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Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987 - File 001. 1987-02-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3247/show/3222.

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(1987-02-13). Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3247/show/3222

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987 - File 001, 1987-02-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3247/show/3222.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 329, February 13, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 13, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ___FE BRUARY _13'--1,9 87_ __ 2 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13. 1987 Crystal's 911 W. Drew 522-7524 Crystal's 1st Valentine Pink & White Party Sat. Feb. 14 Come with Your Favorite Sweetheart or Meet The Sweetheart of Your Dreams! Happy Hour Extended 'til 10pm Free €hampagne Door Prizes and Drawings All Night Long for Roses, Tickets to Alley Theatre, Bar Tabs and Fabulous Prizes Special Drawing for Private Dancing with Nexus Nauties (Good for Feb. 15) FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Abandoned Buildings Draw Ire of Civic, Business Groups By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice Following what Houston Fire Depart­ment arson investigators say is the fifth suspicious fire in a few weeks time to start in a vacant building on lower Wes­theimer, representatives of local busi­ness and homeowner organizations are waging war against negligent property owners and non-responsive city agen· cies they say are carelessly allowing the hazardous open buildings to proliferate in the neighborhood. A house at 203 Westheimer, the former site of an Oriental "modeling studio," burned for the second time in less than three weeks Monday after­noon, Feb. 9. Fire engines and other emergency vehicles blocked access via Westheimer to the Southwest Freeway Milam ramp and the downtown corridor for over three hours. The house and a nearby building at 108 Westheimer, also vacant, were the scene of two fires which started separ­ately on Jan. 14, according to arson investigators. Five lower Westheimer arson cases are currently being investi­gated, and the fire department has not found reliable evidence to connect the fires, investigator Butch Lewis said. Fires in vacant buildings are usua1ly considered arson because, in the absf:'nce of electricity and appliances, there is generaJly no other reason for a fire to start, Lewis said. Open buildings on lower Westheimer pose a particular hazard because of the number of transients in the area, Lewis noted. Local attorney Sharon Weintraub approached the Neartown Businss Alliance Wednesday, Feb. 11, urging support of an aggressive letter-writing campaign intended to "scare" owners of potentially dangerous buildings into c1eaning up and boarding up their prop­erties as required by city ordinance. Weintraub spoke as a representative of "The Coalition of Montrose Organi­zations," an action group inc1uding members of NBA, The Greater Mont· rose Business Guild and two area resi· dent organizations, Neartown Association and the Avondale Associa­tion. The coalition had drafted a letter sev­eral weeks earlier, urging property owners to take action within 10 days to bring their property into compliance with the laws and warning that owners have been held liable for criminal acts occurring in unsecured buildings, Wein traub said. She added, however, that she did not feel the letter should be sent out until the neighborhood groups decided on a definite follow-up plan of action . Gail Ramsey, who at first suggested the NBA endorse the letter and facili­tate its immediate mailout, withdrew her motion on the condition that the coalition or a special committee meet to discuss action on the letter prior to the next atliance meeting in March. "Oth(.•rwifie, I withdraw under pro· test," Ramfiey stated. "We have be(.•n fooling around with this (vacant building issue) for the past six months, and if we don't do something now, thrrf.' will jut;t b<• more buildings burning until next month." .John Daniel told members ho had spoken with Luke London of the Hous­ton Department of Public Works, who he deRCribed as the city contacl for dan· gerous buildings in the Montrose area. London assured him he would get involved in investigating specific cases of hazardous conditions if they are prop· erly reported and documented, Daniel said. Daniel agreed to invite London to the March 11 NBA meeting. A major problem exists in contacting the owners of abandoned, burnt-out buildings as complete, up-to-date records of the property holders seem to lw rare or non-existent. Many of the properti(>s have changed hands many times, and some owners are foreign cor­porations or individuals who cannot be traced. Even the police and fire depart­ments do not have complete Iist.S of the owners. "We have a partial list, that's all," Sgt. O.V. Williams, supervisor of the Neartown Police Community Center, said. "We have a lot of problems with these vacant buildings when vagrants break in or go into an open building. Officers go in and chase them out, but they come right back when the officers leave," he explained. "If we could contact the owners, we can put these vagrants in jail," Willi­ams said, noting that many would stay there because they would not be able to pay the $800 bond for criminal trespass­ing. "But they can only be arrested with the owner's permission _ .. if we can't contact the owners, there's nothing we can do." L.ewis said the arson investigators working on the recent lower Westheimer fires don't know who owns the property at 203 Westheimer. Vernon Black, administrator of the Houston Health Department's Office of Housing Conservation, which enforces many of the building ordinances, said it is not difficult to use count} tax records to determine who is paying t.lxes on the property. Delays are due to the fact that evf.'ry mortage holder, lien holder, and anyone else with a possible interest in the property must be notified beforf:'any action can be taken, he said. ft is these "owners" who are sometimes hard to find, and this is one reason it takes time to respond to dangerous building com­plaints, according to the administrator "The dty must allow due process to (.•veryone with an interest. Otherwise, we're liable to suit subsequent to a demolition by someonesayingtheywer· en't notified." Black said. Terry Phillips, who works in the office of City Councilman George Greanias, said complaints received by Greanias are turned over to the health depart· ment for investigation. "The first step is to ask the owner to board it up. If that doesn't work, the owner may be ticketed," Phillips said. Phillips cited financial constraints of the city and the escalating rate of prop­erty abandonment in Montrose as other reasons for the continuing problem. "We have only a certain number of men who tear down buildings . . they are literally being abandoned faster than we can tear them down," Phillips said. Getting permission to tear down a building is cumbersome because of the legal restrictions, he added. Black said there are currently at least 2.5 cases of code violations in some stage of investigation in the Montrose area. But neighborhood forces insist the city is unnecessarily sluggish in enforc­ing its own laws when it comes to vacant Montrose buildings. Warren Duncanson, a member of the Avondale Association, said he is "spearheading'' a group of neighbor­hood property owners who are investi­gating the legal possibility of filing class action suits against negligent holders. Duncanson said the area's "ghetto look" due to the abandoned properties has made it impossible for him to lease out a retail space he owns on Westheimer. Other property owners have had similar problems leasing or selling what would otherwise be consi­dered good locations for new business, he said. BETTER LAWilS & QARDEilS Totc1l lc1wn mc1mlenc1nce Commercic11-Residentic1l • Landscape • T rdsh Removdl • Ch1mneq Sweep • Tree Seruice • Stumps Removed • Complete Spnnkler Sqstems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN ROCK "N" HORSE rn a.. :::J UJ z :::J I­C.) Help Us Celebrate Our 1st Anniversary Sat. Feb. 14 Champagne Fountain and Food with JUSTINE (ALL GIRL BAND) with Shannon, Susan, Susan, Anna Marie 9pm-1am Open Tue.-Thurs. 4pm-2am Fri.-Sun. 3pm-2am 5731 Kirby 520-9910 Nerene Kee. owner GENERAL REPAlilS ¥/itl. j'1 ~ ~,. ~ z ~ o AUTOMOTIVE o (~.) zz ~ (;) w Happy ~ Valentine's •Y( Day ~/ 1411 Tall 1i ~:· • j'. 522- 2190 TRANSM•SSIONS 4 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 13, 1987 Coping with Our Society's New Idols The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe My daughter, Malphasia, came down to breakfast wearing high heels, a strap­less, sequinned gown and a toothy smile. She looked at me, waved and clapped her hands. "Bye-bye," she said. Ah, parental deci­sions. I couldn't de-cide whether to com­ment first on her costume or her greeting. "I'm prac­ticing for my ca­reer," she explained. "As a dysfunc­tional lady of the evf'ning?" I inquir­ed. "No, Daddy," she said, "a• the next Vanna White." Six months ago, I might have asked who Vanna White was, but she has since appeared on the covers of both People and Newsweek. From scanning the pictures in the former and the text in the latt•r, I now know that Miss Whit<' ts a pretty, charming, talentless airhead who has become a national celebrity by turning over letters on a quiz show called, "Wheel of Fortune." So I wasn't surprised when Malpha· sia slunk sexily over to the calendar on the wall and turned the page-annoyed, but not surprised. "It isn't March yet," I growled, "and why are you pointing at that gargage compactor?" " I have to practice pointing to the prizes, too," said Malphasia. "There's lots to this job." "That compactor's no prize, believe me," I said. "And don't talk with your mouth full of English muffin. You'll never be a television star if you don't learn to emote properly." "Vanna doesn't talk at all," said Mal­phasia, "except to say, 'Bye-bye.' That's why everyone's so excited by the title of her new autobiography , 'Vanna Speaks.'" "If that's her worst fear, she must be either very secure or very uninformed," I said. "Of course, one probably goes with the other." "And she reveals her secret recipe for Lasagna a la Vanna," continued Mal· phasia, who never pays any attention to my aphorisms. "It's no wonder her pub· hsht•r gave her a $250,000 advance." Considering that's 50 times more than any publisher ever gave me, I thought I took the news with mature stoicism. "Are you out of your mind emulating an empty-headed bird ­brain?" I shouted. "What will it get you?" "Rich," said Malphasia. And with a big smile and a little wave, she chi riled "Bye-bye" and flounced up the stairs. I took my umbrage out in the back­yard where my dear wife, Glynda, was trimming the pyracantha. "What kind of a society are we living in ," I demanded, "that worships shallow glitz and surface glamour and doesn't care a whit that their idols have no more intel ­ligence than a flea?" "Now, now, dear," said Glynda, "I'm sure Malphasia will turn out just fine ." "But she's betrayed the entire sexual revolution and the sexual equality that her sisters marched and sued and pick­eted for," I said. "Even in this society, what position of importance can she ever hope to aspire to if she relies soley on mindless charm?" Glynda lopped off an errant branch with a single deft snick. "The presid­ency?" she said. 11 1987 1987 (S F ) Chro nicle Publishing Co Gay America Gay Community Events Nationwide .. Hearings Predicted on National Gay Civil Rights Bill From a Human Riahts Campaign Fund Press Release With a record 50 members of the U.S. House of Representatives and six members of the U.S Senate co-sponsonng the Gay and Lesbian Civil Rights Bill this year, the climate appears to be favorable for actual committee hearings on the bills during the 100th Congress The House bill was introduced as HR 709 on Jan_ 21 by Rep Ted Weiss (0.-N Y.) . The Senate's version of the bill, S. 464, was introduced on Feb. 4 by Sen Alan Cranston (0.-Calif_) Joining Sen. Cranston as original co-sponsors were Senators Kennedy (D - Mass), Kerry (0.-Maine) , Moynihan (0 .-N Y.), We1cker (A -Conn) and Inouye (0 -Hawaii) . ·we've worked long and hard with Rep. Weiss and Sen. Cranston to get this many co-sponsors," said Vic Basile. executive director of the Human Rights Campaign Fund HRCF describes itself as a national political action and education committee of the gay and lesbian community and has made passage of the civil rights bill a major focus of its political activities for the past six years Hearings on the House version would afford supporters and opponents an opportunity to go on record with their positions on the leg1slat1on. For the gay and lesbian community, this means a very htgh profile forum in which to present evidence and arguments on behalf of their need for civil rights protection. For their opponents. it necessitates bringing bias and prejudice out of the closet and putting them on record Almost all of the co-sponsors of both bdls were recipients of contributions from the Human Rights Campaign Fund in last November's election_ Contributions from the cam­paign fund are contingent on a candidate's promise to support the civil rights bill Basile predicts that a record number of members of Congress will sign onto both bills as the year progresses To help make that happen, he asks members of the gay and lesbian community, as well as others supportive of the bills, to wnte their representatives and senators and urge them to support the bills Members of the House may be reached by writing them (with ''The Honorable" preceding their name) at the U.S. House of Representatives. Washington DC. 20515 Members of the Senate may be reached by wnting them (with ''The Honorable'' preceding their name) at the US Senate, Washington. D.C. 20510 FEBRUARY 13, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 5 The Ultimate After Hours Stop Serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner & Our Famous Pot Pies 24 Hours a Day We're Always Open We're a Little Short on Parking but We're Long on Good Food and Friendly Service. 1525 Westheimer 528-4350 Male Strip Finals, Feb. 20 11pm $250 Cash Prize to Top Stripper 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1987 MAKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION • • on Houston·s outrageous New conference Call our exciting phone service has become the rage In callfornla, Phlladelphla, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dlal you Wiii be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from an over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine Interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acquain­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. Top or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they·re all here! It's only $2*-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are required. Your anonymity Is guaranteed. can 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • Houst~~: 713·976·9696 ·This call is only 52 In most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller al'ld yet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi· tional toll charges may apply in some areas. FEBRUARY 13, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 Condom Ads Are Only a First Step Time Has Come for Television Blitz on AIDS Commentary by Neil Schram PacifiC' News &n1iee Whether TV networks should allow advertisements about condoms is not the issue. The real problem is that such ads don't go nearly far enough in rt>alizing our most powerful medium's ability to educate. AIDS-related television advertising should abound, its cost borne by the goVf.•rnment, corpQrations, and the net­works themselves. Its content should be detailed with advice about condoms, but should not be left up to advertising agencies for condom manufacturers alone. Unlike present condom ads, a new batch of public service announcements (PSAs) must explicitly and repeatedly remind people that the AIDS virus is spread by intercourse (anal or vagina]) and that condoms significantly reduce that risk. Because of different popula­tions that must be reached, the term "rubber" is likely to be needed as well as the word condom. Sharing injectable drug needles or equipment is the other major way the virus is spread and this must be broad­cast as well. Given the moral concerns which pres­ently paralyze the networks, it would be better to include advice on abHtaining from sex as well as about condoms if that is what is required to get the mes­sages on the air. So far, the major networks and almo1;t nil local stations, in an effort to avoid FLOWERS & GIFfS A Cupid Special for the One You Love includes a Cupid Valentine Arrangement with Seasonal Flowers and Valentine Decorations only $25 including tax and delivery inside the Loop 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted controversy, have indicated that infor­mation about condoms for AIDS pre· AIDS-related television advertising should abound, its cost borne by the government, corporations, and the networks themselves. vention is heing provided by debate on news programs. Unfortunately, that does not reach most of the people who need to be reached. One station in Minneapolis is allowing advertisements for condoms after 11 :30 p.m. Those ads certainly will not be seen by most people who need to be reached. Instead, PSAs about AIDS dealing with condoms must run on pop· ular TV shows like Cosby and Family Ties. And they must be repeated fre­quently. In Great Britain, information about AIDS was mailed to all households in the country by the government. Govern· ments of other European countries have funded television announcements about AIDS and sex. That must happen here. because AIDS is out of control. Some two to four milJion Americans are expected to become newly infected with the AIDS virus in the next four to five years. For now, the rare local TV station that permits ads for condoms represents only a token gesture in this epidemic. It should be seen only as an indication that condoms can be mentioned. not as a sign that significant education is occurring We need a television blitz on AIDS. And we mu~t launch it now. PNS ~mmentator Nell Sc'1ram. a phys1cllln heads 11'1e OS Angeles County AIDS Task Force ohey had each other So what else did they need? A Divorcel ~~~~~.m; Pickles Polansky Free Again! Maria Fingermore Barefoot and Pregnant! Nobody does Naugahyde & Nylons like ... 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 >. Q. (/) 0 0 tJ ~ ~ Can Beer $1 .25 Q. :::i Draft Beer 75C co 0 Morning: Afternoon: Even ing: Well Drinks $1 75 I ?am- Noon 6pm-8pm 11 30pm-12:30am Shots $1 25 Monday-Saturday Monday-Friday Every Night 8 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13. 1987 BEER BUST 25A DRAFT All DAY, All NIGHT llf)t; 'r 7 Days a Week I-SATURDAY & SUNDAY LIQUOR BUST 15~ All the Well Liquor You Care to Drink 4pm-7pm 220 Avondale Wet Jockey Short Contest $200 Cash & Prizes Starring Maude Thursday Evenings 529-7525 Sponsors Found for Sodomy Law Repeal By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice Texas Lesbian Gay RighL• Lobby now has sponsors for a bill to repeal the state sodomy statute, but lobbyist Glen Maxey admits filing the legislation dur­ing the ongoing session of the Texas !.Rgislature will accomplish little more than •·setting the tone" for future steps toward decriminalization. Maxey reported Wednesday, Feb. l l , that Sen. Craig Washington and Rep. Debra Dan burg of Houston, Rep. David Cain of Dallas. and Rep. l..<>na Guer­rerro of Austin, had agreed to spon8or the bill, which calls for outright rep•al of 21.06. All four legislators are Demo· rratA. Three additional spomwrs from Business Alliance Endorses Neartown Assoc. Plan Ry Sheri Cohen Darbonne Members of the Neartown Bm1inl'sH Alliance voted to endorse Neartown Asso<:iation 's comprehensive planning project, noting that the endorsement did not constitute acceptance of the group's neighborhood plan, which is not yet complete. "We aren't at the stage of making any recommendations yet," Jill Hefner, a member of the homeowner group's plan· ning committee, said."What we're ask· ing for is an endorsement of the process we've undertaken." Hefner and two other committee members, Tom Minor and Chuck Dal­ley, who is also a planner with the City of Houston Office of Planning and Development, displayed a map pre· pared by Neart.own Association volun· teers who have been conducting a land use survey of the Montrose area. The map color codes area land use patterns m classifications. The ultimate goal of the survey is to develop a "master plan" to enable the association to work with property owners and developers in promoting a type of development "that is good for the neighborhood," Hefner stated. H<'fner said her group was interested in preserving certain unqiue character· istics of Montrose, such as its mixed-use environment, dense population and pedestrian orientation. Characteristics of an individual neighborhood can be overlooked in the large·scale, general neighborhood plans proposed by the city, she noted. Another reason for the research was to estahli.sh a basis for determining future projects oftheassocation, Hefner said Tht• group will be able to use the information when presenting capital improv(•mrnt projects to the city, she added. The business a11iance's endorsement was sought because Neartown Associa­tion wanted to list the group's name on u hrochure designed to explain the plan­ning project to the public. Participation by the business group would also dem· onstrate a more united community sup port, Hefner said The committee members agreed to indude a representative of the Near­town Business Alliance on the planning committee. the House of Representatives are expected, but have yet to confirm, and the lobby is seeking another sponsor in the Senate, Maxey said. "We know we don't have the votes to pass this bill, and quite frankly, we really don't even want a vote on it this session ," Maxey commented. The pur· pose of introducing the legislation, he said, was to "desensitize the issue" before members of the legislature, and to make the legislators aware that gays are going to push for decriminalization in future se~sions Maxey called educating the legisla­tors. even thm;e sensitive to gay i.o:.;!.;ues. "a long, arduous process." "A numborofmembers (of the legisla­ture) are saying, 'are you sure this is what you want to do?'" Maxey said. l.Rgislators have warned the lobbyists that pushing an outright repeal hill could result in a backlash against the gay community, he noted. However, after speaking with attor· neys about possible alternative ways to approach the issue, such as couching the repeal within a more general pri· vacy bill, Maxey said the lobby most likely will file specifically for decrimi­nalization. "Everyone is going to see right through that (general legislation)," he said. The legislature will never "get to the point" regarding 21.06 unless com· munity leadership takes a pro-active stance and boldly pursues its ultimate goal , he added. Regarding negative legislation, Maxey said that no negative bills deal­ing with gay issues have been filed. He noted, however, that the filing deadline is not until mid-March and that the major filing crunch is yet to come. "Only about 700 bills have been filed so far. We're expecting about four times that many," Maxey said. Also, last-minute amendments could pose a "tremendously dangerous situa­tion," as bills considered. "good" could be made negative by amendment, Maxey pointed out. One piece of legislation posing a potential amendment threat is the Com­municable Disease Act supported by the Texas Department of Health. "The key is to make the sponsors understand the importance of not accepting an amendment," Maxey said, noting that the TOH is so strong on the package proposal that it might be inclined to accept an amendment. Maxey said he is convinced that the bill's co-sponsors, Sen. Ray Farabee and Rep. Nancy McDonald, understand the issues well enough to kill the legisla­tion if an unacceptable amendment is attached. TLGRL also hopes to file several bills dealing with AIDS issues next week, Maxey said. The lobby is presently working with public health lobbying groups in attempts to garner positive support for the legislation. The proposals include a general anti· discrimination bill; a bill dealing with informed consent for HIV testing; confi· dentiality of medical records; prohibi­tion of using the HIV antibody test as a required determinant for obtaining insurance; and prohibition of the test being required by a third party for other purposes (such as housing or employ· ment). The bills are being filed separately in case individual areas draw opposition, Maxey said. FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Community Groups .. Hou-Tex Tennis Club Results The Hou-Tex Tennis Club met Sunday, Feb. 8. at Memonat Park for challenge matches Results are: David Helland def. David Garza 6-3. 6-2; Steve Bearden def. Eddte Chavez6-2, 4-6, 6-4: Eugene Brown def. Randy M111er6-4. 6-4. Randall Dickerson def. Bobby R 1-6. 6-7, 6-1, and David Hei1and def. Steve Bearden 7-6 (7-4) , 6-2 The Hou-Tex Tennis Club meets m front of the bleachers at Memorial Park Tennis Center Wednesdays. 7 30-9:00 p. m .. and Sundays. 10 30 a m -1 30 p. m For further information call Ron Moss or Bil A. at 861-2ns6 or Randy Miler at 796-1846 .. Mary's II Leads MSA Pool Standings As of Feb. 4, Mary's II remains in the top pos1t1 •n 1 the MSA 81 1ards League standings Bacchus II and Adventurers fohuw in second a 11d thrrd places. respectively A new league vice president was elected at a meeting held Sunday, Feb. 8. Lisa Mustach1a was elected to fill the pos1t1on vacated by Jim Dorr Dorr remains a playerm the league, but ncreAs d work respons1bil1ties forced te the off1 · • .. Softball Team Slates Fundraiser The Manon & Lynn 's softball team w1 ho ii a 1drarser show ., Thursday Feb. i9 at the Ranch, 9150 S. Mam The show is to begin promptly at 8:00 pm A $3 donation will be used to offset expenses for the team to travel to the Gay Softball World Series The team hopes to represent Houston Women's Softball at the event to be held m San Francisco at the end of August Direct Burial or Cremation CREffiAT\On SERVICE mTERTIATIOTIAL® Operated by James H Murphy Funera~ Homes pnrPd $39S jrJm ~ 363-9999 The Montrose Voice Ifs The Place to Advertise 10 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13. 1987 m on t rose VOICE HOUSTON TEXAS ISSUE 329 rn10AY FEBRUARY 13. 1987 l Published weekly during February and March Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours 8am-6pm Henry McC ~rg 1)4.0 sh•r-fld•ttN Linda Wyche mM&aging fld;UY David Aoumfort /NOduc ''°" Elroy Forbes. social d•'ec"" Shen Cohen Darbonne "••t ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (7131 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland lldv•rrw '19 d•rectot Ken Boge acca...111 ••«"' v• PO$TUASTEllt Send .odt ... eorrectlOtlS :0 41)(1 Avon­dale. Houlton .... 71C0&-3029 Subxnption ,.,,, "' "'S (by VOK• r;arr •• °' US Ma II: $• 25per ......... {1JOtCl2•UU•I S65peryN'(S2•ettllSl.Of S:l2~per11•monll'ls(2ew..-s1 '''-''""'' Mh•rtialr>g ,..,..es..-it1f,ve R1veride1I M•rllelll19 P 0 Bo.II 12MI Pl•tnl•9kl NJ 07061 (201) 75'-43'8 Ftflfll Mllrert•JJttg tMedtlflfl All display ads 5pm 2 dly:S prlOI' r,o pvbllC•!ion d•t• Al c1ass.l1ed ads 2pm 1 day prrn to pubf1ut1oro CS.I• Notit• to ~•rt•s••s AOvet't•SIJ'IQ rite schedule E1grot-A wu•tt«:1•v• Apnl 11. 1996 RHoonaibttty W• cso not astume l•n•nc1a1 rnpo1111b1hly lot Cll•rN by edvtlr1•s•~ but rNde~ ••e asked to ad\o•H th• newspaper ot •"Y 1uspicio11 of lradulent or O.C1191""" tldv~•t•ng •nd ll.ISptelont w•U b9 irlv•liga!ed News ,.,voce Uf'•llld p,_, lntf!mato0na1 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 1J :;·:I'. Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. Gumbo Cooks Needed for Benefit Cook-Off KPFT's Third Annual Cajun Gumbo Cook-Off is set for Sunday, March 22 Entrants are needed for the benefit which will be held at Clear Lake Park Entry fee is $50 per category Preparers of the best seafood and non-seafood gumbo will win a vac:i:tion m Las Vegas or New Orleans KPFT 1s the listener supported Pacifica radio station in Houston. More information and entry forms are available by calling 526-4000 ttDeputy Registrars to be Sworn In Those wishing to be deputy voter registrars will be sworn 1n by representatives of the Hams County Registrar's offtce for two year terms at the next meeting of Houston Gay Political Caucus The m~ ~ting begins at 7:30 pm on Feb 18 at the Viscount Hotel. 2828 Southwest Fret•way b4~twe~·n Kirby and Buffalo S~ !dway .. AIDS Awareness Sunday at MCCR Metrr•pol1tan Communtty Church of the Ae1urrect1on's AIDS Awareness and Intercessory Prayer Sabbath Observance"" will be held this Sunday, Feb 15. at 10:45 p_m Daniel G Moreschi of the Institute for Immunological D1sorders will speak on ··Turning Darkness Into Light· and will present the latest information regarding research into causes and cures of AIDS MCCR 1s located at 1919 Decatur For more mformat1on about the '"Sabbath Obser· vance. ·call 861·9149 Letters to the Voice From the readers of the Montrose Voice Farewell to Frye From ler.y N1 ·noi 1n After years of perpetrating assorted controversy, I am pleased to read that Phyllis Frye has finally decided to pull back from the gay community Over the years Phyllis Frye has instigated an unbelievable strmg of offensive protest Now Ms Frye is making one last slab at the Houston gay community with her half mdllon dollar law suit I can only wish her well . Whatever the end result. it's good that the gay community won't have poor Phyllis to kick around anymore Happy retirement, dear Editors Nt•te Frye's suit involves members of the Greater Montrose Business Guild ~ Write the Voice ll1~m~ 1n the ·Letters· column are opinions of readers and not necessarily those of the Vun.:e Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to Houston Please keep letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor." Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. All letters must be signed and mclude address and phone number to verify authent1c1ty Address and phone will not be printed Name will be withheld on request Fortunes Virgo Unbothered By Merk Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For Frtday evening. Feb. 13. through Fr1day morning. Feb 20. 1987 ARIES Take your love of acting, and your ability to show yourself off to your best advantage, and then 1mprovise Show someone new something new, and that someone may show you something you've never seen before TAURUS Did you dream 11. or did 11 really happen? Is 11 real, or an illusion? This could be a confusing time. except that you're enjoying 11 too much. Let your 1maginat1on run riot Create reality out of fantasy GEMINI You're an adventurer, an explorer. a searcher after truth. You're looking for something more than action You want to know where you are. who you are. and what it's all about Use those talentsi Look behind the scenes CANCER This romance of yours has got you thinking In learning about this loving person, you begin to learn new ways of loving yourself. Remember that being childish and being childlike are two different things LED If you're a loner. forget 11. If it's solitude you're look mg for, there won't be much to be found. This may be the time for being with others: the needs, plea­sures and responsibilities of friendship is what this time is about VIRGO The things that ordinarily get you down don't phase you at all right now There's an ease about your life, a natural flow of events that puts things in the proper perspective. You're enjoying all the games, of any kind LIBRA Be willing to lead as well as follow You'll be asked to take on some responsiblity No reason you can't Ever­yth1ng's right in this new position. Be innovative and flexible. Take pleasure m the master's role. SCORPIO You and and someone close have things to work out, and this 1s the time to do 1t. All parts of your relation­ship are open for examination. Lots of talking and listening will go a long way toward making important decisions SAGITTARIUS Now, you're the sleuth. looking for clues and reasons Your mystery could lead you to some interesting and bizarre people and pla­ces. Things do get complicated some­times. don't they? CAPRICORN Promises, promises Don't make them 1f you're going to break them. There are limits to what you can give Pay attention to advice offered you now You may not want to hear it, but you'll be glad you did AQUARIUS -Don't be so concerned about where you're going that you miss out on where you are. Take pleasure m simply doing what you're doing The future is a fine place to v1s1t, but the pres­ent 1s the place to be PISCES Work takes on new meaning and excitement right now Smee you've got the energy and drive. you can accomplish something important 1n that area Meanwhile, back tn the boudoir. a new fnend could mean a lot of fun m off hours. ~Pl~y ~Safe! FEBRUARY 13. 1987 t MONTROSE VOICE 11 THE VIET NAM RESTAURANT 3215 main st. at elgin The Best Vietnamese food in town with no preservatives or M.S. G. in our food Lunch Buffet M-F 11:30-2pm $3.75 All You Can Eat Safe Parking Beside Restaurant Open 11:30-midnight Sunday-Thursday 11:30-2am Friday & Saturday Happy Hour 12-7pm Bloody Mary Special $1.25 Your Host and Bartender Andy Mills ---------------------------- 'I • 10°/o Discount with this Coupon on All Menu Items I ---------------------------- For Reservations Call Andy 526-0917 12 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13. 1987 Judge Considers Restraining Order Against Hospital in AIDS Suit TYLER (UPI)-A federal iudge has taken under advisement a request for a temporary restraining order against Mother Francis Hospital, which is accused of discriminating against an employee who has AIDS. Mark Bible, director of anesthesia at the hospital, last week filed a $1 million suit. He claims that when the hospital found out about his condition, it cut his salary and restricted his duties. On Wednesday, Feb. II, U.S. District Judge Robert Parker, who took over the case when U.S. District Judge William Wayne Justice disqualified himself ear­lier this week, scheduled a March 9 hear· ing on Bible's request for a temporary restraining order Glen Maxey of the Lesbian , Gay Rights Lobby in Austin said Tuesday, Feb. 10. Bible's is the first case to his knowledge of a health care worker in Texas challenging an employer over alleged AIDS discrimination. Bible sued the Tyler hospital where he hns worked since July 1984, MargaretS. Ht"ath, an a~sistant vice president and Bible's immediate supervisor and Ray Thompson, the hospital's assistant executive administrator. The lawsuit says Bible was diagnosed as having AIDS when he was treated at Mother Francis Hosptial for pneumo­nia. but his doctor authorized his return to work without restrictions on Oct. 6. The suit alleges that hospital officials told Bible they had learned of his condi· tion and ordered him to confine himself to managerial duties. On three separate occasions, Bible wai;; reprimanded for participating in patient-related activities, including a three-<lay SU8pension without pay. He also said his desk was moved to a different part of the hospital in an effort to isolate him. Bible claims he was informed Nov. 14. that as of Feb. I, his salary would be cut approximately in half. The law•uit alleges that the hospital officials invaded Bible's privacy my misusing his confidential medical records and discriminated against him because of his illness. Bible's lawyers have asked the court to award unspecified damages and court costs as well as to order the hospi­tal to reinstate Bible to his position as director of anesthesia at his former salary. Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seel! o dote. on odventure, on encounter Send o mes.sage lor ell to see to someone you love Advertise your secret lonlosy TO "-ACE A 'l'Ell'SONAL' IN THE NEWSPAf'fi Of MONTROSE NSTCAl.l 529-8490 ''''''''''''''''' ' Tom's Pretty Fish ' ' 224 Westheimer ' ' (Only Six Blocks from Main St.) ' 520-6443 'Give your lover for Valentine's Day' ' a Pretty Red Fish in a beautiful ' heart-shaped 1-foot high vase •,w,ith, r,ed, g,ra,ve,l a,nd, a, s,ma,ll ,pl,an,t. ', ~ 11· •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO • ••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Ar ound the corner from our old l ocation OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS Spruce Up Your Home ~for the Holidays l HSK CONTRACTING •• •• •• • • •• A Full Service Contractor Roofing (All Types) • Tile/ Masonry Remodeling • CarpeVFlooring Sheetrock/ Painting • Cabinets Plumbing/ Electrical • Decks/ Hot Tubs Foundations Repaired • Room Additions Tree & Trash Removal • Concrete Insulation • Chimney Sweeping & Water Proofing Repairs Pest & Rodent Control • Fully Insured Heating/AC • References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 --VISA j\ .~ ~\ I Dallas Parks Director Cha rged in Men's Room Incident DALLAS (UP!)-The director of the Dallas Parks and Recreation Depart· ment has been charged with disorderly conduct following a sexual enc0unter in a men's room at a city park, police said. Jack Robinson, 55, and a man who identified himself as Gary Evans fled from police officer Bobby Heddin in Northlake Park after he found them partially undressed in the bathroom, police spokesman Bob Shaw said Wed­nesday, Feb. 11. Both men have been charged with dis· orderly conduct. Evading arrest charges against both have been referred by the district attorney's office to a grand jury, Shaw said. The police report says the men gave their names to Heddin, who recognized Robinson, but fled in different direc· lions when he asked them to walk with him to his patrol car. Suspension Seen as Quite a Drag MEMPHIS, Tenn. (UPl)-A 17-year-old youth says he has been susp•nded unfairly from high school-because he wore a gold dress, high heels, lipstick, a wig and earrings to a basketball game. "! don't skip classes. I don't talk smart to teachers. I don't think I should be suspended for what I wear," Ronald Cox said Tuesday, Feb. 10. But Dorsey Patterson. principal of Booker T. Washington High School thinks differently. ' Patterson said Cox caused quite a stir when he attended the school's basket· hall game Friday night in women 's attire. "ft was very disruptive. We were up by st•ven points when he walked in , and afh.·r that comotion we were down by one_" Patb•rson said he escorted Cox out of the gym Washington rallied to win 'Undesirable' Aliens Excluded, Says INS Official By Ken F lynn United Press International EL PASO-Aliens who are homorexu· als, prostitutes, Communists members of radical fringe groups or co~victed fel · ons are not eligible for amnesty under t~e new immigration reform law, offi . c1als said Feb. 3. Al Giugni, director of the El Paso sec· tor of the U.S. Immigration and Natu ralization Service, said all applicants for a legalization of immigration status will be required to take a medical exami­nation to prove they do not have AIDS or other contagious diseases. "The law sets up certain standards for all irnmigrnntR," Giugni said. "Th<' new law grants amnesty to those who are not otherwise not excludabJe, such as convicted felons and people with con ta· gious diseaseR or undesirables. The new Jaw prqvides amnesty to tho•e who hav• been living illegally in the Unite'<! StateR since before Jan. 1 1982. • FEBRUARY 13. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Relationships Are Our Most Cherished Possessions Achieving Emotional Intimacy Can Be A Challenge Seek Solutions to Life's Frustrations in An Understanding Atmosphere DR. NICHOLAS EDD, Pyschologist • individual and family therapy • relationship counseling • biofeedback and stress management • habit disorders (smoking/diet) New Westside Location: Memorial City Professional Bldg. 1 902 Frostwood Suite 269 Houston, TX 77024 465-2377 • court evaluations • 24 hour phone service • insurance welcome • accepting Sanus and Humana • evenings and weekends available Montrose: 2128 Welch 527-8680 14 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 13. 1987 The Ensemble Remembers Slavery Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrosr Voicf' To make Do L-Ord, Remember Me (The Ensemble), playwright James de Jongh took recorded interviews with black men and women in their eighties and nineties. He excerpted the best, most representative stories and then molded them into some dramatic unity. This is basicalJy the same process with which A Chorus Line was written about Broadway dancers. It has resulted in the same rich, quiet, quasi· psyche. While the violence is never far beneath the surface, these tales also go into detail about the everyday and even the happy times blacks were able to achieve under this harsh system. o Notes Texas state government is facing a huge budget deficit. All arts appropria­tions wi1l be under stringent review. Feb. 18 is Arts Day. Anyone who can, please go lobby in Austin that day, or at The Ensemble's "Do Lord. Remember Me" by James de Jongh features Michael Ballard, Brenda Wilson, Deanna Woods. Trat·1s Willis, Keith Kirck, and Adorn Blye documentary style that made that show so powerful. There is also a lot of singing. The six· member cast doeR some moving, lyri· cally beautiful renditions of gospel music. Thi~ is not a fervently anti-white show. It condemns the whites of that time, but white audience member!; are not made to feel personally guilty and unwelcome. Michael Ballard is a stand-out in a uniformly exceptional cast. After many stories of what slavery is like, he appears with a story promising equal­ity. Then he become• Nat Turner lead· Steve Epstein is one of the Outlaw Comics ing a doomed uprising. Finally, he becomes one of the black men who fought victoriously for the North. The play stops at the end of the War Between the States. Slavery is over! The emotional and physical scars on those who actually lived through it never quite healed and should not be forgot· ten . But now there is a possibility of healintr the !'tears on the national least call your legislators. To coordinate with everyone else, contact the Cultural Arts Council of Houston. If you don't know how to have sex safelv. look at our classified ads in the "Per~onals" section . lf you don't know why you must play •afely, see The Nor­mal Heart downstairs at The Alley. 228- 8421. Children's theater is really active right now, what with Tom Sawyer at The Alley and Charlotte's Web at Stages. The 87-AA Houston Symphony season has been announced. There will be the world premieres of a piece by Dutch composer Tristan Keuris and of a cello concerto by Knussen David Eisler was originally sche· du led to sing in Houston Grand Opera's comic hit Orpheus in the Underu·orld earlier this sea!;on . But he got sick and had to be replaced. Next weekend he will appi>ar in Falstaff, replacing ailing Richard Leech. Karma. Both productions were directed by Peter Mark Schifter Houseke!'ping: Diane Fox is the new managing director of Main Street Theater Contests: National Short Film and Video Com· petition: deadline March 2, info: USA Film Fesbval office, (214) 744-5400. Third East End Show: juried art exhi bition: $500 first place; deadline: Feb. 21., info: East End Progress Association 926-3305 or the Lawndale Center 921- 4155. Interviews: Astroworld techniral and wardrobe personnel; Feb. 14 o Celebrate! How often does midnight separate Fri· day the 13th and Valentine's Day? To celebrate Valentine's Day, be it lover or just best friend . please hold hands in public B'days: 13-Tennessee Ernie Ford, Stockard Channing, Oliver Reed. 14- Jack Benney, Thelma Ritter. 15- Harvey Korman, Susan B. Anthony, Melissa Manchester. 16-Katherine Cornell, Patty Andrews, Le Var Burton. 17-Simon Raven, Hal Holbrook, Alan Bates. 18-Cybil Shepherd, John Tra­volta, Matt Dillon, Adolphe Menjou. 19-Carson McCullers, Copernicus, Lee Marvin. "I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn't learn something from him ... -Galileo Galilei (born Feb. 14) o Openings Close Ties (Company Onstage, 13) Graiman, Kelly, Waldon (Comix Annex, 13 & !4) Mozart, Ravel , Berlioz (Jones. 13)­Sir Georg Solti conducts the Chicago Symphony Orchetra. ONO' (One Night Only') No More Sequels, Part II (Comedy Workshop, 13)-Hilarious hijinks! Lisa Schlett's puppets (U. of St. T. Bookstore, 14, 11 :00 a.m.). ONO! Choralis Brass (First Presbyterian, 14)-Family Pops concert. ONO! Chrysalis Repertory Dance Co. (Jew­ish Community Center, 14). ONO! Pinocchio (HITS Unicom, 14) Andras Schiff, pianist {Jones, 14)­Neville Marriner conducts the HSO. Torres-Garcia : Grid·Pattern·Sign, Paris-Montevideo, 1924-1944 (MFA, 14). Meet the Artists (MFA, 15, 1)-HGO. ONO! "Torres-Garcia" (MFA, 15, !)­lecture. Freebies. ONO! The Outlaw Comics Get their Balls Busted' (Blythe Spirits. 15). ONO! Diane Fox is neu· manal{ing director of Main Street Theater Concert Chorale (First Presbyterian, 16)-Swedish music conducted by Eric Ericson. ONO! If This Be Treason, Let Us Make the Most of It (Fitzgerald's, 16)-The Out­law Comics get political. ONO! Let's Call the Whole Thing Of{! (Hous­ton House, 16)-Musical revue about reunion. Marsha Carlton and Randy Jobe. Plays Mondays through Wednes­days. My Fair Lady (Music Hall, 17)­TUTS. The Dmmg Room (U of St. T's Jones Hall, 19)-comedy. Much Ado About Nothing (Main Street, 19)-jolly classic. Paul Polk (foreground) is narrator; (background left to right} Mitchell Gossett .is Joe Harper; Dennis Paton is Tom Sawyer, and Roger Mangels is Huck Finn m Timothy Mason's adaptation of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," play through Feb. 21 on the Alley's Large Stage Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose British Airline Must Hire Men LONDON (UPl)-Dan Air, which flies to British, European and Mideast desti­nations, denied a charge by the government-funded Equal Opporuni­ties Commission Monday, Feb. 9, that Dan had justified its women-only policy on the grounds that 30 percent of men seeking jobs as flight stewards were homosexual. According to the commission, Dan Air said it believed cabin staff were "sexually promiscuous" and that homo· sexual men would pose "a danger to the health and safety of passengers, and existing employees." Dan Air, which employs seven female pilots, denied in a statement it ever claimed its cabin staffs were promiscu­ous, but said it already had voluntarily changed its "women only" policy as a result of the commission's investiga tion. It said it was planning to recruit about 20 men to work as flight attend­ants. The airline said it had hired only women for the 1000 available cabin jobs because their customers like "a bit of glamour" and preferred them to men. According to the commission, the alr· line had held that AIDS was associated with homosexual men, that it could be transmitted by blood and saliva and therefore passed on to or from pas· sengers when staff cut themselves at work or when passengers required arti· ficial resuscitation. The commission, set up to monitor Britain's 12·year.old act outlawing sex discrimination in the workplace, said that on medical advice it dismissed Dan Air's case and ordered it to change its hiring practices and to employ male robin attendants on an equal basis with women. FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 \ BE FAMOUS. BE SEEN. ADVERTISE IN THE MONTROSE VOICE. Shop Kro9er for af£ your Vafelitine needS! 16 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 13. 1987 New Movies Feature Successful Suspense, Mundane Morality Review by Bill O'Rourke Montroae Voice o Black Widow Black Widou· 1s a very stylish detective .story. It's not a who-done-it. We know whom right from the beginning. So does the police woman. Once she notices that the method i~ suspiciously the same between several similar deaths. the only other link ls the mysterious lady The detective befnends her to find out. But that lifestyle is so seductive that she becomes swept up into it. She finds she loves the sensuality, the glam­our, the passion. And the man who is slated to be the next victim. It doesn't look like she can save him. In fact, she's being systematically framed for his death . Even should she be able to escape, will she ever be the same person again? Will any of us? The ever·enduring human black widow will. Catharine (Theresa Russell, center) ensnares Alex (Debra Winger) in a deadly game u·hen she introduces her to her next victim, a millionaire named Paul !Sam1 Frey), in "Black Widow" We know how she does it. She admin­isters poison in such an ingenious way that the victims always die while she is out of town and they are off-screen. That's class What intrigues the investigator, played by Debra Winger. and all the rest of us ib why she does it. Not in the way that is fairly obvious-for the money. But what is this murderess, played by Theresa Rus:sell, feeling? What makes her tick? She romances, marries and beds all of these men before she kills them. She really does seem to care for them. She surely has enough money in that Swiss bank account by now. Yet she feels she will be doing this for many years to come. What is so addictive about this kind of relationship? It seems like she will be the same enigma forver The filmmakers give us an emotional understanding for her, but they never make the mistake of trying to reduce her to words. Director Bob Rsfelson and director of photography Conrad L. Hall shot a lot of this film in gorgeous locations-the mountains around Seattle and the black sand beaches and erupting volcanoes of Hawaii. Production designer Gene Cal­lahan had the indoor scenes lit stunn­ingly. All of that style combines well with the substance of Ronald Bass' script to give us a true edge-of-the-seat adult thriller o Light of Day There was once a movie about a young Lincoln Hau·k fS)'ll'ester Stallone) pits his ability and u·ill to u·in against 'Bull" Hurley /Rick Zumu:alt) in a match that u·ill determine the World Armu:restling Champwn in "Ouer the Top" female rock singer in Cleveland. She was involved with a young male who upheld the traditional values in the face of that city's grinding, redneck poverty. The movie became a comic send-up of old invaders from space horror movies . It was a flop called Hou:ard the Duck. Now Joan Jett is playing a young female rock singer from Cleveland in Light of Day. The only family member she feels can even begin to understand her is her younger brother, played by Michael J Fox. Because of the trauma of giving birth out of wedlock , she has developed a live only for the moment philosophy. So he is really the only man she has any kind of an ongoing relationship. He stands firmly for traditional values: family and responsibility. He tries very hard to reconcile her with their born-again mother (played by Gena Rowlands). But when his sister goes too far for even him to forgive, he kidnaps her son (cute little Billy Sulli­van) to give him a proper upbringing. Because it extols the virtues of people living in poverty, this movie stays true to its surrondings. Director Paul Schrader has relentessly driven to the heart of lower-middle class mediocrity. The movie has an overwhelming mood-dreariness. The music (and there is a lot of it) is all really good rock. They're all really down songs. I didn't even feel emotionally uplifted or inspired at the meaningful, happy ending. It was only a return to dealing steadfastly with a boring life. I can easily see this movie as a hit among the art houses. But as a commer­cial release, I don't think it's going any­where. By then, I've been wrong in Cleveland before. o Openings The Color of Money Hannah and Her Sisters }rfannequin- A young stockroom clerk assemble~ his perfect woman, and she somehow comes to life. Ot·er the Top- What is it with arm wrestling, already? Now it's Sly Stal lane's turn. Winner Take All- Motorcross! Now that's a much more photogenic spart! Children of a Lesser God (Belair) A Place of Weeping (Belair) Last Tango in Paras (Rauer Oaks, 1.1) The Petrified Forest and The Little Foxes (Rice Media Center, 13). ONO! Signore e Signori (MFA, 13). ONO! Michael J. Fox plays Joe Rasnick, a blue collar worker with dreams of becoming a musician, in "Light of Day" The Official Story (Rice Media Cen­ter, 14 & 15)-presented for Amnesty International. Sedotta e Abbandonata !MFA, 14!­Seduced and abandoned. ON01 The Seven Samurai (River Oaks, 15)­Kurusawa classic. Vedo Nudo (MFA, 15)-1 See Nude ONO' A Night al the Opera (River Oaks, 18)-the Marx Brothers! Potemkin and Metropolis (Rice Media Center, 19). ONO! • Houston Challenge • WE TRAIN FOR SUCCESS * * * * * * ****** * • Don't Like Your Boss • Need Cash for Dash • Star Quality- Joker Pay • Paid on Time, No Excuses • Play But Can't Pay • Hamburger Blues We Can Help You Help Yourself Many Posi tions Open Up to $1000 a Week Call 271-6736 or 271-9455 or apply 7324 Southwest Freeway and Fondren 12th Floor FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Career Institute Paralegal Professionals . Law is one of today's fastest growing professions Over the past fifteen years the Paralegal {legal assistant) concept has continued to be recognized and encouraged by the legal profession. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 98% growth rate from 1984- 1995. The job responsibilities of a Paralegal are as wide and varied as the law firm, corporation, agency or legal office in which he/she may_ work. In all cases, Professional Paralegals increase the eff1c1ency of the office and decrease a client's costs. Of course, the better and more thorough training acquired, the more s_1gn1f1cant the_ role will be as a member of a professional team delivering legal services. That's why Career Institutes' program is taught by lawyers and Paralegals. This teaching approach produces stimulating and practical dialogue between the instructors and ~tr~1;~~fo~~~-prepares graduates for an exciting career as Paralegal Why Career Institute? Professionals in today's legal system consider Career lnstitute's Paralegal Program one of high quality and excellence. Some of the reasons for this include: • Nationally accredited • Approved by Texas Education Agency • Sustaining Member of Houston Legal Assistants Association • Tuition Financing • Placement Assistance • Morning, Afternoon and Evening Classes • Computer Assisted Research System • Legal Resource Center To Apply • Call 529-2778 to set an appointment for additional information and a tour of our facilities. • Class begins February 23, 1987. Applications will be accepted through Saturday, February 21st. Curriculum Career Institute offers a Paralegal curriculum that emphasizes practical learn-by-doing and intensive course work experiences designed to demonstrate the skills, knowledge and ethics required to effectively assist lawyers in their work. Areas of concentration include: • Intro to Law, Research and Writing • Family Law • Property • Business Organizations • Litigation • Commercial Law • Law Office Management • Legal Dratting • Torts • Legal Philosophy • Selected Legal Problems • Advanced Legal Research and Writing Your Goals Are Our Goals Career Institute is goal-oriented and believes m dedication and professional excellence. The goals of our Paralegal education are: •To tram students in a professional environment that will promote high standards of achievement. •To provide a Paralegal program of exceptional value to qualified students who would like to be a member of a professional team. •To develop a student's potential tor career advancement by preparing them to meet challenges confronted by today's practicing Paralegals. •To maintain a professional faculty and staff that perform consistently with the high ideals of students and the Career Institute. •To achieve high employer satisfaction with JOb performance of our graduates and provide, at no cost. placement assistance to help fulfill career ob1ect1ves If you are interested in a career in this legal field Call Career Institute The Paralegal People 3015 Richmond Avenue • Houston, Texas 77098 • 713/529-2778 We're Houston's largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice We're about 27,000 readers weekly (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewher~ around $6,000,000 u·eekly on the things we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartments, cars and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes, that's $6 million weekly .) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY THESE f!O IRfS HAI/{ 8Ef N AOJUSlEO IAC·M f AR&.tEA PlJ8llSHr0 flGuRES W..SCH ~1AO AlSO FIEHECHD THE TUfSDAY EDITION TKESE JIGUA(;;, ~flECT lNl.'I' Tt4£ FFll(JAY £°J'Tl0N FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Valentine's Weekend and Our Hearts Belong to Montrose Around Town by Elroy Forbes Montrose Voice Social Director o Friday the 13th It's here, Friday the 13th! And we get another one in March. For those too superstitious to go out, Channel 13 is running "Friday the 13th" weekend movies just for you. We also have some birthday people. Larry Frazier of the Venture-N says it's fun to play Count Dracula without any teeth. Rock 'n Horse's Darlene RPt ... v Stet'" and R£•ck.v says, "each year my bust keeps getting bigger." Man about town Troy Maniard says nothing at all. Darlene informed me that Boobie Rock, like the Pho­enix, will rise again. This time the Wes­theimer nightspot will be Club Rendezvous. At any rate, take care, it is Friday the 13th. o Good News for Robin It was a long, but a great, show. Becky and Betsy pulled out all the stops to host Robin Gibson's benefit at The Ranch. There were half price specials, tons of people, and many costumes. Everyone was there: Ed, Marty, Francine, Chuck Ditsy, Mike, Buddy, Gene, Leon, Time'. less Taffeta's John and Dauid, Walter Strickler, Steue Shimer, Buzz, John Rene, and Ted. ' Artist.a David Sims, Maurice Davis and 1 donated paintings for the door prize along with Diamond M's festive hat, shirt, handmade belt and many other wonderful things. A delegation from Jolly Rogers, The Colts, TGRA, Happy Hour Dad­dys Revue and most everyone Robin has worked with were represented. "ft was a wonderful benefit," Ron Sioux and Patsy Kline mentioned, "because Robin was not only able to be there, but performed." There were many great moments. Th<' Ranch's Jimmy performed. The Whore House Girls did "Leader of the Pack," "Lollipop" and may other fun '50s tunes and brought down the house. Miss Lila did her own exotic strip that brought back many memories. But the vision of Robin in magnifi­cent silver gray gown brought tears and many to their feet. Everyone worked well and long on this outstanding show. Even Babs Monroe, Robby Roberts and many other legends performed and brought the total up to $1,316.80. Thank you Robin for all that you have given to our community. Those who wish to contribute may mail checks made out to Robin Gibson, in care of Dayle Everts Barber Styling, 940 Heights, Houston, TX 77008. o AIDS Alley Gala Due to our change in printing schedules. here is the late report on the Alley Benefit for AIDS Foundation Houston. Blow-ups of AIDS articles and graphs were displayed in the theater. A wonder­ful buffet and wine tasting was fur­nished by Jackson Hicks of Jackson & Co. Catering. Spearheading the event was Michael Fultz and lovely Beth Romney. Del McGee was with "Off. shore" Kim Seguin who is planning to host popular Bostonian, Richard Bour· bon in late Feburary. Also spied were Curtis Dickson, Dauid Murphy, Hyatt Regency's Bruce Pe/gar, realtors Rick Kittrell and Jerry Blum. On different nights, city officials Lance Lalor and Eleanor Tinsley also joined the 300 oth­ers. The Galleon's Jay Allen was so swept away by the ~ast that he invited them over to The Spindletop for cock­tails and later to the Galleon. Some $15,000 was grossed at the Alley and many people gave additional money. o Out and About Baba Y ega is donating 3mf, of every­thing taken in Valentine's Day week­end as a donation to the AIDS Foundation. Many employees are also donating wages and tips. An unusual leather and barbed wire floral arrange­ment will be auctioned. Paul Aguilar, a former Houston resident who died of AIDS Feb. 8 in San Antonio, created the unique bouquet. Aguilar formerly worked at Touch of Leather. The Montrose Country Cloggers start dance classes Feb. 18 at the Bra­zos River Bottom. Tuition is $2.1 per person. February 17 ts Ripcord's Prime Cho­ice Contest for hunks over 40. Colt 45's Darrt•ll Rutt>r is entered. Not bad. Houston Council of Clubs is work ingon "Let Us Entertain You" week(·nd for March 6·8. Basic Brothers got thC' swimwear out at th(• same time they put out the Mardi Gras costumes. Pot Pie is really packing them in . Thl'y still have the 24-hour full service m(•nu, hut thr pot pie specials are great Try the macaroni. ch(•(•se and ham, Thl' Venture-N win be celehrating Vall'ntine's Day all day. That's right. from op<>ning 'til clm;ing. Miss Alabama is featured at the n(•w Club Rendezvous. Kilroy's has Mardi Gras accessones I don't know how long gloves work with camouflage. At Missouri Street Gallery, 1006 Missouri, Artists Choice continues through Feb. 27. lt is an exhibitofworks by members of the Montrose Art Alliance. Call 526-6336. Onwaugh, 1306 Waugh, works by painter Al Bil­lings and metalsmith Mike Moore con· tinue through March JI. Other Valentine events include The 611 Breakfast Club's pajama party starting at 10:00 a.m.Stone Soup, the AIDS food bank will officially open at the McAdory House Saturday at noon. This cupboard will be the place for dep­ositing food for distribution to people with AIDS. The AIDS Foundation Houston, the Zoo, several local entertainers and con­cerned individuals arre sponsoring a benefit to establish a dedicated burial fund for AIDS victims. Many well known entertainers will perform both nights this weekend from 9:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m. All performers are donating their time e.nd services. All tips are going to the benefit. The club is donating pro­ceeds from sales. A $2 donation is Of Course We're Having a Valentine Party!! All Day-All Night Saturday, Feb. 14 with Valentine Drink Specials 2923 Main 522-0000 Robin Gibson requested . A carnival and yard sale will begin al 7:00 a m Saturday with all pro­ceedtoi going to AFH. Have a ~afe and happy Valentine's Day Until next Friday, see you Around Town. Dementia An Early Sign of AIDS United Press International The first and sometimes only sign that a person has AIDS is not an infection but a neurological problem, researchers report. AIDS dementia, a complex of neuro­logical, motor and behavior problems, often appear in patients before any of the opportunistic infections that result from AIDS, said Dr. Bradford Navia. Furthermore, Navia wrote in the American Medical Association's Archives of Neurology, many AIDS patients with dementia never develop other infections despite having no immune system to fight them. Navia, of the Memorial Sloan­Kettering Cancer Center in New York, described 29 cases of patients at risk for AIDS who exhibited dementia either before or in the absence of other AIDS symptoms. Upon further examination, six were otherwise healthy and the test exhibited a mild fonn of AIDS-related complex. "Over half of these patients," Navia said, "either survived for five to 16 months or died without exhibiting sys­tematic manifestations of AIDS." Happy Valentine's Day 1901 Ta it at Websle< 524-8601 20 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 13, 1987 Gay and lesbian reading ============from============ A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS LOVE SEX LOVESEX: The horny relationship chronicles of Max E:under, by Max Ex· andcr. $7 .00. Exandcr gives a vivid description of his personal six month odyssey toward establishing a lasting gay "Clation<;bip which incorporates safer sex SECRET DAJ-;GERS, by John Preston, SS.00. In this latest installment of the Alex Kane series, ex-marine Kane and his young partner, Danny Fortclli, battle a world·widc terrorist ring that is using v1olcncc aj!;amst gays to promote its own ends BELDON'S CRIMES, by Robert Rein­hart, $7.00. A grisly sex murder and a homophobic job dismissal suddenly tum Dave Beldon's life upside-down. When he decides to fight for bis rights, he becomes the country's most recognized gay man. But soon the question arises· Will Dave Beldon ultimately be the vic­tor - or victim of the three-ring media circus that sunounds him? A new and origmal novel &om the author of A History of Shadows. ""'ow fo r my next trick ... ., ~ '~ 1::t "' .ts ' r ~ I f J r;ow FOR MY NEXT TRICK by M1chael Vv 1ilho1te, SS 00. Michael Will­hone's cartoons have been entertamin~ rea<lcro; of The Washrngton Blade for many year.-.. ow. c;ome 80 or his best canoonc; have been collected into thi::i book EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 .00 Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engrossing - and funniest - you'll ever read. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $12.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian phot0grapher Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. !Oversize paperback) THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7 .00. Burton Raider's problems begin m hi~h school when he realizes he's in love wuh h1o; friend Roman. As he gets older, the problem<; increase - and so does the humor or his catuation, in what Chm,­topher Street calls the funniest gay novel of the year " QUATREFOIL, by James Barr, $8.00. The year is 1946, and Philip Froelich faces a court martial for acting insubor­dinate to a lazy officer during the closing days of World War ll. Then he meets Tim Danelaw, and soon the court mar· tial is among the least of Phillip's con­cerns . This classic novel, first published in 1950, remains a romantic and suspense· fuJ read, an intelligently-written love story that gives a vivid picture of our re· cent but often-forgotten past. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely~ Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet instead he finds himself pursu­ing the handsome and unpredictable Mark LONG TIME PASSING: Lives of Older Lesbians, edited by Marcy Adelman, $8.00. In their own words, women t.illk ahout age-related concerns: the fear of losing a lover; the experiences of being a Jcshian in the 1940s and 1950s; and issues of loneliness and community ACT WELL YOUR PART, by Don Sakcrs, $5.00. When Keith Graff moves with his mother to a new town, he feels like the new kid who doesn't fit in. Then he joins his high school's drama club and meets the boyishly cute Bran Daven­port . REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, SS.00 The moving auto· biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he took a gay date to his high school prom. SEX POSITIVE, by Larry Uhng, $7.00 Many religious leaders have distorted Biblical passages to condemn homosex­uality Herc Uhrig fights back, discuss­ing positive 81hhcal views of same-sex rclationsh1ps, and arguing that sexuality and spirituality arc closely linked THE SPARTAN, by Don Hamson, $6.00. In the days of the first Olympics, gay relationsh1~s were a common and valued part of life. The SparUJn tells the story of a young athlete and his adven· tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our histOry . r .. ,i~· .. -r·i'i~~o·· I LIFE ~.: :. · ,~ ~J~~~~ .~~la:~~~_:: IN THE LI FE: A black gay anthology, edncd by Jo,cph Beam, $8.00. When foo;qih Beam became frustrated that so ltttlc gay male literature spoke to him a"> a black gay man. he dl·cidcd to do some· thinK about 1t. The result is this an· thology, in which 29 contributors, through stories, cS'iays, verse and art · work, have made heard the voice of a cot ... often silent minority. THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Hcmz Heger, $6.00 Thousands of gays were thrown into Nazi concentration camps for the crime of homm.cxualny. Heinz Heger 1s the only one ever to have told his story. Here is a chilling recollection of one of the most frightening chapters of our gay past WORLDS APART, edited by Camilla Oecarnin, Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo, $8.00. These collected science fiction stories present a wide array of imagina­tive characters, from a black lesbian vampire to a gay psychodroid. Here is adventure, romance, and excitement - and perhaps some genuine alternatives for our future. -----TO ORDER·----j Enclosed is S _. Please send the books I've listed below. (Add $1.00 postage when order­ing jusr one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Visa and Mastercard accepted; enclose acer. no., exp. date, and signature. Send me these books: name address city state z1p . ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118 I I I I I I I L---------------· ' ~ J \ ~ \ #" \. ~ \ "Ohl Four steps to the ten and then three to the right! ... Whal kind of a dance was I doing?" FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Voice Comics "See Dick run. See Jane run. Run run run. See the wolves chase Dick and Jane. Chase chase chase . ... " Anoth_er unpleasantness. Elliot makes a change in his proposed animal-training correspondence course . •• • (M !;URE. , t 5U~E. ~e. iXX>(,.'j ~.S et.~ OUR.~~ 'Wt.lL ~. li!iI"\ "M2'{ .)US\ "PON'\ I'~ '1.l.I>.,~\ ..... ~OUC::.""­' l'OR ~f(\" 'UP c.u:>se.' t<.iLl~u <:ll'~'l' ll::'i.NCC . . ' (Cl-.tUotl.'f 22 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 1t hstecl here 1n theV01cewhere11ter· ally th(lusands turn each week TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochurr newsleller. promotion can help our business target your goals and reach your market Cal 524-0409 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Adverltse your professional serv1ct through a Voicecrass1f1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by chec:k or chargt. •I n your Ameri­can E•pr~ Dmw·$ Clu1 MasterCard Visa or Cart~ 1ar ANNOUNCEMENTS KELLY BRADLEY. M.B.S .. R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN 1no1v1dual lam11y ana group pracl ce 1miled to cop1ng-strns role re1at1.on­sh1ps 1nd self concept 1nterventt0n Qttce 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voa a general circulation new$­paper hav•ng publ •lied l'"l'll•"",.,'l'IY flu over 'I \J 11 t. 8( JI · qaJ not>< ANSWERING SERVICES HARO ..,.1ME ME )AGE CENTER 93' 194' SEE OUR P A'fAO PAGE ME• C.JMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS, 622-4240 SEE OVR OISPlA r .ao HARD TIMESA 0 ' MESSAGE CENTER .. CaH Foward or Use Our Number Only 10' a Month (713) 568-1145 24 Hour Service Available Page Me!'" Electronic Telephone Answering ( TIP Jlf' ~eJ Al SW(' nQ Sefv•Cl' For Youi P ral and Horrn' l • • ?4 Hour Day ~MY•Ce • Your Messaqes "r Pnvale • No LJYe- ()peH,IOfS N•l M stati.es Asli. Abou t Frtt Tnal Oller 622-4240 ANTIQUES YESTERDAY"$ \\OALD ANTIQUES. 171~ WPSlhf01mer 526-264~ ' ·~ Yesterday's World Antiques 1715 Westhe1mer 526-2646 !;m ATTORNEY PHYl..llS FRYE. 72'.J ~ G••"leral ptiu t1ceol llw ELAINr: SHAW 4°Z 7111 645- )159 $EE OU~ . ELAINE SHAW : 'f~ 1 .. ~e~ at Law • • • Accdf>nt 222-7772 or 645-3159 Ne f''11'y AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR 2516 Genesee (101 Pai; 526- '723 $f.C OUR DGPm.A" AO SALV1N AUTOMOTIVE. 524-8219 SU OUff OISPI A" AO To advertise. cal 529-8490 dunng business hours TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Tait 522-2190 rEOURD'SPl.M'A(J NEARTOWN KARZ. 1901 Tall. 524-8601 Sff OUR Dl'7PLAY AD WEST GRAY AUTO. 238 W Gray 528-2886 "'l<f DISPLAfAO MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimafes All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 .orburff ;p 101 t E · -r •· r:a1 ~eμa All BrakE" WOfk ~~ SALON 1515Y. Dunlavy 522-7666 ~o·s Barber Shop. 302W 11th Haircut• 56 up. 863-1520 tor appouitment Tommy·s Barber Shop. haircuts $ 10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appcintments 528- 8216 HAIRCUTS BY MIKE. 522-3003 SEEOuRO'SPLAYAD ~~~7:SRTON 1515' Ourlavy SEE OUR D SP' Ar AO GAV BARS BARS listed here are only the gay bar. wh1 ;h have placed a recent advertisement in lhe Voice For inlorma11on on these bars. r 81ake Special $59.95 per axle 1 ~:~~~e b~~=. '~,·r t~~s ria~r s~~~7;~~id 0a~ 529-3211 or see their ads 1n other pub11cat1ons Tune-Up Special 4 cylinder $49.95 6 cylinde1 $59 95 a cylonder $69 95 West Gray Auto 238 W Gray-528-2886 : =<!s WDB ~m:Y~a~ • Murn.s • Tires Car : :~•=: Spec1anst I Texos stal• Inspection St~ L _ ~m -:_30p.:M: -~ _ J WORRIED ABOUT YOUR CAR? Let Bruce ,,r Jr1hr ch+·,:k •I 1ut Expern•nced. O+ pendabl Mecham Reasor1ablf' Rate! SALVIN AUTOMOTIVE 524-8219 720 w 11th 861 -2846 BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Haircuts, etc. by Mike Shampoo Cut & Blow Drv •· I $14 - by Mike BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM 2400 Bra· zos 528-9192 SEE 0UR015PtAYAD CHARLIE"S CLUB. 1100 Westhe1mer. 527-6619 Sff OUR DISPLAY AD CHUTES. 1732 Westhe1mt"r 52'.\. 221 l ~EE (luR O'SPlAY AD CRYSTALS. OVERLOOKING MONTROSE. 911 WJ Drew 522·7524 EE OUR "'PLA,,AlJ DIRTY SALL y·s. 220 Avondale 529-7525 SEE OUR DISPlAY AO KJ"S. 11630 Airllne. 445-5849 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MARY'S, 1022 Westheimer. 528-8851 Sff OUR OtSPtAY ACJ M1CHAELS. 428 Westhe1mer 529-2506 SEE OUR~SPIAYA!1 ROCK N" HORSE. 5731 Kirby. 520-9911 S_ff Ol~R OISPtAY All THE 611. 611 Hyde. 528-9079 SEE OUR DISPI A Y AD VE:NTURE-N. 2923 Main. 522-0000 >ff 'JUR DISPLAY ,&D K.J.s/ Dirty Sally's Northside 11830 Airline 445-5849 2 Blocks South of Aldlne Bender BONDSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fast courteous. d1 ;ereet. al 1 type of bonds made Micha'· E Standage. agent Mention the Voice tor $25 off all quahhed bonds 678-4488. 621-8452 CARS AND BIKES SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose V1 ice cla• 1h ~ ad Call 529-8490 CARS WANTED Buy all li.mds ll car any 1ype. any year W1llpaytoppnce 528·7231 AskforM•ke CHURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNnY CHURCH 614 E 19th. 880-3527, 351-4217 Sff OUA 0 SPLAY AD CENTER FOR A POSITIVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 " - Kin~dam Community Church ·Join Our Family m 1987 614 E. 191h Sundays 11am 880-3527 or 351 -4217 Center far a Positive Lifestyle rn ,. D1•w111ow• H( day •v•,ry M< 1y '3pm For more info. Dall 497- PRAY CLEANING SVCS SERVICE PLUS A Quality CIHnlng Senlce Ruldential • Commerclal •BONDED• Jell Cunningham 522-3451 COFFEE COFFEE & TE-A WORLD. 3939-R Montrose. 524-8536 >ff - IR - )Pt_Ar AD Caffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fme Teas Accessories 3939-R Montrose Blvd. 713-524-8536 COMMERCIAL SPACE H8a1th ctubforTease.3207 Montrose 661 9774 CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING HsK cONTRACTING. 520-9064 •ff OllR - ~"LAY Ai- COUNSELING OR NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Wei :h. 527-8680 Sff OUR DISPt..AY AO DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER DDS 427 Westhe1mer. 524-05.38 'ff OUR O~PlAY AD RONALD A PETERS. Dos 620 w Ala bama 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 W('St h.-1mN He . .,,, TX 7fMit· M, .. ,,~.y 1hr1 ..,,11 Hour., Oy A11 "nln .·11! (713) 524 0538 DWELLINGS. ROOM MA TES. HDUSES/APTS. FDR SALE. RENT. LEASE Roommate. 2 br. 1 bth condo at 101 Strat lord Garage. security. w1d. $212 50 plus e1~1r1c1ty 524-CI048 alter 9pm r\ICOULD B£ 1"£ S1AR1 OF <mET\111'(, BIG ... For rent 4 -272. plus atnum. fenced patio 5500 011 Montrose 474-7683or666-2206 One bedroom River Oaks apt S300tmo Gas/ water furnished. ceding fan. Aller 4pm 522-2254 or 528-5026 Roommate needed Mostly furn;Shed 3 bedroom. 2 balh house in West Umvers1ty with large fenced yard w.'Q Bnng your own Ced $325 plus 'I.I bills 664-9039 lovely large one bedroom. study Oil Newcastle, one mile toGallena. to Green­way New carpet. ltahan Ille, track hght- 1ng Stable homeowner assoc1at1on 622-3231' $35.000 TOWNHOUSE/ MUSEUM AREA ~~~n~~~~~lt; ~~:~~~~~~~~~~ c~~~ 1ral air1 heat. fenced patio with pond and fountain. oll-street parking $650. Derek ~1-9000 day. 523-1203 evenings Share 2 bedroom. one bath apl in Monl­rose Call 527-9457 Roommate needed to share -3 br apt Close to UTMB in Galveston $150/mo plus hall ut1ht1es No deposit Cal: Lit ~409• 763-1407 J06 Stralford at Taft 1 bedroom. central AiC. lree gas heat. celling Ian. secunty gates. pool & laundry Adults only. small pel OK $315 plus $150depos1t 523-6109 Professional executive GWM seeks same 28-38 yrs old to share mce home Wes· the1mer' Gessner area Must be sincerely interested in home sharing and discrete friendship Thrs 1s a good opportumty for a together profess1ona1 Write POB 772867. Houston 77215 Montrose one bedroom apt m small quiet complex with pool. security gates laundry tac1hhes. cable available Adults No pets $100dep S265pluselectnc. 713- 529-8178 fOWNE PLAZA APARTMENTS. 4655 ~~do!5'Rd~~~Pt~~1~~880 Heights. 424 E 28th. 3 bedrooms. ltving room. dm1ng room. 1 bathroom. large kit­chen. apphances. washer & dryer con­nections. burglar bars. ale-heat, fresh paint. carpel. fenced yard. yard ma1nte· nance provided. $400 per month. $100 depot1I plus ut1 1t1es 695-8831 AVONDALE SQUARE APTS. Clean 1 bdrm & 2 bdrm apartments $235 & $295/mo Pool 2nd month free Call 529-1488 105 Avondale FREE APARMENT LOCATING Houstoni Galveston area Let me help­Call Rob (713)981-5560 ROOMMATE WANTED Respons1ble GWM Private room. fully furnished apt Reasonable rent 870-9509 Greenspoint area. girl or guy Fnday Must type and be lam1llar with general of11ce :~~': Only experienced need apply 445 3 pools, free cable, utilities paid Only a few units left But still Warth a Call 621-7880 Another Fine finger Property EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED HIGH COMMISSIONS PAID! Outside salespersons needed tor prinl shop in Sprmg Branch. printing expe­rience preferred bul not necessary Must have own transportation. proof ol msu­rance Call 465-4163 M-F 9-5 Ask for Mark or Lynne PERFORMING ARTS Box olhce Sf'f'kS quahf1ed personnel. excellent verbal skills required Aller­noon. evening or both Call Mr Schwartz 526-5323 DIALING FOR DOLLARS Our representatives shared $10.000 last week Making their average mcome $500 r,Jsweek Call The Money Makers 271- EXERCISE TAI CHI CH'UAN Gentle exercise promotes bodily har­mony, peace of mind. increases energy, alleviates effects of ch ronic ailments February beginners c lasses Jack McGann 523-5204 or 531-9222 !MISC.I FOR SALE ATTENTION SMOKERS Cigarettes all maior brands $7 24 car­ton Call Brad at 522-6603 eves Duncan Phyfe dmmg room surt. six chairs. buffet wit beveled mirror Olher­m1sc. 923-5502 FOR YARD SALES See ads under '"Yard Sales· at the end of the Voice Class11teds FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch. 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO CREMATION SERVICE­INTEANATIONAL 3400 Monlrose 529-6666 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO FURNITURE REFINISHING GIFTS CHRISTMAS CAITIERS. 1318 Nance -re JRD'SPLAYA[' • 9.99 1'1"""" .' & l'wndhng•ndra• Texas Cowbear l-'lease make c heck or money order payable to: HRISTMAS CRITTERS 1318 N ance Street • Houston, Texas 77002 GYMS PARKWAY ATHLETIC CLUB. 800 Rosine. 528-5467 INSURANCE BRIAN LOHSE 5716 Del 'res. -266-8832 Sff OuHC · 'AYAC INSURANCE Ma1or med1_cal health (no AIDS exclusion) and d1sab1h­ty insurance available for ind1- v1duals and groups.Reasona­ble rates For more info call B rian Lo hse at 266-8832 LAWN CARE Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards, repair and build wood fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing, house cleaning, painting, gutters , small house repairs. Free Estimates BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS 523·LAWN $( OUR 0'' PLA 'f AD STO<X ANO CHIPS INC 665-6294 J.-12·444'.1 $£ OUH0Sr AYAO LEATHER LOST & FOUND Lost tri-colored (black) femal e colhe Answers to "Kelly ... Last seen 1n the Heights heading toward W University Reward 664-9039 lost" P8;si8n c'ii White"Shicied s1tver:­lemale with some teeth m1ssmg $50 reward 529-0622 MEDICAL CARE STE-vEO MARTINEZ. M D. 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy #1000. 621·7771 FABRE CLINIC. 5503 Crawford. 526- 2320 SEEOIJROISP(AYAO MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS A PREMIUM SERVICE Body Rub. 24 hrs 526-3711 For -an excttmg. fun·hlled body rub. Cati Peter 464-8781 Houslon. handsome. healthy. honest and masculme (713) 988-0402 Marc THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David D of Et (713) 520-8232 STOP gelling rubbed the wrong way Call Carl 622-3942 St1mulat1ng body rubs 'Out caliS 529- 3970 Thom ol Houston, 523-6577. Houston. handsome. healthy. honest and ma!ICuhne (713) 988-0402 THOM OF HOUSTON 523-6577 Sensuous massage 1n or out 529-3970 Nude rubdown. your Place 531-9952 MOVERS MOVEMASTERS Boxes tool! Visa. MC. Amex welcome 1925 Westhetmer 630-6555 PAPER HANGING All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 Sr( 0 •A 0 .">PtAY AO ~aper Hanging and Vinyl Residential and Commercial All Types Remodeling All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 o• 497-5228 PERSONALS Atlrac11ve European male. 5·9· 145. col. lege student. d1sl1ke bars & drugs Look· 1ng for monogamous relat1onsh1p Interests museums. movies. music and traveling Reply blind Box 32&K c10 Voice ~=~If lover aeek1 Hl1panlca. Call 876· Want small butch male 531-9952 MAN-TO·MAN SEX LINK Feehng horny? 100Ch ot horny guys are hot to get oll on the 24·Hour Sex-Link• Pnvate. one-on-one. unhm11ed i.me No ~~~~~6-b~~4~xcept Jong distance Call Thousand~~T h~~~ ~e~~~~1~g to get 1t ~::,~~~ J61 1n 1 t t~: ~':~;n~ ~°o~ ~~~: ~0e~ ~ink Private. conf1den11a1 (415) 346-8747 Pnvate social club forming lor those interested in explonng the erotic art ol spankmg and'or bondage No fees No parn No dishonesty Seeking trust· worthy interested participants to meet and share experiences and ideas for ~~~e~:h1~u~u:~,1~~~i1~I s~::~~~111i6nn a"ured Please respond with letter and g;g_5e ~g Jg1~~ontact Reply Blind Box ~:¥~l~RCJ,~~L~~A~TWOAK, 976-8500 CLASSIPHONE. 526-4423 (place ads) ~?·c!r:~ _the:~ ~is) 5·1o .. l50~~~~;~~~~ ~;!dt1mew1th :~:;:o,~~.~~~ c~~~e~~=~~~~tch~~d~!nkd rig tor a proless1ona1 GWM 27-37 140. ~:>c:ho eniova the same Ad 321 A Clo Hairy men. hair fans adl ,1 lnlop1xpak. $3 00 Hair. 59 West 10th NYC 10011 PLAY ..• safely at J o E Meetings 5 nights a week And it's fun (See our other ads) Michael Lee Singles. DOB 04-05-49. SSN 363-48-6268 I am aware of possible changes tn your hie. but that does not matter Please contact Penny Jo {Sin­gles) Wheelock. 443-F E Edgewood Blvd LansinQ. Ml (517) 887-2250 --S&M MEET YOUR MATCH Rough. raunchy. top, bottom. master. slave. daddy. boy. locker room? Meet your sex-match NOWI IOOO's ol prrvate, one-on-one, phonemates No phone bill but Ing/ dist Call 415/346-8747 NOWI -- DON'T DO IT ALONE -­Join onginal 24-Hour Sex Unk Uninhi· btled. Discrete. No b1tl to phone except lngldst One-on-one. man-to-man. low­cost conneclions 1,000's of horny guys waiting for calls (415) 346-8747 --- GOOD DAYS/BAD Improve your chances 1n romance. finance. business thru btorhy?hms Send name. b1rthdate including year with $8.00 to Konrad. 2615 Waugh lf294B. Houston TX 77006 GWM. 32. 5·s··. 150 lbs brown hair and :;~p!=~ny.~o;e:i~~t1rv~'ii~~~~~~~ shy and stable I like music, dancing. sports. home hie. eating out. and rehg1on This ad is for !hose as serious as l am Wrrte 2470 S Dairy Ashford #136. Hous­ton 77077 LISA'S RECORDED LOVE STORIES * SHE WILL WHISPER * * SWEET NOTHINGS IN * * YOUR EAR * ** g~RL~CT ~:~~~::~~:;~gg ** * NOW! 1·900·410-3800 * ** NO MEMBERSHIP NECESSARY * * w ~~:, .. ~'JO=··,~~ ... :·~:·..... . * * * * * * * * * * FiULES FOR THE PERSONALS Person­als (and other advertising) should not descnbe or imply a descnpt1on of sexual organs or acts No Personals should be drrected ~~ minors Advertising mus1 be ·pos1t1ve. not .. negatrve.N (I I you have certam preferences m other people. hst the quar1t1es you desire. Please don't be negative by l1s1tng the kmds ol people or quaht1es you don·1 des1te.) Thank you. and happy hunting AN EROTIC ADVENTURE The Society ol J 0 E. a pnvateorgamza­t1on for reasonably anractwe adult gay men. meets 5 nights weekly Adm1ss1on times are 8-9pm Tues & Thurs. 11pm- 1 45am Fn & Sat 6-9pm Sun at lhe Col tage Playhouse. 611 Pac1f1c (Rear ol house look for PtaySafe !lag J CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry·s One-Hour Photo has moved to 408 Avondale. 1n the same build mg as the Monirose Vo1 :~ Open Monday-Fnday 9am-6pm SAFE SEX? For your mental health. ha"esex For your physical health. make 11 sale sex Salese)I; 1s where there are no bodrly fluids @)!;changed The v1rus which leads to an AIDS condition is believed usually trans· milled from one person to another from blood or semen Those who are "recep· t1ve" are especially at nsk Do condoms protect? They carta1nly help But con· doms MUST be used with a wa ter-based lubricant (the new product Lubrasept1c is especially recommended). Petroleum or vegetable-based lubncants will actually dissolve the condom and el1mmate the protection Please "Play Safe . A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frech nck Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play pass1"e games with the personal ads In their book ·c1ass1f1ed Affairs." they'll tell you how lo write an ad that realty stands out. what to expect when you place or respQnd to an ad. and even what all those tunny little abbre"•at1ons mean Send $8 to "Class1!1ed Affairs ... Alyson Pub. Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. SI Boston. MA 02118 (Also mcluded w1U be a coupon !or $5 oil on your ne)l;t Personals in your choice of 25 pubr1ca11ons. mclud1ng the Voice I PEST CONTROL RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL. 2513' Elmen. 524-9415. 223-4000 SffO •R ResuHs Pest Control 251 Elmen 524-9415 Pest Control Supplies FEBRUARY 13, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 <. PETS ANGELS TO ZEBRAS Petworld 11725 Eastex Freeway at East Mt Houston 590-0471 TOM'S PRETIY FISH. 224 Weslhetmer 52(}.6443 .SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PHOTO FINISHING --1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALU Printing and developing. enlargements. 1umbo pnnts. film. Kodak paper 2615 Waugh Dr 520-1010. PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING. 5..00 Bella1re B~d 667-7417 SEE OUR OISPlAY AD PSYCHOLOGISTS DA NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Welch. 527-8680 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO RESTAURANTS CH-APUL TEPEC. 813 Richmond 522-2365 SEE OUR OISPlAY AD CHARL1-E"S. 1102 west-he1mer. 5-22-3332 SEE OUR OISPlAY AO NATRAJ IN-D-IAN-RESTAURANT.-2047 Marshall. 526-4113 ++f ()IJR01SPtAYA0 NICKY'S PLACE.2109 Dunlavy. 520-8039 ';ff OUR DISPLAY AO PiZZA-1NN. 3105 S Shepherd. 522-5676 ';ff OUR DISPLAY AO POT PIE.1s-i5 Westhe1mer 528-4350 :Cf r••/:I D OPLAY AD - CA1Eib1- - Chicken Fish Pasta 2for1 Anytime wllh this Coupon per P•rty ol Two Orders to Go, Call 520-5221 W-. Ala-bam-a a-t Sh-eph-erd Pizza inn. ~ Delivery i' (Hotline) . 522-5676 3105 S Shi!pherd CAFE EDI. W Alabama at Shephard- 52(}.5221 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD SEWING SPECIAL LADY DESIGN Costumes and general sewing for adult• Cal Jan or Wanda 957-8102 STORES IMISC. ITEMSI THE-EAGLE. 1544 w1 ~thet"""r 124 rM}-3 SUPERMARKETS KROGER. 3300 Montrose TAX PREPARATION Bill ROBERTS. CPA. 871·1~29 TIRES fHE TIRE PLACE. 1307 Fa1rvi. w 529-1414 ~( .rt Pl.AYAD -~~ 529-1414 \\)THE 11t\£ PLACE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fa1rv1E·w ti1i..~ W• Mc TRAVEL Professional executive GwM y1 ,rs old. wants similar to share vat 1tion tr JV· els If you·re serious and want to entoy a weekend or wi:tek. write PO Bo)!; 772867. Houston 77215 San Francisco 1987 EJed..Breakfast Pn­vate Homes Comlor1 friendship De1alls BayHosts 115!" Boswortl'l 94 31 415-337-9632 NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE. 1118 Jr uhn "''04' 566-1177 FRANKLIN HOUSE DENVER 302 331-9106 520-8108 in Houston for in fo A Guest House at 1620 Franklin Denver, CO 80218 RICH $14-$1/ol S1ngl~ Fn•m SlU Doubl FAANKL1N(fUEST-HoUse: 1620'" Frankhn. Denver. Co 1303) 331-9106 >EE OUR DI-- ..A.YAO TYPESETTING SAME DAY TYPESETTERS. 408 Avondale. 529-06490 "<£OUR DISPLAY AD UPHOLSTERY. REFINISHING - FlJANITUAE STRIPPING SHOP In the heart ol Montrose Aefrt"1sh1ng repairs. upholstery 529-7833 ALLEN--WA-DSWOA-rHCO 1NC -9830- sweetwater. 445-4141 SEE OUR OISPLA Y AD VIDEO LoBO VIDEO. 1424-C Westhe1mer 522-5156 SH )UR OISPLA Y AD WE DELIVER- VIDEOS_ 1420 Westhe1mer. 522-4485 SEE OURDISPL.AY AO WILLS STOP PROCRASTINATING Protect your loved ones Complete per­sonalized wins. most only $50 Cal 522- 2485. evenmgsorwntePeople'sW1 PO Box 66541. Houston n266 YARD & GARAGE SALES HAVING A YARD SALE? Anni JU nee 1t here then stand back for the crowd Call 5~6490 orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sale annouricement ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular class.tied rates of paying 'by the word ... you can purchase space here ··by the inch." Since these are considered "Display Ads." not ·c1ass1fled Ads." you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE 1" $24 2"' $34 3" $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE 1' $19 2· $29 3" $39 Pl~y Safe! montrose VOICE 24 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 13. 1987
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