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Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987
File 017
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Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987 - File 017. 1987-02-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3247/show/3238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-13). Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3247/show/3238

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987 - File 017, 1987-02-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3247/show/3238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 13, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE/FEBRUARY 13. 1987 New Movies Feature Successful Suspense, Mundane Morality Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice a Black Widow Black Widow is a very stylish detective story. It's not a who-done-it. We know whom right from the beginning. So does the police woman. Once she notices that the method is suspiciously the same between several similar deaths, the only other link is the mysterious lady. The detective befriends her to find out. But that lifestyle is so seductive that she becomes swept up into it. She finds she loves the sensuality, the glamour, the passion. And the man who is slated to be the next victim. It doesn't look like she can save him. In fact, she's being systematically framed for his death. Even should she be able to escape, will she ever be the same person again? Will any of us? The ever-enduring human black widow will. Catharine (Theresa Russell, center) ensnares Alex (Debra Winger) in a deadly game when she introduces her to her next victim, a millionaire named Paul (Sami Frey), in "Black Widow" We know how she does it. She administers poison in such an ingenious way that the victims always die while she is out of town and they are off-screen. That's class. What intrigues the investigator, played by Debra Winger, and all the rest of us is why she does it. Not in the way that is fairly obvious—for the money. But what is this murderess, played by Theresa Russell, feeling? What makes her tick? She romances, marries and beds all of these men before she kills them. She really does seem to care for them. She surely has enough money in that Swiss bank account by now. Yet she feels she will be doing this for many years to come. What is so addictive about this kind of relationship? It seems like she will be the same enigma forver. The filmmakers give us an emotional understanding for her, but they never make the mistake of trying to reduce her to words. Director Bob Rafelson and director of photography Conrad L. Hall shot a lot of this film in gorgeous locations—the mountains around Seattle and the black sand beaches and erupting volcanoes of Hawaii. Production designer Gene Callahan had the indoor scenes lit stunningly. All of that style combines well with the substance of Ronald Bass' script to give us a true edge-of-the-seat adult thriller. □ Light of Day There was once a movie about a young female rock singer in Cleveland. She was involved with a young male who upheld the traditional values in the face of that city's grinding, redneck poverty. The movie became a comic send-up of old invaders from space horror movies. It was a flop called Howard the Duck. Now Joan Jett is playing a young female rock singer from Cleveland in Light of Day. The only family member she feels can even begin to understand her is her younger brother, played by Michael J. Fox. Because ofthe trauma of giving birth out of wedlock, she has developed a live only for the moment philosophy. So he is really the only man she has any kind of an ongoing relationship. He stands firmly for traditional values: family and responsibility. He tries very hard to reconcile her with their born-again mother (played by Gena Rowlands). But when his sister goes too far for even him to forgive, he kidnaps her son (cute little Billy Sullivan) to give him a proper upbringing. Because it extols the virtues of people living in poverty, this movie stays true to its surrondings. Director Paul Schrader has relentessly driven to the heart of lower-middle class mediocrity. The movie has an overwhelming mood—dreariness. The music (and there is a lot of it) is all really good rock. They're all really down songs. I didn't even feel emotionally uplifted or inspired at the meaningful, happy ending. It was only a return to dealing steadfastly with a boring life. I can easily see this movie as a hit among the art houses. But as a commercial release, I don't think it's going anywhere. By then, I've been wrong in Cleveland before. □ Openings The Color of Money Hannah and Her Sisters Mannequin— A young stockroom clerk assembles his perfect woman, and she somehow comes to life. Over the Top— What is it with arm wrestling, already? Now it's Sty Stallone's turn. Winner Take All— Motorcross! Now that's a much more photogenic sport! Children of a Lesser God (Belair) A Place of Weeping (Belair) Last Tango in Paris (River Oaks, 13) The Petrified Forest and The Little Foxes (Rice Media Center, 13). ONO! Signore e Signori (MFA, 13). ONO! Michael J. Fox plays Joe Rasnick, a blue collar worker with dreams of becoming a musician, in "Light of Day" The Official Story (Rice Media Center, 14 & 15)—presented for Amnesty International. Sedotta e Abbandonata (MFA, Hi- Seduced and abandoned. ONO! The Seven Samurai (River Oaks, 15)— Kurusawa classic. Vedo Nudo (MFA, 15)—I See Nude. ONO! A Night at the Opera (River Oaks, 18)—the Marx Brothers! Potemkin and Metropolis (Rice Media Center, 19). ONO! Lincoln Hawk (Sylvester Stallone) pits his ability and will to win against "Bull" Hurley (Rick Zumwalt) in a match that will determine the World Armwrestling Champion in "Over the Top" Houston Challenge WE TRAIN FOR SUCCESS • Don't Like Your Boss • Play But Can't Pay • Hamburger Blues • Need Cash for Dash • Star Quality—Joker Pay • Paid on Time, No Excuses We Can Help You Help Yourself Many Positions Open Up to S1000 a Week Call 271-6736 or 271-9455 or apply 7324 Southwest Freeway and Fondren 12th Floor
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