Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998
File 039
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 039. 1998-06-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3044.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998-06-12). Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 039. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3044

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 039, 1998-06-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3044.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date June 12, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 039
Transcript BALLET REVIEW Artists step into choreographic frying pan Young Ballerina Shines in Houston Ballet's 'Manon' by RICH ARENSCHIELDT The season finale for Houston Ballet is a solid interpretation of Sir Kenneth MacMillan's version of the classic French tragedy "Manon," continuing this weekend at the Wortham Center. The current production allows artists Courtney Harris and Julie Gumbiner to step out of the corps de ballet and into the centerstage spotlight, or, more appropriately, the choreographic trying pan. MacMillan and Houston Ballet ■*\rtisUc Director Ben Stevenson are cut from the same clolh. both working together decades ago at Sadlers Wells (now Royal Ballet). England's premier ballet company. Many of MacMillan's works are in the Houston repertory and he maintained a close relationship wilh the ballet company until his death in 1992. MacMillan, like Stevenson, is a kind of balletic hybrid — classically trained and yet most productive from 1960 to the 1990s, a period of radical change for choreographers and dancers. "Manon." premiered in 1974, is an anomaly, in spile of the predicable and well known story. The audience witnesses a metamorphosis on slage as the dance changes strikingly as the story rolls toward an expected sad conclusion. Witnessed is a girl on her way to a nunnery who takes a wrong turn and ends up getting sold by her brother inlo prostitution. True love. sex for jewels deporlal and rape in prison all find their way into the plot, ending in Manon's untimely death. MacMillanis "classicism with an edge" is evident throughout the piece. The first act utilizes a fairly traditional dance vocabulary with hints of modernism. Dominick Walsh excels as the drunken brother, a seemingly mandatory part in the story ballet genre. Parts of MacMillan's pax de deux are right oul of a dance textbook, making the radical changes into modernity in the third act al! the more startling. The final act shows Manon Striking dance: Sean Kelly as Des Grieux and Julie Gumbinner as al the nadir of her life Manon in the Houston Ballet's production of "Manon," which Arrested as a prostitute completes its run June 14.—Photo by Jann Whaley deported lo New Orleans and . act with equal success. Manon. beautifully portrayed by Julie Gumbiner, spends a lot of lime on stage, mosi of it above the stage. MacMillan has taken this petite jeune flls and dumped her in the midst of men who tear her limb from limb. throwing her. while suspended, from one cad to another. Many of MacMillanis moves might be considered graceless, however Gumbiner handles them adeptly. Partnered by brutalized by her prison warden. Manon is utterly spent. MacMillan presents this in stark contrast to what has come before. Where grace once was, angularity reigns. Softness and symmetry are replaced with harsh lines and harsher movements. Al the end of this ballet it is entirely plausible that this poor wretched waif could die from abuse and consumption. Seldom has an overfed operatic soprano been able to pull off the same the always competent Sean Kelly, and others, Gumbiner was tossed like a salad and still managed to maintain her form, landing on point without fail. Though Manon's inner turbulence is brilliantly depicted Ihrough MacMillanis choreography. Gumbiner had not a hairpin out of place. Peter Farmer's dark sets and costumes cast a forebodingly accurate shadow through the piece. The stage, thankfully was not cluttered wilh all manner of props and rings of plastic flowers, allowing the audience to see the dance, unobstructed. The bedroom scene is wonderfully sparse and yet still darkly effective. Some minor technical diffi cullies, mostly a slow curtain, created a few awkward moments, but aesthetically Ihis production portends all the intended sadness. What: "Manon," Houston Ballet When: June 12-13 at 7:30 p.m., June 14 at 2 p.m. Where: Wortham Theaier Center, 500 Tejcas Ave. Tickets: 810-S84, 713-227-ARTS FILM REVIEW Cute, campy Teoria' needs a little flair by STEPHEN R. UNDERWOOD Sleven Diller's "Peoria Babylon" is gay film noir encased in a cute and campy schlick. wfiere gays ami straights plot and connive againsl each olher to heisl a collect ion of expensive paintings. If sold, lhe paintings are worlh hundreds of thousands of dollars. Wilh Candy (Ann Cusack) and Jon (David Drake] down on their luck, the cash would really be handy. Candy and Jon plol a deceptive publicity stunt for their ailing muse um with Mallhew (Matthew Perreli). a con-artist painter. After he exchanges the pricey original paintings for fakes, Matthew, in front of all the press, throws smoke bombs in the gallery and rips the fakes wilh a knife. The museum gels instant world publicity. Meanwhile. Candy falls lor a handsome gangster named Paul (Brad Kessler). When Paul's uncle (Raul Ke.ssler) joins in on lhe scam, all hell breaks loose when Matlhew accidentally destroys the mob boss' original. Police gel word thai the museum debacle was laked. and Matthew and Jon land in jail. Affairs blossom and complicate the scheme. There's Candy and Paul's attempt lo pair up. Jon becomes enthralled by Mallhew after he ties him up and plays dress up. Then Matlhew plans a marriage of convenience wilh Octavia DiMare (Tlie "Lady" Bunny), a proslituie lesbian porn queen running for U.S. Congress. Taken as Diller intends, "Peoria Babylon" is a regurgitated menage of patchwork subplots. Even his attempts at deception have an "oh, gosh I knew that was gonna happen'' aroma lingering throughout. Fortunately. Lady Bunny spares us the brassy camp we're so accustomed to seeing with RuPaul. It's obvious The Bunny likes to prelend and acl. And unlike RuPaul, at least you know ils an act. Still. Diller's mythic Peoria is a miniature microcosm of what's wrong with .America (like religious hypocrisy and homophobia), and an even smaller one of what's right. You can't blame The Mostly Untdbulcus Social Lifje ofj Ethan Green the down and out for wanting to gel ahead, but their deception becomes a karmlc boomerang that returns to set ihings right. Even so. "Peoria Babylon" is a palatable homogenale in dire need of an aesthetic flair. HOUSTON VOICE RATING: **i MPAA Rating: Nol rated Run Time: 76 minutes Genre: Nolr Director/Script: Steven Diller Cast: a-Xnn Cusack, David Drake. The Lady Bunny. Matthew Peslorius, Paul Adelstein Theaters: Rice Media Center, Entrance 8, University Boulevard, at Stockton. June 13 at 3 p.m. by Eric Orner enr some rep dot
File Name uhlib_31485329_n920_038.jpg