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Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998
File 041
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Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 041. 1998-06-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3046.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998-06-12). Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 041. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3046

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 041, 1998-06-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3046.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date June 12, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 041
Transcript BRAMER/ from page 1 up on the idea that two men could be in love, but Monette opened his mind to a different way of thinking. "(Monette) really believed in the concept of boy meets boy, of gay love. He really believed gay relationships could work. That's less of an issue now. but back in lhe mid 70s. there was really not much out there to support the idea that gay people were capable of maintaining relationships with each other." Bramer said. While meeting with Monette for three hours in 1992, Bramer laid out his desires to document the award- winning author's life. The documentary would become "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End." but Bramer had to first convince Monette that lhe project was worth beginning. .After considering the idea for a week, Monette (an ex-screen writer magnetized with a preference for lhe dramatic) delivered this clever answer: "I've read your fascinating proposal." he told Bramer. "and I've decided to accept the part." The "part" lasted for two-and-a-half years as Bramer assembled numerous interviews with Monelte and his friends. At first, Monelte was a lough cookie to crack, bul Bramer managed lo get past Monette's treasury of sound bites and "down to the real man." That was n'l easy, he said. "When you do a do* u mentary like this that is long form. you sort of want lo peel away the lay ers a lillle bit and gel past what is studied and polished. (Geiting) down lo what is more personal and revealing ... takes time," he said. Bul time didn't prove lo be a friend In Monette. His body responded unfavorably to chemotherapy and Ihe vast array of medications intended lo prolong his life. Sticking around for Monette's death wasn't part ol Bramer's original plans: and Monelte didn't wanl the end of his life filmed, either. Yet something compelled Bramer to include Monetle's dealh in Ihe film. But how lo could he convince Monette? "I told him. 'Paul, someday, someday. AIDS is going lie over with. And as much as It's hard to imagine how people are going lo forget, and I bel they're going to forget the depth of il in last order." Bramer remembered with passion. Monelte — sick, frail, and wilhering — asked if Bramer wanled to meet the following week. Bramer responded. "How about tomorrow?" Monelte read through Ihe lines. Bramer "You don't think I'm going make it another week?" he asked. "Paul, I don't know. I hope you live for another 10 years," Bramer told him. "But you've said yes now. and to be honest with you. I've had a crew on standby for the last three weeks." The evolution of Monette's death is the film's most powerful element. The transition from a virile, handsome, attractive man contrasts darkly wilh the living skeleton we see at the film's end. As he struggles for each breath, Monelle looks like death, but he doesn't sound like it. Even at the final moments of his life, Monette is a man fully conscious of his fate, yet he maintains enough sense of self to know lhal his life truly means something, to the world and to his friends. Monetle's life struggle touched Bramer deeply as well. To me, Paul was a sort of an older brother thai I always wished that I had. who could leach me things about what it meant to be gay. It was wonderful to be around someone like that who was so completely out, and so completely into Ix'ing gay thai it transcended all stereotypes, and all of my own fears aboul being gay. So, [ could see thai he was what a fully adult gay person looked like." he said. Even so. Bramer's film gels a wide array of reactions. At one screening, a middle-aged woman asked Bramer. "Could I have my money back?" Surprised. Bramer asked why. "Oh, it's just too medical." the woman said. "I like movies about dying people and everything, but this is jusi too much lor me." Bramer said that he got to "work out a lot of fears" in making the film. He feared dealh, feared AIDS and feared his own sexuality. But Bramer transcended those fears as he spent more time with Monelle. Now that he's discovered his own sense of selfhood. Bramer said that what he feared "was far worse than the reality." "I wanted to present a gay life in a way that I thought would reveal not only to gay people bul lo straight people, the depth of who we are. I wanted to show somebody deeply in love — bellevabiy ami undeniably in love." What: "Paul Monette: The Brink of Summer's End" Who: Direcior Monte Bramer will attend both screen screenings When: June 13 at 7:30 p.m. and June 14 at 7:30 p.m. Where: Rice Media Cenier, Entrance 8. University Boulevard al Stockton Streel Tickets: SS. 713-527-4Hr-,'A SATURDAY, JUNE 13 6:00PM. Celebration of Life for Rusty Braswell in the Outback Gay Pride Roof Top Tickets On Sale Beginning 6-12-98 Best View of the Parade in Montrose Limited Amount To Be Sold 1022 WESTHEIMER • HOUSTON 713.527.9669 Email: marysbar@aol.com Leather * Levi * Cruise Saturday, June 13 • 9pm The Houston Area Bears Social SUMMER SWEAT FEST ■fr Noon til 7pm everyday All Well and Beer $2 •& 2923 Main • Houston • 713-522-0000 ■■■■■■a ■ ■ ■ ^ ■ ■■ ■ LR A G E -4 B J l_l l**J ft
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