Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998
File 005
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 005. 1998-06-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998-06-12). Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3010

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998 - File 005, 1998-06-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3055/show/3010.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 920, June 12, 1998
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date June 12, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript ll RALLY/. from page 1 Worth late Thursday, ready to paper local gay establishments with flyers about the rally. They also plan to distribute information when the convention opens today about 1 p.m., Labinski said. "Everything has come together perfectly." he said late Thursday from Fort Worth. Log Cabin also planned to purchase advertisements in newspapers in the area to promote the rally, Labinski said. After Black's barbs about gays and pedophiles. Bush weighed in through a spokeswoman, urging an end to any name-calling and infighting. "Governor Bush believes all individuals deserve to be treated with dignity and respect." said spokeswoman Karen Hughes. "While he differs with the Log Cabin Republicans on issues such as gay marriage, he does not condone name-calling." Bush is staying out of the fight and said he had nothing to do with Log Cabin being denied exhibit space at the convention. "He urges all Republicans to focus on our common goal of electing Republicans based on our conservative philosophy." Hughes said. Black said he has not been as inflammatory or insulting as people who have called him in opposition to lhe party's decision not to allow the group an exhibit booth. There is no need for dragging this out further," he said. "The answer has been 'no.' is 'no' and will be 'no.'" Many groups are allowed to set up booths at the convention lo distribute flyers, buttons and literature. But the state GOP said Log Cabin is hateful toward family values and people of lailh. "Sure, it's Just a booth." Labinski said. "But not long ago. it was just a lunch counter. Some party officials are practicing the same type of discrimination and segregation against gay Texans that their ideological predecessors practiced against black Texans just three decades ago." Members of the gay and lesbian organization sued the party after it was denied exhibit and advertising space at the 1996 state convention. The Texas Supreme Court ruled against lhe group, saying the GOP is a private organization. Labinski said he is a Republican because he believes in most of the party's positions. But he said religious conservatives have taken control of party administration, making it hostile toward people of differing views. Black said mainstream Republicans control the party. "We were very happy that the governor spoke against name calling," Labinski said. "That is what the party has been doing since we applied for the booth. The extremists here are the ones in the party structure, not the governor or other office holders." The Log Cabin Republicans are also concerned about proposed changes to party rules, including an attempt to move the nomination of Republican candidates for state office from a primary election system to a caucus sysiem "Ihat would require changes in state law even if adopted by convention delegates. Labinski said religious conservatives want caucus nominations because they could control who participates. "It would be disastrous," he said. "They would field unelectable candidates." MERGE/. from page 1 Though some areas, such as administration, will be scaled back when final details are resolved later this year, jobs at either agency are not at stake, said John M. Gonzalez. Bering's chairman of the board. Development and other areas will be strengthened, he said. Most of Bering's 28 full-time employees, along with Omega's nine, are funded through grants or in other ways that ensure their jobs, he said. There are no immediate layoffs and we don't anticipate any reduction in staffing." Gonzalez said. "We anticipate growing because we will be expanding services." A joint board of directors will be created from the two current bodies, he said. "Just as we have seen this virus mutate rapidly to render drugs ineffective, the epidemic is evolving in ways thai render former responses inadequate," Gonzalez and Omega chairwoman Cathryn Rodd said in a joint statement. The merger will help create new projects, officials said. First on the list could be mixing Bering's in-home temporary care with Omega's hospice efforts to develop a residential program that would temporary relieve primary caregivers. Or a home hospice service could be developed. "What we are seeing here is an opportunity to bridge some of the gaps between the programs." Kersten said. Both agencies have worked together in the past and share some volunteers, officials said. "We started seeing the potential of being even more seamless. Now we are covering a broader spectrum of care." Gonzalez said. State Rep. Garnet Coleman (D- Houston). chairman of a House subcommittee on indigent care, praised the merger as a positive step in reacting to the changing demographics of HIV/AIDS. "It is a great day for Houston when two acknowledged community leaders can put their institutional egos aside to Join together for the benefit of their clients." Coleman said. Bering was created in 1987 by Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. With close ties to Christ Church Cathedral, Omega House grew from lhe inspiration in 1986 of a 75-year-old grandmother who wanted better care for terminal AIDS patients. Bering serves about 2.000 palients a year with its $2.3 million budget, nearly half of which is supplied through state and federal funds. Omega, which has served 420 in 12 years, receives nearly two-thirds of ils S600.000 budget from individual donors and private foundations. About 350 volunteers help staff both agencies. Corrections A story in the June 5, 1998 edition of Houston Voice Incorrectly reported the date of the Pride Parade. The correct date is June 27 at 9 p.m. Also, a story incorrectly listed the date of "Harvey Milk" CD release party. The correct date Is June 25 at 6 p.m. at Crossroads Market Bookstore and Cafe at 1II1 Westheimer. We regret the errors. ■ ■■■*■■■■■■ *M ■ ■■ ■
File Name uhlib_31485329_n920_004.jpg