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Montrose Voice, No. [156], [October 21, 1983]
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Montrose Voice, No. [156], [October 21, 1983] - File 001. 1983-10-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3113/show/3084.

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(1983-10-21). Montrose Voice, No. [156], [October 21, 1983] - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3113/show/3084

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. [156], [October 21, 1983] - File 001, 1983-10-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3113/show/3084.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. [156], [October 21, 1983]
Alternate Title Montrose Voice, No. 155, October 14, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 21, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).; Incorrect issue number and date printed on first page.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Colony Assoc. Generally Pleased with the Outcome Westheimer Art Fest Gave Some Chance to Dress Up in Advance of Halloween Hollis Hood, p .5 v 0 I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Oct. 14, 1983 Issue•• 155 Published Every Friday David Cassidy's Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Montrose Live, p.20 How Gay Are You Roz Ashley's Quiz, p.16 'Eddie and the Cruisers' Jack Sturdy's Films,p.17 Five Emerging Artists Jeff Bray, p.18 Alief Teacher Fired; Seeks Community Support By Robert Hyde "I'm frightened because I feel my future is gone," Jamea Frem said in an intense meeting recently. Frein is a 25-year-old sixth grade Eng­lish teacher who was fired recently from bis three-year position with the Alieflnde­pendent School District because he is gay, and he is now seeking support from our community for his personal ordeal a nd for his upcoming entanglements with the Texas courts brought on, he fee ls, by homophobic administrators. "I need your emotional support," Frein said, "and lwanttoletthegaycommunity know that there are people out here not ashamed of what they do in their private lives." But the school administrators feel that Frein should be ashamed or, at least, they feel ashamed to have him on their teach· ing staff. All it takes today is an event such as this to remind us that we still have a long way to go in garnering the respect so many of us richly deserve from a society still entrenched with all the fears and hatreds inherent in our Judeo-Christian heritage. And this is an isolated incident, a story reported by an angry man - a scared man. Tired of the bar scene, Frein sought to meet other gay men in Texas through an advertisement in The Advocate. After responding to an ad with a letter and a photograph of himself, he carried his sealed envelope for mailing,Iater in the day in hie briefcase to school with him- a carelees mistake, he admits, but he never dreamed that hi1 personal property would be violated at some point during that morning. Around noon, Frein noticed that his letter addressed to The Aduocate, was mi11ing from his briefcase. Since he did not 1ee it taken, he was somewhat per· plexed and, he admit.I, a little &eared . Later in the day, Frein reported that his worat fears materiahz.ed: "Ken Lince, the aaaistant principal at the school, entered DlsmiBBed teacher James Frein my classroom in the middle of the after· noon a nd said, 'They want you in person· nel immediately; J'm taking your class."' Frein then had to confront three school administratore: Bob Schumacher, super· intendant of Aliers middle school; Tom Brenner, assistant personnel director; and Dr. Henry Morse, a school figurehead whose exact title is not known to Frein His letter to Thi' Advocate was on Schum· acher'a desk. "Is this your letter?" Frein said Schum· acher asked. "It was found opened in the girls' bathroom." Frein reported that the girls who had taken the letter from his briefcase had enjoyed it in the privacy of their restroom and had then given it to a teacher. The teacher, in tum, gave the letter to Kay Clapp (another assistant principal) and Lince, who forwarded it to the personnel office. "There could be a potential scandal over this," Frein reported Schumacher as say­ing. "And we're concerned about student gossip and their parents' reactions. Of course, you'JI loae your respect as a profes­sional over this." Frein said that he was then shoved a blank sheet of paper and was asked to sign it. After being told by Schumacher that he ;:~~ n$!~~~~~~~~~~~n~~.~~::!I't your resignation or we'll fire you." Frein then asked them, "Doesn't my three years of dedication to these kids mean anything to you?" Cornered, Frein asked for a transfer to another school, after which he was told by Dr. Morse that another position was not available and doubted that there would be one. Frein signed the blank sheet of paper - presumably his resignation - and left. Feeling that his rights as an individual had been violated, Frein then contacted Sam Blackman, a union representative with the Alief Education ABSociation which is affiliated with the Texas State Teachers' Association. Blackman advised Frein to retract his resignation, which Blackman saw clearly as being made under duress. Blackman folJowed up with a call to Al Hook, superintendent of Aliefs school district, and informed Hook that Frein would be reporting for work the fol· lowing Monday. "As far as I'm concerned," Hook told Frein, "you resigned." Blackman told Frein that he would file a greivance on his behalftoretracthisresig­nation and seek his position back or, bar-ring that, secure for Frein another suitable position within the district. Blackman then arranged for a meeting with the school officials for lat.er in the week.. "But when we do meet." Frein said to Hook, "! hope we can remedy the situa­tion. If not, rm prepared to go to the media." ''That will be your choice," Hook said. "We are prepared to fight from our end." At the meeting, which Frein said was very breif, the school officials and their attorney for the district told Frein that his resignation would etand. Frein is now car­rying his case before the Texas State Teachers' Association in Austin. Superintendent Schumacher was con· tacted for any comments he might have regarding this incident and said, curtly, 0 We've been advised at this point not to do anything on that." Frein was hired by the AliefSchool Dis­trict based on his outstanding creclentials. During his years at the University of Mis­souri, where he graduated near the top of his class, Frem supported himself through work that would bring him closer to fulfil­ling his lifetime goal. He was a school counselor for elementary students, he worked as a teachers' aide, he functioned as a substitute teacher for the St. Louis school district and in rural areas of Mis­souri, and he sponsored and taught in var· ious religious programs for Catholic students who were attending public schools. Now, still in his 20s, Frein is afraid that this intense preparation for a career he has always wanted will become meaning· less. "I'm angry.'' Frein said. "They want to take away my livelihood. They do not have that right." Frein lit a cigarette with shaking hands and smiled sadly. "I'm not going to let these people judge me on a moral iS&ue and tell me what I've done ia wrong. And I'm very hurt by the fact that I may never be able to teach again ." 2 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT 21, 1983 NOTICE! Nightly . Happy Hour 10pm till 12:30am Halloween Costume Contest 12 Midnight-Saturday, Oct. 29 1st Prize, Best Costume: Trip to Acapulco 2nd Prize ????, 3rd Prize ???? See next week's Voice for more details Naturally 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 OCT. 21, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Be Supportive, Convention Urged Gay Parents Fire Marshal Addresses GPC Montrose "I love you, but I need your help," was the tone set by parent.a of gays when some 125 parents from all over the country recently met at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York for the second annual convention of the Fed­eration of Parents and Friends of Lesbi­ans and Gaye Inc .. Parente FLAG, as the federation is =~~~0:~8r:::~1:~~~~~i~~!:::"P~ dent Adele Starr of Los Angeles. One m four American families have a homosex­ual member, she said. The 125 delegates represented 80 chapters. Richard Ashworth, president of the New York affiliate, said that the major 1984 focus will be to convince religions that homosexuality is a natural sexual orienta­tion, and that "our children are good citi­zens, not sinful or wrong or evil." The outreach effort will include mailing literature to 90,000 churches and syn­agogues and speaking in any church that will take them. Arleen Nelson, director of the Seattle group, said that the parent organization can help overcome the nationwide fear of AIDS, which has caused increasing dis­crimination against their children. Delegates also noted that parents often had more problems "coming out" to th~ir friends about their child's homosexuahty than the children had telling their par­ents. People think you havesomekindofa monRter, said one mother, and the organi· zation hopes to change some of the nega· tive attitudes toward gays. Goin' South Illegal drugs and workers are str~aming into the United States from Mexico, but customs officials say the real action is going the othe~ way. American pilots are making fortunes supplying south-of-the-border consumers with everything from tax-free stereos to stolen cars, reports the Boston Globe. The exploits of the border runners, called "Contrabandistas," have evoked mixed reactions from American authori­ties. The FAA is keeping hands off, saying it's purely a Mexican problem. But so~e smugglers accuse the U:S. custo~s ser.:1ce of tipping off the Mexicans to mcommg American nights. By Robert Hyde Houston's Fire Marahal, Eddie Corral, went before Houston's Gay Political Cau­cus Wednesday evening to address the issue of what some members in the com­munity view as harassment by the HFD. When the repeated recent evacuations of Rich's Disco on San Jacinto were brought to his attention, Corral said that he was ignorant of the events and alarmed that this was happening. "I won't tolerate any type of harassment of this sort," he told the Caucus. Corral said he responds in most cases to telephone calls which demand fire depart­ment investigation of a premises. Some are warranted, he said, some are not. The marshaH said that many investiga­tions made in the community are the result of competitive bar personnel. '"Peo­ple are calling in on each other," Corral said to attempt to harm a rival business. "And these people are not required toide!1- tify themselves, even though we ask for 1t. Very often, they give us fake ~am~s." GPC President Larry Bagnens said that he contacted the HFD regarding bar harassment and was received favorably by the department. Thia resu~ted i.n a tour of various area bars, Bagnens said, whe­rein "we educated each other." He also mentioned that the department was impressed by the way that many estab­lishments are running their businesses. And to offset any fears that the gay com­munity is being singled out by the depart­ment, Corral mentioned two nongay clubs in particular that had been under depart­ment investigation: Cooter's and the popu Jar Diamond Back on the Gulf Freeway. In a somber note, Corral added, '"There have been a lot of tragedies around the world due to overcrowded clubs." Bagneris was then awarded an ho":or· ary certificate by the department ~h1ch ''entitles you to a free cup of coffee 1n my ofn~e~·~~:~al ~:;~ificates were also awarded to managers of The Copa, the Venture-N and Just Marian & Lynn's for their contributionJI to safety. Earlier in the evening, Bagneris menti­oned that he had sent a letter to Houston's City Council in which he addreased the recent multiple bar vtstt.s by several of the city's policemen. He pointed out that.these police actions usually occurred pnor to Gay Pride Week and just before important />;f 1\\ESE mcr.s, I ~~~tt ~1\\a cur-me NRLl~ES-·· 11' ~'TWffiER 1-\E™AT 1\\E~E. ~ Cllea<Slt-1 1"E.~- municipal elections. Bagneris asked the council to initiate more appropriate behavior within the HPD, particularly regarding their "intimidating attitudea toward members of the community." The letter also requeated that a police captain or a higher official authorize future welk­ins. Regarding further business, Bagneris turned his attention to the upcoming city election. He mentioned that a benefit wiH be held for GPC endorsed candidate Nikki Van Hightower this Saturday 7-10 p.m. at the Sheraton, 777 Polk, and a GPC benefit entitled "The Night the Stars Came Out" to be staged at Rascal's on Monday even­ing 10.2. GPC volunteer coordinator Debbie Squires reported that the caucus had regi~­tered approximately 2500 voters in their recent registration push. It was also mentioned that GPC endorsed Anne Wheeler needs community support, especially on Tuesday and Wed· nesday evenings for help in her phone bank. Chimp Lovers Protest Use in AIDS Research A group affliated with the ~nt~rnatio!1al Primate Protection League is circulabng 1200 "Save the Doomed Chimpanzees'' petitions in hopes that the protest will s~op the University of Texas from attemp~mg to infect chimp~nzees with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. reports the Austin American·State,;man. The group's petition maintains that there should be other ways to prevent, study and treat AIDS rather than subject· ing primates of "miserable and painful deaths." The newspaper reported UT official Steve Stuyck said chimpanzees would be the natural animal to study to look for possible cures to the disease in huma.ns Although considered a threatened species, the chimps are the closest laboratory animal to humans for study purposes, and he stated that scientists. wo~l~n·~ b;e involved in such a study proJect 1f1td1dn t have potential benefit for humans. Mouth A Busy News Week This has not been what Johnny Carson would call a "slow news week." There's tons of stuff cramed in this week's Mont· rose Voice-most of which you will NEVER read in any other publication. There's the Alie! school teacher who was fired when school administrators gave in to a severe case o~ homo~hobia. We've got reviews of David Cass id~ and his ''Technicolor Dreamcoat,'' Sister Mary telling it all at the Tower, and a half of dozen other plays and movies reviewed A group of 5 Montrose artists are spo­tlight. There's a gay man who·s been on death row in Florida for 5 years -o- Folks. Halloween 1s next week. Good lord It's time to lock up the kids and go out and party. Wait a minute? Halloween used to be a kids holiday, didn't it? That's too long ago to remember. You got two chances from the city VD people to make sure you're healthy before Halloween, Their mobile health unit will be at Mary's this Saturday, the 22nd. 4 to 8pm, and next Saturday. the 29th. at the Ripcord. POiiter Girl of the Wef k: Cassandra, manager of MaT) s The Exile Lounge. downtown, with a new owner is returning shortly. Houston's second oldest gay bar recently closed -o- Shanti of Texas. a volunteer. peer coun­seling service for individuals and friends who are facing life-threatening illness will meet Friday. October 21, 7 30 to 9 30. at 3520 Montrose All counseling will be provided without cost to the clients. For more information. call 522-5084 The Unt\lersity of St. Thomas will present a free flute concert Wednesday, October 26. at Bpm in USTs Cullen Hall at 4001 Mt Vernon. The program will feature music from many different eras. For more information, call 522-7911 , ext 240 -o- Those of you wondenn.g what ever hap­pened to Paul Lewis. hes alive and welf m Dallas. working at the Old Plantation­belleve 1t or not 4 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 21 1983 THE ALTERNATIVE We have a better way. A better way of putting you in touch with the people that you want to meet. People whose interests are compatible with yours, sensitive people. Attractive people. People who may be interested in lasting relationships. People who understand that you can't depend on the bars to provide you with quality companionship. We have a better way-and we'd like to show it to you. Private selection offers a unique approach to video dating, combining state of the art technology with the dynamics of inter-personal relationships. Call today for your free consultation. ~PRIVATE [2 es. SELECTION The Sensible Alternative 4200 Westheimer-Suite 250 (713) 961-9876 OCT. 21 , 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Art Festival Draws Crowds to Westheimer Pumping Iron Leads to Personal Burst By Hollis Hood The autumn edition of the previously sus­pended Westheimer Colony Art Festival drew its anticipated crowd of several hundred thousand last weekend to view the work of artists and artisans during the two day event. Despite some Colony infighting and the disappointing non participation of some of the businesses in donating their space to Colony-sanctioned artists, the festival was termed a success. Bill Eagan, whose artistic designs have been appearing at the feAtival for several years, commented that this was the best year in four that he has had One restaurant owner, however, com· mented that there seemed to be many more spectators than people buying from the artists. "It's the economy," he said. "It has even hit the festival." The event was Iese flamboyant than in years past, perhaps because the crowds seemed more reluctant than usual in catching the spirit of the festival. Another festival is planned for the spring. Festival participant Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentacopyright • t983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm He';Zbl~~lurg AcelClark Q"ph1a Jett Bray g"ph1a ~~n~!;il Robert Hyde m•naglng.clttor ~~~·~,:d Chuck Meredith IPOf1•ed1tor Jon Cheatwood _,,,;:n;:,~!~.,. LytHams M/vwt1Srngd1r.ctor Mark Drago lld¥ertl61rtg Jon Cheatwood cl1U1f1ed~.,,,11ng ~~~~7i~' GrNtef '-AonttOM Bi..1nea Guild. G.y =~~/Cff lnt•n•t1on•IG•yN-1Agenc:y. Pacif1cN-• Au1tm BINNU C•p1tOI New• Service Syndicered Feerure s.tvk:•• & Wnt.,• (San Ft•OC11CO) Chronlc~Featur•, UnltedFNtureSyndlcet•.JetfreyWllaon, R1ndy Allred. Slonewall F .. 1ur .. Syndic•!•. Brl•n McN•ught.JMB•k•r POSTMASTER Send•ddr ... correct1on1103317MonlrOM •308.Hovslon. TX77008 Sublct1pt10rtr•t•lnUS1n ... ledenvelope $411peryur(52 IUU .. ).S29per1lxmonth1(2e111uea).or$125perW9ek(IMa then 2e INUM) B•ck !MUM $2 00 MCh N1t1on.I 11dverf11mg repree.nr1tM Jo. OiSebeto. R•v«ldell Marketing. 8M eth Avenue. New York 10011. (212) 242-M&J Advert,.mgdHdltM Tueec:ley,530pm.IOt!uuerele•MdFr~ dllyeY9nir'lg Nolie.to edll«tlHn Loceta<tvert111ng r•te1eheduleS1x-A w•ellecti¥eJuly1, 1983 ::::l:~:::~=:~~~..:::u::=: VO/lica"toanydeeeptrveed¥•rt•11nt Festival rep displays juried art Pumping iron may pump up your blood pressure, too, reports the International Medical Tribune Syndicate. Canadian physiologist Duncan Mac­Dougall says his study of powerlifter" found they experience enormous increases in their blood pressure while working out. The doctor says the rise is only temporary and shouldn't be much of a problem to young. healthy athletes. But he warns that people suffering from hypertension, as well as older lifters, should be very careful. He suggfflts that anyone who's worried about it should SY.itch to swimming or walking-or at least ignore the no-pain­no- gain crowd and quit before reaching muscle fatigue. Attorneys Think that Longstaff Case Will Finally End Up in the Supreme Court By Hollis Hood A 2-to·l decision on September 28 by the 5th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals affirmed an earlier ruling by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas that Richard Longstaff would be denied U.S. citizenship because his homosexuality made him "exc)udable." The ruling was the resultofLongstafra application for naturalization after 15 years on an immigrant visa in this coun­try. De1:1pite the recommendation of an INS examiner, the district court denied his citizenship application because he had violated the Texas Penal Code regarding homosexual acts. He admitted that he had engaged in homosexual activity before entering the U.S. in 1965. The ruling was appealed, and a second trial in 1981 also denied his petition for naturalization. He was deemed exculable under a 1952 INS Act because he was not "lawfully admitted," per his circumstan-ces The courts said that Congress, through the act, designated homo~exuality as included in the category·of '' psychopathic personality." Psychopaths cannot become citizens. The Act also listed some seven medical reasons for denial, among them mental retardation, cont.agious disea~ and drug addiction. However, Longstaff was never examined. Longstaff today owns the Union Jack clothing stores in DalJas and Houston. National Gay Rights Advocates offered their services as friends of the case, and Longstaff& attorney appealed. Following that action, Longstaff asked NGRA to become his attorneys of record and Don Knutson, law scholar, and Leo­nard Graff, San Francisco legal director, spent the weekend planning strategy. On October 12, Graff announced that NGRA filed a petition for a rehearing in the 5th Court of Appeals, claiming that the majority's arguments in the Longst.aff case run contrary to Supreme Coun prece­dents in INS cases. In light of the recent Carl Hill / INS success in the San Fran· cisco 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, the denial is even more inconsistent Knutson, founder and long-time NGRA director, said he was happy to be working on an anti-gay case and thinks the case will eventually approach the Supreme Court. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 6 MONTROSE VOICE I O CT. 21, 1983 21.06 Plaintiff Among Those to Receive Academic Award The Gay Academic Union, Inc. will pres· ent special awards to 11 individuals and two organizations at an awards dinner in San Diego, Nov. 26. The dinner, a fund raising effort for the National GAU Scho­larship program, is part of GA U-9, the Ninth National Conference of the Gay Academic Union on the campus of the University of California at San Diego. This is the fifth presentation of annual awards by GAU, an organization of les· bian and gay academics and profession· ah with chapters and members nationwide. The awards are designed to recognize and honor the achievements of individuals in various fields who have made significant contributions to gay scholarships and understanding and the enhancement of the gay experience. Previous recipients have included such mdividuals as Abigail Van Buren of .. Dear Abby" fame, former presidential advisor Midge Costanza, writer Chris­topher Isherwood and former California Gov. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. The Humanitarian Award for demon· strating exceptional understanding, com· passion, courage and commitment to human rights in work that had direct benefit to the gay community this year will be presented to Paul Popham and the Gay Men's Health Crisis, Inc. in New York City for efforts at raising funds to meet the major health crisis of this decade. The Evelyn C. Hooker Research Award for gay-related research that demon­etrates in its design and implementation the standards of excellence that have characterized Dr. Hooker's own work will be presented to Rhonda R Rivera, Esq., Associate Dean for Clinical Programs in Ohio State University College of Law for her monumental analysis in Hastings Law Journal of nearly every gay-related court case. Her 200-page article was cited in the decisions which invalidated the sod­omy laws of New York and Texas and pro­vides the basic legal position for civil litigation on behalf of gay and lesbian clients. The Theory Development Award is for work-in-progreBS on the development of social theory promising to contribute sig­nificantly to an understanding of gay­related issues. This year's recipient is the team of Dr. David P. McWhirter,MD, and Andrew M. Mattison. PhD, of the Clinical California Officials Urge Federal Prosecution of Dan White International Gay Sew• Agency SA.\; FRA.\;CISCO-San Francisco Mayor niane Feinstein has joined Calif. Gov. George Deukme)Jan in urging U.S. Attor· ney General William French Smith to prosecutfio Dan White under federal law. \\lute the former San Franci!'<CO super­visor who in November 1978 murdered the city's Mayor. George Moscone, an~ fir~t avowed gay supervUor, Harvey Milk, is scheduled for release from prison next January. Both Feinstein and Deukmejian have sent letters to the U.S. attorney general asking him to prosecute Whi~ un~er the provisions of federal law for Vl?lating t.he civil rights of the two assassinated city officials. The mayor and governor con­tend that White's actions "naturally inter­fered" with the ability of Moscone and Milk "to qualify and campaign as candi· dates for rHlection." As such, White is punishable under federal law Feinstein was head of San Francisco's Board of Supervisors at the time of the assastiinations and was automatically propelled into the office of mayor by L White'• ac~:n.:. ... ••••••••• .. Institute for Human Relationships in San Diego, for their exhaustive study of gay male couples to be published this fall. The Performing Arts Award is for out­standing achievement in a theatrical medium that serves to inform and enlighten the public's view oflesbians and gay men. This year it salutes the unique contribution made by Harvey Fienstein to the growing field of gay theater and its crossover into wider acceptance by a non· gay audience as exemplified by his Tony Award-winning play Torch Song Trilogy and his book for the current Broadway musical hit La Cage aux Folles. Ironically, last year's award was to John Glines, pl"O-' ducer of Torch Song Trilogy which had just made the transition to Broadway from Greenwich Village. This year's GAU Literature Award for published work with a gay-related theme that articulates with unusual beauty issues of importance to lesbians and gay men is being presented to Alice Bloch, author of Lifetime Guarantee(Pereephone Press, 1981). Her new novel, The Law of Return, being published this fall by Aly­son Publications, is described as "the rich sensual story of a woman claiming her voice as a Jew, a lesbian and a woman" which is winning praise for "its vibrancy and sense of revelation." The 1983 GAU Fine Arts Award for achievement that illuminates in an excep­tional way the quality of the gay expe­rience goes to David Hockney, a distinquished artist whose career has embraced not only pointing but theater and opera design. The Journalism Award is designed to recognize the unique contributions which reportage about gay men and women and their lifestyles makes toward greater knowledge and understanding of the gay conditon. This year it is being presented to The Body Politic Collective in Toronto which has made a valiant effort to pub­lish, despite the concerted efforts of Cana­dian authorities to shut down the paper. The President's Award for unusual dili­gence in overcoming anti-gay prejudices and increasing understanding and accep­tance of gay people in the community at large will be presented to two individuals this year. Virginia Appuzzo, as Executive Director of the National Gay Task Force, has become one of the most effective spo­kesperson" for gay men and lesbians. their concerns and their lifestyles, before Congre'"'sional committees, with White House aides and in the media. Emery Hetrick, MD, who helped develop the Cau­cus of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Members of the American Psychiatric &sociation and is a founder of Gay Psy· chiatnsts of New York and New York Phy­sicians for Human Rights, has also been a frequent spokesper~on on television and in print for the gay community. In addition to these honors, two Special Recignition Awards for actions signifi· cantly contributing to theadvancementof the lesbian and gay rights moverp.ent wi1l be given to Jeanne Cordova of Loe An~eles and Don Baker of Dallas. During the decade she published The Lesbian Tide, Cordova provided a sorely· needed voice for the lesbian community. She was a political force successfully pushing for a lesbian platform at the International Women's Year Conference in Houston. More recently she has written for a variety of publications, including Gay Commuinity News, The Advocate, Update, Frontiers and Off Our Backs. Baker is the former Dallas school teacher who was plaintiff in the successful suit to strike down the Texas sodomy law He headed the Dallas Gay Alliance for three: terms. The awards to Cordova and Baker recognize their long-standing com­mitment to gay and lesbian rights and their willingness to put themselves on the line to achieve those rights. The awards dinner will be held at the La Jolla Village Inn in San Diego beginning at ~:30 p.m., Satu~d~y, ~ovei:nber 26. NO TRICKS, JUST TREATS, NO FOOLIN'!!! 808 LOVETT ___ ._. .. ----•serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner ____ _ Open Weekends, Orders to Go --------528-9211, 521-1015 _____ .., open 7am-10pm OCT. 21, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 VOICE Night at Tower Attracts the Bizarre By Robert Hyde Plenty of nuns with beards joined in the revelry along side a red-tailed devil, an abstract vision of the Holy Ghost, an ancient oriental philosopher and St. Tho­mas Becket when the community responded to MONTROSE VOICE Night at the Tower Theatre last week, held in con· junction with Pace Theatrical Group's and Stages' presentation of Christopher Durang's Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You & The Actor's Nightmare. VOICE readers were invited to appear as their favorite (or at least most ostenta­tious) religious character for free admis­sion to the show and for a drink on the houttt> afterwards at Mary's. In a packed but subdued house, the more daring members of the community rubbed elbows with the more conservative, who chose instead to gloat at the offstage celeb­rities. Even a local television team arrived to interview the more reserved members of the crowd and asked them, "What do you expect to see here tonight?" While the show, itself, might have left much to be desired-several members of Jin. the audience left during Sister Mary, out of The biggest show, of course, was during boredom or because Baby Jesus was being intermission when the VOICE's religious crucified on stage, we'll never know- partook of cocktails and tobacco in the during its more tedious moments, all the theatre's lobby. I never expected to see the audience had to do was shift their eyes to a Holy Ghost smoking a Camel and enjoy­row of regalJy dressed cardinals, focus ing a bourbon and water, but now that I their attention on the horns of the devil think about it, I never expected to see a sitting in front of them or glimpse at the monk wearing a see-through gown colorfulorientalvisionofphilosopherGan It was an unusual evening, from the Editorial: A Part Of, Not Apart From By Robert Hyde Earlier thio week, I was invited to attend a social function sponsored by one of Hous­ton's more elite gay organizations, or so their PR would have me to believe. Having heard about the group for some time and after being invited to join by several of its members, I was very eager to take a closer look at the group. To my knowledge, there are no other associations in town who present themselves as being the creme de la creme of Houston's gay community Their publicity alone - both good and bad - was enough to make me sluff off deadline pressure to determine whether or not the group qualified for my member­ship. I was already confi~ent that I met most of their qualifications: I had a degree, I had a responsible mana~erial position, and I had blue eye~ and a dtmple in my chin, the latte~ being the most respected of my credenbal_s, so I was told. And the evening was interesting, but heaping with rare meat, stale political rhe­toric and several speeches by some members of the association who told fel · low members how valuable they were to the community. This is all well and good and can be understood at this time of the year when. so many people are concerned with how important they are. But the night became of greater interest to me when aftf'rwards, at one of our nicer bars, my host introduced m~ as !fl&nagin~ editor of this esteemed. pubhcat1on, a poa1 tion I hold humbly and with all due respect to the men of the community whom I try to fairly repreHent. I had been warned earlier by certain members of this particular association. that the group neither sought nor wanted publicity, and so I attended their little affair without the pen and P8:d. that usu­ally accompanies me to political func­tion•. But after my. introductio~s to aeveral of its members, it was 1mme?iately assumed that I had a computer br81f! (or a hidden tape recorder or a _camera hidden behind my irio) and that within a few days I would be exposing the lot of them. Never before have I been subjected to such blat­ant fear of exposure from a group_ofmen who choose to live their lives diffe~":t from most of aociety and gather penod1- ca:l~a~·~~~~f:::n8h~~:~ C:~~~=·hostile reaction to my presense had I been an NBC cameraman venturing into the Club Baths at two in the morning. My reaction was three-foJd: I was amused by their paranoia, puzzled by their outrage and, regretfully, somewhat disheartened when members such as themselves choose to hide in their collec­tive closets to leave it up to the rest of us to establish a respectable place in a society that condemns them, when their educa­tions and their experience on their hidden perches could do so much for us all. I did not learn much about the organiza­tion and I'm sorry that I did not. I had bee~ told by certain members that the group had had a great beginnmg after it wao originally formed. I had been told that the group hod done notable things for the community, But I also had been told that now the men gathered for tea socials ~nd to pat themselves on the back fo~ havmg graduated from college and having good jobs which makes them supenor to other members of the community who have been less fortunate in obtaining a respectable education or career And it was also mentioned to me that the group is nonpolitical - a remark that confuses me since several people were at this week's function who realJy want our attention on November 8. Then sadly I'm reminded of one of Nathaniel Hawthorne's stories of old New England which depicted villagers run ning away into the woods at night to wor· ship Satan. After the reaction I received this week, I wonder if perhaps these men don't gather to worship fear- a fear they must recognize repeatedly when they meet in their own dark wood, a fear that will be forever with them until they have the cour­age to do something about it. So this, gentlemen, is what you have feared this week. When the paper is put to bed tonight, I will throw on my designer jacket over my old, faded jeans and go out and have a cocktail with some of the men who aren't afraid to put their arms around each other during Gay Pride Week. And afu!r reading your copy of the VOICE, perhapo you should look once again on page one at James Frein'a etory - 1omething that merited the front page - and before you go to bed tonight, you might want to give a small clap for him. absurd plays on stage to the looks of the less festive members of the audience who could not believe their reverent eyes. Afterwards at Mary's, several of the colorfully devout wondered where the local TV news team had gone. They wanted to buy them a cocktail. HPDAwakens Community From Gregg Russell Once again as the elections draw nearer, the Montrose community is again bar­raged by a series of bar raids conducted by the Houston Police Department. Anyone familiar with the history of the Houston gay community can attest to the fact that these raids are particularly common at election time. I have never been an advocate of whole­sale violations of various sorts which occur in gay bars (i.e. public sex, liquor and age violations, etc.) but, for those who prefer to rationalize that these violations are the cause of such raids and, therefore, provide justification for bar raids, I must ask: Why do these raids primarily <>?Cur only at election time? Are we to believe that there is a sudden increase in these violations during October and Nobvember of each year? Any reaeonable thinker must conclude that theRe raids are politically motivated. But, by who? Who is pulling the strings and calling the shots downtown? For years we have been told that the villians behind these raids are the leaders of the HPD. We have been taught, like Pavlovian dogs, to react to these raids by marching down to the polls and mind­lessly voting for any candidate who utters the correct political rhetoric. Still, after having a significant amount of success in placing a majority of city council members into position, these raids continue, attest· ing to the fact that little real change has been made. One must stop to wonder if the gay community is not being taken for a joy ride. Above all else, the HPD recognizes the significant effect. that a large voter tur· nout in the gay precincts will have in the mayor's race. When, then, do they actively seek to awaken gay voters from their slum­bering and apathetic state. They have learned before that to do so results in a greater voter turnout. I do not believe that they are so ignorant that they have forgot· ten this leason. Could it be that they are acting as henchmen for a higher authority in an effort to activate this community, and that we are being manipulated and exploited by those who would play on our fears at election time? If not, why are raids allowed to continue, and why are officers who are involved in them never disci­plined for their actions beyond a superfi­cial level? Furthermore, who benefits the most Letters when the gay community is angered at election time? We must begin to examine the po88ibility that we are being used and manipulated by the current administra­tion. Although we find ounelves in the position of not having a great deal of cho­ice in this election, we would do well to begin to look for alternatives for competi­tion in future electorial races. 912 Westhelmer at Montrose 524-7859 all major QUALITY BOOTS *Zodiac USA *Bona Allen *Justin *Dingo *Regal *Chippewa *Frye *Durango *Wrangler *Levis *Sandals Largest Choice Available In Houston Prices start at 13915 8 MONTROSE VOICE/ OCT. 21, 1983 By John Kyper Via Gay Press Association Wire Service Robert Austin Sullivan is used to waiting. For a decade-longer than any other pri­soner in the United States-he has been waiting on death row at Florida State Pri­son and fighting for his life. He stands convicted of a 1973 murder, a murder he says he didn't commit. His wait almost ended in 1979. He came within two days of the electric chair. He probably would be dead today were it not for the energetic support of a volunteer attorney and a few hundred people who have contributed to a defense fund. It all began on Sunday night, April 8, 1973, when Donald Schmidt, the night manager of Howard Johnson's Restau­rant in Homestead, Florida, disappeared with $2700 of the restaurant's money after locking up for the evening. His body was found two days later at a target range 19 miles away, with two shotgun blasts to the head, said the coroner His wrist watch was missing and so was his wallet and Mastercard. The card was used in the next few days, and police soon tracked down the user: Robert Sullivan, a former manager of the restaurant who resigned the previous year after an embez­zlement investigation. Sullivan contends he was set up for the murder rap and that he blundered into it. He had just arrived back in M;ami after a trip to New England and was staying in a motel with a traveling companion named Reid McLaughlin, whom he had met at a gay bar in Boston. Relations between the two deteriorated, however, when a messy triangle deve­loped with John Lucheck, a former employee at Howard Johnson's. Things got even worse when Gilbert Jackson, who both Sullivan and McLaughlin knew in Boaton, flew in to spend the Easter vaca­tion. One day, McLaughlin showed Sullivan a Mastercard issued to a Donal Schmidt and said that Sullivan could use the card to repay expenses. McLaughlin said he had been going out with Schmidt and had borrowed the card. So Sullivan took the card and bought clothing. He also took a watch that McLaughlin lent him because his own watch was in for repair. Those were the worst mistakes he ever made. The following day, Sullivan saw an account of the robbery-abduction-murder in the Miami News. Angrily he confronted McLaughlin, who finally confessed. Among his versions, McLaughlin claimed that he had committed the crime with Luchek. They had borrowed the shotgun and shot Schmidt twice. He was later to tell various cellmates that Jackson was the actual murderer. Sullivan and McLaughlin were arrested on April 16 while driving home from a bar in Borward County. The car was searched even before they were read their rights, revealing a shotgun in the trunk and a pistol in the glove compartment. Police also found the Mastercard and what they claimed was the victim's watch on Sulli­van. Hia protest.a of innocence and repeated requeata to call an attorney, whom he had left only moments before at the bar, were ignored. Police grilled Sullivan for more than eight hours before booking him, and he confeaaed. Meanwhile, McLaughlin signed a state­ment that named Sullivan as the killer. Gilbert Jackson waa releaaed at the arrest scene after a brief questioning and was never brought to the police station or called aa a witneaa. Sullivan was pitifully naive, believing that bis confeaaion would be thrown out of court and that he would get a fair trial. But hia father, a surgeon, refused to hire a law­yer. Instead, Sullivan ended up with a pub­lic defender, Dennis Dean, who never contacted five people whom Sullivan said could testify that he waa 40 miles away at the Broward County bar at the time of the ately stated that he had beat Schmidt in the head with a tire iron and shot him four times, knowing that these statements would be contradicted by the autopsy report. Sullivan says Dean neither con­tacted any of the alibi witnesses nor exposed contradictions in the confession and in police testimony. He failed to note that the defendant's feet were larger than the footprints found at the scene. Dean says he tried to contact the witnesses, but admitted to a Rolling Stone reporter that his enthusiasm was dampened by the belief that he was defending a guilty man who had failed a lie detector test. In court papers, Dean has been accused of provid­ing an inadequate defense. At his trial, Sullivan was portrayed as a cold-blooded killer wanting to commit the perfect crime. Then why, one wonders, would he have used the credit card of someone he had just murdered? He was quoted as saying during the interrogation, "I always wanted to commit a murder," a remark he denies he ever made. One of those testifying against him was McLaughlin, who slipped during cross examination and admitted, '4My sentence will depend on my testimony." (He received life with the possibility of early parole and was released in March 1981.) Dean did not pursue the slip, asking few questions of the state witneBBe&. He alao neglected to reveal that McLaughlin had failed four out of seven lie detector ques­tions. The police, prosecutor, judge and jury all knew of Sullivan's homosexuality, and the proaecutor made repeated compari­sons to Leopold and Loeb. But there was no Clarence Darrow to get him off. He was found guilty and sentenced to die. Robert Sullivan was the seventh person sentenced under Florida's new law. He has lived on death row since November 14, 1973. He first appeal, automatically granted by the statute, was to the state supreme court, where his death sentence was the first one to be upheld by a 4-2 vote. In 1976, during the week of the Bicenten­nial, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled death penalty laws in Florida, Texas and Geor­gia constitutional and shortly thereafter declined to hear Sullivan's direct appeal. (Theoretically he still has one more chance at the USSC before exhausting all appeals, provided be ia not executed first.) State legal aid is provided to capital cases only through the first appeal, and Dennis Dean officially withdrew from the case in October 1976, leaving Sullivan without representation. Friends, shocked by the realization that Sullivan was being left to face a severe predicament alone, formed a defense fund. Through the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, an organi· zation that represents indigent death row clients regardleBS of race, he met Roy Black of Miami, the first attorney to take an active interest in his case. He is volun­teering as lead counsel, assisted by Anthony Amsterdam of New York Uni­versity Law School, the nation's foremost authority on capital punishment. Black wants to get a new trial for Sullivan, but his most urgent task has been to keep him alive. Sullivan's case was presented to a clemency board in 1977. The ruling waa negative, and Governor Robert Graham signed thedeath warrant on June !9, 1979. Execution was set for 7 a.m. on June 27. Sullivan was taken to the superintend­ent'• office to be informed of his new sta­tus, then taken to a cell behind the execution chamber. He began to plan his own funeral and burial arrangements. Roy Black left hie sickbed to argue for a stay of execution before the Florida Supreme Court on Friday the 22nd. A stay was refused by a four-to-three vote. In a bitter blow Justice Boyd, who had voted for Sullivan in hie 1974 appeal, had switched his vote. Yet Chief Justice Arthur England'a vigorous dissent was adopted by the U.S. District Judge Jose Gonzales three days later when he granted an indefinite stay 38 hours before Sullivan was to die. Sullivan had survived the week with the support of many friends who wrote him and a few who visited him every day. ult was not easy to preserve the balance between having hope and yet also prepar­ing for the worst," he wrote just after hie stay had been granted. Cardinal Hum­berto Medeiros of Boston and a number of other biohopo sent telegrams on hie behalf to the governor. In a way, the signing of the death war­rant proved beneficial for Sullivan. Aa a result of the nationwide publicity brought by hie plight, two new witnesses, William Harlow aad Peter Tioighe, came forward to sign oworn tlate111enta that Sullivan had, indeed, been at the Broward County bar at the time of the murder. They were among the names he had given his public defenders to contact. Harlow had good reason to remember that night: it was his 18th birthday, the first time that he could legally drink in Florida. And there have been new developments concerning evidence in the case. The adhe­sive tape that had bound the victim's wrists had two fingerprints that did not belong to either Schmidt, Sullivan or McLaughlin. When examining police evi· dence in 1978, Roy Black discovered thata clerk had destroyed the tape. And recently, Black's private investigator, Vir· ginia Synder, has ascertained from the victim's family that the Waltham watch found on Sullivan at his arrest was not Schmidt's, as had been alleged by both McLaughlin and the police. His watch, they informed her, "was very definitely a Timex." Snyder also has succeeded in locating several more alibi witnesses. But one-the man at the Broward County bar who claimed to be an attorney-has refused to talk. Other obstacles have arisen. Five days after being contacted by Black in August 1978, Gilbert Jackson was found mur­dered in his Winthrop, Massachusetts, home. The late David Brill, reporter for Boston's weekly Gay Community News, was aleo investigating the Sullivan case and believed in his innocence. Not long before his mysterious death in November 1979, Brill's car was broken into and his briefcase taken. When the briefcase was recovered, the only file missing was Sulli­van's. In the four years since the death watch, attempts to obtain a new trial have met with a series of legal setbacks in the federal court system. At the beginning of 1983, a three-judge panel of the I Ith U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta unanimously rejected his appeal. In May, the full court refused to reconsider the rejection. The next step is to appeal to the Supreme Court. If he loses there, the governor of Florida would sign another death war­rant. With all appeals exhausted, Sulli­van's execution would be virtually certain, possibly before the end of the year-unless his lawyer could produce new points of appeal to persuade a judge to issue a stay. Contributions for his defense may be sent to the Robert Austin Sullivan Defense Fund, Ralph Jacobs, director, 53 Leicester Road, Belmont, MA 02178. Congress May Set National Drinking Age Congress ia set to begin debate on a national drinking age. New Jersey Rep. James Florio has introduced a bill to make it a federal crime to sell liquor to anyone under the age of 21, reports the Philtukl­phia Inquirer. The move is sure to arouse opposition not only from the liquor lobby, but from states' rights advocates. Florio 1ays, however, that the federal government can regulate drinking because the manufacture and sale of alco­holic beverages involves interstate com· merce. The congreSBman says it's time for a national solution to the problem of teen­age drinking, which accounts for 60 per­cent of all teenage highway fatalities. Twenty-eight state• have already adopted 21 as the legal drinking age, Five 1tatea allow IS-year-olds to drink bard liquor while 10 others have limited them to beer and wine. The rest have set the legal age at either 19 or 20. LOOK HOW YOU'RE HELPING CanCmsher Co~ration We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! 0 Trash by Can Crusher's definition is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation is a full-service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans. 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"' JJ/F LITl\l4TE BAAIDfflT-4 TO SPUDS AREA GIRESBEST FRIEND! 416 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 620--0664 fill MICATEX VIDEO PROPERTY i nc IN VEN TORY SEfWICE ' A DISCREET SERVICE FOR HOME AND BUSINESS •Video Tape Inventories of Insured Valuables , Homes and Fu r niture, Antiques, Automobiles, Company Fi xed Assets and Vehicle Fleets • Document Home Improvements · Addit ions • Video Histories of Property Development •Proof of Real Estate Property Condition Prior to Leasing 013) 669-9355 10 MONTROSE VOICE / OCT. 21 , 1983 A Disturbed Peace Comparing Gay Civil Rights with Black Civil Rights By Brian McNaught Non-gay black men and women can be the best and the toughest members of an audience listening to a talk on homosexu­ality. That, at least, has been my expe­rience as a speaker. As one would hope, many black men and women are able to identify with the oppression they hear articulated by a white gay male or lesbian speaker. You can see it in their eyes, in the knowing nods of their heads, in their half smiles, and you can hear it in their questions. For that reason, I am always happy to see black men and women in audiences and I generally try to relate the struggle for Gay and Lesbian Civil Rights to the Black Civil Rights struggle. That technique also prompts some non­gay black men and women to be the tough­est, angriest members of an audience. The general response from these individuals is "How dare you compare the oppression of a gay person to the oppression of a black? I will always be black but you chose to be gay!" The defendable point is that gay people face blatant discrimination when they choose to identify themselves, and black people don't have the option. A white gay male or lesbian can pass. A black non-gay man or woman can't. Yet. even when that is acknowledged and even when it is made perfectly clear that sexual orientation is not chosen but determined by unknown factors by no later than age five, and that IO percent of the population has always been and will always be gay. and even when it is explained that the horrors of the closet and the horrors of isolation make coming out leas a choice than it seems, there is still resentment on the part of some racial and ethnic minority people when they think they hear it suggested that anyone has 1uffered as much as they have. I don't have much patience with the game "My pain's bigger than your pain." Pain is relative and totally subjective. How do you compare the alcoholism, drug addiction and suicide of black, Hispanic, Native American and gay people? Each results from a personal sense of frustra­tion, depression and hopelessness. Whether it's racism or homophobia, the effect is the same. The grPat tragedy of such competition is that it pite one hurting person against another hurting person, acting as if both were fighting over the same hospital bed by comparing their aches and pains. It also conjures up images of two children arguing "Mother always hated me more than she hated you ... The arguing is an exercise in counterproductive wound lick­ing. How much more sense it makes to say "We are both entitled to full and equal access to the benefits of the earth. We have been historically denied them. How can we help one another become whole peo· pie'" GREEK ISLAND Open 11am-11pm Monday-Friday 6-11 Saturday Parking next door Fine Greek Food & 1/ Seafood ~ Cocktails 7 522-7040 ~ Those statements are rarely made because it is human to be selfish. We imagine there is a limited amount of jus­tice to go around, and we want to make sure no one interferes with us getting our share. We imagine there is a limited amount of sympathy, a limited amount of time, a limited amount of money and a limited amount of patience on the part of the non-gay white masters. So, we bicker. Politically active minority people tend to cooperate with other minority people when they see it to their advantage. Elect· ing progressives to positions of power is generaHy one agenda we share. But watch out if there is a black progressive running against a gay progressive! In my quiet moments of dreaming things that never were and asking uWhy not?," I imagine a world in which every person is conscious of the oppression they create in other people's lives and makes the conscious decision to alter their behav­ior and attitudes. I imagine integrated gay bars and integrated gay and non-gay high school proms. I imagine integrated gay and non-gay neighborhoods, not because people were forced financially to live together, but because they wanted to. "Why not?" Because we're imperfect and afraid and selfish. Attitudes are deeply ingrained and we are a11 racist, sex­ist, religious elitist and homophobic. We have )earned to spend our time on those things which benefit Us, and no one has shown us how spending time imagining the horror of growing up black in America is of any benefit to us personally. While I still dream about an individual and national shift of consciousness on the attitudes of people toward one another, I find that I spend most of my time today concentrating on behavior. By way of example, I have spent nine YEAR ROUND GROUNDS MAINTAINANCE INSECT CONTROL FERTILIZING ~SC~APING r FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE CALL DAVID WORTHY (713) 529-0027 GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 ID )J ~en years taveling across North America giv­ing two-hour talks to predominantly non­gay audiences on homosexuality. For the first eight years, my presentations have been tailored to educate with, in a non­threatening way, the truths of homosexu­ality. I have witnessed significant changes in the attitudes of many people, but I suspect the majority of them were ready to have their attitudes changed. Others accepted me as the exception. For the last year, I have concentrated more on changing the behavior of non-gay people toward gay men and lesbians. I am less invested emotionally in having the audience like me than I am in having them respect my rights. In a recent class of police cadets, I underscored several times that I did not care whether or not the cadets approved of homosexuality or whether they thought it was normal and moral. I was principa1ly concerned that they treat with respect every gay man and lesbian who entered the poJice station to fill out a report on a crime. As black author James Baldwin has stated, he doesn't worry much about racism anymore. Racism, he states, is the white person's problem. I worry less about homophobia because homophobia is the non-gay person's problem. My problem is working to guarantee that gay men and lesbians can live where they want to live, work where they want to work and receive the services to which they are entitled as taxpayers. It would be nice if our land­lords, employers and those who provide services liked us, but it is not essential to happine.-s. Education continuei:i to be important, most especially given the incredible level of ignorance in society about sexuality. (I would hazard the guess that the majority of the country thinks cunnilingus is an Irish airline.) But education is most effec­tive when the information is communi­cated through actions rather than just words. AJJ every poll has shown, attitudes about homosexuality in this country are directly linked to "coming out." It is not by hearing eloquent presentations by gay and lesbian speakers that the average American decides to support Gay Civil Rights but by his or her personal contact with a self-affirmed gay man or lesbian who has come out of the closet at home, at work, in the neighborhood and in church. There is one moment in my presentation to a public audience during which I see nearly every black head nod in affirma­tion. It is when I describe my suicide attempt and the lesson I learned then. Whether we are black or white, male or female, gay or staight, young or old, beau­tiful or average-looking, fat or skinny, ablebodied or physically challenged, we all have the individual choice of living our lives for ourselves or living our lives to meet other people's expectations. Do we live, do we dress, do we laugh, do we stay silent to make Mom and Dad, my boss, my landlord, my mail carrier, non-gay people, white people and powerful people happy, or do we live, dress, laugh and stay silent because we find it gives our life meaning? If you make your decisions based upon your dreams and affirm the right of others to do the same, the question of who has suffered more becomes irrelevant. If you are then able to embrace the directive which states that you love your neighbor as you love yourself, the quet1tion "Why not?" becomes moot -J983by -&an McN7ught. who lives in &ston, and is a long-time gay activist in the Cat/wile Church. His monthly column appears here and ln other gay publica­tions. * H ALL A L L 0 cw 0 E S E T N u M E s 10% OFFI with this coupon 528-4565 open 11am-9pm (except Sun.) 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However careful and circums· pect each of us is in known environments, so much more 80 must we be in places where local Jaws or mores are only par· tially known or even unknown. When travelling to a foreign country, it is important to review every item you take with you in order to make sure that you bring nothing which might be construed u illegal. Magazines or books sold openly in the U.S.A. may be deemed pornogra· phic or contraband in some other country. And the rever&E: is true, too. Last aummer, I had the unpleasant duty of find· ing an immigration lawyer to assist an Australian friend who, on arriving in the U.S.A., was found to be unacceptable for admission because of a couple of mildly pornographic postcards found in his suit· case. The cards had been "bon voyage" notes from friends! Once abroad, one must be careful not to run afoul of the local laws. Frequently, for gay men particularly, the ability to keep on the proper side of the law is to some extent dependent on vagaries oflocal law enforcement. vagaries we have a clear understanding of on our home turf but no knowledge of whatsoever in a foreign jurisdiction. It is important to understand that gay eex is, in some places abroad (just as in some places at home), a criminal act. The o:tent to which criminal laws are enforced varies from place to place. Still you risk incarceration if you act without being aware of the local laws or their environ­ment. Returning from a couple of weeks in the Orient last month, my lover and I passed through Hong Kong, reputed to be one of the great "Open Cities" of the world. Still, while we were there, the local English lan­guage paper had an interesting small piece reporting the trial and sentencing of a man found guilty of soliciting for gay sex. A fine of several hundred doUars was levied, a high price to pay for a night of fun It is important to remember when we travel that we frequently leave behind the protection of "due process of the law." Accordingly, when in a foreign country, we have to be particularly careful about observing local laws and rules. 1983 Henry Walter Wei3B, a New York City attorney. Hia column appears here periodically and in other gay pubUcationa. Letter• and questions from readers are welcome. Write 4519 Lincoln Bldg., 6() E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10165. Ugly Kids Better Off Being an ugly child may be a blessing in disguise, reports Parents Magazine. . Child psychologist Anita Gurian believes unattractive children have a bet­ter chance for aucces1 and happiness than youngsters who are good-looking. Gurian eays children who are not fawned over for their beauty develop other qualities to make themselves attractive to others, such as loyalty, a capacity for intimacy and the ability to ehare interests, concerns and feelings. These skills. says Gurian, make homely children prime candidates for 1ocial suc­cess. because they make them "capable of building long-lasting relationships that are not based on 1uperfi~ality ." Every Friday, Al/Over Montrose, The Voice Informs, Entertains Thousands. The Montrose Voice is read each week by nearly 30, 000 in Houston. That's thousands more than any other gay or Montrose community publication. When you have a message to deliver to Montrose, put it in the Voice ... the professional, dedicated, community-involved Montrose Voice. number 1 in Montrose OCT 21 , 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Commentary Moondaughter's Emporium: The Way It Was By Sharon McDonald after all, men do it, so it must be patriar­Not all relationships start out smoothly, cha!, butshejustexhaledacloudofsmoke and for us lesbian feminists, politics are and stomJ>e:d. off. She ~orralled a member often the waves that rock the boat. When I of the Cooking Collective who reluctantly think of all the energy I had to put into produced a small ceramic cunt-shaped raising Louise's consciousness about ashtray and said reproachfully, "Do you Feminist Dating, Goddess only knows re~lly wai:it to P.ut y~ur filth,Y ashes into how I've put up with it all. I could see it this beautiful thmg? Louise s r~ply, they coming from the very first day. told me later, was very low consc1ousness. educating, I kept warning myself as 1 pushed my hair into place and eased open one button. When she leaned over and ki88ed me, I decided I should start by shar­ing good literature with her-like the new lesbian sex manual I'd just bought, for instance. That night we did our first skill sharing. The Collective member gave her a dirty I guess it just goes to show that appearan· ces can be deceiving. Louise turned out to be very well-educated, and as I said before, I'm always eager to be educated. "Hi, Sharon? This is Louise, from the look, the ashtray and five leaflets explain­Women Against Sexist Things Every- ing how smoking is a patriarchal institu­where meeting. Want to have dinner with tion used to keep women oppressed. me at the Emporium tonight?" Just as we were getting settled again McDonald, who lives in Los Angeles, is "Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes!" I said coolly. I was put off at her approach, of course. As everyone knows, a proper Feminist Date begins when two or more women simul­taneously ask each other out, participat· ing equally in the decision-making process, neither party buying into the Man's game by resorting to macho behav­ior like speaking first. An image of Louise in her new vest at last week's meeting flashed through my mind, and I decided to let her blunder pass. ~~~~ht, I .:;" h::~cap~u~~~g w~n;~nih! excitement of the political task ahead. Although she had started off on the wrong foot, Louise showed promise by obeying another rule of Feminist Dating: Get Thy Entertainment at a Feminist Establishment. The Emporium's full name was Moondaughter Blood.woman's Menstrual Sponge and Whole Wheat Date Nut Bread Emporium, and it was a popu­lar movement hangout for the six months that it operated. It served as a combina­tion restaurant, therapy center, theater, meeting hall, menstrual sponge ware­house and crash pad for traveling dykes. On weekends, there was entertainment by local performers who read from their jour­nals in two-and-a-half-hour sets. Tonight was All You Can Process Night, with con­tinuous reading for 24 hours at no extra charge. We arrived just as the Cooking Collec­tive was dishing up the Savory Separatist Stew (the meat was what had been separ­ated) and generous helpings of Nukeless Noodle Surprise, a casserole with a baked­in anti-nuke leaflet. The Cooking CoBec­tive was committed to their motto: "Don't just eat, Educate!" We filled our plates and helped ourselves to the specialty of the house, the little indi­vidual cunt-shaped whole wheat date nut bread loaves. Joining the others sitting on the cement floor in concentric circles, we commenced to get in touch with the woman at the microphone, who wae read­ing her life story and acting out all the parts. Whenever she got to a male charac­ter, her primary relationship stood up and led the crowd in booing. By the time we got there at 9 p.m., she was up to her fifth birthday party and the train set she never got. "Wow, you two really missed something earlier!" a woman sitting near us whis­pered to me. "There was this great show­ing of Marge Johnson's art!" "Who's Marge Johnson?" I asked, always eager to be educated. and I was telling Louise about Marge co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit Johnson, I noticed that she was looking at for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing me oddly. The more she looked, the more I from the Gay Press Association. Her lost my train of process. She had the most column appears here and in other gay beautiful eyes. She's going to need a lot of newspapers. Massage (Doing it the Greek Way) Performed by a European­trained technician. Special­izing in Sport Massage, Accupressure, Reflexology, Alcohol Rubs, Back. Neck & Foot Massages. Reasonably Priced. Special offer to first 10 calls. By Appointment Only. 868-9271 Pete Fall Specials "Wow, you haven't heard of Marge J ohnson? Oh wow. Marge Johnson was, like, the best artist, like she killed herself in 1955 because she couldn'tstand being a housewife, you know, and she was proba­bly a dyke, and like she made all these paintings that male art critics won't recog­nize as great because they say, 'They're only paint-by-number, so how great is that?' but, like, her work is so full offemale images and places where she purposely didn't go by the numbers! It was so heavy." Mon-Fri/Two ForOne Lunches/ Plate Special or Soup&Sandwich. I turned back to Louise to raise her con­sciousness about Marg~ J91lnson, but she waa busy Iookina-for an ashtray. I tried te raise her consciousness about smokmg; 402Lovett 527-9866 Dynasty on Wed. Nights Mon.- Thurs $5.95 Dinner Special 14 MONTROSE VOICE/ OCT. 21, 1983 Commentary Year of the Queen? Gay Astrology Simplifies It All! By David Meunier Today, many people are fascinated by aotrology. You know that system where people sup­posedly have similar personality traits according to the month in which they were born. They are assigned funny little sym· bols and animals to represent them. It's all very technical because you have to know exactly in what hour and minute you were born. You also have to consider the posi­tion of the moon and what planets were in transit. Like, can you believe this crap? Person­ally, I think people would be much better off with 1ign1 like: OPEN 24 HOURS; OUT OF ORDER; UNDER CONSTRUCTION; or NO TRESPASSING. However, wouldn't you just know it. Thooe inscrutable Orientals would have their own system. In Chinese astrology, they don't bother with all this day and month business. They go for whole years: Year of the Monkey, Year of the Tiger, etc. I find this a little easier but still confusing. So I've developed my own system, based on the Chinese method which will help put all gay people in one of five categories. You don't have to bother worrying about reaearching your birthdate. As you read on, it will become readily apparent which group you fall into. YEAR OF THE QUEEN: Do you like to decorate? Find china patterns stimulat­ing? Recognize good crystal at 40 feet? You may have been born in the Year of the Queen. People in thia group are likely to be pre­tentious. materialistic and dizzy. On the other hand, they are organized, efficient and like to clean house. They also have an inordinate interest in Princess Di, and not many of them will be found in the service profe88ions. Some famous people born in this group include Liberace and Barbra Streisand. YEAR OF THE BlITCH: Butch people like to join gyms, work on cars and smell leather. They are usually strong, confi­dent and stuck on themselves. They can also be fun folks who like to wear coatumeo and party all night. They do not fare well when exposed to opera, ballet or public television. More women are born into this year than any other. Some famous butch people are Grace Jone• and Tom Selleck Pantyhose Supreme If celebrity salad dressing doesn't make you feel glamouroue enough, now you can pick up a pair of celebrity panty hose. Diana Rose has lent her name to a new line of 1tockings. The ainger will have a hand in styling, designing and packaging the hose and will receive royalties bued on 1aleo, report. USA Today. Gay Pen Pals Being Ripped Off by Prison Inmates A few memben of the gay community cor­responding with priaon inmates are becoming entrapped in a prison ocheme involving altered pootal money orden, report. the Phikuklphia Gay Newo. Some prisoners seeking pen pals through gay publications encourage their correspondents to cash money orders in large amounts and then wire the amounts to a pri.aoner'a friend on the out.aide. Banko alerted to these fraudulent tran­aoction1 by the Chief Poatal Inspector deduct amount& from the correapondenta' account.a. Some individuals have lost as much u $20,000 through this scheme, the newspaper reported. YEAR OF THE ALLIGATOR: What do Brooke Shields and Attila the Hun have in common? You've guessed it!They are both alligator people. These people think they are adventu· roue and exciting and reach puberty at an early age. They are also healthy, like to travel and are just plain boring. Alligator people have hobbies such as knitting, stamp collecting and mixing drinu. They tend to work well when disco muaic is playing in the background. They are loyal lovers and good politicians. They adore things like "Save the Whales," "Ban the Bomb," etc. YEAR OF THE CRAB: Crab people are unlucky in areas of health. Even when they are well, they look sick. On the positive side, they are kind, con­siderate and love soap operas. They like to work in health food stores and fast food chains. Unfortunately, they make terrible lov· ere, since they never feel well enough to do "it." Some well·known crabs are David Bowie and Typhoid Mary. YEAR OF THE TROLL: Many persons born under this sign tend to be physically unattractive or, at the very least, have an unpleasant personality. Trolls are not great social mixers and will not enhance your dinner parties. They like the outdoors-living under bridges If you are an avid fan of THE FAR SIDE cartoons, you'll have to have Gary Larson's newest collection And if you missed his first best seller, you'd better be sure you have ... and cliffs or in caves suits them just fine. On the positive side, trolls love animals and live Jong lives. (Or maybe it just seems like they never die?) Ifyou'rea troll, you're in such company as Truman Capote and Jerry Lewis. Remember, you may have been born in transit {if your mother didn't get to the hospital on time), so You could have traits from several groups. What? Y-ou say the whole thing is ridicu· lous and has no redeeming social value? Well, that's what I said in the beginning. Frankly, my sign has always been: MEN AT WORK! Meunier is a freelance writer living in Houston Order now if you love humor that starts from and remains firmly footed in left field! Mall m Far Side Books, c/o MOntroSe IA:liee 4400 Jonnson ortve, Fairway, KS 66205 1Make Clled<S payable to universal Pn!5S syndicate> °'Y------ "Pull out, lleltyl Pull outt .•• Youw htt an arteryt• OCT. 21 , 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 16 MONTROSE VOICE/ OCT 21, 1983 How Gay Are You? By Joe Baker Okay, everbody, listen up. So just how "gay" are you? You don't know! Well, then it is time to take the first "Joe Baker Official Gay His­tory'' test. Yes, I know, you never liked history in school. You never could remember all those famous people, places and dates. That's probably because you were even "a little funny" way back then. You didn't like history because no teacher ever told you about uour history." You couldn't relate to all that boring, straight stuff. So here's the history lesson you've been waiting for all these years. I've put it into the form of a test so you can quiz yourself and see how gay you really are. The information presented comes cour­tesy of The Gay Book of Days by Martin Greif, which I found recently while brows­ing through a bookstore. The book provides a wonderfully funny and informative insight into who is, was, may have been, probably was, and almost certainly seems to have been gay during the past 5000 years. The author uses humor to make a very serious point: that gayness has always been a natural condition throughout his­tory and that it is, has been and always will be a vital part of the human expe. nence. Boys and girls, take out your pencils and let's begin: 1. Whose mother claimed that he had affairs U'ith other men in his youth? a) Gay activist Ray Hill. b) Winston Churchill. c) Hans Christian Andersen. 2. Who once found a rare moment of comfort in an affair with a female drama coach? a)Marilyn Monroe. b) Eleanor Roose­velt. c) Billie Jean King. 3. Who liked to dress himself in animal skins and tear at the sexual organs of pri· soners tied to stakes? a) Richard Nixon. b) Nero. c)JuliusCae­sar 4. Who was known as the '"killer fruit?" a) Dallas County District Attorney Henry Wade. b) J. Edgar Hoover. c) The Sundance Kid. 5. What great woman actress liked men, liked women and especially liked herself? a) Elizabeth Taylor. b) Tallulah Bank­head. c) Mae West. 6. What Pope u•anted to take the name "Formosus I (the Well-Shaped)" upon his election and is rumored to have had a heart attack while playing bottom to hlS favorite top? a) Pope Pius II. b) Pope John Paul IL c) Pope Paul IL 7. Who said, "Ever since I had that inter­view m which I said I was bisexual, it seems twice as many peopk wave at me in the streets?" a) Billie Jean King. b) Barry Manilow. c) Elton John. 8. What presufent of the United States was (is) knawn as "Mr. Nancy?" a) James Buchanan. b) Ronald Reagan. c) Both. 9. Who was the first professional athe· lete to publicly reveal he was a homosex­ual? a) Joe Montana. b) Danny White. c) Dave Kopay. 10. What famous composer liked more than a banjo on his knee? a) Stephen Foster. b) Ludwig van Bee­thoven. c) Tennessee Ernie Ford. 11. Who said, "I was a beautiful little boy and everyone had me-men. women, dogs and fire hydrants?" a) Jack Wrangler. b) Truman Capote. c) Paul Lynde. 12. When asked whether the first person he slept with was a man or a woman, who replied, "I dont't know, I was too polite to ask?" a) Truman Capote. b) Calvin Klein. c) Gore Vidal. 13. Who popularized the "daisy chain" or "conga line" of people joined front and back in sexual union? a) Robert Louis Stevenson. b) Joseph R. McCarthy. c) The emperor Tiberius. 14. Who said, "Iwasonceahomosexual, but it didn't work?". a) Richard Burton. b) Bette Midler. c) Tab Hunter. 15. Who revealed that he "once had a homosexual experience in which he spilled his seed faster than anyone-in two seconds?". a) Tiny Tim. b) Howard Hughes. c) Montgomery Clift. 16. Rumors have circulated for centuries that this man was nat the man he was cracked up to be? a) Maurioe Chevalier. b) Yves St. Lau­rent. c) Napoleon Bonaparte. 17. Who walked fully clothed into a Tur~ kish bath in the movie East of Eden and was told, 14Youmakemehotjustlookingat you?" a) Sal Mineo. b) James Dean. c) Rudolph Valentino 18. Who used to write letters to her frU!nd that said things like, "Hick darling ... Oh I want to put my arms around you ... I want to a~0b~:::d~~~;;; ?~) Mary Tyler Moore. c) Eleanor Roosevelt. 19. Who looked like a young Charks Lindbergh? a) Amelia Earhart. b) Mick Jagger. c) Emily Dickinson. 20. Errol Flynn, Tyrone Power and Montgomery Clift were great Hollywood womanizers. What else did they have in common? a) They were all underendowed. b) They all liked to jump into the sack with men. c) They couldn't get it up for a woman. 21. A certain rumor has it that billia­naire Howard Hughes turned over for a handsome, uirile movie star-for cash. Who was it? A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 a) Errol Flynn. b) Truman Capote. c) James Dean. 22. Who IS the patron saint of gays? a) St. Sebastian. b) St. Christopher. c) Mary Magdalene. 23. What famous churchman was so upset over his "best friend's" death that he threw himself upon the deathbed and spent the night with the corpse? a) John Henry, Cardinal Newman. b) Rev. Jerry Falwell. c) Pope Leo X. 24. To anyone growing up gay in the 1950s. this person was an inspiration? a) Nick Adams. b) Johnny Mathis. c) Tab Hunter. 25. Who caused untold misery for both his colleagues and three generations of British homosexuals? a) Paul McCartney. b) Oscar Wilde. c) Quiz Walt Whitman. Everybody finished? Now check your answers. If you answered all 25 questions cor· rectly, you should be leading the Gay Pride Parade next year. If you answered 20 to 24 right, your boss knows you're gay. If you got 15 to 19 questions right, your mother knows you're gay. Ten to 14 cor· rect, your friends have a hard time believ· ing you're gay. If you answered only five to nine of the questions correctly, you are having a hard time believing you're gay. Four and under, forget about being gay. you're obviously straight! ANSWERS: 1-b, 2-a, 3-b, 4-b, 5-b, 6-c, 7-c, 8-a, 9-c, 10-a, 11-b, 12-c, 13-c, 14-a, 15-a, 16-c, 17-b, 18-c, 19-a, 20-b, 21-a, 22-a, 23-a, 24-c, 25-b. Linda "Lulu" Simpson announces ll©!P> ©IF IJ[l={]~ [l={](Q)[L~ U~ INl©W ©!P>~INI 3 Plus 2 Revue Featuring Show Director Ron Sioux with Robbie Roberts & Tracey starring Maude & r~\..ieiiilll .... _.. Champagne THURSDAY Fish Fry, 7pm till Sunday, 4pm HAPPY HOURS Mon-Fri 10-7 Saturday 7-7 CHILI COOKOFF COMING SOON HOURS Mon-Fri 10-2 Saturday 7-2 Sunday 12-2 OCT. 21, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Eddie Cruises, Woody Loses and a Chill that Thrills Films By Jack Sturdy Summer's over, the kids are back at school, and Hollywood has settled back to releasing films for adults again. Here are some capsule reviews of the latest abun­dance from the silver screen. o Eddie and the Cruisers Eddie and the Cruisers has a great fi.Jm buried within it that surfaces unexpect­edly at poignant moments of focused intensity. It's a good film; director Martin Davidson's statement as a visionary is blurred by neither content nor context, but by uneven performances from his cast. Eddie and the Cruisers were a chart­busting 1963 band. On the eve of their greatest achievement, signing to release an innovative, ambitious album called "Season in Hell," Eddie Wilson, the group's vocal and spiritual leader, drives off a bridge. Was it accident, suicide or murder? Eddie's body was never reco· vered, and the following day the tapes for the new album are stolen from the vault. unofficial patriarch and matriarch of the friends. Sam Weber (Tom Berenger)is now a Magnum-like TV star; Michael (Jeff Goldblum) is a quick-quipped gossip mag­azine journalist. Nick (William Hurt), a cynical Vietnam vet, is a drug dealer. Meg (Mary Kay Place) is a successful attorney, and Karen Bowers (Jobeth Williams) has sacrificed a writing career to the Ameri· can dream of husband and family. An eighth houseguest is Chloe (Meg Tilly), Alex' much younger girlfriend, who participates as an observer. Her innocence sets off the group realization that each will never accomplish certain goals or fulfill specific expectations. Does all this sound depressing? It isn't. Kasdan and co-author Barbara Benedek have written a very funny and bittersweet comedy saturated with poignancy, friend· ship and love. The story picks up 20 years later, when the Cruisers' music is back again on the charts. Reporter Maggie Foley (Ellen Bar­kin) is investigating the mystery of Eddie's demise, and she looks up the remaining group members. Michael Pare acknowledges crowd's chear as F.ddie Kasdan's cast turns in the best eneem· hie acting of the past decade. That, com­bined with a brilliant script, John Bailey's exciting cinematography and Kasdan'e direction provide excellent entertainment which satisfies every eethetic demand as well. The Big Chill is one from the heart. And it shows. Rates ****! These ineffectual people, whose lives are vacant without the drive or intensity that Eddie provided for them, collide in their weak confusion, buckling under the pres­sure of some unknown person who is van· dalizing their homes and lives in an effort to ferret out the missing tapes. Thie is a film about obsession and how it takes on different guises tailored to indi· vidual quirks. The Davidson screenwrit· ing team has written a script that borders on the profound. Moments of slashing clarity bite through the lack of resolve which envelops the characters. Two performances are outstanding. Michael Pare as Eddie brings an irresieti· ble mysticism to his role. Helen Schneider is appropriately moody and bewildering as his girl friend Joann. Joe Pantoliano and Matthew Laurance are effective as Doc and Sal, two ofthe Cruisers who have suffered the ignominy of anonymity. Tom Berenger as lyricist Frank Ridge­way turns in the least even performance. He appears to be badly miscast and uneasy in his role. But the worst perfor· mance in the film comes from Ellen Bar· kin, who singlehandedly kills the first scene. When she and Berenger share the screen, the picture stagnates. Fred Murphy's gritty cinematography and John Cafferty'• brilliant score add realism to the film. In fact, Cafferty'• haunting mu11ic may be the beet movie score I've heard this year. Though Eddie tries to be too much of too many elements, do not let that deter .\'ou from seeing this fine, thought·provoktng film. Rates ***· o Zelig Zelig, Woody Allen's newest film, is a retread of Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy. The burning question is: how stupid can Allen's new live-in leading lady Mia Farrow be? The collapse of the filmat­ically fruitful Woody Allen-Diane Kea­ton relationship has not diminished Allen's desire to maintain it. He has dressed and orchestrated current love Far­row as a cheap Keaton imitation. In Zelig, the usually brilliant Allen has overstepped the parameters of good taste. He can't have Keaton, so rather than pout solemnly by himself, he takes a broad swipe at Keaton's current beau, Warren Beatty. Zelig is told through the reminis­cent eyes of old people, the exact technique used by Beatty in his tour-de-force, Reds. The story is cleverly manipulated through the use of newsreels. Leonard Zel­ig's life unfolds through interviews inter­cut with authentic footage. While novel, this "documentary" form elicits yawns halfway through the yam. It's too newsy­cutesy without enough Allen schtick. Zelig (Woody Allen) is a human chame­leon. Because of his desire to belong and be accepted, he can change hie appearance to blend in with his surroundings. With fat men, he ie fat; with black men, he is black; with oriental&, he is oriental. Eudora Fletcher (Mia Farrow), the doctor on the case, explains that the appearance changes are involuntary. The scientific community is at first awed by the case, but when it cannot be solved,the doctors turn their attention to more pressing matters. Only Doctor Fletcher insists that with therapy Zelig can lead a normal, self-asserting life. Her breakthrough is stymied when Zelig's sis· OW IHO~DNG BOYNAPPED ter removes him from the hospital to put him on exhibit as a money-making attrac­tion. Then, Fletcher realizes thatehe loves Zelig. There's more to the story, but to tell would be to spoil it for Woody Allen fans. I'm one of those, but I found Zelig to be hollow and without merit. Zelig rates a dieapppointing • 'h. o The Big Chill The Big Chill is one of those rare pictures in which a cast and crew love the project so much that all facets of the production glow with the enthusiasm and total immersion of actors into characters. Directed by Law­rence Kasdan, who also wrote Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Empire Strikes Back and Return of tlu! Jedi, this is a very per­sonal film. Though described as a "comedy of values," it is more a compassionate testi­monial to the idealistic baby-boom non­conformists who have survived the passion of youth to become members of the Eotablishment. In this context, the title takes on several resonant metaphorical meanings, from the obvious reference to the group's own mortality (reinforced by the occasion of their own reunion) to the cooling of idealism in the face of calcu­lated self-interest. The story centers around seven college housematee who are reunited by the sui· cide of their collective conscience, Alex, some 15 years later. The reunion becomes a weekend examination and reaffirmation of friendship, as well as a time for re­examination of individual goals. The weekend retreat takes place at the sprawling home of Harold and Sarah Cooper (Kevin Kline and Glenn Cloae), Sturdy is tlu! film reviewer for "The Weekly News " publ'8hed in Miami. ~ 1983 Stonewall Features Syndicate. Drunken Memories A Maryland psychiatrist says he can determine if someone is an alcoholic by asking one simple question, reports The American /ssru . Dr. Leo Hennigan says the question is: "What do you remember about your first drink?" Hennigan, who is a former alcoholic himself. says boozers are usually abJe to describe their first drink in Joving detail. often recalling the experience as pleasant. Social drinkers, on the other hand, either can't remember or describe the stuff as tasting awful. Be Your Own Big Brother Now you can improve your sex life just by watching TV, reports the Wall Str .. tJour­nal. A Michigan company has developed something called "expando-vieion," which sends split-second subliminal mes· sages from your home computer to the tube. Besides making you a better lover, expando-vieion will supposedly help you stop smoking and drinking, lose weight, advance in your career, and even improve your golf game. Expando-vision's hardware is $90, and the software will set you back another $40. One little problem: results from prototype tests aren't in yet, so the company that makes it isn't sure if it works. We feature . .. • All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka, 1.75 liter, $7.69 Jamie '08 Scotch, 1.75 liter, $11 .79 McCormick Blended American Whiskey, 1.75 liter, $9.89 1402 Welch at MAsrJi~AcARo Waugh Drive AMERICAN EXPRESS 529-9964 18 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 21, 1983 Five Emerging Artists By Jeff Bray Houston boasts of many varied entertain­menta. It seems highly unlikely that there is anyone in the city who cannot find a suitable form of diversion or interest. There are, however, those who sigh and moan that there is nothing to do because everything coats money. Well, now there is no excuse for being bored or totally alone. Many people have been aware of the fact that Houston is full of wonderful enter­tainment, especially in and around the Montrose area - art galleries! The Art League of Houston, 1953 Mont­rose Boulevard, is currently presenting a new show, "Five Emerging Artists." From over 100 applicants, five artists have been chosen to represent their work to the pub. lie. Their art is varied and offers a pleas­ing mixture of atmosphere and taste. Priscilla Coleman is a "color pe1'80n." Her work is bright and luminous. She says that she really does not work by a true theme, but rather through variations of color as they appeal to her. Her "Work No. 4" is a small painting made large by the use of geometric shape and brilliant colors. The greens are like tropical waters - liquid and lit from something below. Coleman has a natural understanding of color and form which may be attributed to the fact that her mother also pain ta. The artist says that her pictures are "sensu­ous. Kind of like skin and body parta." Hers is fun art that makes us smile. Coleman is the courtroom artist for Channel 13 and also does the TV news graphics Eileen Montgomery works more with mobile and mixed media art, although her main material is clay. Her art has a theme of humor and playfulness, done with clay rods and string. To pull one string (which the viewer is encouraged to do) creates a chain reaction of movement that has almost a ripple effect on the viewer. One can participate in Montgomery's art. Montgomery, who has been working with clay for over six years, says her works "kinda develop themselves." "There are no deep horrible things in my work," she says. There seems to be an aire of joy and optimism in her work, and although most of her pieces are rather monochromatic, their movement makes up for lack of color. Montgomery ia the director of the ceram· ics tkpartment of Little Egypt Enter­prises. On another plane of thought are the photographs of Bill Frazier. Most of his beautiful black and white photographs are of ancient cemeteries or are funereal in nature. bringing the mind close to the more serious side of life - perhaps even death? Frazier focuses on his target, yet there is an unmiatakable quality of phantasm that makes the eyes feel blurred. The soft velvet-like texture of the pictures, due to the gelatin silver process, create the illu­sion of great age. They look like photo­graphs taken decades ago, and they give that same haunting feeling of looking through old photo albums in Grandma's attic. It is sobering, but beautiful and John Halaka" and a very deep sense of meticulously finished work. self-realization in ''The Contemplative Frazier is the coordinator of exhibits a1 SpiriL" It is art to see one's self through. the University of Houston's Blaffe' Halaka works at his painting full time Galkry. He also teaches plwtography and after recently attaining his MFA from the is working on his MFA in photography at University of Houston. U of H. So far, in viewing four of the artista dis- The art of John Halaka is intriguing played, there has been an unmistakable both for ita introspective depth and for ita pull from playful and brilliantly colorful unusual encaustic technique. Encaustics art to deeper, more introspective art (or is the use of wax mixed with pigment on feelings). The show reaches complete wood. While the wax is still hot, it is mixed rounded success with Stephanie Kaid.is, with color, then put onto the wood where it whose paintings reflect both playfulness quickly hardens to form layers of color and self-realization. and smooth texture. Kaldis likes to use cool grays in her It is a painataking media, but it produ- backgrounds, with shadowy figures ces an incredible depth and incandes- interspersed with bright pinks and pur­cence. The sufrace ie of that smooth, soft, pies. Although the colors are rather sober­waxy texture that almost invites the ing, the figures in such works as viewer to touch, and the colors in Halaka's "Wandering Muses" and "Muses in Par a­work: are dark and muted and give a warm dise" seem to rut and dance in an almost luxurious feeling fairy-like way across the canvas. }-lalaka'1 subject matter is serious and There is a certain humorous hide-and-quif. o introopective.~ n. ...... a.• 1'oe-lik.s •• Mek. '!uality In lhese rather ghostly fi&'.· quality to his '"Funerary Monument for urea, as they seem to hide behind palms Montrose Art (from kft) Art1St8 Halaka, Kaldis, Montgomery, Coleman, Frazier and other objects - not quite real enough to be fully seen. "Shadows in the Jungle" is very bold, with flailing jungle leaves in a dark back­ground. Once again, a gray image peers at the viewer from behind the palms. Ka/dis i• also working full time at her painting after receiving her MFA from the University of Houston. For a truly enjoyable and well-rounded ..xporionce where the colorful and the fun mingle with the more serious, few other exhibits can equal "Five Emerging Artista" at the Art League of Houston through November 4. Information is avil­able at 523-9530. o Desert Artist at Moody Gallery By Jeff Bray Don Shaw is one of tbo6e ~lenta who can crea te ·a · viaual e•i>erlHt simply, with either paint or steel. Hie show at the Moody Gallery, 2015-J West Gray, com­bines watercolor with metal sculpture, as well as pen and ink, to present an impres­sive array of images and ideas. Shaw is very much influenced by the New Mexico desert. Even in his metal sculpture, the viewer can see the flat horiz­ons, the vast distances and the occasional · billowy cloud. His colors are vibrant and intense, but so are the colors of the desert southwest. The artist, who lives and works in New Mexico much of the year, says that Hous­ton and New Mexico are two different influences for him. "Houston is exciting," Shaw says, "like a crap table we can all play." He says it is fun to see Houston change before our very eyes, and that here "we will either make it to the year 2000 or screw up." It is the desert, however, that is 80 pre­valent in his work. While Houston has hazy atmosphere, the desert has extremely clear skies. "You don't see color in Houston like you do in New Mexico." Shaw ahows nature - the clouds, light­ening and brilliant rainbows-in much of his work. He is one of a host of modern artist.a who are being drawn to the southw­est in the footsteps of Georgia O'Keefe. Frank Lloyd Wright also found solace and creative inspiration in the desert southw­est, and cities like Santa Fe are becoming meccas for the North American art world. Some of Shaw's sculpture is actuaBy quite industrial and urban looking, but he infuses bri11iant color and shading to render an otherwise heavy-looking object into something ethereal and weightless. · His art is pleasing to the senses - a8 calm­ing as a desert sky, as intense a8 a sudden downpour that leaves the desert bursting with color and life in its aftermath. The show will be at the gallery through November 12. For information, call 526- 9911. c .1l )> c ~ 0 ;:: ~ a )> ~ ii :D Winterize (') )> * z 0 Cooling s249s z U;::l 0 :; (ii 6 Ul 6 * .z Alllinment $2495 ~ moat .S. cara Gl Gl . m * /:", p:! z m m /:".,.ee (') :D ~ )> 11-t~Ol)f € :D r 0 :D tn,s ilrt'1ct CJ, z m a j1 eek ~ i.i c z )> * 011 rr ii Change s1995 c 1l (') . 0 )> z c 0 ~ :; fcee c'f\eeV.. 0 6 ;:: z iC 9c&V..~seo ~ z ~\tntn a Gl ~ ::0 )> z Ul ;:: (ii Ul 6 z •AUTOMATIC • OCT. 21, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Proudly Presenting Our Newest Musical Comedy ~. lll~t't l)lJSl"'lf~S . - Cabaret/Theatre SHOWTIMES Thursday-9:30pm Friday-8:30 & 11pm Saturday-8:30 & 11pm Sunday-8:30pm Doors Open 7pm Happy Hour till 8:30pm 2700 ALBANY-Open 7pm-2am-528-3611 (adjacent to Officer's Club) 1981. George Greanias ran for City Cou ncil with a commitment to be a productive repre­sentative for his constituents and an effective member of Houston's government. George won that election to the Houston City Council from District C on the city's southwest side. This diverse district includes the Neartown, 4th Ward, Montrose, Avondale, Midtown, Rice University, Medical Center, and Astrodome areas, among others. During his first term, George has proved to be a highly productive, c reative and articulate represent­ative. His efforts resulted in the street closing during the Westheimer Colony Art Festival. His office was the first to use computer technology to keep track of over 14,000 constituent contacts. He has worked closely with neighborhood organizations on a multitude of ISSues. George has applied his considerable mlents and en~y to a broad range of municipal issues and concerns. He has chaired Council comnuttees focusing on Industrial Development Corporation Gu1delmes, Cost Allocation and Cost Recovery, Regulation of Sexually Oriented Businesses, Transportation Reform, Classified Civil Service Reform and Electric Rate-Making Policies. RE-ELECT GEORGE GREANIAS George has taken a leadership position in the city's budgeting process by serving as co-chair of the Council Budget Review Committee durmg both 1982 and 1983. In addition to htS chairing responsibilities, George has been an active member of the MIS Executive Steering Committee, the Allen Parkway Village Steering Committee and the Personal Property Taxation Policy Committee. A 17 -year Houston resident and a graduate business school professor, Geor!l" has taken a special interest in the areas of economic development and neighborhood revitalization. In the short time since his election, Councilmember George Greanias has developed a ttuly outstanding record of involvement and achievement, benefitting both his district neighbors and Houston as a whole. November 8th, Re-Elect George Greanias. Doin g what he promised .. .and more. • District C Political adv<mSmg paid for by George Grcanias for Council, Basil Grcanias, T ouston, TX 77252- 20 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 21, 1983 Montrose Live Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat By Joe L. Watts Are yo~ in need of a show that is pure entertainment - nothing heavy - and something that wiII brighten your mood? Joyously coloring the Music Hall is the m~gical, musical medicine I hardily pres­cnbe: Joseph and the Amazing Technico· lor Dreamcoat. Joseph, from the pens of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, who gave us J esus Christ Superstar and Evita (Webber also wrote Cats), is a pop/ rock musical based on the Old Testament story of the favored son of Jacob. Told entirely in song, this happy, exuberant retelling cleverly uses a variety of pop music idioms, from calypso, country and western and French cabaret to 50's rock. about hie personal life, although he admits to enjoying the times he can be with hie family, which is usually only at Thanksgiving. Living on a ranch in Santa Barbara, California, and breeding tho­roughbred horses, the actor is not very fond of the Hollywood social scene, which he sees for the most part as an effort at patronizing people for the right roles. "I just don't know how to look people in the face and say 'hi' in order to get a job," he said. "But I really enjoy entertaining people," he added, "and it's nice if you can do that without compromising yourself." Beyond his possible series, which he feels will be "the kind of thing the public would like to see me do," he has no definite plans for his future - either in recording, television or Broadway. "A lot depends on what I do with this TV series. " I would like to say I can do it all," he added, "but I'm human, and I have to live my life." Cassidy has no favorite area of work, although he regards recording as "some­thing to me that's mine," as opposed to TV and theatre which he sees as group efforts. But he ac.lmits that he loves whatever he's doing at the time. After Joseph's father, Jacob, gives him the beautiful dreamcoat, Joseph's 11 jeal­ous brothers sell him into slavery in Egypt, and he is bought by Potiphar with his American Express card. But Joseph gets into a bit of trouble as Potiphar's ser· vant and is innocently seduced by Poti· phar's wife. He is then sent to the dungeon where he interprets so successfully the dresms of two of Pharaoh's top staff that Joseph is brought to Pharaoh's court to interpret his dream of "seven years of plenty and seven of famine." Joseph is then made Pharaoh's "number two,'' is reunited with his father and brothers and everyone lives happily . ... Cassidy, as Joseph, reconciled with his family And he's currently very fond of Hous· ton, and based on the reaction from many at Monday's opening night performance, the feeling might be mutual. Emmy Award nominee David Cassidy (The Partridge Family), who just closed with Joseph on Broadway, is here to recreate his role as Jacob's favorite son. Cassidy brings a fine voice and strong sensitivity to his performance as Joseph. His accomplished acting abilities and gifted stage presence are very evidenl The role of the narrator is very impor· tant in that she carries the story line in song, and Robin Bourdreau was pleasant enough in the role but needed more energy and spirit to carry her to the level needed to reslly sell it. (She wasn't helped any by the bad sound system problems in Act I on opening night - not all her words could be heard and understood - but the system was much improved by Act II and all flowed beautifully.) Joseph's 11 brothers provided a rousing male chorus and delivered some of the real "show stopping" numbers. Telling their father that Joseph was dead, they honky­tonked their way through "One More Stsr in Heaven." Brother Naphtali (well played by Charlie Serrano) leads the brothers in a shining number call "Ben· jamin Calypso." And with "Those Canaan Days," the brothers did a French cabaret routine, complete with berets, that brought the house down when they held a high note for a breath-breaking length of time. Leslie Feagan was a crazy camp as the lackluster, busineBB-like Potiphar. And Hal Davis as Pharaoh was the jelly hip shaker supreme in his good impersonation of Elvis. The great sounding small, nine-member orchestra was wonderfully conducted by musical director/ pianist Valerie Gebart. It was as much fun to watch her in the pit as it was to watch the performers on stage (a real case of someone loving their work). Director/ choreographer Tony Tanner has created a fast-paced, stylish, fun· loving, sheer entertainment package that the whole family can savour. So ... forget your troubles and go get happy with Joseph, playing through October 22. o David Cassidy's Ready to Grow Up By Robert Hyde The bubble gum hero of the 70's is gettini. older, and from what he said in a recent interview, he is enjoying it. Fonner teen star David Cassidy is in town this week recreating his Broadway role in Joseph and the Amazing Technico­lor Dreamcoat, a part he took over in March for a six-month run after teen idol Andy Gibb was fired . Following his Hous­ton appearance, he will appear briefly in Toronto and Pittsburg, then relinquish the role to a lesser known actor for the completion of the tour. Cassidy, now 33, is looking forward to a possible TV series he's packaging with Columbia Pictures, but beyond that, he Halloween Weekend Kick-Off MCCR's Halloween Country Gimival *Free Admission* Free Refreshments * Costume Contests * Dancing 9-ll:30pm Friday, Oct. 28 1919 Decatur, 861-9149 Religious Sernces Sunday 10:45am 7;l5pm. Wednr"1ay 7:15pm ... -, .. -... ,._,-···-··-----···- wants to lead a quieter life, different from his hectic earlier career, and only occa· sionally visit Broadway or do a recording. CaSBidy's youthful charm bas mellowed now, and it would be difficult to see him shouting the words to one of his 18 gold records in front of a teenage audience. He even admitted that he feels more comforta­ble in the second half of Joseph when the role demands him to be more mature. He's eager to grow up. CaBBidy spoke disparagingly about his early career when he felt he was a victim of a maBB media blitz - following his appearance in The Partridge Family in 1970 - which pushed him on coloring books, lunch boxes and bubble gum, around the world at 20 through over 300 concerts, a Broadway debut and toward an Emmy nomination in 1979 for best actor in a TV movie (A Chance to Live). "He doesn't actually move," he said of the way his fans used to think of him, "and I just couldn't handle being me like th.at. There was too much over-hype with being too famous." After maxing-out on his popularity, Cassidy withdrew from the public scene for over three years and "just did nothing," he said. "That was the time in my life that caused me the most grief," he spoke of the period when he tried to break away from his image. Cassidy, son of the late actor Jack Cas· sidy and Broadway actress Evelyn Ward, as well as stepson of Oscar winning actress Shirley Jones, is very private "I feel very welcome here,'' he said. Cassidy opened at the Music Hall unfa­miliar with the stage, with the company with whom he would be working and with the show's different blocking. " I really hadn't had a rehearsal with these people. I went on stsge last night," he said, "and it was like working in the Twilight Zone." He mentioned that he had fears of trip· ping, and because of the intense spa· !lights, he could only catch a glimpse of ~~~s::~c~;::!i!:de~t:~::::;:~.e uFor the most part, I wae trying to wade through traffic." But hie new company supported him, as did the audience when they gave him a standing ovation. "The energy level was right there," he said. "When you're going through opening night, it's always exciting. And I felt like I had been embraced by this new com­pany." Today, Ca88idy is a relaxed man and excited about his future in a quiet way, resdy to grow up gracefully. And he's feel ­ing good about himself. He sees his more mature public image as, "Great. I've never felt better about that in my life." o Theatre: Playing in Local Bands By Joe L. Watts The Houston premiere of Nancy Fales SPANISH I FLOWER RESTAURANT ~ COMPLIMENTARY BREAKFAST 3921 N. Main 869-1706 ni~1'..1:\!r'll: 1 ~::"~ .~l~1!~r1';i11k~;O~.~,~~rn A TASTE OF MEXIC0-24 HOURS DAI{X THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 10-31-83 closed Tuesday 10pm; re-open Wednesday 10am Garrett's Playing in Local Bands opened (and should have closed) last weekend, and this play was nominated (much to my total amazement) for last year's Susan Smith Blackbum Prize, which is awarded annually to a woman playwright writing in the English langauge. A comedy (?) about a New York punk rocker's search for her hippie poet father, Playing is a dismal, bloody bore. In Ms. Blackburn's (a Houston actress, journalist and teacher who died of cancer in 1977) memory, I would persona11y like to see her name be disassociated from this produc­tion. She deserves better, not to mention the audiences. The play has James, a former hippie poet, celebrating his 39th birthday by entertaining a few friends, one of whom is his classy black girlfriend, Monique. After the other guests leave, Monique tells James that she doesn't want to see him anymore. She can't deal with his "sleep­around" lifestyle (male and female); she is "one.on-one." James wants to resolve this in bed, but Monique refuses his offer and exits. Enter Kendra, a 15-year-old punk rocker with blue hair and the wildest punk, sleazy, trash outfit seen on any stage in a long time. Kendra's mother committed suicide when she was two weeks old, and she has been searching all these years for her father. She had heard Jsmos read his poetry that afternoon, and hP had read about Woodstock and a IAdy with a but­terfly tatooed on her an kl< r.d about mak­ing love to her. Kend,.a's mother was a waitress at Woodstock and had a butterfly - you know the rest. Fales Garrett's script, which is lame at best, deals with the emotional struggles going on inside these two: Kendra, lost and hopeless inside, is a foul-mouthed lit­tle brat; James is an empty, self-centered, never-a-commitment man who may be forced into one as a new father. Oirecl<'d by Lucille Ralph, most of Stages' Cast never rises much higher than the script. Tom Miltenberger, as James, delivers a great deal of hie lines to the floor and doesn't charge his character with enough believaQility. Diane Brents, a student at the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, can be forgiven for her just-adequate performance as Kendra because of her age. Eileen Morris, as Monique, possessed an assured and natural quality and seemed to be the only performer that had the right feeling for her role. Theatre can be so exciting and wonder­ful, greatly due to the fact that it's lwe. Sadly, in the case of this show, that ele­ment has been omitted. Playing will run through October 30 at Stages, 709 Franklin at Louisiana. o Music: Houston Grand Opera ~arber of Seville" Francisco Ariaza (Count Almavlva), Thomas Allen (Figaro), Marla Ewing (Rosina), Sesto Bruscantlni (Dr. Bartolo), Paolo Montarsolo (Don Baslllo), Evelyn de la Rosa (Berta), Eugene Perry (Fiorello/Sergeant); Houston Symphony Orcheslra, John DeMaln, Conductor By Peur Derksen Great comedy and great music are seldom combined; lovers of both should have done whatever possible to be at the final perfor­mance last weekend. The radio blitz which proclaimed this cast to be the "best in the world" for this opera was, for once, accu­rate. The singers fit the roles ~s if ~e latter had been created with them m mmd, and the overall production completed a delightful package that h~d the opening night audience beammg with pleasu~e. Francisco Ariaza, the young Mextcan tenor making his HGO d_ebut._ is a. fine actor as well as singer. H1s lync voice is still very young and pure, and in exten~ed ~~sssar~e::e~~~~~"~':!~v~~e h~nheal~;!~~ slight difficulty with the coloratura m t~e opening cavatina, though he se~tled tn vocally as the opera progressed. Hie loves· truck Count, though involved in the action, we.a nonetheless con~ous of his nobility. Thomas Allen, also making his HGO debut, was quite the lusty rogue pocketing a profit from everyone else's emotionality. (In modem times, he would be a psychia­trist rather than a barber.) Mr. Allen has that rare quality of making great singing and great acting seem easy, almost com­monplace. He was a bundle of energy from the moment he stepped onstage until the final curtain. Equally important, though, he never overshadowed the other charac· ters or their singing. Maria Ewing has been one of my favor· ites for several years, since I saw her at the Met in Marriage of Figaro and Dialogues of the Carmelites. She combines a superb mezzo voice with flawless technique, act­ing ability and nonstop charm. Ms. Ewing's portrayal of the saucy Rosina, who even Figaro admires as hie equal in cunning, was the high point of a great evening. Seeto Bruecantini brought all his 35 years of experience in Italian character roles to Barber. His Dr. Bartolo looked and OCT. 21, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 acted like a cross between Bob Newhart and Mr. Magoo - one even felt a bit sorry for him at the end, though he loved Rosina more for her money than for herself, and, in the days before convertible term insu­rance, had nothing to offer her in return. Paolo Montarsolo, who directed as well as sung the role of Don Basilio, is another Italian opera veteran of vast experience. He has a superb buf{o voice which filled Jones Hall. He chose to direct Barber more as slapstick than as a light comedy, which suited everyone very well. Evelyn de la Rosa sang and acted Berta as if she had never heard that it is sup­posedly a "minor" part (which it isn't). She was an integral part of the action and music. Eugene Perry is another example of the fine talent at the Houston Opera Studio; I look forward to seeing him in Candide and Fidelio later this season. John Stoddard's set was simple and ingenious. All the action took place at Dr. Bartolo'• house, which looked like a chapel at Ninfa'a. The house could be turned around for a cutaway of the inte­rior, so there was no need to drop the cur­tain for scene changes. Marie Barrett's lighting was effective and unobtrusive. She created a master­stroke at the end of Act I: framing the sextet in a horizontal band of light, leav­ing the rest of the stage in semi-darkness. The action was thus frozen visually as well as musically. The Houston Symphony played very :~~~ 8o1:~:s~:ss~::t~::d~::~ ~Ji~ out any of the minor woodwind problems noticeable earlier this season. Jean Mal· landaine did an excellent job on continua, though I object to amplified harpsichord on principle and because the result is usu­ally too tinny and too loud- both true this time. In fact, the orchestra was a bit too loud all the time. I would have preferred an approach closer to Mozart than to early Verdi. Overall, though, John OeMain did very well with the deceptively simple :·:·:·:·:·:·:·:-:·:·:-:·:-:-:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·: MONTGOMERY, PLANT & STRITCH appearing thru Oct. 29 .. The staff of Rascals presents ... "Night of the Stars, Monday, Oct. 24, to benefit GPC -. ..... ~ ••1 ··~ .. .., HI .... •••••• _.!!!!l • ; ~· L I 2702 Klrby - 524-6272 ,.r -..,~ ~111r---.,, 41~ lllr ~· •!-11i.Jll , I ~11~ Ill •I. ~~~=jj"~~~i- ~illJilL~.-~,=~·· DlMer Moo-Thurs 6-11 Fri&Sat6-12 rese1VOtlons requested Shows 9:30, 11. 12:30 22 MONTROSE VOICE I OCT. 21, 1983 score. with a two-humped camel. They recreate The men's chorus sang clearly, without for her their Christ story-pageant, not any of the mumbling which plagues other seen since they left her. operachoruses,particularlywhensigning After their show, Sister Mary is quite in a foreign language. appalled to learn that of the two female One mystery in the production credits: students, one has had two abortions and "First aid has been generously provided theotherisanunwedmother.Ondiscover­by Red Cross Volunteer Nurses." Either ing that one of the two male students is they did their job so well that I never gay, she asks with dismay, "You do that noticed they were there, or, more likely, thingthatmakesJesuspuke?"Toherhor­they were off working where there was a ror, he relates that he was "seduced in the more press mg need: at the box office. seminary." o Theatre: The Actor's Nightmare and Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You By Joe L. Watts Sister Mary's dogmatic religious views are very controversial , so if you can't han­dle religious puns, this lecture is not for you. But if you're up to it, Sister Mary, although unusual and bizarre, contains a great deal of humor. Well directed by Stage•' producer/ direc· tor Ted Swindley, the actors served their roles well. Kathryn Hill gave a very finely crafted performance as the most rebellious of the former students. Jean Proctor, as Sister Mary, was devoutly perfect - sly with the punch of a Dragon Nun. She held the stage wonder­fully and was totally competent and believable. Not a bad lecture, and Sister Mary might even ask you questions; after all, it is her classroom. Durang's double comedies will play at the Tower through October 23. o Cabaret: Montgomery, Plant & Stritch By Jon Cheetwood Montgomery, Plant and Stritch are back - or mostly back, that is - at Rascal's this week through the 29th of October. One third of the group has changed, but the harmonies are still intact. They continue to make some of the nicest sounds to be heard in Houston and cover a gamut of musical tastes. The change in the group is new member Rebecca Plant, an Edie Sedgwick looka­like who must have been a beauty queen somewhere along the line. She fits into the group quite nicely, thank you, and dis­plays her solo talents, as well, with "Move Over Sun" from Inside Daisy Clover. She is easy going on stage and has already developed a smooth, witty rapport with Montgomery and Stritch. She informed the audience at one point, "They'll get me potty. Until then, I'll just use papers." Old timers Montgomery and Stritch have never had any trouble displaying their individual talents, either. Montgo· mery did a stand-out version of "Ain't Anyone Here for Love" from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, and Billy Stritch was fine singing a smooth and scatty "Honey· suckle Rose." But it is the harmonies they create together that really fill the bill. And an eclectic blll it is - from their high energy "lip flapping" Medley de Morte contain­ing such tunes as "The Joint is Jumping" and ''It Don't Mean a Thing" to "Our Love" with melodious cresting harmonies and a Summertimesque but souped-up "Come to Sugar," which they described as The marquee on the Tower Theatre proudly proclaimed ''Montrose Voice Night" - openingnightofStages'produc­tion of SiJ1ter Mary Ignatius Explains It AU For You, their revival of Christopher Durang's off-Broadway comedies about a tyrannical nun and a nonactor who finds himself in a play he doesn't know. The curtain-raiser and companion piece to Sl8ter Mary was The Actor'• Night­mare, which turned out to be just that. George, an accountant, walks onto a bare and dark stage, and the stage manager tells him he has 15 minutes until curtain. He asks the manager what play they're doing. Sbe calls him stupid by a name other than his own and tells him to "get ready." Is it Private Lives, Hamlet or Waiting for Gid-Ot? In this case, it's all the above, with bits and pieces of each float­ing indiscriminately throughout. But with the aid of the stage manager and fellow actors. George manages to get through the evening with flair, in spite of never really being sure which play he is performing at any given moment. CLUB HOUSTON IS: For maximum enjoyment, one needs to be familiar with the plays George has to face. But despite being built around an interesting premise, Nightmare isn't all that funny. Randy Dupre, as George, the nervous nonactor, displayed a bright wit and had funny moments with his performance. Kathryn Hill was smooth, fine and ele­gant as Sarah Siddons. Jean Proctor was swift and very secure as the stage manager. But the real actor'• dream in this Night­mare was Nancy Lee Rogers as Dame Ellen Terry. Her hysterical bit in a trash can in Waiting for Gidot - in this case Lefty - with her pu~king her nose and popping her eyes, proved she is the funni­est rubber·faced lady since Lily Tomlin. Now for the headliner - here comes Sis­ter Mary. She came down the aisle from the back of the theatre to take her place on stage. which was now her schoolroom at Our Lady of Perpetual Sorrows. She started her lecture by explaining to us the differences between Heaven, Hell and Pur­gatory and said that "we can expect to remain in Purgatory anywhere from 300 to 7 million years ... Thomas, a young student of Sister Mary's, runs on and off the stage, and each time he can recite one of the IO Com­mandments. he ia rewarded with a cookie. Sister Mary then goes to her lectern and reads question-cards, supposedly taken from the audience on entering the theatre. One in particular keeps popping up: "If God is all powerful, why does He allow evil in the world?" This is always passed over silently in exchange for one that asks her to tell us more about her family, which she gladly does. Sister Mary has Thomas read to us her list (updated regularly) of people going to Hell: Zsa Zsa Gabor, Roman Polanski, Big John Holmes and the editors of After Dark. She a!Jio informs us that modem· day "Sodom's" are New York City, San Francisco, Amsterdam and anywhere that the population is over 50,000. Lecturing the audience on what is a mor­tal sin (rather than a venial one), she is quick and stern to point out that mastur­bation is a mortal one. Then while Sister Mary is singing in Latin(! hope for her own pleasure), four of her former atudents (clasa of '59) enter the cla88?00m dreeaed as Mary and Joeeph CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN 659-4998 llEllBER CLUB BATH CHAIN "Calgon bath" music. Of particular note was a lovely "Moonglow" done just as it should be. Their music and their rapport (with the audience and with each other) seem to be the key to the success of this group. All performers must have these qualities, of course, but when they are handled with such adroitness within a group, it becomes special entertainment. All superlatives one might have attributed to the earlier group have been maintained. This is truly a pleasurable evening of song. o Houston Kool Jazz Festival Begins This Week The 1983 Kool Jazz festival, a six-day cele­bration of America's unique musical art form, October 25-30, brings the country's jazz greats, including Ella Fitzgerald, Rosemary Clooney and Mel Tonne, to Houston under the sponsorship of Society for the Performing Arts and Brown & Wil­liamson Tobacco Corporation. The festival opens at noon on Tuesday, October 25, with a free Kool Jazz kick-off in Holcombe Plaza featuring the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts Jazz Ensemble with guest artist Kirk Whal um. Tuesday night, the Temptations and the Four Tops will be in Jones Hall for an 8 p.m. performance of their greatest hits and newest releases. On Wednesday, October 26, the festival moves to Texas Southern University's Hannah Hall for performances by Art Bla­key and the Jazz Messengers and trumpe­ter Freddie Hubbard. The Park at Houston Center hosts a lunchtime concert by the HSPVA Jazz Combo on Thrusday, October 27, from 11:30 a.m. to I p.m. Ella Fitzgerald, the first lady of jazz, and her trio wiU be on stage in Jones HalJ for the Friday, October 28, Kool Jazz Festi­val performance. Rosemary Clooney and Mel Torme headline the Saturday, October 29, festi­val program in Jones Ha ll, which also fea­tures the Concord All-Stars. The festival closes on Sunday, October 30, with a Jones Hall double bill featuring the fusion jazz group Spyro Gyra and alto saxophone player David Sanborn. All evening performances being a 8 p.m. Festival tickets are available at the Hous­ton Ticket Center in Jones Hall, at all Ticketron locations or by calling526-!709 or 227-ARTS. Ministry To Conduct Workshops New Way Ministry. a national Catholic gay ministry group, will sponsor and con­duct a tour of onMlay workshops on ''HomoMexuahty and Family Ministry" in .e1x citil'e in Texas and LouiRiana during November and Decembe,. , they nnounced Sr Jeannine Gramick. SS1'D, who wn te the newly released Homosexuality and the Catholic Church, and Fr. Robert Nugent, SDS. A Challen;ie to Love: Gay and Lesbian Catholic in the Church, a nun and priest, res~tivel_y, who_ have been engaged in mimstry with lesbian and gay men since 1971, will conduct the work­shop, they said. The workshop will explore the sociologi­cal and pastoral dimensions of homosexu­ality, and is designed for educators, counselors, social workers, clergy, reli­gious, social justice advocates as well as family and friends of lesbian and gay Christians, they said. The Houston workshop is scheduled for Dec. 5 Texas Southern University, New­man Hall, 3535 Wheeler Ave. A $25 regis­tration fee includes tuition and materials. Another workshop will be conducted Dec. 7 at Sisters of the Most Holy Sacra­ment, Faller Hall, 409 W. St. Mary Blvd., Lafayette, La. The srRAYf oRD ~- on Baldwin Condominiums as individual and private as you are. ,,.Inf Lurnn11• Fm~t'r Inc O
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