit­age at the Noch•y Dia Ballroom, 2103'h N. Main beginning at 9:00 p.m. for $4. The Fred Paez Memorial Concert will be the feature of Saturday, June 25. On June ZX, 1980, whiJe gay Houstoni­ans were celebrating during Gay Pride Week, 1980, one of Houston's founding gay activists was killed by a Houston police officer. He is remembered each year in this concert, organized and presented by the Montros.. Symphonic Band. The concert. "1th several musical groups in attendance, will be at 7:30 p.m. in Cullen Auditonum. University of Houston. Admi8810n is $5. The highlight o! I: e week w be Sun· day's parade featuring 18 professional floats, several dozen private floats and units, more than ever before, plus march­ing groups and musical groups from throughout the atate. The parade will begin at 5:30 p.m. near Shepherd at Wes­theimer and will proceed down Westhei­mer to Bagby. "GPCelebration '83: A Night with Friends at the Summit" will replace the traditional Spotts Park Rally as the finale of Gay Pride Week in Houston. The event will kick-off at 7:00 p.m., after the parade. Buses will be available from some of the bara to take people to the Summit. Head· lining will be dynamic rock and blues star Tina Turner, with Pamela Stanley as the warm-up. AJHo invited guests are the Houston City Council members, Comp­troller Lance Lalor and Mayor Kathy Whitmire. Other guests include State Hepa. Debra Danburg, Al Edwards and Paul Colbert; State Senatora Craig Washington, John Whitmire and Lloyd Doggett, and Kathy Webb, nati~nal secre­tary for the National Organization of Women and special guest Virignia Appuzzo, exectuvie director of the National Gay Task Force. Tickets are available at Ticketron and Ticketmaster for $9.65. Attack of the Killer Bambis The old saw about violent movies trigger­ing violent behavior apparently doesn't hold true for mental patients, reports Psy· chology Today. Studies at a Veterans Administration Hospital in upstate New York indicate that Schizophrenics become more aggres­sive after aeeing nonviolent movies than after violent ones. sychiatrists Roy Johnston and Burdette Lundy say the reason may be that, for people confined in institutions, scenes of ordinary life may be more upsetting than blood and mayhem. Apology for Gay Slur International Gay New• A1ency A vice president of a publisher of law reports has formally apologized to the two openly gay elected officials in the Minne­. iota legislature following a prot~st by the same individuals about a sneenng head ~ ing appended to a description of a gay rights bill that waa printed in one of the firm 's publications. Allen E. Schechter of Commerce Clear· ing Houae, Inc., wrote to Senator Allan H. Spear and Representative Karen Clark, saying "Your outrage and indignation over the heading applied to Senate Bill 83 is no greater than ours." Schechter went on to say that it "was the act of an indvidual employee, who was disciplined immediately, and in no way represents a Commerce Clearing House position ." Schechter did not specify the nature of the discipline. He did note that a subetitute page, cor· recting the defamatory heading, was mailed to subscribers the same day it was di,scovered llaat Janaury 26). The spokesman for the company added that ''We do not regard this issue as frivo­) ou.s, and we certainly don't consider our initial heading a joke."' Senator Spear, commenting on thea~l· ogy, apologized forthetwo-monthdelay m reporting it tothe press because "our office has been very busy." The new Commerce Clearing House des· cription of the gay rights biJI now simply reads: ~ Sex Discrimination-Prohibits discrimination in employment, sale. ren­tal or lease of real property, public accom· modation. or credit. based on affectional or sexual orientation." Spear in a preB.B release. said that he and ReP. C1ark 'now oonHidered the mat· &er cloaed." NOW OPEN UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP LINDA "LULU" SIMPSON Featuring: Free Sunday Afternoon Buffet Wednesday Steak Night, $300 Happy Hours 7am- 7pm 7 Days a Week CELEBRATE PACHY & RANDY'S HAPPY BIRTHDAY WITH US FRIDAY, JUNE 17 109 Tuam-528-9128 402 l.ovelt 527-9866 VISIT BAJA'S PATIO BAR NOW OPEN 4PM TILL, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY NOW APPEARING Luisa Amaral-Smith and Geoff Allen In order to allou.., us to maintain the high qualitv of n1tntaimnmt that you expect, Baja ·, now hru a $1 door chargeperpn.vm on IRID.t Y V S..t Tl "RD..tl' NIGllTS OS/}. Ilappy Ilour l-8pm A gift that's a lot of laughs! Mike Peters, whose editorial cartoons appear In this newspaper, laughs at politics and pokes good-humored fun at olflceholders in his latest gem of a book! Win One For The Geezer includes many of his Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoons, and lots of laughs. Just $3.95, plus tax, at your bookstore. Mike Peters' funniest book yet! A private way of life. foJ<Hth.40)· M .. lrOs<ana Condtmtm111111.1 The STRAWORD .......... '.)O&ldwu "/J l62/-8J50 The Voice is the Choice Responsible, Dedicated Service to the Texas Gay Community The Montrose Voice Publishing Company DALIAS GAY NEWS The Weekly Gay Newspaper for North Texas MONTROSE VOICE The Weekly Gay Newspaper for South Texas OUT IN TEXAS The Weekly Statewide Gay Entertainment Guide 3409 Oak Lawn #109 3317 Montrose #306 Dallas, TX 75219 Houston, TX 77006 (214) 528-1838 (713) 529-8490 -----..JU NE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 LOST GOLDEN RETRIEVER 2 yr. old male, answers to "Petey." Lost last Tuesday (June 14) in the Fairview- Tuam area. No tags. REWARD Call 522-4021 or SPECIAL PALS 666-3515 DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIAL Beef or Chicken Kabob, $3.95 (fries included) 112 pound burger, $2.95 (fries included) Served 11am-2pm £ Visit o. ur new Sweet Shop • ~uY"1al //(!urk.J 'z·~" ____ _ Special Occasion Cakes Party Mmts & Catering 2047 Marshall across from Alabama Theater ._ ____52_1-9_516_ ___ _J Register Now for Your FREE LISTING in the 7th edition of the Gay Areas Business Directory Houston/Montrose Section now in preparation SPECIAL OFFER: A custom trademark ad is FREE to the first business that takes our a 1/3 page or larger ad in each classification Call for details at 713/524-7200 Montrose Glass & Mirror Company 1833 Richmond 524-6016 David Pace Specializing in custom mirrored walls ~~~'ci.~(jlrlr.:S\ 01vU1s1rY _, ________________ , HOUSTON CJAY Pl\IDE WEEH 1983 CREATIVE GLASS Stained G lass • Beveled Glass Specializing in Custom Etched Glass 1833 Richmond-Don Davidson 523-8802 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17. 1983 Miami Area, Ranking High in AIDS, Establishes Foundation Ur. ~i~&rr!'~!/The Weekly New• Fund-raisers at individual gay businesses have been helpful, but one group in South Florida feels a problem as eeriou1 as the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome calla for a separate foundation. The recently-formed AIDS Medical Research Foundation of South F1orida, Inc., baa a lofty goal in its first year of operation; Raising at least $1 million. The money will come from private con· tributiona and various fund-raisers around the state,'' said William E. Oliver, eiecutive vice-president and chairman of the board of trustees. We already have some very healthy pledges." The foundation iB the brainchild of Oliver-an idea he has nurtured and researched since September of last year. I talked with everyone possible about AIDS to see if there was desire and support for a foundation," he said recently. I got an overwhelming positive response from the gay community, but they made it clear they wanted two things: "An entirely gay group which is com· pletely independent of existing political gay organizations. "Accountability of the funding-How it is apent, who get& aHoted what and where do they spend the money. "After oecuring good response. I decided to organize," Oliver aaid. Oliver oaid once ample funding has been raised, research groups will apply to the Foundation for consideration. Final deviaion on where the money will be donated lies with the Board of Advisers. Officials have been talking with three different groups: Sloan-Kettering Insti­tute of New York, Center for Disease Con­trol in Atlanta and the University of Miami Medical Center. "But this doesn't limit to these groups," Oliver said. "We'll accept applications from any group or try to determine who ia closets to finding a cure. That will be our primary criterion." •'There's a possibility we might fund two groups. But I doubt it right now," he said. "The CDC and university are the only two making reaJ strides. Right now, we're leaning to the university because they need the money worse." He said the CDC recently received a pri· vate donation for work on AIDS reserch, and if the federal agency got closer to find­ing a cure, the Foundation probably would funnel it. efforta there. According to Oliver, officers of the Foundation are working on a strictly non­paying basis. All minor work will be voluntary and the only projected expenses are for printing and public relations. 'We are considering some outside help, like hiring of an outside P.R. firm," Oliver said. "We want to hit moat of the major radio and TV stations and newspapers in the South F1orida area." ENTERTAINERS Keokl Kona 5-9pm 3012 Milam 528-6988 Marc Sanders 9:30pm-2am Afternoons with our Still, some observers have taken excep­tion to the following phrase from the arti· clea of incorporation: "No part of the net~aminga of the corpo­ration shall inure to the benefit of, or be distributed to, its members, trustees, offic­ers or other private persona, except that the corporation shH.11 be authorized and empowered to pay reasonable compensa­tion for servicee rendered." "For example, Matt Margolis donates hie legal time to the Foundation and we wouldn't anticipate any legal fees," he said. But if we ran into any considerable expense, of course, we might have to pay something for that." "Sure, there are going to be people who mistrust foundations,.. Whiteside 1aid. Mainly because it's another organization. But I feel the idea behind this foundation is good and we want to work with them aa much as we can." Whiteside said the time and the setting is right for such an organization. Qne out of every 10 AIDS victims now lives in Dade County, They represent 125 patients-placing Miami third behind New York and San Francisco-and it may ballon even further in the near future. ''I'm afraid that Miami may soon have as much AIDS aaany place in the country, because we have more than one risk group living here," said Dr. Mary Ann Fletcher, a Univeraity of Miami researcher. Fletcher recently wrote a grant to the fedeal government for $300,000 in funding over the next three years. She said she hopes the grant might be reviewed some­time later this year, and admitted there has been difficulty getting enough federal money :in South Florida. "We're setting up our own research pro­ject here and right now we have not other source of funding," Fletcher said. $1000 buys that much in supplies and re-agents and we're very thankful." Much more money will be needed, how· ever, to get the research project flying, she said. "We need to be able to jump in there (on individual casee) much earlier," she said. "There aren't any good diagnostic han· dies for AIDS to tell the people who are at risk." The severe funding needs of F1etcller' s group, Whiteside'• program, work by Dr. Margaret Fishel and others like them helped push Oliver into establishing the Foundation. "Thia isn't a one-time shot," he said. "We're going to continue this for one to two years until a cure is found." Wednesday 10pm Talent Night Open to any li\le act. singers comedians, etc WHY ARE THESE PEOPLE SMILING? new bartender, 8111 Pleau BECAUSE THEY HAVE FUN AT KEYBOARD• SECURITY PARKING-1 BLK FROM WESTHEIMER with Come to know Mexico. PUERTO VALLARTA from s199 at Los Pelicanos (on the beach) A NEW CONCEPT IN SPECIAL TRAVEL!! space limited ... call today LAMBDA INTERNATIONAL TOURS All pnce~ mdude: of-the-Southwest 4112 Lemmon Avenue #I-A Dallas, TX 75219 214-528-4700 • Hou·l acrnmmodauons for' nights 4 ddy\ • MCfting and grf't'ting .,en-·ice at tht· airpon by bilingual \laH • Round mp trampononion a1rport 1hotrl airport • N(W 15' wx £or all fe;uurcs purchav-d (indudmg extra ni~ht\' • \\'ckonw cocktail ;.u partu.ipo:uing hou·h • ';t-n-ict's o( local hoM to U'i\i\t you with optiun;1I 3Cll\."lllf"' ~~a:~~: :;}~c~1:!;~/~~t!~ • Olll!R OFSJ J:-.;ATJO:-.;S. • Guadalajara SW'.>, '-h"tito C:u~ J209. Can< 6n $311 Protect your most valuable possession For glowing skin that looks Younger & Younger A complete skin care treatment formulated for those special people who care about how they look 1. Cleansing Miik Creame-8oz.-$8.25 The cleanser can be used on the most tender skin 2. Honey & Almond Scrub-2oz.-$9.00 The treatment refreshes, unclogs pores, cleanses and brightens the texture of the skin. 3. Skin Toning Lotlon-Boz.-$8.00 This lotion improves the skin tone, closes the pores and stimulates the skin 4. Solr De Fete Mask-2oz.-$15.00 The beautifying results of this mask are immediate-even on the most sensitive skin. It soothes as 1t renews tired complexions 5. Aloe JoJoba Creme with Vitamin E- 2oz.-$10.00 A creme that softens & helps prevent premature aging 6. Creme de Excellence- 4oz.-$14.50 This special formula is enriched with collagen. truly a creme of excellence. ----------------------- Younger & Younger, Please send me the Ma11 lo Younger & Younger. PO Box following 42809 dept 352. Houston, TX 77242 ITEM Sales Tax Postage & Handhng Total Enclosed PRICE Include S2.oo per order for postage and handling. Include 6% se:les tax for Texas addresses Allow 2-3 weeks delivery. Visa & MasterCard accepted O Check or Money Order D VISA •llP date O Matercard exp date ~--...._z;p_.....;,..,.....J.:...,,_J,, \; Creaoallt'.A'!;"""'""-._~_ ......... ;,.,,~ .. Signatur• Films 'Angelo, My Love' By Steve Warren Robert Duvall had an interesting idea about building a film around a seven-year­old gypsy, Angelo Evans; but Duvall's execution is not equal to his concept. The boy certainly has a magnetic per­sonality, and his family and other non­profossionals who were cast Crom within the gypsy community create interesting and authentic screen presences; but Duvall seems to have been uncertain whether he was making a documentary or a dramatic film. The result is a rambling set ofimprovi­sations based on incidents the writer­director obRerved in studying Angelo and hie subculture. There's even a transvestite gypsy, one Duvall says is known and accepted in his tribe as "Baby Nick" or "Sissy Nick." Vignettes which would have been useful in the beginning are shown as outtakes behind the closing credits. The main plot, about Angelo's attempts to recover a ring stolen by a Russian gypsy, is forgotten for long stretches as other aspects of the boy's life are tenta­tively explored. Another running thread involves Angelo's romance with a "gai jo"-American girl; but there's nothing to prepare us for the long planned wedding (at age 14) of his brother Michael. Many sequences are individually inter­eeting, others totally undisciplined as if the director had thrown up his hands and said "Get what you can.'' The final aseemblage is so lacking in structure that you might re--edit it in your head as you watch and come away with a better film. The raw material is there-especially Angelo. 'Montgomery Clift' By Steve Warren There are many possible approaches to film biography. Claudio Maeenza takes one of the worst in Montgomery Clift, an Italian film made entirely in English. Masenza has rounded up a few people who knew Clift and let them tell his story-and their own-in great detail. Most of these individua1s mean nothing to us and much of what they have to say is redu.ndant and boring, not to mention self­servmg. We hear repeatedly that Clift was tal­ented, he was bisexual, he brought out eve­ryone's maternal instincts and he was tortured in later life. The Liz Taylors and John Hust.one don't appear; instead they're talked about by the likes of Clift biographers Patricia} Bosworth and Robert LaGuardia. The clips from about a dozen of Clift's films are all too brief, not enough to con­vey the genius that people keep talking about. Home movies catch Monty from infancy on and publicity portraits show him at his most beautiful. Those intersting visuals would be better against a musical soundtrack than the two hours of prattle dished up on Montgo­mery Clift. 'Alsina and the Condor' By Steve Warren For the intensely political film that it i1, Alaina and the Condor doesn't forget to entertain on a human level. Dean Stock· well'e American officer is a cardboard vil­lain, but 10 despicable that even conservative• are likely to cheer when his helicopter is shot down. Verbaiizing hie ideal of the reason for U.S. involvement in Nicaragua, Stockwell 1ays, '1This (world) is a duplex. There's the communists and the capitalists; and then there's the toilet-that's the Third World," The hero is a pre-pubescent boy, Alsino (Alan Esquivel). who wants to fly­" alone, like the birds." He and his country engage in parallel struggles to break free of their restraint.a, and when they join for­ces in the end they soar together. Alsino's grandmother represents the simple peasants with their love of the land, adding power to scenes in which civ­ilians are slaughtered by the anny. The U.S. "advisor•" only object to killings that might cause bad press. Director and co-writer Miguel Littin made the film with a coalition of Nicara· guans, Cubans, Mexicans and 11a few Chi­lean exiles" on what he calls "a small economic budget but a large human budget .... For us making the film was a great human adventure." Littin haa invested Alsina with humor, romance and even gratuitous sex for com­mercial enhancement. Its impact is tre­mendously political, but it works on other levels as well. It was just honored with an Academy Award nomination this year as Best Foreign Language Film. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 NOW SHOWING JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 2327 Grant at Fairview-528-8342 75~ Well Drinks & Beer KRAZEE HOUR DAILY 9-10PM KRAZEE TUESDAY 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer 9pm-2am Happy Hour noon-6pm daily, $1 well drinks, 75f beer NOW OPENING AT 12 NOON WITH BIG JACK A People's Place. Your bartenders: Big Jack, Daniel, Andy, Ronnie. Pewee, Morrie l.INIT~ Tli.,Ol.IC.d DIVE SITY ... ____________________ ,,. 110USTON GAY PAIDE WEEI~ 19Sl CELEBRATE GAY PRIDE WITH US JUNE 16-26, 1983 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 Parking Problem in Montrose By Hollie Hood The number of cars regularly parked on the street in Montrose is higher than any area of town, and represents a problem particular to this area, said Chris Barnes, traffic engineer of the Operations Se<:tion of the Houston Traffic Department. "Part of it is because of the number of businesses going into these older homes in the area," he said. 0 There is just no place for them to park in a residential area." He said that every parking !traffic situa­tion is considered individually, and that the most important aspect is that traffic not be impeded to the point that it does not flow and emergency vehicles cannot get down the 1treetll. All citizen complaints about on-street parking violations or hazards are investi-gated, he stated; however, there is not an overall ordinance for the city, but some 31 restrictions in the Houston Traffic Code to work from. "Montrose is the biggest problem area of the city," he said. Residents of Cherry­hurst have posted signs in their area stat­ing oppot1ition to a restaurant operating in the neighborhood. One reason is the increase in on·street parking. Businesses want the traffic to flow so customers will come, so they ask for one set of regulations regarding parking. Resi· dents may want other considerations, said Barnes, so the solution to parking prob­lems is not always simple. Investigation of the complaints keeps the five engineers of the office busy, he said. "It'• difficult to control in a city without zoning," Barnes said. Creative Hair Designs For Appointment Call 526-4494 3220 Yoakum at Westheimer Congress Acts on $12 Million AIDS Bill Stanford Square On May 25 the House of Representatives unanimously passed a $12 million fund­ing increase for research on the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in fiscal year (FY) 1983. On May 26 the Senate Appropriations Committee pa.aaed an almost identical $12 million AIDS supplemental appropria­tion. Key Senate staffmemben predict the S 12 million proposal will paas the full Sena le shortly. The funding increase, if approved, will nearly double the federal government's 1983 budget for AIDS research. The AIDS Project, an affiliate of the Gay Rights National Lobby (GRNL), its constituent organizera, and allied groups, were instru­mental in persuading Congress to finally act on a major AIDS research fu nding propoaal, they announced in a press release. Despite a fiscally conservative appro­priation• committee and subcommittee, Weick:er recommended that $12 million in "new" money be spent on AIDS this year, in addition to the $14 million already bud­geted. Weicker'a proposal was included in the committee'• supplemental appropria­tions bill without opposition. "We are dealing with a public health emergency, one of mysterious origin and deadly consequences," said Sen. Daniel Moynihan. "Public health officials sug­gest we may have only seen the tip of the iceberg, but one thing is certain: our search for answere must begin now. The efforts of The AIDS Project have been and continue to be a major force in com batting this national epidemic." Conference On Aging Being Held International Gay New1 Aaency The Second National Conference on Les· bian and Gay Aging will feature presenta­tions by a large number of respected and high qualified speakers. To be held in San Francisco June 24-25 at San Francisco State University, the conference will be one of the major activi· ties leading up to the Lesbian/Gay Free­dom Day Parade, Sunday, June 26. Older leebiana and gay men, early com· munity activists, political leaders, service providera, and a host of specialists in research, teaching theater, cinema, and writing will participate. The conference will begin with a key­note address and a general session on "The Politics of Aging" and "the Lesbian­/ Gay Movement in Historical Perspec· tive ... Confirmed pr ... nters include Morris Knight, Dell Martin, Phyllis Lyon, Dorr Jones, Harry Hay, Jim Kepner, Harry Britt, Don Clark, and Judge Herbert Donaldson. TOWNHOMES The twenty-four' townhomes at Stanford Square afford I.he convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a rnrdully-planned, secure en\'ironment. Theo;e one and two-lx·droom traditional brick studio hom('s are wllhin minutes of the downtown business and cultural district, Greenway Pla7.a, the medical cl'nter and I.he speciality shops, galleries and fine restaurant> of the Montrose, museum and Ri\'er Oaks areas. Careful attention has been gi\'en to senirity requirments. An automatic entry gate permits controlled access to the townhome community, while automatic garage doors and well-lighted parking areas extend security within the perimeter of I.he property. As an additional feat ure, each home has been pre-wired for its own security system. Stanford Square Townhomes offer a variety of amenities, including: • Woodbuming fireplaces • Private patios • Kitchen appliances (refrigerator & microwa\'e oven) • Washers & dryers • Smoke detectors • Pre-wiring for cable TV Cathedral ceilings, skylights, allies, studies, porches and balconies also are included in many of lhe floor plans. A swimming pool and sun deck are located in the center of lhe courtyard. g""'' z 0 ALLEN PARKWAY l o W GRAY Oz z''----­~ ~~ W-ORlW UNIV OF T THOMAS OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KITTRELL REALTY 529-5981 Two Nurses Quit Hospital After Refusing to Treat AIDS Patient B,Y Rosalie Nichols Via Gay PreH Auociation Wire Service Two registered nurses resigned thier jobs at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San ,Jose, Calif., after refusing to treat an AIDS patient, according to a story by med­ical writer Bob Goligoski in the San Jose Mercury News June 11. The patient, believed to be suffering from Acquired Immune Deficiency Syn­drome, was subsequently moved to Stan­ford Hospital in nearby Palo Alto. The patient, whose identity was pro­tected by hospital personnel, is the first officially acknowledged AIDS patient in Santa Clara County, As late as May 29, Joseph Di Caprio, the communicable­disease specialist for the Santa Clara County Health Department, had told the Mercury News that no loca1 cases had been reported, "although he has heard rumors of them." One of the nurses who quit criticized the hospital for not taking adequate precau­tions, stating that procedures weren't spelled out until the patient had been there more than a week . "They should have realized this was coming and lists of precautions posted," she told the newspaper. "People were not informed ... A kind of panic broke out with a lot of people." One nurse, who was carrying a bedpan, "was real1y upset when she spilled some on her leg," she said. Hospital official Anne Moses defended Val1ey Medical Center's handling of the case, stating that guidelines for treating AIDS patients were discussed and adopted at a recent series of staff meet­ings. The guidelines, which essentially call for placing AIDS patients in isolation, are similar to those adopted by hospitals in San Francisco, according to the news­paper story. Moses, quoting from reports issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, said that "there is no reason to believe that health care professionals are a specia1 risk . except for those in one of the high-risk groups already-" Moses said that there is no provision at Valley Medical Center "that permits a nurse to refuse to treat a patient" and added that disciplinary action would likely have been taken against the nurses had they not resigned Gordon Everett, president of the Regis­tered Nurses Professional Association at Valley Med, said thalneitherofthenursea had complained to the association. He de8C'ribed the nun;es' actions as "rare" in the nursing profession and said during his six years at the hospital, he didn't know of any nurses who left Valley Medical Center after refusing to treat a patient. A spokesperson for Stanford Hospital told the Mercury News that the AIDS patient was admitted there from Valley Medical Center becuase "the protocol­the method-for treating AIDS is avails· hie here but not at VMC." The story of the nurses' resignation broke in the local press on Saturday morn­ing, June 11, and was picked up by televi­sion crews the same afternoon. The patient was transferred to Stanford at 7:00 p.m. Saturday. Another AIDS patient, who lives in the San Jmse area, told the gay publication Our Paper l88t month that his doctor advised him to go to San Francisco for help, saying that Santa Clara County physicians are relatively unprepared to cope with the disease. : NERnmn11N I ff!:' I UWI I GR~RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 12 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 17, 1983 EXCITING &: REFRESHING is what they're being called Two sisters, who previously performed solo, have teamed up to bring Houston audiences some unforgetta­ble moments of fine entertainment Stephane Parker & Sister Kashaka performing June 20, 21 and 22 2700 Albany 528-3611 Try Our New MEXICAN MENU Carne Gulsada Plate Pollo Gulsada Plate Beef Taco Plate Fajlta Plate with free Coke-$3.95 LUNCH SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 3 Beef or Chicken Enchiladas plate topped with melted cheese-$2.99 All plates Include rice, beans and salad. FREE COKE WITH ALL MEXICAN PLATES Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shop 1536 Westhelmer 528-4655 Famous hamburgers sh1sh-kabob. tacos. gyros Open 11am-10pm daily (till m1dn1te Fn. & Sat.) ,.-&Wzz_,,.L:o. .. -rr "'.~....-.-.-..- -· ~ UNIO.N. .. JACK T-SHIRTS TANK TOPS MUSCLE SHIRTS UNION DALLAS .JACK HOUSTON SPORTSll'EAR/llAIRClJTT/.VG (214) 528-9600 (713) 3918 CEDAR SPRINGS DALLAS, TX 1212 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON, TX COWBOYS COME AND GET IT! from $299 Round Trip NATIONAL RENO GAY RODEO & COUNTRY FAIR August 4-7, 1983 ~ EASTEFIN America's fcrrorite way to fly. Call us at 738-8615 For special group departures to the National Reno Gay Rodeo, contact Bruce Woolley in Houston at 524· 7324. Dolly's On the Road Again By Steve Warren Carol Channing may never die, but one get the impression in talking with her that she stopped living long ago. The songs and stories haven'tchanged. Those wide eyes and that unique voice have been preserved in a wax puppet topped with an assortment of blond wigs which are shorter but no less lacquered than Ann Miller's. If you put $25 or $30 in the slot and push the right button, this doll will put on a show for you from her unvarying repertoire-Hello, Dolly!, her night club act, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes or its sequel Lorelei. She'a done all of them enough times that she needs no rehearsal; she can juHt stand in the wings and listen to the overture to know which show to do. It's Gentlenum Prefer Blondes if the overture is followed by the chorus singing the opening lines of the first song: It 's high time that we all went places, 'It's high time we were gay .... "; and Carol is once again Anita Loos' unflappable flapper, Lorelei Lee. Channing calls Loos her "spiritual mother-she's labeled herself that. She wanted me for Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and made me a star ... She came to see this little revue Lend an Ear (the first Broad­way show directed by the late Gower Champion, Dolly's original director­choreographer) and she said, 'There's my Llrelei! ... ' And Jule Styne was sitting there and he said, 'I'm goingtowrite''Dia· monds Are a Girl's Beet Friend" for that girl!" Aren't legends wonderful? True or not, that story's been told so many times that it's part of show business history. Carol has a million of them. The World Almanac aays she turned 60 on January 21 (Katz's Film Encyclopedia says 62), but no one can remember when shew as young a nd in a ll probability ahe'Jl never eeemn old. The daughter of a noted Christian Science lecturer, she appeared in two Broadway shows, No for an Answer(l94 I) and Proof Thro' the Night (1942), after a brief stint as 0 a drama-dance major" at Bennington College. Champion disco­vered her in Lls Angeles, where he mounted Lend a.n Ear before moving it to Broadway late in 1948. Film producer Hal Wallis also saw her in that 1how and, in lieu of a screen test, gave her a bit part in Paid in Full (a.k.a. Bitter Victory). The high point of her sparse movie career was Rose Hunter's Th-Oroughly Modern Mtllie, which earned her an Oscar nomination in 1967. She was suppoeed to work for Hunter again in 1976, co-starring with Goldie Hawn in the fiJm version of the musical based on Patrick Dennie' Little Me; but that project never got off the ground. Cha nning credits her instincts with tell­ing her which roles to accept: "I've been lucky enough to play only the greatest characters in ... American theatre ... It's the script that I go for ... ~rge Burns was telling me this: You must embrace all mediums of entertainment if you want to work over a lifetime, because then you're free to tum down a ecript that isn'tgoocl." Between touro of Dolly she decided to give Gentlemen Prefer Blond.ea another airing. Because Llrelei Lee isn't 88 ageless as Dolly Levi, the script had to be updated. The result was Lorelei, in which an older, widowed woman looks back on the events of 20 years earlier. Channing epent the better part of four years in the mid-70s touring with that show. The Broadway opening of Lorelei was, Channing says, on Ani_ta Loos' 80th birth· day. "The New York Times got all excited and asked, 'Is Gentlemen Prefer Blondes-the original novel that she wrote whirh is Lorelti's diary-is that the great American novel?' And they were of the opinion it was. ~nd the great (g_ay) litf'rary cirtic Merle M1ller wrotfo an art1de in a biK magazine sayin~ Glntlemtn Prefer Blondes is indoubtedly the great American novel. "Well, I didn't know this when they handed me the script ... I just went madly in love and would have jumped out the window if I could not play (Lorelei)." Thia year Carol's once again the match­less matchmaker Dolly Gallagher Levi in Hello, Dolly!In 1963 she cut short a tour in Shaw's The Millionaires• to take the role (when Ethel Merman reportedly turned it down because she needed a rest after Gypsy), and it's made her a millionairess many times over. Dolly won Channing a Tony over Bar­bra Steisand, whoRe Funny girl opened two months later; but Steisand got a later (if not the last) laugh by landing the lead in the film version of Dolly, a role she was 20-30 years too young for at the time. That was just deja uu for Carol, who more than a decade earlier had seen her inimitable Llrelei turned into one of Marilyn Monroe& most memorable screen personae. "I knew that Dolly was a cJassiccharac· ter," Channing eays, bringing us back to the aubject. "It's Thornton Wilder. He's probably our greatest American playwright-outside of Tennessee Willi­ams.'' The show also gave Channing some new songs to sing, written by Jerry Her· man. "His mother died (of cancer) at ... a very young 40," the star recalls. "He was devoted to her and he now writes most of his music for his mother. It's a great com· pliment that he said, 'I want Carol Chan­ning to sing- the score of Hello, Dolly! I wrote it for my mother and I see my mother in Carol Channing ... Anyone who reminds me of my father, it means he's a wonderful man to me." On the road with the show for the ump· teenth time, she seems no more tired of it th a n her audiences are of seeing her do it. She's "toujours gai, 1 ' like Mehitabel, the cat she played in on the recording of archy and mehitabel and nothing ever changes but the prices. When she travels Carol brings along enough personal effects to make her hotel suite look and feel like home. Then of course there's the legendary organic food that she and her huaband-manager Cha­rles F. Lowe grow on their California ranch and have sent to whereever she's performing. Even when dining out she'll pull her own food from a handbag that rivals Queen Elizabeth's, rather than sample the local pollutants. My fondest memory of Carol Channing occured years before I met her and didn't even involve Carol herself. My lover of the time and I had been on the road all day and arrived in Dallas for the first time. Not knowing where to go we drove around until we saw someone who look as if he might be going to a gay bar, and we fol­lowed him. (Does anyone else remember those days?) Carol Channing was in Dallas at the time, probably doing Hello, Dolly! when we entered the bar, tired and disoriented, a figure on the distant stage was singing one of Carol's songs in a voice not unlike here. We saw the blonde wig and the saucer eyes and a for a moment we thought .... It was only a drag queen, but a good one. In many ways he was as real as the "real" Carol Channing, whoAe only advantage is that she's been plaing the role longer than anyone else. Like l,,orelei and Dolly, "Carol" is one of "the greatest C'haracters in .•. American theater." [f her linee don't always sound fresh, they still sound wonderful. As I admire the tackv "diamond ring" she's given me-the kiiid she throw& out by the handful during her club act-Rhe 1ays wiAely, "I know they're a girl's best friend, hut I've never seen a man tum one down yet.' JUNE 17, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 3100 FANNIN AT ELGIN HOUSTON, 522-2379 Fantastic New Pieces to Choose From Choose from the new load in air conditioned comfort ••• coal summer prices .•• )IOU will &e amazed. Old English Furniture 1138 W. Gray, 521-9145 * Wide Selection * Reasonable Prices * Customer Service * Major Credit Cards *Delivery Available 14 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 17, 1983 WEEKLY SHOW TIMES Thursday 8:30pm Friday 8:30 & 11pm Saturday 8:30 & 11pm Sunday 8:30pm TICKETS AVAILABLE ATTHE DOOR The Club that specializ PROUDLY P lli!()M llJLU~~ Ti with a (layover in Bur 2700 A ializes in Musical Revues LY PRESENTS JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 SPECIALS ·Monday-Happy Hour 1/2 price well 8 till closing Tuesday-50¢ draft 8 till 11 Fetaure performers Monday thru Wednesday T() ll312()A[)WA~ a u Burlesque ) ~~ JU~~ 17~1S~ 1~ ALBANY 16 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 17, 1983 The Noel Coward Diaries By Daniel Curzon/IGNA THE NOEL COWARD DIARIES Little Brown and Co , 1982. $22.50 ~~~~~~~~~~~- I'm afraid Noel Coward was just a name to me until recently. I didn 't even go to see a play of his with him in it when I could have when I visited London in the late 60s. I have seen him in a few movies, like The Italian Job. But now that I have read his diaries I feel I know the man-and the artist-much, much more. One has to come away with respect and even admira· tion for Mr. Coward. I expected him to be bitchy and queeny, but he comes off as cheerful and humorous. Indeed, it is cheerfulness. courage and humor that Coward prized in people. He tried to practice what he preached. What a life he had! From the age of 24, when he starred in his own play, The Vor­tex, until he died at the age of 72, he was famous. Of coune he had his down years, particularly in the years following World War II, but even then he was writing new playa, musicals, directing, acting, flying hither, thither and yon, dining with Viv and Larry, Lynn and Alfred (the Oliviera and the Lunta to the uninitiated). It'a amazing how many lunches and dinnen one man could have with so many friends and famous people! The diaries, in actuality. don't start until 1941, when Coward himself was 41. They continue until about four years before hia death of a heart attack in 1973. The editor1, Graham Payn and Sheridan Morley, have painstakingly provided identifying footnotes for all the cavalcade of yeaterday'a glittering array that passed through Coward'a life. All writers should be ao lucky aa to have had such devoted frienda. Coward apparently was a one-man renaissance, not profound, not at all dar­ing in his approach to plays, but energetic, hard-working, talented, and determined to make "entertainment" for everybody. He took his knocks, critically, especially in the late 50e and 60e, when his brand of writing was increasingly attacked for its light weight. Even Noel Coward had to fight for critical esteem in these years, even to the point of having to audition his work for potential backers. As for his homosexual leanings, there is no question that Coward was gay, but he was also entirely closeted about it. He makes comment.& from time to time about sexual rights advances. but he did nothing to assist them. He visited Fire Island once and found it dreadful. He didn't think it wise or good for so many gay men to be so openly eexuaL A reader of the diaries comes away with the strong notion that sex itself was not terribly preSBing for Coward. He alwaya seemed to have a boyfriend or a compan­ion, but there is not one single entry in these pages about a sexual act. Coward was also very conservative pol­itically, a real fan ofroyalty, especially the Queen Mother. He never says a negative word about any of them, and he reports his timea with royalty in the broadest general· itiea, which is exceedingly loyal but just a trifle monotonous and unilluminating. Coward does sometimes rail against leading ladies of the theater, because they couldn't remember their lines, take direc­tion , or avoid temper trantrums. He was eapecially angry with Claudette Colbert and Lilli Palmer, both of whom played leada in playa he directed. But he loved far more than he hated. All in all, Coward's was an enviable life, Books with rarely a dull moment. He was always lunching with the Queen of Spain or Mar­lene Dietrich, or flying from hie Swiss home to his London flat or going off for the opening of a New York production of something of hie, performing in cabaret in clubs, wowing them in Las Vegas, playing smallish but scene-stealing parts in movies, writing a new story, tossing off a novel, and on and on. Such a full life, and most poor suckers are starving to death! Curzon i1 a San Franisco author who '1 latest book ia "Violent Men" Cussing Today Lacks Style People don't swear like they used to, so says South Carolina English professor Dr. Norman Olsen, who specializes in the use of swear words. AJJ reported in the East West Journal, Olaen aays people used to be able to cuss at great length without resorting to vulgar obscenities. He blame• the decline of oral and written skills on television. AB an example of true cussing style, Olsen cites thia blaat, overheard from a lumber camp operator addressing a mule: "You bandy-legged, spavinated, hay­buming son of an illegitimate, miscon­ceived, ornery, hell-fired cuss of a varmint! Either get your tail in high gear or I'll flay the flash off your bones and leave your stinking carcaH for the box-ankled hounda and aplit-toed buzzards to feed on." NOTICE To offer his GAY clients the personalized service they deserve BRUCE WOOLLEY has left TravelTech. For personalized gay travel or all your travel needs, call Bruce Woolley (713) 524-7324 Tuesday & Wednesday Movies, June 21 & 22 Blue Angel starring Marlene Dietrich Yankee Doodle in Berlin with Max Sennett U~IT Tlil\OUC.11,..._._...,. DIVE liiiiioiSl..._TY...._ _ ~ HOUSTON CJAY PftlDE WEEI~ 1983 All Day Wednesday le Thursday Special­Happy Hour Prices to all in Mary's TShirtz Everyday Special-1/2 Price Drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a Motorcycle! Lany Fought-DJ Ev01Y Weekend PARKING IN SIDE LOT SPM-8AM 'MEKDAYS. All DAY 'MEKENDS (TON ~AV ZONE OTHER TIMES) tiOME OF HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB & TEXAS RIDERS AFTER-HOURS N!GHrLv 1022 \NFSTHFIMER 526-11851 MUSIC BY LARRY FOUGHT JUNE 17, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 "WE SUPPORT CELEBRATION 83" 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 17, 1983 The Law Adopting a Lover ~(. ~~:~r~:!~fceWeiss A recent letter asked the following ques­tion · 'My lover and I have been living together for si::c years. Neither one of us gets along with our families. I've heard tht l can adopt my lover. Is this a good idea? ·The idea of adoption by lovers of each other has received considerable publicity. It seems to be an ideal whose time has come. In a state which permits adults to adopt each other, one lover petitions the court to adopt the other or both may cross­petition for similar relief. If the petition is granted the two have achieved societal recognition of a status relationship. Wha­tever legal rights (and responsibilities) flow from the parent-child relationship are now available to them. It seems simple. And it is a process which many attorneys have advocated. For myself, I have been wary of adoption. Some see it as a solution for the problem of establishing a recognition of gay relation­ships. I do not. My concerns revolve around the following issues: 1. Adoption is not a substitute for mar­riage. The same society which sanctifies marriage also provides a means for termi­nating marriage (i.e. divorce). There is no divorce from an adoption. Adoption is forever. 2. Adopting may inadvertently destroy rights of inheritance. The person who is adopted is cut off from the right to inherit as an intestate successor (i.e. if there is no will) from his natural family. This, how­ever, does not bar him from taking any benefits under a will. 3. While adoption may create a status, it could subject lovers to charges of commit­ting the crime of incest. In most places, however. that crime can only be commit-ted by blood relations and not adoptive parties. 4. Adoption does not fairly represent the nature of the relationship. Lovera should be seen as co-equals sharing their lives together, not as parent and child. The use of the legal form of adoption can in fact undermine a relationship, making it appear to be something it is not. To this list of concerns I must now add yet another; It is possible that the petition for adoption will be deniecH In at least one recent case the court, on its own motion, concluded the gay lovers could not use adoption as a means of creating a 1ega1 status not provided by the legislature. In that a case the lovers had the unplea­sant experience of having paid for the legal work required to effect the adoption without getting anything to show for their money. Every case of course must stand on its own facts. In some instances and for some specific purposes adoption may bea useful tool for our community. But, like all tools, it must be handled with care. C/983 Henry Walter Weiss, a New York City attorney. His column appears here periodically and in other gay publications. Letters and questUms from readers are welcome. Write 4519 Lincoln Bldg., 60 E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10165. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose •306 Houston, TX 77006 A limited number of exclu\iH: townhome~ by Allan Edwar~. known for his fine custom homt.·s, are OO\\ a>-..ilA>le 'iotled in the charming llc1gh1.> area. !Ix..,,., to·" nhonx.~ offer total luxury an<l coml."nient, ckr-,e­in locauon For more information about thi~ fahu· kms townhome in\'estment. contact Steve \\'attcr~ at 868·5888 Distinctive Townfwmes from the $90's to $200's ALLAN EDWARDS B U L D E R N C GROOVIN'* CRUISIN' • BOOZIN' 2923 Main St. 522-0000 OPEN AT NOON SUNDAY FOR EYE-OPENERS (50¢ WELL AND BEER) AND PICK-UP VOLLEYBALL ON THE PATIO BOOZE AND/OR BEER BUST SAT. AND SUN., 3-9PM TUES. AND THURS., BEER BUST 9PM-2AM, WITH TERRY G's ALIVE AND HOT MUSIC WED. BARECHEST NIGHT, WITH HAPPY HOUR PRICES HAPPY HOUR 4-?PM MON.-FRI. , SHOT SPECIALS ALL THE TIME, AND CHECK OUT OUR NEW CRUISE DECK! YEA! By HollioHood 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 Hot Wax Thelma Houston: More Positive Than Ever By Jeffrey Wilson Thelma Houston, now an MCA recording artist. ia an independent woman, a free 1pirit with a mind of her own. She is best known for her previous works on the Motown label and one might say that ".Don't Uave Me This Way" was a long time ago. Thelma Houston, now an MCA record10g artist. ia an independent woman, a free spirit with a mind of her own. She is beat known for her previous work.a on the Motown label and one might say that t•Don't Leave Me Thia Way'' was a long time ago. The year for that tune was 1977-the year Thelma HoUAton shared an incredi­ble moment within her kitchen by win­ning the Grammy Award for that song. You aee, she didn't expect to win, so Thelma stayed home to get an early jump on her spring cleaning. As she explained, "That waa a fantastic moment in my kit­chen with an audience of one!" Even today, you can't sell that old tune short. It paved the way for the dance music disc jockeys around the country who were referring to it as "disco" long before Gloria Gaynor or Donna Summer. It seems that disco wasn't quite the nitch Ms. Houston was looking for though. Follow-upo like "Saturday Night, Sunday Morning," "Midnight Mona" and a remake of the Miracles' "Love Machine" received only minor success in the clubs. It was then that Thelma made a important career decision. "I had to decide to leave Motown. It was very, very hard for me to leave the com­pany. Our relationahip was good. It was just a career decision. I thou.ght I would probably do better at another company. I didn't feel there was a lot of energy put into what needed to be done at the time. However, u far as the creative part, I have never been recorded ao much with so many different people as I was with Motown, and that was a pl118." in Japan and being greeted by thousands of well wishers bearing flowers and chant­ing her name. The top of the list was her first album with a full orchestra and pro­duced by Jimmy Webb. However, accord­ing to Thelma, "the actual recording is my least favorite thing about the music busi­ness. This isn't something that just hap­pened, it has always been that way for me. It's hearing all that music compressed in those headphones and coming through my eara!" That's in the studio but the stage is a whole different story, Thelma adds. "I like to perform with musicians behind me. I like to perform 'Jive.' !fl could do an album live, then that would be fun." Which brings us to some of the things about her life in music that Thelma really enjoy&. "Live entertainment is my favorite thing. An album is really an advertisment for your live performances, at least that's the way I look at it. The more people hear your product, and if they like it and it sells, then they will cpme out and see you." "I haven't done an awful lot of touring. I've never been on the road long enough to call home to my manager and say, 'Look you've got to bring me home off the road.' I would like to work so much right up to that point." Ms. Houston profoundly stated her favorite place to tour is "the place where I work that the audience seems to enjoy me the most at that particular time. As far as having a good time and being able to work, I like New York City very much. I like shopping and there's all kinds of things to do there. If I'm off one night, hopefully not a night when the theaters are dark, I can catch a show or see the museums." Thelma Houston 1ees no duet or group collaborations in the near future but ravea about the great time she had with Jerry Butler cutting their Two To One album for Motown. 11Itwas lots of fun because I have been a fan of Jerry's for a Jong time and he was a good person to work with. We got along very well." Her move to RCA quickly became another disappointment with the same kind of closing feelings as when she left Motown. ''I was disappointed because I thought I had an agreement; that we were in •inc aa to what our plan of operation was going to be and it didn't tum out Jilr.e that, for whatever reaa<m,0 says Thelma sounding frustrated at the memory. Thelma ''Don't Leave Me This Way" Houston In her own mind, Ma. Houston has the future planned as follows: "I would like to evolve more into acting and hopefully be selling lots ofrecord1 and touring. Eventu­ally I'd like to get into producing records. I would alao like to work with young people, grooming them in this business. Tell your readers to look out for Thelma Houston's daughter, Kim, who is up and coming. 1 asked her what was the plan of action She's fantastic!" now. what is Thelma Houston going to do? A quiclt and positive Thelma responded, ''Thia is my tint album for MCA; we've been together just a few months. We've released the album entitled Thelma Hous· ton and its first single "Working Girl." I plan to do a promotional tour, go to the radio stations and do some club dates. After that, what 'Thelma Houston' would like to do ia get a good summer tour going!" "Working Girl" with its upbeat, dancea­ble rhythm is not the provocative song it is assumed to be. The lyrics of Michele Aller put to Bob Esty's music describe the plight of career women trying to maintain per- BOARD & BATH SPECIAL! Board your pets for 4 days or longer and they get a free bath and dip. Our air-conditioned facility offers total care for your pets and it's conveniently located inside the Loop. Call for more information. (offer good until June 30) 1640 Westheimer 521-9277 sonal relationships after taking on demanding occupations. While some of the material on her latest album really isn't up to par, Ma. Houston's sound is of fine quality. Described as a fantastic moment by Thelma wu the steping off of an airplane Thelma Houston, who credits jazz and pop singer Nancy Wilson for influencing her early styles, told me proudly, when asked what she would like to be remem­bered for many years from now, "I'm not ever going to retire, I'Jl still be singing 'Don't Leave Me This Way' when I'm 80." r.------------------------ * $1.00 OFF* BRING A FRIEND 708 W. Alabama Buy one of Neal's luncheon specials at the regular price and get $1.00 off on the second luncheon special. Expires June 27, 1983 Good with coupon only JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 'Boys in the Band' a Must See By Lecy Cale Mart Crowley's classic play about gay men is still a hit as indicated by Montrose au~iences last weekend. The production, which stars Joe Watt and Rex Gilli tin lead roles, premiered in Houston June 10 at the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. Directed by James Der, the production played first in Baytown in April, and was such as success, it was brought to Houston as a benefit for the KS/ AIDS Foundation. Charaterizations are outstanding. The play is timeless in theme and particularly appropo for today when many gay men are examining their lifestyles closely as Michael in the play does. ' . All ~e acting is outstanding, and Watt ts particularly good, but the person who stole the show for me was Don Plank as Emory. Emory is the epitmome of all that is queenly in a queen. Plank's interpreta­tions of him truely lends comic relief to a play that deals with very heavy emotional themes and interactions. The timing of this play is very good because Houston's gay community will be out in force during the next few days cele­brating Gay Pride Week. Performances are scheduled for June 17 and 18, Friday and Saturday, with curtain time at 8:00 p.m. Tickets may be reserved by calling 522·2204 or 424-1928 or will be available at the door for ~6. All proceeds go to the KS.' AIDS Foundation. Others in the cast ere Jim Richardson (Larry}, Dick Neave! (Hank), Raan Lewis (Bernard), . Douglas Matens (Cowboy}, Alton Hernn(< (Harold) and !Wbert Hyde (Alan). Lighting was furnished by the Channing Players and props by Joy Woods (who also did makeup), Susan Der, Alton Herring and Don Herring. Assist· ant Director is Lyn Dovell. J. Browning DeHigns furnished the flowers for the Aet and Ventura's Formal Wear the tux. ,Jof' Watts also handled publicity and set design. Spefial thanks was also extended to Leif Lippert and the KS/ AIDS Founda­tion of Houston, Inc. Don't miss this play. It's probably one of the best this season anywhere in town. o Risky Business Not Risky for Players By Jon Cheetwood Opening a new club during these eco­nomic times in Houston may seem like a ri1k to some, but not so to two aspiring actor/comedians who think their troupe has something truly unique to offer. The group, led by Andrea Modisette and Jay Martino, has been releasing for some ten weeks preparing its first production, From Blues to Broadway with a Lay Ouer in Burlesque for the opening of the new club, Risky Business at 2700 Albany in mid.June. "It all started with a show we were in together," said Modisette. "It was named Risky Business, and we liked it so much we decided to name the club that. That was in 1978." Both Modisette and Martino were doing undergraduate work at the University of Rhode Ioland when they met and worked together. "The show was very, very suc­cessful" she said. Since then Modisette directed a repertory company at the Astor Mansion in Rhode Island and together they did "bus and truck shows" traveling throughout the country with a troupe that played universities, churches and a var· iety of places. ModiRette ended up in Houston, like so many others, because several of her friends had come here and found work in entertainment. "I came down on vacation and did alot or research on what was going on in theater and film-whether it was growing or dying in Houston." Ulti· mately, she and Jay moved to the seaport city to actively explore possibilities of opening a club. They decided on Montroaa because "we felt Montrose is to Houston as Greenwich Who are all the.'it people jumping around? It's ;ust a relaxed rehearsal at Risky Busineb8. In the upper right~ Andrea Modisette and Jay Martin. Village is to New York, and this wouJd be where the patrons that are going to be the most apprciative would be." In January, they found the Officer's Club building to be ideal for their pur­poses. "We were totally charmed by the building, the whole avian ct> of it. The peo­ple who run the Officer's Club have been more than generous, magnaimous. And here we are,'' she said. Risky will cood.inate its activitieA to compliment parties and special events at the Officer's Club. The club's troupe will perform four nights a week with 8:30 shows on Thursday and Sundays and 8:30 plus 11 p.m. shows on Friday and Satur­days. The club will be open seven nights, and is available for rent to groups "not in conflict with our image or goals." The 04not too sophisticated establish­ment" is owned by Risky Business, Inc., which in tum is owned by stockholders and investors. "We had a prospectus of expenses and expected return projection which we took to investors. Some of them laughed and said 'good luck, it's a cute idea' but others bit." The overall concept of the club's enter­Ulinment is musical revue. "I found that what people refer to as cabaret here is what I would call paino bar," said Modisette. "A musical revue is a lot more. It is four to 15 people. The first show will feature 12 individuals." The numbers pro­gress very rapidly, and everything is 1piked with humor. Tht> first show, From Bluel.i to Broad· way, gave them the license to be "very funny, very wild, very insane show,'" tihe said. The second production (shows change once a month), is entitled Su•mg and draws on music from the big band era oflate 30& and early 40s. The third show in the planning is The Silver Screen, The Way It Was, which will use spoofs of old movies and some legitimate representa­tions as well. The cast, assembled after ten weeks and 240 persons of auditions, is composed of ten peraons from Houston and two from New York. "We'll draw talented people from anywhere," said Marinto, "but there are many, many talented performers already in Houston." Although formal auditions are over, they hope to hold a space on Monday'• by appointment for persons who want to Montrose Live show off their talents. Risky will not be a repertory company, and the cast will change with the lights and set designs of each production. "We don't feel cocky about it," said Modisette, "but we feel that we are offer­ing something so different from any other theater or nightclub that there's a need for il There's nol'iing going on like trying to put someone else out of business. There's no leBSons to be learned or moralizing to it, what it's all about is paying $3 to come in and be entertained and forget your trou· bl es. "We don'tcare what our client.el is like," she commented "We feel th£t funny is funny. If it's funny a gay person is going to laugh. Our humor doesn't cater to straights or aays; it's universal humor. We're commited to the idea of mixed houses. Some of our hum or is ha wdy and gauwdy, but whoever enjoys it is welcome to come." fro~etbf~~Wu8~u~t 4~0~t~~u~?to~r there will be a lot of variety in them-se­rious moment as well as insane. Eventually, they hope to expand artistic ventures in to cable television. "We just got tired of working for everyone else," said the artistic manafler. (Martino is the busi­ness manager.) "It's going to be alot of fun," aaid Modisette. "People should come here because they want to ha\.·e fun." 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 Sammy Hagar to Heat Up Jam The ''Texua World Mulic Feotival" ia thia weekend, June 18 in Dallas and June 19 in the Aatrodome in Houston. Thia lixth annual Tex-Fest is gearing up to be the hottest show yel Co-headliners ""' Styx and the "Red Rocker," Sammy Hagar, who vowed at a pre-show preaa to make things hot for the • midweotem band. 111 love it,"Tommy Shaw, Styx's diminu­tive lead guitarist, says of the friendly •rivalry between the two acts. 0 lt's a nice challenge. I think the whole situation is extremely healthy. It's a little extra some­thing to get fired up about. It brings back gTeat memories of the not-too-distant past. Back when we were opening for other acts; we were always challenging them. We were the lean, hungry guys." Styx haa just completed it's third and moet cohetiive concept album, Kilroy WC18 Here and mounted a massive multi-media stage production for its current tour. From all reports, the elaborate theatrical-style concert production is one of the most visu­ally and musically dazzling stage shows ever attempted by a rock band. · "We have taken a step beyond Paradise with Kilroy Waa Here. T1e concept and stage presentation will leave little doubt to our fans that indeed Kilroy Was Here­Styx Waa Here. With all that Sammy's got hia work cut out for him, but he says as a ci>headliner, "I get to play longer and I get to do some good production. I can bring in some spe­cial effects because I'm not working with a headliner who aaya you can't do this or you can 't do thaL And, beJieve me, I've got aome incredible special effects for these ahowa," he says laughing. "'For just one show, I'm spending $30,000 on effects above and beyond what Styx will have there for me to use. I mean, it'a their production-their sound and lights. And !get to use all thatplus$30,000 worth of my own 1pecial effects. So, I'm going to do some pretty spectacular thinga. I'm gonna have some incredible lighting effects. I plan on turning both of those Jiant 1tadiuma red. It's going to be real apecial." In addition to Styx and Sammy Hqar, this year'• TeXI&1 World Music Feotival (known aa Texxaa Jam) will alao feature Canada'• hard rock trio, Triumph, Detroit'• "Motor City Madman," Ted Nugent, and Britain'• long-lived Uriah Heep. Tick eta for both 1how1 ""'$18.50 for both ?MerVed and general admission aeat­ing and ""' available at various ticket outlets throughout Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana. Thia year'a TeIIu Jam is produced by Pace Concerti and presented by Bud· weiaer. o Stars Over Houston "Stars," billed as a evening of high enter· tainment supporting the KS: AIDS Faun· dation, brought in more than $3600 forthe Triumph cauae on Tuesday, June 14, at Numbers. A packed house waa on hand to see a wide variety of local and Texas entertain­ment, including acta from Corpus Christi, San Antonio and Ft. Worth. A total of23 acts offered four hours worth of non-stop Open Thursday, June 23 Join us for Stroh's Beer Bust 5-7pm--1318 Westheimer ~~ variety. Danny Villa won top honors in judging for singing his original 1ong about the KS! AIDS problem. The Dancing Dildos, sponsored by The Drum and John Day and Co., tied for second place. Third place SIDEWALK BEER SALE DURING GAY PRIDE PARADE 520-05.54 I 1·11 Sun·Thura 11-12 Fri-8at Ted Nugent went to a contemporary dance troupe sponsored by Catch-One. Master of ceremonies for the evening was Mr. Tiffany Jones, performing his last official act before leaving Houston for a Provincetown summer engagement. JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 All Star Games Are Saturday By Eddie Chavez One of Houston Gay Pride W'1ek's most attended events takes place this Saturday at Levy Field beginning at 3:30 p.m. More than 30 men and 40 women from the MSA softball league will face head to head com­petition with the Oak Lawn Softball Asso­ciation. Why are these games special? In 1980, in a reach-out-and-touch situa· tion, we were "Proud to Be" as the league faced competition with the Houston Police Officers Association and the Houston Firefighters Association. "We the People" in 1981 brought new allstars on the field and only played with the Houston Firefighters. In close compe­tition, the MSA Allstars lost both games. Determined to be "A Part of-Not Apart From," the MSA Softball League once again met the Houston Firefighters in 1982. The crowds gathered at Levy Field in support and unity. Competition and sportsmanship prevailed as the all stars went down in both games Jerry DeSale, all-time president of the MSA Greater Houston Softball League, announced that the league would invite the Oak Lawn Softball League to share in the Gay Pride Week festivities this year. In the spirit of "United Through Competi­tion," the league also invited the MSA Women's Softabll League. This year's games will intensify our slogan for the year "Unity Through Diversity." With games beginning at 3:30 p.m .. the MSA Women'• All-Stars take on Dallas' Women'• All-Stars. The North and South Division All'Stars from the Men's League follow at 4:30 p.m. for two exciting games. The last game features the First Place Briar Patch Renegades of the Women's League against Dallas. For the first time in history, the league will hold intra-state competition with men and women. If a ny event could ma ke a positive sta tement, the MSA games will definately show "Unity Through Diver­sity" in 1983. Don't Miss It. o Webber Too Much For Sally's If you were not at the games Sunday, you missed three exciting games. It11 often been said the pitcher sets the momentum of the game. I couldn't agree more. Four years now, I've watched Danny Webber's pitching improve. Last Sunday should have been on video. The 1983 pitching all-star faced the league's only undefeated team, Dirty Sal· ly 's. Pitching to Sally's and the league's top hatters, he retired Mario Marchena and Bill Schmidt (hitting fou rth and fifth m the batting order) to not a single hit. In two innings he struck out batters on fouls to retire the sides. Sally's only scored th ree runs, setting a record for the Galleon and Webber. The superb control on the mound surely inspired Pat Foreman, Dennis, Bill Fike, Mark !Wsler and Guy Campbell with two hits each. Barry Pirkey and Mark Resler batted two RBis. The Galleon allowed one harmless error, as they scored nine runs. Sally's Jesse Young 3 for 4 and a double, Mike Morrison's 3 for 3 with two RBis and a double along with Ken Bailey'• 2 for 3 brought in scores in the sixth inning. There's nothing wrong in having your steak and eating it too. But not everyone c-an do that. This time the Briar Patch and th£' Barn placed the bet that the loser will provide the steaks, cook and serve the win ner that same night. From the bleachers you could hear "Steak 'em." At the end of the ~ame, the Barn's cheerleaders yelled out. "Two, four, six, eight-who do we appnciate-The Bnrn." As the huddle broke up, bibs forthe steak fest were already hanging from the «-nm mrmhers uniformA. In a 1().9 games, BP'sJot·y Halton'• :!for 4, Snmmv Montno's 2 for 3 and Jeff Rrppm '• ·2 for 3 lettd tht> i.nam humimr" bandidos. Allstar Dennis Owens doubled bringing in two runs. Leading hitters for the Barn were Gay Najpauer 2 for 3 with two RBis, Tony Lozano's 3 for 3, double and a scarifice fly; Buzz Smith's 2 for 3 and a walk. Buzz was also busy at the plate with four plays at home. All in all-it was a fun game. Saturday's game with the Montrose Mining Co/ JR's team pulled it out in the last inning of play to defeat Charlotte's 10-9. All-.star Phill Loveland, Fred Lopez, Marvm Hoemeier and Mike Wild all had two hits. Rodney Dietz with bases loaded, solidly hit a triple scoring three RBis. Hank McPhate and Carlos Romero con· tributed with two walks a piece. Charlotte's Ryan Mayne's 3 for 4 with two RBis, Mario Bianco's 2 for 4 with two RBis, David Stacy's 2 for 4 with two RBis Eddie fu!agan, Nick Borjas and BarrY Beck shared two hits each. Pitcher Ron Kennison also had two sacrifice flys. The Brazos River Bottom had the1r hands full when Jim's Gym almost defeated them. The BRB 7, Jim's Gym 6. Dirty Sally's overwhelmed The Barn on Saturday downing them 11-3. The Galleon broke the camel's back in their game with Jim's Gym. After four innings with a score of 3-2 for the Galleon, they broke loose and scored 12 runs in the fifth inning. Catch One forfeited two games. One for. feit was awarded to the Montrose Voice, the other to Charlotte's. With all the upsets recorded in the past two weeks, a softball member asked "How does that change your commentary?" I replied. "What commentary?" MSA Greater Houston Softball League LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Saturday, June 11 Montrose Voice 7 Catch One o (lorl811) Mont M1ne1JR"s 10 Charlotte's Drrty Sally's 11 Barn Galleon 15 Jim's Gym Sunday. June 12 Bnar Patch 1 O Barn Galleon 9 Dirty Sally·s Brazos A1v Bot 7 Jim's Gym Charlotte's 7 Catch One O (forfeit) STANDINGS Won '"" "" South D1v1s1on Galleon 10 1 909 Montrose Voice 8 4 667 Briar Patch 3 7 .• oo Jim's Gym 3 • 272 Catch One 0 13 000 North D1v1s1on Dirty Sauy·s 11 1 917 Brazos River Bottom 7 3 700 Charlotte's 5 6 455 Montrose Mme/JAs 5 6 455 Barn 5 8 385 THIS WEEK"S GAMES <G1m9111 leyy F,..d From J.Aontrose. go out Fl1ehmond. pe111<1rt;Jy. ietl on Eutlide ) Saturday, June 18 (MSA Women's All·Stars vs Dallas Women·s All·Stars. 3.30pm) MSA Men's North All-Stars vs Dallas Men·s All·Stars. 4 30pm MSA Men's South All·Stars vs Dallas Mens AO-Stars. 5:30pm (Brrar Patch Renegades vs Dallas Women·s All·Stars. 6:30pm) Sund•y. June 19 Jim's Gym vs Dirty Sally's. 6pm Galleon vs Brazos River Bottom. 7pm Briar Patch vs Charlotte's. Bpm Montrose Voice vs Montrose Mine/ JA"s. 9pm G8 2'• 6'• 7 11 3 5 ~ .5 .... MSA Monday N ight Bowling STANDINGS Fotlow!ng June 6 competition A DIVISION C DIVISION 1 Tush Ticklers 2 Hole 3 #2 Oust Rollers 8 DIVISION 1 Dirty Sally's Strokers 2 5 Easy Pieces 3 Five Esses HIGH GAMES Wayne HollOway 214 erry Manor ?23 GeneBtl c> 220 1 Barnyard 2 Plus A 3 E/J's Men HIGH SERIES Horace Lat•met" Gene Basco Wayne 1-'otloway 583 574 569 And the South Division All-Stars Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Fol )W' lQ rEl(;ttnt compet1t1on 1 A1Ch Ryan 2 Jan Mauldin 3 Otv•d Robicheaux 4 Tcm Calho1.m 5 Ron Landn.H];( A LADDER 6 John Ryan ' Davcd Rob1etieau:w: 8 Jon Colbert 9 David Garza •O A...dy ,,.,...,"'1? Sports MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bow ling STANDINGS Follow ng recent competition Catam1ry Lane 2 KS Overdnves '3 Thu l'lday Knight Tricits 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 MV Quality Dental Care. The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Care, we believe n living up to our no me. And that means not only g v1ng you quality dental treatment but providing tat a pnce you can afford . We'll customize your payment pion to your fomdy budget . Plus, you con sove up to 20% of your costs with our Qualident membership plan, even 1f you hove dental insurance Quality Dental Care Complete dental services at a price you con live with Now that's something to smile about Quality Dental Care Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway at Korby 523-2328 Bring 1n 1h1s od and get o complete dental check·up, diagnostic x-roys and your teeth cleaned for $25 00 Offer expires July 5. \983 DO YOUR FRIEND, AND YOURSELF, A FAVOR. INTRODUCE HIM TO Crabs. ar.e not the end of the= 1s 100% e.ffect.1ve m removing world , but they can certainly dead hce and nits So the make 1t unp~asant . RIO next time you or your 1s a hquid treatment that friend discover crabs, 1s available without pre- do yoursetves a favor scnphon. It's safe and it and get RID. It'• ..... kills crabs m ten minutes. It'• available whhout Each package includes a a preac:rtptlon at your patented fine-tooth comb that local ptwnwcy. And M - · JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sal JUNE JUNE 17 18 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 19 20 21 22 23 For addd•OMI 1nlorm•hon or phone numbers tor events hated below. IOoll lor the spon&0r1ng org.1n1- iat1on undet "Org.1n!Ht10ns" ~n !he MontrOM Clu11l1ed rlFR/DAY: Gay Pride Week: "A Salute to Gay Businesses" mFR/DA Y: Black & White Men Together rap group, 8pm II.SATURDAY: Lambda Bicycle Club meets, then tours, from llam, unless raining, at 210 Fair­view, apt. I II.SA TU RDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Families and Friends of Gays reception, Liberty Bank Commun· ity Room, 1001 Westheimer, 12· 3pm • SA TU RDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Sports Assoc. allstar games, Levy Field, featuring MSA Women's All Stars vs. Dal· las Women's All Stars 3:30pm, MSA Men's North All Stare vs. Dallas Men's All.Stare 4:30pm, & MSA Men's South All Stare va. Dallas Men's All Stars 5:45pm II.SA TU RDA Y: Choice's Lesbian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 -.SUNDAY: Texas "Junet.oenth" Day -.SUNDAY: Father's Day • SUNDAY: Gay Pride Week: Houston's "Salute to Dallas Day" -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, Mac· Gregor Park • SUNDAY: Choices meets 12:30pm, YWCA, 3615 Willia -.SUNDAY: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets at 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin -.SUNDAY: Families & Friend• of Gays meets 2pm, Presbyterian Center behind First Presbyterian Church, 6300 Main -.SUNDAY: Dallas Gay Pride Parade, "Marching Out of Obs­curity, Into the Dream" -.SUNDAY: Gay Pride Week: Black & White Men Together J~neteenth afternoon BBQ at ~:~~~al~~~f~iio s~~~n~~~~~~ 1, 4965 M.L. King Blvd. OAMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 • MONDAY: Gay Pride Week: "Men and Women Together, An Evening of the Arts" at the Swim Club, 2114 Peckham, with Mont· rose Chorale and Montrose Art Alliance OAMONDAY: 7th Annual San Francl.co International Lesbian and Gay Film Feetival opens, lasting to June 25 OAMONDA Y: MSA Summer Sea­son Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Summer beings at 6:10pm • TUESDAY: Dee Smathers as "Dee Smathers, I Am," ?pm, Gra· cielynn Books, 704 Fairview • TUESDAY: Montrose Sym· phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm • TUESDAY: Gay Pride Week: Montroae Sports Assoc. variety ehow at Numbers, 300 Westhei­mer • WEDNESDAY: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineera & Scientist.I meet 7pm • WEDNESDAY: Montrose Cho­rale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm • WEDNESDAY: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Courtseling Cen­ter, Montrose Clinic & Gay Switchboard present "ClaJ>­Shtick," 8pm, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:3Q.9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week: "Salute to Gay Youth" • THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week' Homophile Interfaith Alliance's National Day of Remembrance with Montrose Singere at MCCR, 1919 Decatur, 7:30pm • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowlo, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 82()() Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: Latino Day, Gay Hispanic Caucus 5th anniversary dance, N oche y Dia Ballroom, 2103 N. Main, 8pm-2am, June 24 • IN 1 WEEK: 2nd National Conference on Lesbian and Gay Aging, San Francisco State Uni­versity, June 24-25 • IN 1 WEEK: let Latin Ameri· can & Caribbean Gay/Lesbian Conference June 24-29, Bogota, Columbia • IN 1 WEEK: Full moon, 3:33am, June 25 U N 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Mardis Gras Maddness Inc. after­noon fundraising carnival for AIDS research, June 25 U N 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus reception June 25 for out of town visitor• to Gay Pride Week • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: =~~;~~:: ~fo1ia7:~~d~nn~red Spirits Ensemble in Fred Paez Memorial Concert, "Festival Cho­rus?" Cullen Auditorium, Uofif mam campus, June 25 • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Gay Pride Parade down Westhei­mer, 5:30pm, June 26 U N 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Parades June 26 in San Fran­cisco ("Strengthen the Ties Break the Chains") and M~mphis ("Gay Rights are Civil Rights"); and Gay Pride March in New York City • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Gay Political Caucus rally at the Summit, 7:30pm, June 26, star­ring Tina Turner U N 1 WEEK: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm June 28, Bering Church, 1440 Harold • IN 1 WEEK: Lutherans Con· cerned meets June 2.8, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh U N 2 WEEKS: Twin Cities Good Time Softball League invi­tational July 1-4, Minneapolis U N 2 WEEKS: Lone Star Gay ~flball Classic, Houston, July • IN 2 WEEKS: Blue Boy C1888ic t;'~\~g Tournament, July 2-4, UN 2 WEEKS: "Liberty and the Pursuit Of ... " theme party, Offic­er's Club, 2700 Albany, July 3, !Opm, partial benefit for KS/ AIDS Foundation UN 2 WEEKS: Independence Day, July4 U N 2 WEEKS: Greater Mont· rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm July 5, Liberty Bank community room, 10()1 Westheimer U N 3 WEEKS: Metropolitan Community Church general con· ference, Toronto, opens July 10, lasting to July 17 • IN 3 WEEKS: International Gay Assoc. Conference opens July 11, Vienna, Austria, lasting to July 16 U N 6 WEEKS: 8th Interna· tional Conference of Gay & Les­bian Jews opens Aug. 4, lasting to Aug. 7, Miami • IN 6 WEEKS: Reno National Gay Rodeo opens Aug. 4, l88ting to Aug. 7 UN 11 WEEKS: Sixth Biennial International Convention of Dig­nity, Seattle, Sept. 2-5 • IN 11 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Chi· cago, Sept. 3-5 UN 11 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 5 • IN 11 WEEKS: "Come Out and Sing Together," ht North Ameri­can Gay ChoraJ Feetival, opens Sept. 8, lasting to Sept. 11, Lin­coln Center, New York "1N 14 WEEKS: Human Rights Campaign Fund annual dinner, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, Sept. Tl UN 16 WEEKS: Texas Renaio­sance Festival opens near Plan· tersville Oct. 1 and 2, also running Oct. 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5 & 6 U N 16 WEEKS: Oct. 8 deadline to register to vote in November elections ~ fo6 WEEKS: Columbus Day, • IN 19 WEEKS: Halloween Oct. 31 • • IN 20 WEEKS: Houston city elections, Nov. 8 • IN 23 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference San Diego, Nov. 25-27 ' • IN 32 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Convention, Jan. 27·29, Houston • IN 47 WEEKS: New Orleans ~orld's Fair opens May 12, Jast­mg to Nov. 11 mNEXT YEAR: Houeton hosts 1984 Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Sept. 1-2, 1984 NOTICE BUSINESS Ow...ERS fhe M0n1ro.9 y;c;j;ll fr• each ...- in ~ MonltOM Clau•l1ed bo~ =.,,..t, i ..t abl•lh""9ntl MfVong •• d11tro~.111on !Of tM V<>tee Ind COl'WTlt.in•ty OfQ•n1a-iindiC8t• 1Mec U.Unt I•• MonlroseYoiC.c1tM,._ butlonpOilnt CARS & BIKES GAY Tired of being hassled by straight salesmen? Looking for a car? Call Ted Lynch at 529-4911 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES LARGE MONTROSE CONOO 830 square feet, large covered bal­cony. Small quiet complex. security gate $385 month, $200 deposit Adults only. 8&4-0472 Montrose Classified EASTWOOO OUPLEX LEASE l bedroom, private patio. with gar­age. 4 minutes to downtown. Water paid. $340. Also huge 1 bedroom garage apartment, hardwood floors & garage. $310 227-9753 HOUSTON NW HOUSEMATE that is willing to do housekeeping $50 a month, must have reference Call Mark, 895-8929, 4-6pm MONTROSE UPPER DUPLEX 2 BR, 1 bath, living, dining, kitchen, $500. Bills psid. Days 523-8802, nights 522-6732 HOUSE FOR RENT 2 BR house, large living room, din­ing, den, kitchen. Must see to appre­ciate. n~ miles NE of U/H, 10 minutes to Montrose. $425 month, with lease + deposit & utilities Call 721-4439 GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE Your gay roommate service. 523- 3223. Gary Larson's Cartoons_:-­Exclusive in Houston in the Voice INTER IOR DESIGNER'S HOME in Southwest Houston priced below its value for quick sale. Approx. 2150, 3/2 with parquet floors, vaulted ceilings, Fr. doors, uphol­stered walls, designer wall papers, mirrors, storage. 25'1e13' screened spa room with redwood decking & brick flooring Landscaped private yard with lighting system. Excellent home for entertaining. $108.000 Catt 498-3416 or 498-1764 for appointment MONTROSE HOME/OFFICE 31211.!, study off master. Owner pays closing costs Low move-in. Perfect for investors, roommates, etc Updated and clean. Priced for quick sate. $117,000. Century 21 Shear & Co., 729-4800, 729-0758. An estimated 24,400 HOUSTON readers each week-the Voice! EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED TYPESETTER Montrose Voice Publishing Co. now interviewing for an experienced "graphics typesetter." one extremety familiar with AM equip­ment. Typing speed important but so is ability to "code" an advertise­ment fast and accurate. Duties will include typesetting ads for Out in Texas, Montrose Voice and Oall15 Gay News and independent typeset­ting JObs. Person will be reqUtred to meet customers, estimate typeset­ting and graphics costs, and follow the job through to completion. Send resume to Montrose Vo+ce, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston. TX 77CX>6 Or call Henry McClurg. (713) 529- 8490, 2·5pm. SEE FOR YOURSELF Local Amway distributors are en1oy­ing extra income We show you how Phone for interview. Gene at 859- 0418 anytime Kent Naasz 520-6541 (M-F 5-7pm). Hank ot (W) 529-7525 or (H) 523-6598. Trish & Phyllis at 723-8368 WHAT ARE RETREADS? R_etreads for folks who (like us) didn't make the above business work initially but want to try again. Call us RECEPTIONIST/TYPIST Mature individual with technical office skills and knowledge of Hous­ton's gay community. Contact Annette at MCCA Monday thru Fri­day, ~5. 861-9149. ADVERTISING SALES . The Montrose Voice Publishing Company has openings in Austin and San Antonio for advertising representatives Inquire to Lyt Har­ns, 3317 Montrose #204, Houston. TX 77006 (713) 529-8490 ACTORS/STUDENTS Telephone promotion of '83-'84 Alley Theatre season. A great sense of humor a must. Call James Fowler. 228-9341, 1-9pm. Excellent pay GAY BARS =~=1"523 Lovett S23-3396 lrve •ll­:,:~ ·1-'0:2 Lovett 527-9866 dining. i!Vil • Barn 710 P1e1hc 528-9427 country e Brazoe RIVW Bottom-2400 8ru09-628- 9192 countty . ... , P8tcf'I :"2294 w Holeom~9671 :..~~1 0.co-4965 M.ltln Luther 1<ong- • Ct11cken Coop-535 W•1tieimer 526-22-«i ~ 2631 RIChmond 52&-225t· d.IKO woth :_oi:..,. . n1 Drum 1732WMthetmer-52&-&5.28 e Otrty S.lfy-"1 220 Avond91e-529-7S25 • Ooub19 R S..oon-5731 Korby-521-1'" e E.-J'e 1213 Richmond-5.27-9071 e E.w;i~1011 Betl-659-0453 country e Galleon-2303 Rocf'lmond-522-7616 ~•m-52&-9128 e J R 1--808 P9cihc-521·251Q e Just M•l"lon & lynn·1-a11 F91tVteW -52&- 9110' lftb••n e Keybollrcl 3012 Millm-528-6988 e K1ndred Spir1t1-5245 Butf•lo SpMdw•y- 665-9756. predominantly lllb!•n • L&l:y J 312 Tiwn 5211-93'0 • lol•• O.pot-111 F•1rview 528-8342 e Ma.ry·1 1022 W•helmttf 521-8851 • ..._ CN.11ott•"• 911 w or- ~ COl,lnlry e Montf'OM M•mt'lg Co . ......8()5 P.cific-529-7.U • Nurno.w. 2-300 W.lhel1Ml"~1 ·- e Off>C*°'I Club-2700 Alb9tly-623-40&4 •On• on en.-1016 w Gray-5284503 e Tll• Ou119WI 1419 Roctvnond-5.28-a903 .•..~.n.k.£ 19pt\9n1 1211L~·wi1h ~-:•ls-2702 Kirby-524-6272· dining. 11'19 e Ropcord-715 F111rv.--521·2792 • T111uR~-1316W11the1merOPlflll"IQ e lwons-535 W•tt'le•rn•-520-02« 111Mn ·- e v11v11 M91n""9r-3333 W 11th-8M-554 eventu,.N-2923 M9in-522-0000 e W1td 811'1·1 Cornl--J.ctson •I GrlOt-522- 73111 _______ _ ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ORGANIZATIONS 5£1.ECTED NATIONAi.. OAGAH!V.TlONS-G-,. "'- ~i.on-POB 33805 W""'•t-.g!Ol'I DC 20033-!Xltl 311·2'30 Gey Rights Nal!Of"lll LOOOy-f'081192 W••r-.gton OC20013-(202154rr18C1 Humlln Rights~ Fvn6-POB 1396. W•h­lnQlOtl. DC 20013-i202J 546-2025 l..,bdel910.1---132W 43t'd.f"-Yorll NY looot-(212'1 tu-MU Mild•• Fund for Hum•n R1gt111 1Gey Pr"' AslOC,.lion)-P08 33605. w .. hongton. DC 20033-!202)317·2'30 N1otione1 A.-:>c..a.on ot Bus.- Couno11-Box 15145.5911Fr~.CAIM11S-('15)~ N91.oon.1Anocolot.oncM Gey &llllb.-n091'f!OC'lllC Clubs-1742 W.. A..,. SE. Wutungton. DC 20::>03-(202) 547-3104 NII'°'* Gey Rogtu Actwoc.lt-S.O Cat'O-S9n F~. CA IM114-l-41~h ~· Neto"191Gl'(T•FOll»-I05tl'IA ..... N-YOft..NY 10011-(212J7'1-5Ml0 NGTf'1 er..i.,..._ta'.>Ol 221-7044 [OUIMMI ,...... Ycwt. Stt111 A PIKI tre tM Surt-eto G•.cilynn Boott1. 104 F••M--522--7• subgroup of l.'M Inc con­e. ts 7ptnTUIS ACLU 1238 W G...,.-524-5925 AIOS Mott~<> G.y Sw•tc:hbo9rd-529-3211 ~Att;;.is-457..-.:> Ameroe.n l .. t~n (IOOlll ciub~lat o.n.-.,,1 Drum .• 1732 w .. thlimlf-521--8.s28 Club night Wed =~~bow All .. nc.--520-9451 ('10<C41). 520- S.you e·1u - Montro. Chorlo.. • ~"~.:~~~0~·~~~11~~~­=~~ ch&~~~::':J:r:.~!~~~~~.a,-; "JunetMn!tlC.~toonol'Frwedoft'l".ftefnoori ~~::0i.:.s:~ly~1:>t~:L9~~'.;/ CAIY•ry Pent9COl!M Churctt-5210 Fwwn- 520-5437. ~ 12.l()pm Sun 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 0 nlat's see ... No orange ... no rootbeer ... no fudgesickles . . . Well, for crying-out-loud! Am I out of everything?" The Far Side by Gary Larson " Aha!" - .. ---""-- - " I SAID I wasn't interested ... Now get your foot out of the cave." ~-MQ.ilrOM) Church OI Chnst 1700 Monlros. 777-1286 Mrv<.ces l 1am Sun Church of Chrttt•an F••rt't--21iffi,..._,_ ·529- 8005 Mro•ce. 104~m Sun & 715pm Wed B•bl• study 7 15pm Tues & Sun choir practice Wed 1ftl!I' 58f'v1ce1 C.t11ens lorHumari Equal;ty (CHi:i-609 F1nnm •1301- 236-a&66: b<M:rd meet1"g 2nd Tuesdays C011 •s·1 (soct.a clubl-rneets at BrazOI R1v9r Bottom. 2400 Br.:os-528-9192 COrnmuMy Goapel- Ceroter·-1700- Montrose- 523-6018 Cong Aytz Ct1ay1m-meets at MCCR. 1919 Oecatur-552-1340. 688-8997 aerv1ce & social ~2nd&"hfr1d1ys Conroe Area Lambda Society -Jan at 756-0354 or Ray 11 756-4097 Cri111-Ho11;;:;9-22S.:1s05 O.il-1-Gay-Alhe11t-•51~666o American G-ay Alhl•lll i),.-;,-.- f0Unda11'0n-2i00 Muon--52•·:5791 Oogmty-mMl.111&1tlol.c-Studet1t<:enter,1703 Bolsover-520-9289. 528-7644 meetmgs 7pm Saturdays Famd•et-& -Ffiendl of Glrs-•6':&663 me.is 2Pm lfd Sundays at Prffbytenan Center. •I OaltMle. betund F1r1t Pr•byter1an Church. 5300 Main. community reception t2-3pm, June 111 :;:.,tierty Bank CommuMy Room. 1001 w.1-.. l"ltlln1ian.-nChUrch-5210F.nn1n~5i1- ..-v1ce 11 t5am Sun . Gay Pnde Week ahow ;;~·g-~"J~~~h~r~:~:=n~"Ci~~~. ~ June 22 ~ners-520-9258 GrMn1po1nvFM1-i60 Are-,-,,-,•.-•-,- ,-,.-.-.,.,-,_- 1121-96111 Gay a °Ahve Snar1ng-fXper1ence (GA5-E)-52S: t311.528-o811 0..y I Lffb•an ArCtl1Y• ol Tens atfilia1eot llH '"' O.YH11pamcC.ucu1-2722Newm1n•12-s21-- :~~ ~!' 2:r~~~~d6r.e:11~CX:~~~r~~ Main Q.y-lt9t•an GrouP-5~98"4i ..... --­Gay- N~IA"'8nCe=880-M&e-- - - G•y Piii7hcil'CauC~PC):.POB 66W 77258-521-1000 meets 4600 Main •217 7 30pm 111 I 3rd Wednetd1y1. recep11on June 25 for out-ol-town Y111tor1 to Gay Pnd• Week. GPC Rally 1n tha Summ•tt. 7 30pm. June 26. 1tarnng Tina Turner a.y·p--,,----0.W .. 11 COmm1ttM-clo Manon ·001. man. HOl.IM ol Coleman. 901 W Alabama-523· 2521 meell YltlOUI Sundays. 2 JOpm. K1ndr9CI Spmt1. 5245 Bull110 Speedw1y. Gay Pnde WMll June 1&-26 1m11or ...-.nt1 l•!ted 1n 7·D1y calendar) Gar Switchboard Poe 3624 ~29-3211 .n1ei.­m111on. counMh"1l relerr111. TTY. AIDS Hotllrie. Gay Pnde w .. k show ""Clap-Sht1ck"" ••th MonlroM Counte"ng Center and Mont rote Clime. llpm_ June 22. 111 Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannin Greater Montrose Bu11nea1 GU11d-con1act ~ri:3:vs~c°:!~~n•t~o;:m~~~-~~-,;~ W•IJ\etmer Homoptule 1n1erl11th All11nce-729 Manor- ~2!~!6! s~~~:~·!8!~b~.~;~o~:~u~ J~~: ~- 7 30_pm Houston Are1 -G1y & Le1b1an Eng1neer1 & Sc•enh1t1 -526--73116 meet• 7pm 4th Wedn•· days ~C?O•lon ~_mmumty Clown•-~:8314_ Hootlon Dita Pro1 ... 1on11s-m .. 1s 1n E111 Room. Hohd1y Inn Central, 4640 S Main~523· 11922 meeting 7 30pm 2od T..-days Hou1ton Mo!Ofcycie. Club(soc~.A,).-c10 ~~ry·• 1022 ~fflheorner-52~~ Houston NOf1h Prol•H•Ofl1l1- POB 384-0~ Hum· ble 77331-8111 at 821·712e l/H Inc ~PCB- 180.fr ·11222--.:&94~1732:' s29- ~~11i'.,;~'1i:1~,.g::u1~1 ~ '5:i8:.•~!::.'.!•r~~ Alhance. Gay I Lftb•an Arch•.,..• ol Texas. Gay Sw•lt:hboard. MontrOH Sympt\Omc Band. Mont­roH Clogger1. board meeting 7 30pm 111Thurs­d1y1 (Yaned 1ot:111onsJ. educ1t10nal !Ofum 1 .)()pm 3rd Thurld1ys ~,~~~=r~~~:~12~0fu:: II Autry Houte. 6265 M11n. I 4th Tuetdlyl at Ylfied IOcahons in1eract. edUcil;Onal 1ubgrouPot l/H Inc= Pbe 1!!041, 77222-529-7014. 894-1732 KPFT Rad«>~ -FM-iio----:4iil0Vel181Yd ~52i" j~~= "nSteln"g1yrad•oshowThu~1y1 KSIA10SFound1t•on-1001WM'ihe1meri19f- 524-AIOS "Liberty and the Pursuit 01 "'1heme party at Olhcer'• Club. 2700 Albany, July 3. 10pm. part11I beneht Llmbda B~cYC1.--Club--01tYld 1182--0456. Carol 5n..497S meell. tours 111m Saturday•. uni ... rain•nQ at 210 F11rv1ew apt I ~~:0'!;G~R~:'n-8::1~IJ,~~~~4~~ 12'3 L•t><•nt a Gar Peop1e •n M.<ic1ne--ee0-94116 meeMg 1 30pm lit Saturdays L•bl•n Mothers sub;rouP-ol Cno.cea. meell lit and 3rd Sat 11 Xlpm. 210 Fan'Y•ew apt 1 lutherW. eo:ne.med- meell 11 Grice Luthe­ran Church. 2515 Waugh-521-0983. 453-1143 mee11no 2nd I 41h Tues .-.en1nga e MelroPo111an Community Ch'UrChOi1he Re;ut rec11on !MCCR)~1919 O.C.1ur-1161-9149 pot- ~uoc!~~T171~ ~~t ~·~ 1~~1".Jlftd~ :- ber1h1p 1nquorer1 t:lau 4pm ~un educatK>n t:IH ... Tu• I Wed ...... MontroM Art Alhance· 521-2461 alllllate l/H ~ •. ~! !::J .z~:::~1~e~lr. 'Z~~y:= ol the Ar11," at lhe Swim Club, 2114 ~ltham, ~:=~w~7.;;r~:. ,.c .,,";'"'.,."'''•=-,~.~.,,-_.~--n MOOf'I. d1r. 521·2009 rehearsal 1 J0.10pm Wed at Bering Church, 14'0 Harold. In concert 11 ~~~ j~ ~:.!?.~~~.~~ ~=~~~~,~~ Montro .. Art Alliance_ In concert with MonltoM ~inr.~:r~~::.d~~=!'::"'~ cert. June 25 at Cullefl Aud1tonum.. Uo!H main "M'"ot'i"lr'O"M Ctoggen all•l••I• of~. mMts c~~ ':ti g1"rGh" t 1 ... 8~ 3405 ~tvieCluti ... NeartownAMOC1.11.00 eMontroM Clinie-104 W•th41irMr-e~5531 open Wffkdayt 10.~Spm fllll~pl Wed) •ncl wM«d1y ..,.. 8 30-9 30pm. WOl'Mn·1 empha111 P.CC::sh,,~;,r:,,~"on1?C: b~~.:: C:.-:r •nd G1y Sw1tchbolird. &pm, Jun• 22. 111 Unt11r­l1n Church, 5210 Fannin Montrou CounHling Center~iOo- Lovett 1203-53-0037 AIDS viel•m support group IT'IMts II 30pm Mondayt. Gay Pr•de WM!it ahow 'Cl1p-Shhck·· w•th Gay Switchbolrd and Mont­tOM Clinic. Bpm. June 22. l1tlJrlrt1n1n Church. 5210F1nn1n MOIWOl.-Sl/;gef......:JOhn·M1chHI Alb9rt 11 74~ 2832 day. 701 ·9498 evenings rehelrul Mon evenmgs. BemlQ Church. 1«0 Harold_ concert 11 Homoptnl1 lntertl!th All11nc1·1 N1hon1t Day ol AMl9mbr1nc1 at MCCR. 1919 O.C.tur. June 23. 7·30pm Mon1ro .. Sporti-~SA1:m.3304 women's •nd men's 1e1ogue111i-.11r g.amn Ju,,.. 18.L8\'Yfielcl. 330-7pm ~,ro;.--r.nn., CtUb-J•mlt527-=-a118Pii;I Sundays. 10 JCMm-1 30pm. M1cGr-oc>r Plrk =r=i::~~~~~':45%S:-:i:=m ~fu:i:t~~·~=-~~~~i~ 1523 MW-UnttKI Racque""""'ibiil LMP MSNG;eater-HM!orl{Men'a 1Sot1tw11.-.:..m.. 8802daya. 523-0413.,... Altsllrgarn.June 18 L...-yF1eld.345-7pm MSA!Womt;n·• Sottbait Le90u&:.72.i371. All· star garnet June 18, Llt'IY Fleld. 3 4~7pm ~.Ti:.-aao-2830 gam9173oPm T~, Gregory-Lincoln school, 1101 Tart ir;lcw;!roM'-SYmphonlc Band-mMtl at king Church. 1"-40 Harold-527-ieei mMtmg ~1= ~U:ia ~~~ex::,,~ ~~:.1;:rci:,~~ FrH Pau: Memorial Cone.rt. June 25. Culi.n Auditorium, UotH main campu1. athl19te l/H Inc Montr011 W1ttch '.ubgroup NffnOWri-AU~ ~toC;J"Ctub).:.mMti 91-,,...-e.rn-.710 Pac:11.c-528-"427 ch.ib nighl Thurs N .. nown ...UOC.at;O;i-{MOntrOM C!Y-iC Club}­meell at Benng Church. 1440 Harold- -522- 1000- meeting 7pm 4th Tu.days Ne.w Freeclom Ci\,;,1;8nCnUrC:h='e1i w 111h­st1- 1342 MrVlcu 1oam Sun. 7 30prn Wed Piril" P9ople-cto NWio;_n _ -Community Firehoun--741·2524 ,P.a.iy, u~won:-roe 80l'.iii3: 77260-523-­ReerNiiONil: i.nd" F~--=-M~tanQ ClubproJl(:I R;~,L. .IH an"SUpPOnG;-OOP:::.S2i- 012• Texas -B1y--A1aa ~G.;;~.313?-;;;;;t1ng Thurs. evening Texas Bay ,Je, Q8y- Youth-332--3737~,nga bl-weekly .T.I.X ,U a.ylL..o..n Tuk F~7it1. -­~~= hn_5~~~4FOu';;dat1on~ii1s f;;..~~1der1-ctO Mary·a. 1022 W•t"-"er Unit~;;;Ji;t-G-.Y-~ua--:ci"o -"'lii Un1ta111n Church. 6210 Fannin-520-8787 . .528- .5642' tl'IMllng 3rd Sun 1rternoon1 w.;i;y--;;. FelkJwl.h•p-flM--8898 ==~,'='-£~~~~Art9A.i'OC11l1on~ wom.n·1 LO-~ Ail1i.nc;...:..-Ch.Itel- :521~0439 Your dependable, unbiased source of community news in Montrose-the Voice PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce. 521-2009 ATTRACTIVE Bl W/M 27, married, submissive. Seeks day­time meetings. Photo, phone to POB 430432, Houston, TX 77243 10 BEAUTIFUL MONTHS­Thanks Michael for making my life sparkle. You are so wise & beautiful that even a dried up water hole would sparkle if you were there. The love we've shared can't ever be obli­terated from my mind. You're a winner Mike. I only wish we could have won together I'll always love you. Charles INTIMATE LOVER SOUGHT I'm, a youthful 27-year-old straight­looking man, active with hair chest Enjoy movies, sports Or quiet even­ings at home. I'm an asst. mgr. at a theater with a normal salary but a lot of love to otter the right 18-30-year­old man. Please answer if sincere because I am. Ad 138-A, c/o Mont­rose Voice. GWM, 5'1-1'_',_1_65_,_m_a-sc-u-li-n-e,-34-b-ut look 26; versatile, Greek preferred; likes maturity, sincerity, considera­tion; also disco, movies, bicycling; most any type activities out or at home with my boyfriend; Seeks sim­ihar 22 to 36 for friend or lover. Ad 138-B, c/o Montrose Voice. JULY 4TH FUN Enjoy Galveston's newest condo. Seawall Blvd at 53rd St. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, pool, etc. 3-nlght weekend $350. Full week $600. Call ror details 1-409-744-3281. Beverly arter 5pm. Or write ad 137-A, c/o Montrose Voice TENSION EASING MASSAGE Ucensed, certified, in or out. Phone for appomtment. Chase, 527-0876. YOUR FANTASY REALIZED Describe your desires and let us be your fairy godfather TexEscort, 751-9000 Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 'Montrose Live' each we~ in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: o $2 for up to three bold words and o 30¢ for each remain­ing word in regular type. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other r~tes. Advertisers who wish something different should consider running a display advertisement. o Deadline for all advertising 1s 5:30pm Tuesday for newspaper released mid-day Friday. o Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. o Deduct 159' if you run the same ad•weeks or more and pey for the full run In advance. o Bring or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to: 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Advertising placed under our old rates and format will continue to run until it would normally expire Use th is form or blank sheet of paper ---------- Nom< Add~ NllfTIMr of llllfflcl Ml M to run -- - Amount .,,CIOHd _ _ o Cl!Klc C MOMy Order 0 Cuh (not by mall} C VISA ch•rge C MuterC.,d cl'!Mge cred•tc.,dll PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e Oub Houston Batht 2205 F1nnin~99I •Franch Ou•ner Thllllf-3201 Louililine· .527-0712 e M1dlowne Spe-3100 Fannin-522-2379 • 2308 OUb-2306 Gen.....-528-1235 RESTAURANTS ii.)1·1 402 Lovett--.527-9968 ier....n1Two-1322wM-,,,..-...,---.~~-~ eC:hapUtapec-813 RIChmOfld-522-2365 eo·Arnores-219 w .. ih;°mer-520-lfl&i i,,.F. r~~.;a, w. .t heimer-529- iG;Mi1111~Tlnm-ii2Toi0- • Gv.:O_ QYrOl_SandW:;-ct1 Shop-1538 W111h .. mef-528-'655 i'He"ar'S Eth;op;an-Cu•s~28- - W•thlltnef-52&-2895 eHOuu ol P••-3112 KlrtJ.i-526--3818 9HouM ol Sh11h Kabob- -2042 ~all--521- .. ,. ~n.=22..:wM1t;i1~2M3- e wera--1303 W•!Mimer-.526-6823 e Old HOOltOfl Dtner-914 W Allbaml-524- 2311 e ,._,.y·1-A1chmond al Ktfby-524-0075 eRucals-2702 Kirby..:;524-8272 • Salon Et VoUI WIM & COM• brer 1338 W11themwr-522·3"111 e Spud-U·Llke-418 w .. tneimer--520-0554 e S11t P\Zn--2111 Nortolk-.523-0800 e St•k ·n· Ego-1231 Monlroae-528--41~ eTim·1 CoftM SMp-152.5 Waltlllll'llJ 529- =~,M~..,~.~ ..' °1'0l=wesihl<"'9r-528-3871 SERVICES, ETC. PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 ASTROLOGICAL CHART INTERPRETATION Professionally prepared, over 8 page printout. Send $10 & birth info to Astro Forcast, 9593 S Main #159, Houston 77025 LOOKING ..• for an honest auto repair shop? We have just opened & our six women mechanics are ready to serve you Our speclalties are tune-ups, brakes & air-conditioning Moving Right Along Garage. Open Saturdays, 663-7329 AMWAY PRODUCTS MEAN quality-& personal service. Try us & see. Phone Kent Naasz 520-6541 (M-F 5-7pm). Gene at 85~0418any­time. Hank at (W) 529-7525 or (H) 523-6598. Trish & Phyllis at 723- 8368 FOR GUARANTEED PRODUCTS & dependable service, call you local Amway distributors at above numbers DISCOUNT MAIL SERVICES Includes mail ptck up, mall forward­ing, notary services, typing. Grand Central Pipeline, 523-3223. GAY TRAVELER_S_ W_A_N_T_E_D_' Grand Central Pipeline is expanding' its operations to include complete travel agency services "High on ser­' 1'ice & low down fares." 523-3223 ROBAIRES HOME SERVICE Apa~ment. house cleaning Experts at mildew We try harder. Your apart­ment flt for a queen_ Call Bob at 520- sn7 while we work. LIMOUSINES D'ELEGANCE Custom stretches, color TV, privacy windows, stereo sound, wet bar. Call 523-4352 RELAX a ENJOY_ __ the Bodyworks massge. Evenings and weekends Call Bill, 526-2470 Gift certificates available. LIFE RELATIONSHIP a LONELINESS PROBLEMS can be alleviated through psycho­therapy Shdmg fee scale tor cou­ples and individuals. Some evemngs. Tony Carroll, M.S.W. 527- 9051. - ESCORTS, MODELS, MASSEURS We do care enough to send the very but 751-9000 Te•Escort Malor credit cards honored JUNE 17, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 DRAINS STOPPED UP Doctor Rooter Sewer and Drainage Co. 24-hour service. No overtime charge for Sundays, holidays Call 473-6449 JOHN'S TRUCKING Moving, hauling. trash removal_ 524- 7203 e F1tn111 -Exchsnge-3307 Richmo~ 9032 e Francisco'1 H11r O.ign-901 RIChm~ 523-0<38 eL191rid1 Hair Onign-"PW .. the"""- ~521- 0108 9L~c;;tH;;;o;.09n.:J220 Yoakum-528-'494 ,•.M.,o ntroM Hllr-0:.ign-1004 Clhlc;;;;,;_522. .9.M,.O_nt,;,o.... .v .O.. C. news~--3317 M;;tt;;' eNe~ Gariiiie--1901 Tatt-.523-27'4 - ~-·magazine--3317 UofrtroM 11306--.53-6490 • Private Postal Sylletnl mail box .. ..:rn-3 W•theomer-5~ :~t• 8a1b9r Shop-2154 ~I~~ • Travel tnnovat•ori1-1.50I W Alabalna­MontroM Tr1'1'11 Club S23-3051. com~ O<OOU"" 523-"'35 SHOPS & STORES By Tycho e A11 That Glttt .. --4325 Montroee-522•7& e .A.sylurn Adutt Boobt~1201 R!ChmoM eBll Pan Adutt Bookator.--1130 W Nabllme ~~~Brothers ctoitnng 1220 W•lMimer e Bed Houae-2115 Norfolk 523-1278 • Blue lns-3818 S Sheptlerd-.52~1127 ,•.C..o bweb Loquors-2036 W11the1mer-526- e O.net"s Adult News-240 W11thetfl'lll'-52&­""'° • Doutir.v•Jones. the Manhole c101tl1ng-19IS3 W Grsy-522-10lll e OownbN.~t ~._~,.~~~2~11~7 ~Aichmond-523- 5340 • Dram11t•u g•lts-3224 va.1u~m~-,­e receti getts--1412 w111hetmer-523-1•12 ifr----IF'°Mt 1331 Weltlheu1•-=ii'~18 e Grac.etyrm Boob 704 F .. rv...,-522-76'5 • Gr-eet•l'IQI Plut--1411 Wnthl•"*~1ea iKi"r1)y-Nft'.StaN:l-311.5Kirb).-:_5~ • Oh -ao; Liii~, Gooc1s-112W9it~ S24-'11Ml •Ota EniJhlh F~,._,,)eWGray-521- 9145 •Plant-~~-53-8050 e 0-1 L-·_:_aw-..tt;.,mi"r-~ • Aeconi"° R.Mi-tnu..c-3108 s-~rd---524- "'°' e sno. W~2024 Welrhelmer-524- oeoe • Studi Mutt ~ 1132 w ..... bafna .... e Up One WHterntLulher-BAI, 2400 Bruos-524-5737 eWesihetmer Flea Martcet-1733 W•theimer eW11tht11roer lntenors-1727 W~ 520-1357 Fortunes Fot Friday ennmp. Jun. 17, 1Gr83. throuph Fnday eov~mg. June 2-f. 1983 ARIES-How can you be dissatisfied when everything 1s going your way? Your mind and your body are both finding their needs met, but something hard to describe keeps getting in the way. Sit down with a friend and figure this one out TAURUS-You're willing to put your all into a very romantic love affair You're ready to explore the depths of your emotions. And, with your heart 1n the right place, you can otter a great deal to the situation Ready, willing and able. Go for it! GEMINI-In your Sign this week: Mercury and Mars (all week) 1111d tho Sun (through Tuesday oven mg). A part ot you wants to go, and a part of you wants to stay. You want to work it out. and at the same time, you're ready to toss it out. This state of indecision may last throughout the week. You alone have to think about what you alone want and need. CA~CER-/n your sign this. week: The Sun (enters Tuesday evening). While 1t may seem as 1f your fmanc1al problems are over, this is not the time for any big purchases_ You may be tempted to lavish gifts on that special someone you've been after Don't be foolish. Give what money can't buy Instead. LEO-Venus contmues in your sign. Stimulate yourseU. The things that you appreciate will be seen with a keener eye, heard with a finer ear Taste. touch. listen; whatever your senses are drawn to will be tuned to the pomt of ecstacy. Your sens1tiv1ty is acute VIRGO-The Moon leaves your sign Fnday evenmg (the 17th). The excitement continues. You're blossoming, and you may be just too much for the shy and gentle ones. Stick with those who have as much intensity and drive as you do! The heat of summer feels right, and hot is the word for your life LIBRA-In your sign all week: Pluto and Saturn. Passing through Fr1day evening to Monday morning.· the Moon. If you can just finish that project you've started, all systems will be go. and you'll be launched successfully. Right now you can see thmgs from a wider perspective than usual, and you appreciate values and qualities in others that you've been missing SCORPIO-The Moon passes through Scorpio Monday morning through next Wednesday morning. Now shines your gentler side. Even in arguments and confrontations, there's something smooth and easy about you You're quite disarming to anyone who expects a fight• A soft answer turneth away wrath" is one advantage, but ·1ove conquers all .. is the better one SAGITTARIUS-Continumg in your sign: Jupiter, Uranus and Nep­tune. The Moon wlll enter next Wednesday mornmg, the 22nd, leaving next Friday evening, the 24th. I'll bet you gave in to some of last week's temptations. As a result, something or someone in your life 1s beginning to feel like more of an addiction than an attraction. Time to get down to that basic question: what is good for you? CAPRICORN-Feeling like the explorer lost 1n distant and unfamiliar territory? Why not seek out an older or more experienced hand? New places, new things, new faces can be as confusing as they are exciting What you need 1s a native guide. AQUARIUS-How can everything seem so right everywhere but at home? You may have gotten so invovled in so many things that you've been forgetting to share them with your lover or close one Sex is good, but there's more to a relationship than that PISCES-When the present 1s so very confusing and the future 1s so very uncertain, the past can have a very strong draw. Indulge it Dive into a sea of memory Look up old friends and reminisce. Find what's valua­ble there to bring with you as you move on. •1113 ST~EWAll f[AT\JAES SYNDICATE 28 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 17, 1983 (lost two nights, this Friday & Saturday, Lou Ann Miles) Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-8pm. Hors d'Oewres 2702 Kirby 524-6272
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