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Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 022. 1982-08-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2971.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-08-20). Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2971

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 022, 1982-08-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2971.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 20, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript August 20,1982 / Montrose Voice 21 Montrose Live Zelda Rose Appearing First Time in Houston By Lyt Harris Contrary to what one might believe at first thought, Zelda Rose is not a female impressionist who lives deep in the heart of Montrose and appears on Sundays at the Copa. In reality, Zelda resembles Mama Cass Elliot ofthe original Mamas and Poppas. Wearing a long, flowing maroon gown interspersed with patches of glitter, Zelda was seated at a stageside table for this pre-show interview. "It was made by my mother," Zelda commented proudly about the gown. "Do you like it?" Seated with Zelda was Corey Fleming, her youthful accompanist. She and Corey have been a team for about a year and she describes her style as "a combination of blues, torch and pop." Born and raised in New Orleans, Zelda has been singing professionally for five years, appearing at such well-known French Quarter spots as Chelsea's on Bourbon, the Bourbon Pub, and most recently at the Old Absenthe House Bar. Zelda was "discovered" by Rascals bigwig Les Blair on a recent trip to the Crescent City. After hearing her perform at the Old Absenthe House Bar, he was able to convince her to bring her act to Houston. "I didn't need much convincing at that point," Zelda exclaimed. "I was ready for something new—a change of pace." Her only other out-of-town appearance was two years ago when she performed at Verelli's in Povincetown and at the Pied Piper on Cap Cod Bay. When not on stage, Zelda iB employed by the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans as a PBX operator. She is also a housewife and is quidk to mention that her husband is most supportive of her career. Zelda'B first set at Rascals on opening night began with "Rocket Man" by Elton John; followed by "Empty Bed Blues," recorded by Bette Midler; "Duncan," an American folk ballad by Paul Simon; and "Come in from the Rain" by Malissa Manchester. Zelda's voice has the power and range of an opera singer. She has the ability to use this great power when necessary, but can adapt very easily to soft and mellow selections. She has a commanding stage presence, but at times enjoys coming down off stage to sing and mingle with the audience. She has great stamina—her first set lasted an incredible one hour and 35 minutes! "I've gone on for over three hours before," commented Zelda when asked about the length of her set. Between songs, she enjoys keeping a running dialogue going with her audience, giving her a great rapport with her admirers and putting everyone at ease. When someone in the audience yelled, "Take it off," Zelda quipped, "No, I don't do that anymore—I'm an artiste!" Regarding Zelda's style, she perfers to sing most songs more slowly and with more emphasis on each word and note than one would normally hear the songs sung. Sometimes you find yourself trying to speed up her delivery, but then you realize that many of those songB that you've heard rushed through on a three-minute recording by a popular entertainer now take on a new and special meaning when performed at this slower pace. Unfortunately, people who prefer fast- paced, active and lively preformances might tend to get bored with Zelda, as most of her selections have the same slow, meloncholy pace. In order to broaden her appeal, Zelda might be wise to mix with her selections with a few more lively and upbeat numbers just to keep her sets moving at a faster pace. Corey Fleming and Zelda Rose now on stage at Rascals the song Rebecca sang lead and looked much like a fashionable amazon blessed with a voice of slick silk. The group dis- But whatever your personal taste, Zelda Rose is a great discovery and definitely a welcome addition to the Montrose cabaret scene. The Flirts at Numbers By Nick Fede The three gorgeous Manhattanites called The Flirts sang to a packed and enthusiastic crowd on August 15 at Numbers, 300 Westheimer. The group, garbed in matching flours- cent yellow, orange and lime Bkirts that were split daringly in back, began with their newest dance hit "Juke Box"—a tune that was rousing as an opener and had the crowd clapping along. After that number, lead singer/choreographer Andrea Del- Conte welcomed the crowd with "Alright Texas!" Before starting their next number, the statesque beauty Rebecca Sullivan dedicated the song "Passion" "to all you sexy Texans out there." While singing passionately, Andrea slowly stepped down offstage to coyly croon at some crowd members who were seated on the steps. Throughout the tune Andrea sang while making good crowd eye contact but Rebecca and third member Holly Kerr cruised the crowd with looks of steel indifference. Andrea adopted a defiant cross- legged stance when singing the song's chorus. The group stood with their backs to the crowd and singly, then in unison shimmied their shoulders before whirling around to sing "Calling All Boys." During coed wildly during the instrumental which delighted the crowd who responded with whoops and cries. Singing their newest release, "We Just Want To Dance," the group offered flattened palms toward the audience in a plead to which the crowd responded by dancing along with them. After that song, the group sang the monster hit "Boy Crazy" while rolling their eyes in wide delight one minute, followed by gripping their heads in frustration the next. Encores can be boring if they are a reprise of songs already sung, but the group managed to get most ofthe crowd clapping along at a steady rate as they sang "Passion." During the encore, the trio's skirts glowed under the lighting like a 1968 blacklight poster, while lasers rapidly shot the song's title on the wall. The group was formed eight months ago and their producer Bobby Orlando writes all of their material in addition to having written for other entertaniners including "Native Love" for Divine. "We initially were a recording (studio) group that went on to performing," said Andrea in a post-show interview. She said that the group's "concept was to perform originally but indicated that they waited to see how their record releases were publi- cally received." When asked to describe the group's sound and hits she said, "They're all dance oriented." When asked if she had been taken out sight-seeing while here she said, "I've been in the South three or four days, and seen lots of airports, motels and highways." When it was suggested that the group is reminiscent of a 60s type singing trio in both dress and choreography Bhe said, at one point we were (jokingly) called The Shangri-La's. Andrea's musical background was shaped by performing with numerous rock bands, while Rebecca modeled professionally and Holly was one of the lead dancers in "Hallelujah Hollywood" at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. When asked how it feels to perform with the group in comparison to Vegas, Holly replied, "It's different and a little more intimate." The group has a new album "10 Cents A Dance" that has been released on the "O" label. Andrea said, "I like to see faces, it stirs something up inside of me. I think most disco groups are too distant from the audience, they're afraid." When asked if she ever personally experienced a fear ofthe crowd by referring to a crowd member dressed in leopard and posed in a cat-like kneel as if ready to pounce on the stage steps she replied, "No, most audiences won't." Rebecca continued saying "they (the crowd) want to be close but they won't hurt you." When the group was asked if any member longed to sing lead consistently except Andrea, she replied, "What's different about our group is that we all sing." She pondered for a moment then said, "We're not like the Supremes." The Flirts
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