Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982
File 018
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 018. 1982-08-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2967.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-08-20). Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2967

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 018, 1982-08-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2967.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 20, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript August 20,1982 / Montrose Voice 17 Health Warts in Your Shorts? By Harvey Thompson, M.D. C 1982 Stonewall Features Syndicate There is "gay" cancer, "gay" pneumonia, "gay" gonorrhea, and the "gay bowel syn drome," so why not "gay" warts, too? Maybe. The viruses of warts from various body parts may look alike, but analysis shows at least five different human papilloma viruses (HPV's), which cause warts. Genital warts have been found with nucleic sequences different from the garden-variety "common" wart. And, for what it's worth, genital warts may be of multi-cellular origin, whereas common skin warts come from a clone (pardon the expression) of cells that originate in a single infected cell. How warts spread isn't clear. The medical books usually say they are extremely contagious. So, why in some couples who are versatile in sex roles does one of the guys have them while the other doesn't? A famous example of this was Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Remember, Tom had warts, Huck didn't, and they did spend a lot of time in the woods together! Dr. Oriel of the University Hospital in London writes articles on warts every few years. He must be one of the authorities, judging by the frequency with which his name appears in the wart bibliography. In a recent month, in the Sexually Transmitted Disease Journal, he wrote that "contact tracing studies have shown little evidence of the sexual infectivity of the anal warts." He has written about warts since 1970, so he ought to know. His conclusion was that "no satisfactory explanation of the natural history of the anal warts has yet been given." Just what I thought. Warts are frustrataing. I would rather have syphilis or gonorrhea anytime; either is easier to treat, and the cure rate is higher. The treatment for warts seems to depend upon their location and the physician's enthusiasm. The usual treatment for anal warts is podophyllin. There is also salicylic acid, cantharides, liquid nitrogen, cautery, radiation (in the old days), or surgery. Experimental treatments include topical anti-viral agents, topical chemotherapy, or vaccine injections (using old wart parts mixed together in a blender). Folk remedies include rubbing a copper penny over the wart, or burying a potato under a stump. Hypnosis or suggestion has been known to work in ridding children of warts on their fingers. Back in med school, we used to give them a quarter for each one in dermatology clinic; between inflation and location, anal warts must cost much more. Warts frustrate both doctor and patient. Treatment with podophyllin is disappointing; only 50% are cured in the first or second treatment. The applications have to be done weekly, which can get expensive at $15 per crack. Warts often recur, even with those who have given up anal sex. The incubation period ranges from one to 20 months, with four about average, so new warts might pop up after others have disappeared. The range of incubation makes epidemiology difficult; your lover of the past year may have nothing to do with their popping up around your rectum recently. Condylomata lata of secondary syphilis can look a lot like a wart and is also found perianally. Experience has taught me to Veep this in mind. Patients often call in to be seen for their "hemorrhoids," which turn out in examination to be warts. Why shouldn't rectal self-examination with a soapy forefinger be a monthly event in the shower? Warts will usually feel rough on the surface and nontender, while hemorrhoids will be softer and tender. Rectal cancer is the most common GI cancer in the American male. So, why hasn't the American Cancer Society gotten into pushing rectal self-exmination? The ACS calls colorectal cancers "the cancers nobody talks about." One of their longstanding recommendations is an annual rectal exam for people over 40. Why not start doing these exams on yourself much earlier? One of the great advances in breast cancer detection is due to women being taught to look for lumps in their breasts by themselves. An additional benefit would be your ability to check your prostate for early nodules or cancer there. It's doubtful that the situation will be "rectified" and the omission is part of the "rectal taboo" or even homophobia. After all, can you imagine the ACS doing TV spots that advise men to stick their fingers up their rears? Why do anything about anal warts at all? Well, often patients want them treated for aesthetic reasons. Like those men with non-pathogenic amoebas, they just don't want them around. I think, though, that if the wart is small and doesn't bleed or hurt, you could just sit on it and apply "tincture of time." One ofthe "wart articles" claims that they involute spontaneously within two years any way, and may need little attention. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Has Added Costs By Johannes Stahl The manufacturer of Heptavax-B, a vaccination to prevent hepatitis-B, announced that the cost at which they sell the drug is around $100. This price reflects what the direct buyer pays to Merck Sharp & Dohme, the manufacturer of the drug. However, by the time the recipient is injected with the vaccine, this price can increase significantly. Bob G. Howell, Houston registered pharmacist, said the drug is usually sent first to a "wholesaler and then to the pharmacy, clinic, or hospital." The price ofthe vaccine is increased at every stage of handling between manufacturer and patient. Howell said he couldn't commit anyone to an exact price but estimates that the pharmacy will charge about $140. This figure does not include the cost for the three trips necessary to receive the injection series from a doctor. A conservative estimate of $20 per office visit brings the total so far to nearly $200. Medical authorities state that gay males are in a "high risk" category of contracting the disease and should be tested before the vaccination to see if they have already had hepatitis-B infection. Those who have had the disease don't always show symptoms and the vaccine would be ineffective for those who have a history ofthe disease, whether they knew they had the disease or not. The vaccine is effective only for hepatitis-B and not for hepatitis-A or non- A, non-B, say the manufacturers. The Houston City Health Department says they conduct free screening for hepatitis infections in their mobile units, but not in the actual clinic. The units go to different locations in the gay community for four hours about once a week. If the patient goes to a private doctor, add the cost for the office visit and the cost for the required lab work. This could add another $60 to the total bill. If a private physician is used exclusively, the cost could run as high as $260. Those people using public health facilities for the screening could pay $200.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n095_017.jpg