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Montrose Voice, No. 33, June 12, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 33, June 12, 1981 - File 001. 1981-06-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3131/show/3114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-06-12). Montrose Voice, No. 33, June 12, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3131/show/3114

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 33, June 12, 1981 - File 001, 1981-06-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3131/show/3114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 33, June 12, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 12, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript INSIDE: Montrose News, Letters, Classifieds, Cartoons-the Montrose neighborhood newspaper INSIDE: Dallas trial starts Monday for Constitutionality suit over Section 21.06-special report Mo11troseVoiee Friday June 12, 1981 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Partly cloudy and warm with a 30% chance of thundershowers and a low of 74 °. Sunrise: 6:19AM. Saturday: Continued partly cloudy and warm with a chance of thundershowers and a high of 94 ._ Sunset: 8:23PM. THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, ISSUE #33, PUBLISHED WEEKLY Two happy bowlers at the awards ceremony of the recent International Gay Bowling Organization Tournament held in Houston. The tournament, with hundreds of participants, was played at Big Texan Lanes. The awards ceremonies occurred at Brazos River Bottom, the host bar. The two participants shown here came from Toronto. PHOTO BY ED MARTINEZ _ 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 12, 1981 Trademark C> 1981 Houston Muscle & Power Co. Where the world meets Houston 106 Avondale, szo-9767 We boaor American it.pr1H, Carte Blanche, Dlaen Clab, Visa and Maatercard JUNE 12, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Other Texas counties offer aid to help Harris County fight Van Ooteghem lawsuit The governments of several Texas Gulf Coast counties have been reported to be making financial contributions to Harris County in its attempt to fight back a lawsuit ordering it to reinstate gay activist Gay Van Ooteghem. A report in a recent edition of the Beaumont daily newspaper said the Jefferson County commissioners there were among those making contribu­tions. It's being done in a "sneaky, secretive way," said Houston Gay Political Caucus member Pam Jones, who appeared along with GPC president Lee Harrington June 6 on a Beaumont radio talk show to discuss gay issues. Van Ooteghem, who had been on the job six months in July 1975 as asaietant treasurer, returned from vacation, told county treasurer Hartaell Gray he was homosexual, and would be appearing at a public session of CommiBSioner'e Court to urge the county commissioners to adopt regulations protecting the civil rights of homosexuals. Gray instructed Van Ooteghem that, no, he would not be allowed to conduct political activity on "county time/' which he defined as the regular work hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Gray demanded that Van Ooteghem sign a letter to that effect. Van Ooteghem refused and was fired. The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed an appeal from Harrie County in April that was trying to overturn a lower court decision ordering it to reinstate Van Ooteghem with back pay. Gray's successor, Henry E. Kriegel, carried hie appeal to the Supreme Court, which refused to review it, but did so "without prejudice," which meant the county was being allowed to have another hearing on its appeal before the lower appeals court in New Orleans. In appealing the case to the Supreme Court, Harrie County officials claimed it did not present an issue of "censorship of speech," but only a question of whether an employer may fix hours and place of work and fire an employee who would not comply The courts had no evidence to find Van Ooteghem was discharged for any reason other than refusing to work his assigned hours, county officials claimed. They also said the suit was between Gray and Van Ooteghem, and the county itself should not be required to come up with money for the back pay award. The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans had agreed that the firing violated Van Oote· ghem's free speech rights. However, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had decided in early March on its own motion to rehear the case en bane or before the full body of federal circuit judges. This was very unusual, County Attorney Mike Driscoll was reported as saying, adding that a decision more favorable to the county was being made possible. Originally, U.S. District Judge Rose N. Sterling in Houston had ruled in Van Ooteghem'e favor and ordered him reinstated with $56,046.92in back pay plus attorney's fees. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the ruling, noting that a new work schedule for Van Ooteghem, who had previously set his own hours, could not be justified for any reason "other than the desire to thwart Van Ooteghem'e lobbying on behalf of homosexuals." Since Van Ooteghem was hard· working and intelligent, the appeals court said, there could be no other reason for hie discharge. Cops stage crackdown on lower Westheimer hustlers Houston vice squad police began a roundup of male prostitutes and others June 3 in the lower Weetheimer and Avondale area known as "the circuit." At least 40 people were arrested in the first few days. They were charged with prostitution and solicitation of prostitution, all misdeameanors. Several civic leaders in Montrose had recently come out strongly urging Houston Police to take action. Among them was city councilman Lance Lalor, who was reported to have relayed letters from Montrose citizens Montrose News to the police about the iesue. The Houston Post reported Lalor also included hie own letter, which complained the area was crowded with "pimp, drug peddlers, hustlers and loiterers." Vice Capt. Tommy Shane said arresting male hustlers was unlike arresting female prostitutes. "Most of them, we've never arrested before. It's not like female prostitutes. We arrest the same girls day after day after day," the Houston Post quoted Shane. The quote by Shane went on to claim that because of the amount of hustlers in the area, Houston had acquired the title of "homosexual capital of the state." Shane said he had shifted many officers into the area and said they would remain there until prostitution became lees of a problem. Integrity becomes Interact Houston's oldest gay rights organiza· tion voted June 4 to change its name to avoid confusion with a gay religious group that was using a similar name. Integrity / Houston, which is not a religious-affiliated group, voted to become Interact/Houston. A national organization of gay Episcopalians is known as Integrity. Integrity-now-Interact was using the name Integrity four years before the gay Episcopalian group was started in Georgia and spread nationwide. The Houston chapter of the group, to try to avoid confusion, was calling itself " Episcopal Integrity." In other cities, ironically, chapters were being referred to by "Integrity," followed by a slash and the city's name. Ned Parker, president of Interact! Houston, said in a press release, "It was obvious that most gays related the name with religion . With our new name, we hope to bring more of the community into contact with the purpose of our organization, which is community education." "In the past, many people avoided our activities because of their mistaken idea that we were a church group," he said. The group was founded in 1970 as a "service/ fellowship" organization. Last year they received incorporation papers defining themselves as an educational corporation known technically as I /H Incorporated. I t H Incorporated was granted tax-exempt statue by the IRS this year. Interact/ Houston holds business meetings at 7:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month and educational forums at 7:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at 3405 Mulberry. Parker said the membership is open to everyone. Among the organization's projects are a Friday night "Community Coffeehouse" each week at the same addre88 from 7:30 p.m. to midnight. The Gay Archives of Texas, also a project of Interact / Houston, announced last month that Jim Kepner, longtime California gay activist and founder of the National Gay Archives, would be giving a presentation in Houston on Monday, June 29, at 7:00 p.m. at 3405 Mulberry "He is probably the most notable authority on gay history in the United States. and we know that Houston will be very interested in his presentation," said Richard Burkhart, director of the Gay Archive• of Texas. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 12, 1981 913 Westhelmer atMonfrOH Drfv-Thru Service Open Mon-Sat 10-9 5-lellsl,. In 1_...i wl-. ....i loeen, II-, d...-.,1 •• Thanks, for reading the Montrose Voice fflng away with a group. a friend or just by yoarseU. Let us help. &.,,,,. tr~• Serrulg the traYel 11eeda of Mo•'-· ••• Yoar TraYel Eq»erta 3&011 Montrose Hoa111ton ~,.,,;:,.,,.- ~- ~/, HOUSE OF BEDS 3 DAYS ONLY MATTRESS SALE FRl.-SAT.-MON. {!!? ,., ill .'J-• u ~-r,P, ' . NAME BRANDS: SIMMONS BEAUTY REST ~.~/: TWIN 911"' FULL 1111"'· QUEEN 1611"' KING 1911"' v 4i• SIMMONS HIDE-A-BED • FULL 29911 QUEEN 4511"' SOFA/L.OVE SEAT. 595•. I ~ HOUSE~~·!\ ~ BEDS 2115 NORFOLK 527-9352 529-3652 Let the goat/ times rail ... HAPPY HOUR 4-7PM MON-SAT., WITH 75¢ SHOTS OF SCHNAPPS TEQUILA ANO AMARETTO ALL THE TIME; SUNDAY FROM NOON, $1 EYE-OPENERS 'TIL 4PM -ANO 25¢ DRAFT 'TIL SPM; UNLIMITED PARKING ACROSS THE STREET, ~GOOD VIBES ... YEAI MOREi JUNE 12, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Section 21.06 trial set for Monday DALLAS-A 9:30 a.m., June 15, docket setting was given for the constitu· tionality trial in federal district court for section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code, said a spokesperson for the Texas Human Rights Foundation. Earlier, THRF had said it was unsure when the trail would begin, saying it could be as late as July 1. Gay activists have been looking forward to the trial since the federal suit was filed two years ago. Section 21.06 is the "homosexual conduct statute," also known as the sodomy statute, which, according to THRF, "legalizes the invasion of privacy" by state officials and "encourages police harassment by identifying the entire gay community as a criminal sub-culture which would be singled out for 'special attention' by law enforcement officials.'' The foundation is one of the principle backers of the 21.06 challenge. They said the statute "violates the individual's rights to privacy, due process and equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the first, fifth, ninth and fourteenth amendments to the U.S. Constitution." Dallas activist Donald F. Baker, 33, a Navy veteran and former school teacher, filed the suit against the county and city district attorneys of Texaa ae a group. The suit is also known as Baker vs. Wade, as Henry Wade is the district attorney for Dallas County. The Texas legiolature adopted the Model Penal Code of the American Law Institute in 1973 but added to it the sodomy statute, which the model code did not include. Said a THRF official, ''This suit is known as a 'class action' suit because all district attorney• and all city attorneys in the state are grouped as defendants. The fact that Henry Wade's name appears as the represen­tative of the 'defendant class' is quite approrpriate. Under his leadership, the Dallas District Attorney's Office is well known for its prejudice and unequal treatment of gay defendants." According to a THRF press release, Wade had argued in court documents already filed that to say gay people are discriminated against because the legislature criminalized homoeexqal activity is analagous to claiming that thieves and rapists are discriminated against because oflaws against those crimes. Robert Schwab, president of THRF, answered with, "To equate private consensual sexual activity with violent acts like rape shows the depth and prejudice existing against gay people. If the state would focua its police enforcement power toward crimes of violence, instead of activity which takes place in the privacy of the bedroom, we would all live in a safer world." THRF has a88isted in formulating case strategy, selecting expert witnesses and funding the costs of litigtion. Schwab said they were also prepared ot pursue the case through the appellate court syotem if neceaeary. Baker, who recently received a masters degree from Southern Methodist University, addreaaed delegates to the Gay Press Association convention in early May and emphasized the national importance of the case. He said this would the first time that a state criminal statute aimed solely at gay men and women was under direct attack on the proposition that its very existence is unconstitutional. He said the final court decision would eventually affect other states with a similar law. The Texas Human Rights Founda­tion said that in court documents released in Baker's suit, the State of Texas aBBerts that "private consensual (sexual) acts have never been the subject prosecution." THRF said that the State's claim is untrue. "This is simply incorrect," said Schwab. "We have documented a significant number of prosecutions of private homosexual conduct.'' Schwab said that the State has further challenged the jurisdiction of the federal courts to hear the case by claiming that the law meeto all constitutional requirements. Schwab said that the Attorney General contends "the rationality of the statute . , . would be that (homosexual) activity would interfere with the basis premise of society, the survival of the people ... should homoseuxal conduct become too widespread, society would lose the means of reproducing itself." Schwab n oted, .. Thie reaeoning contradicts recent court decisions regarding abortion and contraception and is based upon a naive concept of human sexuality in general and homosexuality in particular." "The belief that homosexuality can be compared to a disease and is therefore capable of being spread has been soundly rejected by the medical and psychiatric community. Unin­formed attitudes such as these are the basis for repressive legislation and prejudice against gay people," Schwab said. Another court document filed on behalf of the State paid a considerable compliment to the political success of the gay rights movement, said Schwab. Wade, in a motion for summary judgement before a Dallas federal judge, reportedly said, ''The gay rights movement seemed to exercise a considerable amount of influence in the 1980 election, thus opening an avenue of approach to the atate legislature to addrese the feasibility for the continued need to proscribe homosexual conduct." Wade reportedly continued, arguing for the neceHity of laws against private homosexual acta between consenting adults, citing "the deaths and abuse of young men by homosex· uals and violence associated with homosexual conduct in general." Wade was aaid to have described sodomy as "abominable and detesta­ble crime against nature." Since 1960, 23 states are said to have eliminated laws similar to the Texas law. ThelateatwasNewYorkwhenthe U.S. Supreme Court May 18 left intact a state ruling there, without comment, declaring the New York anti-sodomy law unconstitutional. The New York Jaw, like the Texas law. made it a crime to engage in oodomy, which they defined as "deviate sexual activity," which in turn was defined as "anal or oral sex between persons not married to one another.'' The case involved. a man who was arrested and convicted for violating the law and who in fact admitted engaging in sexual activity with another adult male, but in the privacy of his home. He claimed the law violated hio constitutional right to privacy and claimed that he had a right to doo whatever he wanted in the privacy of his home. The State of New York in its defenoe used a recent southern case where the Supreme Court of Virginia upheld a similar law without even writing an opinion. The New York Court refused to go along with Virginia and pointed out that the U.S. Supreme Court had struck down statutes forbidding the use of contraceptives by married and unmarried couples. The New York court said that personal sexual conduct is a funda· mental right which must be protected by the right of privacy, because of the transcendental importance of sex to the human condHion, the intimacy of the conduct, and its relationship to a person's right to control his or her own body. The court said that sexual activity caried on in an atmopehere of privacy has little likelihood of offending the public. The court also said there's no proof that such conduct is destructive The State to traditional principle of family and marriage. Commented Boston attorney Neil J. Chayet, who specializes in the field of health law: "And so the court reversed the conviction, overturned the Jaw, and in the state of New York, at least, what goes on in your bedroom won't be replayed in the court room.'' In 1974, the American Psychiatric Association passed a resolution supporting the repeal of criminal statutes singling out homosexual acta by consenting adults in private, saying in its resolution that homosex· uality is not a mental disorder and implies no impairment in judgement, reliability or general social or vocational capability. In addition , more than thirty professional, social and religious groups have endorsed similar statements, including the Aemrican Bar Association, American Medical Association, National Council of Churches, United Church of Christ. A Louis Harris survey conducted in 1978 found that 70% of the public believed that homosexual relations between consenting adults in private should not be penalized by law, said THRF. More than 120 corporations have amended their anti-discrimination polices following an investigation by the National Gay Task Force, to include le1bians and gay men. Included in this group are Exxon, IBM, Bank of America, Proctor & Gamble, Adolph Coors Co. and American Airlines. Yes folks, it'a Minneaota Fata himself at the pool table. Are gay people setting more profeuional in their pool play· ing in the ban? Y.., aaya Trend columnist Henry McClurg. Read Trend thia U..ue, page 15. The MONTROSE VOICE is published every Friday. Offices: 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houston, TX 77006. Phone (713) 529-8490. Contents copyright ~1981. Office hours: 1-Spm. Henry McCiurir, publisher/editor. Member Gay Press Aasociation and Texas Gay News Association. Items appearing in the Voice accredited to Copley News Service, San Francisco Chronicle Features Syndicate, Surburban Features, or United Feature Syndicate are copyright by those concerns and are purchased by the Voice for wie in this newspaper. All other items in the Voice are copyright by the Montrose Voice. POSTMASTER: Send addre88 corrections to 3520 Montrose, suite 22.7, Houston, TX 77006. Subscription rate in US: $39 per year, 52 issues, or $24 for six months, 26 issues. Houston advertising representatives: Randy Brown, "Smokey" Ron Ray, Joe Keener. Texas advertising representatives: Jim Olinger and Wade Frey, C-OnMctions, 2401 Manor Road, #118, Austin 78722, (512) 474-1660; Roy Hall, Metro Time•, POB 225915, Dallas 75265, (214) 528-9944. National advertising representative: Joe DiSabato, Rivendell Marketing, 666 6th Avenue, New York lOOll, (212) 242-6863. Advertising deadline: Every Tuesday, 7:00pm, for i88ue to be released three days later. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 12, 1981 Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland, Houston 77002 659-0040 "(!)fay g i'il 9-offLe1'' with your hostess, Laura Lee Love and regulars Lana Kane & Eydie Mae Every Saturday, 10:30pm ($1 cover will go to performers) This Saturday's special guest Jackie O'Shanterl Sat., June 20-Court of the Single Stor Show. ht 10 entries accepted. Trophy & cash to winner. Sign up at the Pink Elephant prior to entry deadline June 16. Complete details on entry form. HAPPY HOURS Saturday Mldnlght-2am Sunday: noon-8pm Mon-Fri: 4pm-8pm open 1 Oom Mon-Sat, n-n Sun A MONTROSI! ALTERNATIVE TWELVE. .. FOURTEEN ••• SIXTEEN INCHES? No sir. We are not kidding! STAR PIZZA WILL DELIVER* HOT & JUICY TO YOUR DOOR *within 2 mile racllu1. * New York-Style hand thrown plz:ra * Chicago-style deep dish pizza * also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian Pizza * Starburst Deluxe Pizza (the worksl) * Super Sandwiches & Salads * Fantastic Desserts * Imported & Domestic beer CALL 523-0800 PUASI AUOW ONE HOUR FOR DELIVERY MENTION THIS AD AND GET $1 OFF * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOM 2111 NORFOLK HOURS Mon: 11 :30am-11 :OOpm Tue: sorry1 dosed Wecl: 11 :30am-11 :OOpm Thurs: 11:30am·11 :OOpm Fri: 11 :30am-mldnlght Sat: 4:00pm.mldnlght Sun: 4:00pm-10:30pm TEXAS FIRST THE 2306~ Open 7 nights, 9pm-6am w•eknights, to 9am weekends 2306 Genessee (Fairview at Tuam) 528-6235 COLONEL PAUL LEWIS POTTER AND THE WILDWOOD SALOON l!S04 WESTHEIMER *HOUSTON PRESENT THEIR FIRST M*A*S*l-I PARTY WEDNESDAY JUNE 17 4PM UNTIL ••• KLINGER LOOK-ALIKE CONTEST PINTS OF BLOODYS $1.00 SCHNAPPS&: AMARETTO I.V.'s 75¢ SPECIAL GUEST APPEARANCE BY HOT LIPS HOULIHAN -ARMY DRAG ENCOURAGED- ********************** WE LOVE THE DIFFERENT DRUM Movies Movies This Week Near Montrose (Friday, June 12, through Thursday, June 18) Theat.en in and near Montro&f': Alabama-2922 S. Shepherd-522-5176 French Quarter-3201 L<luiaiana-627-0782 Galleria-Loop 610 at Weetheimer-626..aOll, 626-0140 Greenway-Greenway Plaza Underground--626-3339 Loew'a Saka-$. Poat Oak at San Felipe-627-9910 Muaeum of Fine Arte-Brown Auditorium, 1001 Biaaonnet-526-1361 River Oaka-2009 W. Gray-..524·2175 Shamrock-7017 S. Main-797·1446 Windeor-5078 Richmond--622-2650 •SHOWING ALL WEEK Titlee to be announced, gay male erotica double feature: French Quarter La Cage aux Folle1 II (1981 comedy, in French with English subtitles, rated R) starring Ugo Tognazzi & Michel Serrault: Greenway •FRIDAY ONLY Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Westheirner, 528-8.508 Forbidden Planet (1956 science fiction): 9:15, River Oaks Robert Wise's The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951 science fiction): 7:30, River Oaks Title to be announced: 2:15am (Sat. morning), Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 •SATURDAY ONLY Title to be announced; 2:15am (Sun. morning), Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 •SATURDAY & SUNDAY Oshima's Empire of Passion (1978drama): 2:30, 4:45, 7;00, 9;15, River Oaks •SUNDAY ONLY Title to be announced: afternoon, Briar Patch, 2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678 •MONDAY ONLY Title to be announced; 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Weetheimer, 528-8508 Peter Brock'• Meetinge with Remarkable Men (1979); 9;15, River Oaks Hermann Hesse and Sven Nykvist's Siddhartha (1973): 7:30, River Oaks Title to be announced- 9pm at the Galleon, 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 llTUESDAY ONLY Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 Jean-Luc Godard's Weekend (1967) starring Isabelle Huppert; 7;30, River Oaks Jean-Luc Godard's Every Man for Himeelf (1980 comedy); 9:30, River Oaks Carmen Jones starring Harry Belafonte and Pearl Bailey; !0;15pm, Mary's, 1022 Westheimer, 528-8851 •WEDNESDAY ONLY Title to be announced: 2:30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Wetttheimer, 528-8508 Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977) starring Richard Gere and Diane Keaton: 7:15, River Oaks Paul Schrader'& American Gigolo (1980) starring Richard Gere: 9:45, River Oaks llTHURSDAY ONLY Title to be announced; 2;30pm, Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 Martin Scor ... e's The Last Waltz (1978); H5, River Oaks No Nukes (1980 mueical) starring Carly Simon, Jackson Browne, Dobbie Brothers and Bruce Springsteen: 9:30, River Oaks Title to be announced: Bpm, Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Westheimer, 528-9040 Tille to be announced: 9;30pm, Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Weetheimer, 528-9040 Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, June 12, through Thursday, June 18) (Nina Vance) Alley Theater (large otage)-615 Texas-228-8421 Agatha Christie's Ten Little Indians. Comedy Workshop Cabaret and the Comb: Annex-1905 S. Shepherd-524-7333 Comedy Tonight 8;30 and 11 :OOpm Friday and Saturday, 8;30pm Tuesday through Thuroday. Stageo Cabaret Stare-709 Franklin-225-9539 Jamea McClure's Lone Star and Laundry and Bourbon (comedies) 5pm Saturday and Bpm Thureday. Stageo Main Stage-709 Franklin-225-9539 Jean-Paul Sartre's No Exit (modem cla88ic) 8:30pm Friday, 5 and 9pm Saturday and 3pm Sunday. POf'\A..ARPRIC1 S Bo•ff .~l.O-,r,c~ah·n.t·-t.• GrlllCIT• Meu..­F> 0"118#ocrlJ Upoet&.i~, JUNE 12, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Color July Tchaikovsky July 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 24, 25. 8 p.m. nightly s12~ •oo 700 •oo too 600 in airconditioned Jones Hall 7 Evenings of All-Tchaikovsky Magic Dazzling International Soloists Maestro Sergiu Comissiona conducting every performance. Popular Prices for the Entire Family­$ 12.50, 9, 7, 6 !I 3 Order now for best seats! The Fireworks Begin July 15! Tickets: 227-ARTS Houston Ticket Center (Jones Hall) Ticketron (Joske's) CO"ICERl Group Discounts Available Festival Hotline 224-6886 UXA "'"' 400 .AJlTlS ·~ ~ -''----'----'----'--~--t----1 c.. . ... - Y!:SI •• _.,._ • ...,_._ ..,,,,.rl'le .. _.,....,s~ .. ...,.:in -· .,.__.,_.._.._.....,_ ... lollowll'IQb' ... - ..... s'l""'D"'O"Y~ ~ .. s,....,...our-Pllll rr-. • ...,. .......,..~~ s.-.~,..ld _ ___ .7!1 I---- 0pe;o. M..ilO~f;'"""'°" 615L.....,.. c.AA"'.JOlAl 8"1111 -·= P.09'_..,.,_~,.... 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 12, 1981 Be wary of cabs and cops From Ray Hill There have been several reports recently of vice entrapment using Yel­low cabs as lures to pick up gay men near gay bars. The usual scenerio includes a vice officer or officers approaching the cus­tomer on some pretense or another who winds up arrested for prostitution. At this point it is unclear whether or not the cab driver is a cop using a real or imitation Yellow cab or a real cab driver cooperating with the vice cops. Please print this warning for your readers. Check the color of your cab. It may savf" you a big hassle. Jerry Vann is gay From t he Montrose Voice Last week we mistakenly reported, it's been brought to our attention, that Warren Duncanson is the first openly· gay person to be elected as president of the Westheimer Colony Association. We were wrong. He's the second. His predeceBBor, Jerry Vann, waa·and of course still is-openly gay. Our apologies, gentlemen. The Westheimer Colony Association is a civic group that, among other things, stages the twice-a.year West­heimer Arts Festival. Under Vann'• leadership, the orga­nization also constructed the eye­appealing park at Bagby and West­heimer, placed Christmas decorations on Westheimer light poles and pleaded before Houston City Council for needs of the neighborhood. Venn's present business interests include the popular Babylon Disco at 300 Westheimer. Gay Pride Week Education Forum Fro m a Gay Political Caucus spokespe r son The Gay Political Caucus announces an important general meeting with a national gay leader making a rare visit to Houston and talking about gay chal­lenges during the upcoming decade. Monday night at 7:30 p.m., June 22, at the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin (one block off Main near the Warwick Hotel), the Gay Poltical Cau-cue Education Committee is sponsor­ing a presentation by David Goodstein entitled, "Our Challenges During the Next Decade." The program will include a history of the gay movement in the United States and an overview of what major chaBenges he preceives to be handled during the next ten years. This topic coincides with the "GPC in the '80s" theme. Audience participation will be encouraged and admission is free. Currently Goodstein is the owner of The Aduocate, the largest and oldest gay newsmedia in the world. Copies of the most recent(June ll)edition will be distributed free of charge at the Forum. Goodstein attended Cornell and Columbia Universities, received a law degree and practiced law as well as managed a mutual fund in New York City. He has been a gay activist since 1970, at which time he was dismissed from his job due to his gay lifestyle. In 1974 he actively worked for the pas­sage of California's consensual sex legislation and was responsible for the creation of the Gay Rights National Lobby (GRNL) in 1976. He co-founded the Advocate Experience, a two-day learning and self-discovery course for gay men and lesbians. In addition to his many activities in the area of finance and civil rights, Goodstein is an avid collector of old- Letters master paintings and he is an amateur horseman, saddle horse exhibitor. Goodstem lives in Los Angeles and continues to be active in the struggle to achieve human rights for lesbians and gay men. His efforts primarily have utilized the judicial, legislative, and political avenues to accomplish bench­marks in the gay movement. As a member of the California State Com­mittee for Business and Economic Development, he was the first of sev­eral openly gay people to be appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown to a position within state government. This educational function should be an exceptionally informative presen­tation and should not be missed. Make your plans now to bring a friend. For additional information, call 521- 1000. Jazz workshop and performance from Delia Stewart's Dance Company Internationally acclaimed jazz dance instructors Gus Giordano and Delia Stewart will present a three-day jazz dance workshop June 26 through June 28, Friday through Sunday. JUNE 12, 1981 MONTROSE VOICE 9 Sunday: 4pm Beer Bust Tuesday: 1 Opm movie, "Carmen Jones," with Harry Belefonte and Pearl Bailey Thursday: Hard Hat Day in celebration of Mary's {annual?) Police Raid featuring representatives from Houston City Council, mayoral candidates, state representatives, and "Mary's Fairies Out Of Jail­a year later." Come and meet us. All receipts from midnight to 1 am will donated to Gay Pride Week expenses. Naturally, 1022 Westheimer 10 MONTROSE VOICE I J UNE 12, 1981 United Cab needs a few qualified · men and women Day lease, Week lease owner/ operator 759-1441 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM The South 40 11034 Almeda Genoa, 941-9796 Sundays: 25C Beer Horseshoes, pool, darts, backgammon On your way back from Galveston, stop by and see our bar. It's in the middle of the woods! .Serving Montrose and Howton UNITED CULLEN CAB CO. PAINT "Growing with Houston" UBODY Z4 Hour SHOP Radio Dispatched 65•0•·••o8 85 Crawford Custom painting, insurance 759-1441 repairs, free estimates Montrose Classified ~•dhn•fornati•UM:TuH .. 7pui,J~ for 1Mue •:W to be releued Thur._ h"~n i nr. June IM: Th•., 7pm, June 23. for JNu. IJM to ti. relt-Med Fri. afternoon. June 26 ., AUTO REPAIR .............................. . CULLEN Paint A. Body Sh<>p-18 10 Cr.wfonl--M0-1886 Custom painting, insurance repairs, free estimates. Professional Auto Repair Proceeds kl go kl Gay Pride Week , or Texas Human Rights Found&· ti on '1\me-'er-Up for Gay Pride Week. $25 plus parts (for most cars). 522-4238 BABYSITTING ..... ~ ....... NIGHT BABY Sl'J~"I-LR- f-or- w-flr-kin-a -m-oth-ft­' I Call Dulw MartlPn at ')20.6Ut7 or m.2626. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Own your own business. Uni'l!'e benefits. qompany car. Convention trips, msu­rance & bonuses. Not time consuming. Great tax incentives. We are listed on the NY Stock Exchange. Financial world ranking. Second fastest growing company. Inquire within. Call Alma. 665-7885. BEDDING ................................ •HOUSE OF BEDS-21115 Norfolk-627- 9362, 629-3662 Special prices on Simmons Beauty Rest Bedding at the House of Beds. See our ad elsewhere this issue. CLOTHING ..................................... • OH BOYi Le ath e r Good •-8 12 Weethelme r -1524-7869 We sell Frye men's western boots. See our ad elsewhere this iuue. •A PLACE iN-TIME-1409 R.idlmond ~1 u:ATHER-=408 Wi.lhei.mn-627·9044 .•.S.P.O RTS U>CKER-311 w;;th~:i): DATING SERVICES "A New Way to Meet Friends" For Information N nd SASF. A 11 to Alternative ConnflctloM Bo• IO, 1713 l'r'ee lh ~m~r "cON~rbThiina EROTICA ................. '!-............ • Al>ONl8 N-•-1407 JUchml)Dd-f,z:>.0494 l'ull l.nrth all·tnal• mov- ahown on video e..\SVLUM-tt.~-;kno-1ilo1 RichrnODd - • HAILPARKJkx>k.~re=JsJo-w. ~~. •fllNER·ti N~;.=.2:W-W9.lhii~-li2"9M:i :~~~~~A~;~~~~~1~-ur'!fi J.nsth aU·m-" movtm GAY BARS ................................ (A)Houaton Tavrm Guild member indication, pJaC't'd in thiadil'«'tory at theirreqUNt • BAsYLON-:-:tOOWNtheimU::.:.52&-BM1 JUNE 12, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE •1iOUSTON-----COUNTRY~2700AI.,:;;;= 522-3591: Gay Pride W~k lcickoffniaht Junr 19. .JUST MARION iiYN-ks-AI7 Fai;;;;.,_ 528-9110: Gay Pride WMk kickoffni&htJune 19; 1ay womtn predominantly • KINDRED SPIRITS-6246 Burfalo Speedway-666.9756: Gay Pride Week Com· mittee m~n12:30pm Sun.; Gay Pride Week kickoff niaht June 19; 1ay women predom1· nantly ·LAM~Ti~Sfv<f~Ml. Gay Pride Week kickoff niaht June 19: 1ay women predoonnantly •iMARY'S=-1022 W8atbeTm;-r-n21- 8861 Shop Mary's after-hours 7 nights •AMONTROSE PUB-1318 w .. theimu­.623- 0035: live p1a.no •ntntainmen.t ni1htly & ~~cta!/~':\i ~ct~#1n~;h~~u~~9 ...O.U.R Pi..ACE-~RICbmOnct-62S: Justine Band is great! Fri., Sat. & Thurs. at Our Place. 1646: di9co 1•11i J--.. Fran & Phillip :.::1'9 ~n:tJy~~hu11t m rpcn".ft~:,8: cloMd Mon · \eec1 . Gay Pride Week kickoff l'lllrht June Ii: °""r rii..-.. ru•hd y •PINK - -E-L-i°PHANT-12f8-Le~d-:. 669-0CMO A Montrose Alternative-The Pink Elephant See our ad elsewhere this issue. "'Pla{!rl Folli•" Su fvenin& with Law.ra ~ba;~ t.aG:YK~J!-We!:1:.~J!~:h~ JJuunne• 19: Court oftM Sin11. !"tar Talent Show 20: p.y mflft PNdoimnantly •ftA?--;CH~ain-G~Ji.1""~1~ ~ ~ ':i~~~Y s~;i:U:t hk~~~:1~ iuaht J\lne 19 •ROCKV·S:...-u16w o.~----c;ay Prid" Week kickoft'ruahtJ\lne 19; 1ay women excJq1~ly -8.ADDLE cwe:.e11-w-o;;;-62i'9'.j;T h" country be.nd Fri_ &. Sat. tvfnin&•: hve- ~::ties':i~~~!,~~~~~~i~n_C:~ ~1kiC:k!olffn:ia!ht~Ju=ne. ~ne;G~~~\~:: 19 •SOti'i'if4-0=I°i034At;ecla:Geno•­IMl- 9798 On your way back from the Beach-the South 40 See our ad elsewhere this i88ue. Bew .beer apecial Sun .. Gay Pnde Week kic'k· off n1sht Jun• 19 -'N'1N~ w~--~---: PY :;:.c:~n=~J'!ii!~t~':ne~9. ~ Vi:,;,rrt;ftE=N-Ziiii af&Jn-622-0000 Yea Party, at the Venture-N. See our ad elsewhere thi1 issue. =~a~/?."u~:i::,.~'K~~~~oorr:i": E~~;~*~~~C'~~a~;e~:~ •WiLOwOoo- · S.llOOn=-l. 5o4 weet: h~liner-528-9040 M• A *S*H Night Wednesday at the Wildwood Saloon. See our ad elsewhere thia issue. ~ror'-h~ ~trd~A =i~~!w!,~; ney TIM9. •verunc. dab la M•A•S•H n11ht ~O:c!t:.~:·u:k:v1;e;;•f.r:,.,. Gay Pnd9 We.k kiclioll n~ht June 19; ho!llf' &and.low Cattle Club. Crossword This is the ninth in our series of the exclusive Montrose Crossword. Some clues and answers deal with Montrose people and places, and the gay lifestyle. The others are standard crossword clues and answers. And. this week's crossword is for adults only. Hide it from the lriddies. The solution appears elsewhere in this issue. ACROSS 1 You, after an all-night.er 5 Shook 11 Draft at the beer bust 13 Grim 14 New York State city 15 Nasal pasaage, for popper sniffing 16 First beginning 18 Former Spanish colony 19 Long fish 20 Dry. as wine 22 Offspring 24 Mouth parta used in lovemaking 26 Plant by strewing 29 Frump 31 Petroleum product 33 Indulger in fantasy 35 Gay-­Adulta organization 36 Comedian Caesar 37 Son of Adam 39 Year (Sp.) 40 Rested in chair 41 Organ of hearing 43 Feeling you get at the baths 46 Heart chamber 49 Medicine you need after an all-night.er 52 Uncanny 54 Galveston 55 What eome are into, sexually 56 Hebrew ascetic 57 Browns DOWN 1 Mae West role 2 Bibical prepoeition --the tea Spanish country houee Status-­Navy ship prefix (abbr.) Loft Saw slit 9 DeVa1era's land IO Speciality reetaurant 12 M .... geboy 13 Newspaper columniat Landers 17 Your feeling, the next day, after eight hours of bar-hopping 11 20 Midtowne 21 Notice 22 Fern features 23 Was indebted kl 25 Cross inscription 26 Amaze '1:1 ----. said Mr. Bill (2 wds.) 28 Jokester 29 College degree (abbr.) 30 Village People song 32 Showing moet age 34 Dine 38 mesh 40 Stem·like part 42 Locale 43 Emit coherent light 44 Employs 45 Plural of 20 down 46 Pismire 47 Celestial bear 48 Bearing 50 Former state representative Waters of Montrose 51 Make angry 153 Highway curve RETURN WITH US TO ... M~l21~ M()~J~Z T HIS RAVEN-HAIRED 6EAUTY F~ rne c:x:>MINICAN REAJBLIC REGNEO AS Qt.EEN OF THE TECHNICOLOR AD.IENTURf! FANTASIES OF THE /9"""05. ,,. . ). BORN MARIA DE SANTO f~~~~-~ ~ ~.s~oun'r O'"~ PVQ;TI,. _,.,,,. AR~ N/&'I'~ ~.. ... ~. f .. t.-A~~~. :.--- OFTEN PLAYED ~- ·.i~ OPPOSfTE HeR • -I ' -*4i . IN FILMS THAT • , ' ~ .• TODAY IM:)ULD =- !f' _. --: :!~"~~p M ARIA .VONTEZ ~s FOUND OE,A,O IN A BATHTUB OF HER PALATIAL HQ\i\E IN A PARIS ... ;;;_\,. ~.~~ +7~51 ~~~~"I- OF HER DEAT'1 ~~p..: • • Stle WAS 33 YE.ARS OLD IV.cJ STILL A BIG N.oOiME AT Tt1E eoxoFFICE 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 12, 1981 RodEzzio Keeping Up by WilliamHamilton He has a working problem, but I wouldn't call him a workaholic. GAY BATHS :C"L"'u"'o...H,"o'"u's"'r~oN'-"'2!'2"!0'0!""!,!.",•, .•,.•_~...,_ :8~!pm~ J!"=91vely, mea1b.nb1p •MIDTOWN!: SPA--3100 Fannin-6:22.2379 1•1 mm exchwvely, m.iben.hip reqlli.Ncl, open 24 houll"I. •2308CLUB-2806Geneeeee-628-4236 Texas' best. The 2306. See our ad eleewhere thi1 i88ue. Go men exdliSiveJy, memberlhip Nq\llred, opm nic:htly HAIR CARE .:.u".'.o" 'N""•'L"·H·~-· ""''-"'. -·"-"a"2"2'"0"!•' ......._- _....~ •SALONDANIEL-1544 WMtbeimer-&~ 1132'1 HELP WANTED ~""u~"'~!"B!"O!"O. .K. '!S!T"O'"R'.E. ." "!u'• n•. ............ '.!",!-.,. htiv1 phone. Call -.7740. NEED HELP? AdvwtiM hen for jmt iM-per wont Ol' 18 per anch and rwcb 14,000ofyoW' ..,.hbon ·---H-O-M-E-S- &- --- APARTMENTS HOME FURNISHINGS ., .. --..----........ "!!"­• BYll AN'S J n t•rlon-901 We1t- 1".__-6H-8002 Byman'sime furnishings, custom interiors. See our ad elaewhere thia iaaue. KEY SHOPS ~.!•"'•"o'"·'s·-·,'.!'." ! 2!"'!'w!e",•1!"••"'•-··•~&~1e~20 Coaamonwe&lt.h-623--2927 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose, 2 locations. LITERATURE !wu.DE 'N' STElN-620 W•thftmer-62P-- 7014: ach.mvely 1•1 LODGING : HOUSTON GUEST HOUSE lOt Avonda.le---32()...9787 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." 'MAIL BOXES : KWIK·KALL Mail Boa--3317 Monuo.-- 5%>1 ... MUSIC •.R..E.C ORD RACK-3109 S. Shepherd-tit ORGANIZATIONS ATI'ENTION ORGAN11..A110NS: Call the VoWie with JWt °'1'aniuboo'• DeW8 and mMtinc data 629-&490, aA.moou A CAPELLA ChOl'"H-C:/o (MontroH) .C.l.u.u ch of Chrul, 620-K W•thrimff-6ZS. ACW-1238 W. Gr.,--6U682:5 n'b•) ADVOCATE EXPERIENCE-eM­~ .-unar Jl&M Z.21. 8UCKA.WHITEMBNT~-S2N006, 774-31581: .. Firemen'• Ball" at Cockatoo, S400 Trav». Jurw 20, fr'lml 8pm. JUNI JW. JUNI JUNI JUNE 12, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 12 13 Mother Ruth's "Montrose Clinic on Wheels" this week: 14 15 16 Selected Events 17 18 Please visit the City of Houston Health Department at 1111~ N. through 7 Days "-FRIDAY: Jnteract/ Hou1ton'1 Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midnight at Bering Chureh, 3405 Mulberry •SUNDAY: Montroee Sport1 Auociation volleyball gamee2Pm in Cherryhurat Park -SUNDAY: Family and Frienda of Gay1 meet at MCCR, 1919 Decatur •SUNDAY: Gay Pride Week Committee general meeting 2:30pm at Kindred Spirit., 5245 Buffalo Spe«lway •SUNDAY: Montrooe Sport• A1eociation softball game• 6pm at Levy Field •MONDAY: Montroee Sporle 1ummer league bowling 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain •WEDNESDAY: Full Moon June 17 •THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week, "We the People," officially begina, luting through June 28 •THURSDAY: Mary'1 1980 police raid commemoration with "Hard Hat Day" plue midniaht­lam rece:ipta donated to Gay Pride Week •THURSDAY: Interact / Hou1ton educational forum 7:30 at 3405 Mulberry •THURSDAY: Montroee SPorta Aaaociation tenni1 matchea 7:30pm, Memorial Park •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n St•in gay radio 1how lOpm-midnight on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 Selected Events Later •JN 1 WEEK: CHE pep rally and fundraiaer for Montrose Sport.I Aaociation June 19 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week kickoff night June 19 with 1pecial eventlJ at individual cluba 9/N 1 WEEK: Montroee SPorta Aaeociation eoftball doubleheader with a Houston fire department team 1-5pm, June 20, in Memorial Park field #1, Eaet Memorial Loop Drive 9/N 1 WEEK: Black and White Men Together111 "Firemen's Ball" at Cockatoo, 3400 Travie, June 20, from 6pm •IN 1 WEEK: The Advocate Experience leDlinar June 2(}.21 9/N 1 WEEK: Dallae Gay Pride Week parade June 21 UN 1 WEEK: "Salute Dallae" day June 21 •IN 1 WEEK: "Word a Out," "A Very Natural Thing" and Gay Pride Week '80 elide ebow at tho River Oak1 Theater, continuou• from 3:15pm, June 21 •IN 1 WEEK: The MCCR Choir concert, 7:30pm June 21 at the church, 1919 Decatur •IN 1 WEEK: GPC educational forum 7 30pm , June 22, ht Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin, with aue1t speaker David Good1tein , owner of the The Advocate, speaking on " Our Challenae1 During the Next Decade" 9/N 1 WEEK: National Day of Remembrance obeervance June 23 elarting 7:30pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur •IN 1 WEEK: "Bringing Men and Women Together" program and reception Juno 24, 8-lOpm, at Rice Univeraity, R.M.C. Grand Hall •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Youth Day June 25 with "Concerns of Gay Youth" program on KPFl', FM-90, l -4pm, and Gay Young Adulta 1wim party at 106 Avondale, 8-lOpm •IN 1 WEEK: Debutante1 for Human Rights' "The Deb BaJl That Didn't Quite Mako It" at the Copa, 2631 Richmond, June 25, from 9pm •IN 2 WEEKS: Heritage Day June 26, with Herilq1! Fieeta '81, 2504 Muon, 8pm-midnight •IN 2 WEEKS: Fred Paez Memorial Day June 27, with KPFT, FM-90, boating a mock trial llam-4pm at Balee School of Law, Univenity of Houston Central Campu1, concerning abu1e of gay people, with teltimony from repreeentativee of tho Fr«! Paez Tuk Force •IN 2 WEEKS: Fred Paez Memorial Concert and Fireworks, June 27, at SPotta Park, Memorial Drive at Waugh, with mueic from Spm by the Great American Yankee Freedom Marchina Band of Loa Angeles, the Oak Lawn Concern Band of Dallas, the Montroee Symphonic Band and the Montroee Singen; and lOpm fireworks •IN 2 WEEKS: Weetheimer parade f:rom 5:30pm June 28, with float., the MontroH Symphonic Band, the Oaklawn Marching Band of Dallas, and the Great American Yankee Freedom Band of Loe An11elee, and Ray Hill and Rita Wanetrom ae grand mar­ahalle •IN 2 WEEKS: Spotte Park Rally 8-9:30pm June 28, Memorial Drive at Waugh, with Sissy Farenthal and MinneapQli1Police Chief Anthony Bouea u 1peak­ero, and with bar-l>-que, beer and fireworke 9/N 2 WEEKS: Gay Archivea of Texu forum with Jim Kepner of the National Gay Archivee, 7pm June 29, 3406 Mulberry •INS WEEKS: Independence Day, July 4 •IN S WEEKS: MSA aoftball team fl1ain1t New York City teem July. 9/N 8 WEEKS: "GayRun '81" in San Francieco July 26 9/N 7 WEEKS: Reno Gay Rodeo July 31-Au&- 2 •IN 12 WEEKS: Texas Gay Taak Force Conference VIII in Houston Sepl 4-7 MacGregor for free, confidential venereal disease testing and treatment. Phone 222-4297. Compliments of the City of Houston Health Department. MONTROSE COUNSELING Ceater-900 Lontt"2ll0---029-00 .M,O._NT=RO SE PATRO~fliclunond­MONTROSE SPORTS VOLLEYBAU.­=-~ Chenyhunt Park-622"3487: • .__ MONTROSE SYMPHONIC BAND-meeu ... Cocbtoo. 3'00 TravV-627·9688 MUSTANGS (eoc:iaJ chlb)-c.10 th. Bun, 7JO ~M27: cob" niaht Mon. PERSONALS ......P..L UMBING ~~~~~~~­MONTROSE PLUMBlNG COMPANY, JQ' ~~-:!i>:i:-==~ Gary Larson 1981 SAN FRAN CHRONICLE FEATURES "So there he wo1 - this big gorilla just laying there. And Jim her• says, 'Do you suppose it's deod or just aslHp?' " 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 12, 1981 Want to earn $250 to $800 weekly? We have complete after graduation placement service locally or in other cities nationwide. 2171 Portsmouth, Houston, 526-0888 DRAWING BY TOBY We Love the Wiidwood! HOME OF THE AMERICAN UATHERMEN Thanks, for reading the Montrose Voice 708 W. Alabama 529-6584 closed Sunday A New Service to the Montrose Community 24 Hours Serving Just Good Food Night or day, the best place to meet your friends Monlroee Stanford * •~ 1 JUNE 12, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Answer to Puult l U I H 0 U A I( E 0 AU I T f fll f U T I C A N 0 S T fll I l 0 " I 0 I N I f N I f f l I f c I 0 N I 0 OOWOY NAPHTHA Olll:IEAMfR YOU NO 110 CAIN ANO I A T f A fll LUST ATRIUM A S P I R I N E f " I f SEAPORT ASSES fllfNf TANI Wallflowers C 1981 Suburban Features PRINTING ................................ •KWIK·KOPY Printinc-3317 MontroM- 622-IN& PUBLICATIONS ~N.~N~E!!!R~V~IE!!!W!"'--<;'!!20!!"!!W!"'N"!th•e•m•.,•--<;~22~9333~­• Montn;;;voiCe-3320 MonlnNe #22'f- 629-8490 The "Montrose Voice," the newspaper of Montrose. Deadline for next issue: 1;'i':si9<i'~o;6.;J~~..J'.'l'.;.f:~l 1ubecription•. Next iuue to be releaeed Thurs. evenina, June 18. Max TWT-3223 Smit.h '103-627·9111 .....R..E..S.T..A..U..R..A...N..T..S. .... •BAJA'S-402 Lovelt-627-9886 Baja's for Lunch! See our ad elsewhere this issue. •BARs:QliE -RANCH--US25 WMthll'imn-- 02!>2289 •BRASSERIE Rulaurant-SIS W A1a­bama- 628-!17H -CHAPULTAPEC Mexican &.taul'tlnt-813 Richmond-622-2365 •HOUSE Ofo' PIES--3112 Kirby--528-3816 •SrEA-MTAeLE-708 w. Alabama-62~ 8245 Nowopen24 hours, the Steam table. See our ad elsewhere this i88ue. -STA-R P1ZzA-2111 Norfolk-623-0800 Hot Pizza Delivered! 523-0800 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •STEAK·N7 [GG-(2J1 Moiauo.e--6~135 ROOMMATES Roommate Connections Share expenses, build a friendship. We provide the referrai. with referen­CM, photo. and all appropriate Informa­tion. Prof .. lonal Screert111a. 526-8002. SCHOOLS •BLUE WATER OiVlrll' School-W•thll'UMr at Montn>M--628-0634 •Pror.-IOna1 Bir.rUnden ·schooJ-2111 Portamouth-628-0888 Be a bartender! See our ad elsewhere this issue. ..........S..H...O..P..S.. ......... •ALL THAT GLITTERS (aifu)-4325 M•int.roM-622.-6976 •BYMAN•s Gift. i AC!CeMOrt .. :.:eo. w .. c.helmer-629-8002: New, now open­B~ an's Gifts See our ad e1sewhere this i11sue. (0 ~r--77 I don't Ilk• lyln9 to Mark about this affair, so I'm lylng to myself lnsteocl. •FACETS Csift.1)-1412 We.thtimu-6~ 1412 •TEXAS JUNK CO.-Taft at Wel<":b 624-8267 Come Shop With Us-Texas Junk Companv. See our ad elsewhere lhis issue. sTREYMAN (IJiftl)-407 W•thti.mtr-623- 0228 TALENT AGENCIES ..........T..A..X..I. ......... UNITED Cab-759-1411 United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Houston, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY • .............. __ ""!"""!'!' ___ _ •PRESTIGE Travel-8205 Montroee- 52:2-1922 Prestige Travel Agency in Montrose. See our ad elsewhere thi1 issue. TYPESETTING & ..........G..R...A...P..H.. ICS ~----'!""· ~~Np/0~=. ~g1e62~'4e:}ttln1- Fast, accurate, computerized typesetting-and printing. ~:C~u= ~';t::ic:i~~111inca~~· .cat .td. unuual proJetU. Let u 11v• YOG a bid YARD & GARAGE SALES Samantha Reads Your Stars If you were born thl• wMk: Your approach to most things Is based on logic rather than emotions. You seek new expedences as a flower seeks the sun. You are very tolerant of other persons dltterent beliefs and beha­viors. You are Interested humanitarian in efforts and are extremely fair. ARIES (3-21/'-19): If the full moon has his way, Aries, expect a perfectly flirty, frolick­ing time of good loving. It's a chatty week, too, as all sorts of news flieS back and forth. Look for a difference of opinion and days end on the upbeat TAURUS (._20/5-20): Smooth talkers approach you this week, Taurus, with proposi­tions Involving both your time and talent and your money. Check out all angfes. Later, someone's retracilon may be for the best and days shut with a bang GEMINI (5·2111-20): Close associate is willing to talk tur­key but may have troub~ get­ting started. You take the Initia­tive, Gem, to get the show on the road. Later, your famous flexlbllity Is lmPortant, as you must change gears speedily. MOONCHILD (1·2117·22): Don't be rushed Into absolute, definitive statements about anything before your're ready, Moonbeam. An S.O.S. asks for your help. Give your support without shouldering the who~ load yourself, angel. Days zip by. LEO (7-2311-22): Cupid makes your social scene for oodles of lighthearted fun. Someone en1oys playing the butterfly; keep jealousy out of the picture, Leo. Later, a change of plans may cause you extra work and week ends with a meeting VIRGO (1·2319·22): Famlly matters and outside affairs both put heavy demands on you in week ahead, Virgo. Even you, capab~ one. cannot be In three places at once. Do find tlme for a heart-to-heart with a certain person. Week runs off. LIBRA (1-23/10-23): Piece together news from various sources to turn a puzzJe Into a comp~te picture, Libby. Look for an Invitation, an offer you can refuse and you just might see a bad penny turn up again. Later, Cupid comes a-callin'I SCORPIO (10.W11·22): This week poses temptations to put your fingers Into a dozen p•. You can't do justice to atl of them, Scorp, but you can realty do a number on just a few. Choose with care; roll up your sleeves; and dig in! SAGITTARIUS (11·23112-21): Ifs a people-week ahead, Saj, with lots of aciivity and rela­tionships hlghUghted. Try to conserve financial resources and keep your budget at least HfT'll-balanced. Latter days are chock full of sugar and spice. CAPRICORN (12·22/1-19): Appearances can be decepttve, Cappy. and you might have to watch for one whose actions just don't match his words. And, in your spare time, you may be winding up a project with a thousand loose ends Good luck! AQUARIUS (1·20/2-19): Use your ingenuity and creativity to develop and expand your goals. Oiscu~ with friends can add valuable Insight, Aquari. Later, don't believe everything you hear and be careful not to take chance words personally. PISCES (2-20/3-20): Make a list of your prionhes at the beginning of the week and stick to ·em. Be prepared to attend a command perform­ance and give a speech. Ignore one who pout d sulks. And don't lose your list, Pisces babel (c) 1981 Soburban Features Tren,d by Henry McClurg Dyke shot? There's a trend in Houston gay bars toward more gentlemenly (or lady-like, whatever the case) pool. That is, pool played more professionally. If you don't make the shot you were trying for but accidentally make another of your balls, you pass the tum over to your opponent without shoot­ing again. You don't go so far as to call your shots. It's on an honor system-which is 50% what sports of all types are supposed to about anyway. It's not win­ning, but how you play. In some clubs this has been a standard house rule anyway, but in most clubs, the rule was, if you make it, regardless of how you did it, you got to shoot again. More professional pool is a natural pheno­menon. In gay bars, some of us have been playing pool since dirt and are getting quite good. Now, about that headline that attracted your attention. Gay guys sometimes use the expreBBion "dyke shot" when they make a ball totally unex­pected from what they were shooting at. Gentlemen: Go over to Marion and Lynn's or Our Place and play pool with a lesbian tonight. You'll get your ass whipped and won't be using that expression anymore. Colorful beach towels Hand painted paper mache love bird and plexiglass wine caddy Crystal candle holder, brass cricket box, plexiglass & ~ brass bookends New-Gifts & Accessories 604 Westheimer, 529-8002 12-Spm, Mon.-Sat. Environmental Designs/Fine Furnishings 608 Westheimer, 529-8002 10-6pm, Mon.-Sat. Manager Thom Lodge Hand painted Oriental plate Major credit cards accepted. Checks welcome. Ample free parking.
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