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Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 001. 1982-08-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2950.

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(1982-08-20). Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2950

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982 - File 001, 1982-08-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2979/show/2950.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 95, August 20, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 20, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Houston activists (left to right) Steve Shiflett of Citizens for Human Equality, Ray Hill of Houston Human Rights L<?ague, and George Barnhart of the newly opened Fred Paez Community Seru1c-es Center, pop the cork at a press celebration ouer the decision by a Dallas federal judge to void the state's so--called sodomy statute Don Baker of Dallas, plaintiff in a success~ul challenge to ouert~~n section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Ccxk, the 'homosexual conduct section Federal Jud e ~ rows That Law Out That's Your Mayor In This Week's Voice interview, page 15 story, page 3 The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #95, Published Weekly Friday August20 1982 Good Evening Montrose weath e~ toniJht: Partly cloudy and warm wtth a ahght chance of evening thundenhowers and a Jow of74" Saturday: Sunrise 6:53AM. Partly cloudy and hot with a slight chance of thundershowers and a high of high of 96" Sunoet 7·56PM 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Presenting FOUR FABULOUS DAYS OF AUGUST NO COVER FOR Linda Clifford Live ... in concert This Friday August 20 AFTER-HOURS Every Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday WITH FREE SOFT DRINKS Under 19 Year Olds Welcome for After-Hours Theme Party 'Midnight at the Oasis' Special guest Rachel Wells, Miss Gay America 1978 THIS SUNDAY August 22 AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Judge Says State's 'Homosexual Conduct' Code Not Constitutional Texas Human Rights Foundation president and Houston attorney Robert Schwab, part of the legal team that successfully challenged the constitutionality of the Texas "homosexual conduct" law By Johannes Stahl Section 21.06 of the Texas State Penal Code, which proscribed consensual sex between adults of the same sex, was ruled " unconstitutional" Tuesday, August 17, by Judge Jerry Buchmeyer of the North­ern DiotricVDallao Federal Court of Texas. It was a lengthy 52-page opinion and was in favor of plaintiff Don Baker on the grounds of uright to privacy" and "equal protection under the law." " ... This statute, 21.06, make criminals out of more than 700,000 individuals in Texas who are homosexual , although they do not choose to be, and who engage in private sexual conduct with other consent­ing adults," said Buchmeyer in his opimon. Stating the U.S. Constituional grounds of right to privacy and equal protection under the law, the opinion continued: "because if it were not (protected), the state would have the same power to intrude into the private lives and bed­rooms of heterosexuals and regulate the intimate sexual relationships of married couples, single males, and females ... " Texas is the 26th state to decriminalize homosexual conduct laws-or have them decriminalized by a court. "It's the first time a federal judge has ruled on h~mo_sexual conduct laws, using U.S. Constituhonal grounds as a basis for his decision," said Robert Schwab, presi­dent of the Texas Human Rights Founda­~:.:;,< THRF), which assisting Baker on the "We plan to immediately enforce the rul­ing against any state action thatdiscrimi­~: i~&h!b.basis of sexual orientation," Steve Shiflett, THRF boardmember, said at a press conference in Houston that day, that any state licensing office and even the police departments in the state will be affected by the ruling. Shiflett said the THRF chose this case and has funded it in hopes of such a ruling. Will there he an appeal? "I doubt it," said Shiflett, "We're pre­pared for an appeal if there is one." An appeal to the decision whould have to come from Texas State Attorney Gen­eral Mark White and be filed within 30 days of Judge Buchmeyer's decision. Mark White was endorsed by several gay political groups, including Houston Gay Political Caucus, in his successful race in the Democratic primary for gover­nor of Texas. However, since the ruling, White has been beseiged with letters and telegrams from religionists urging him to appeJ the ruling. Houston Gay Political Caucus president Larry Bagnerio Jr. Thursday, Aug. 19, urged his members to start a letter-writing campaign to White to counter the mes· sages that were urging an appeal. Baker was fired from his position as teacher for the Dallas Independent School District on grounds of the state law. He is current president of the DaJlas Gay Alliance, serving his third term in that position The case of Baker vo. (Henry) Wade (Dallas County District Attorney), a class action suit, was argued June 15, 1981, in federal court and a decision was due last August but was delayed because of Judge Buchmeyer's involvement in state redistricting. Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire said in a press conference Wednesday, August 18, that the city's legal department is examin­ing the ramifications of the ruling as they pertain to the city. "It's not generally in the best interest of anyone to have the state trying to regulate private acts between consenting adults," Whitmire said, when pressed for a statement. Sgt. T.D. Tippin, Houston police depart­ment recruiting office, said to reporters, "Even if overturned, a state court would have to review any changes relating to hiring practices. It (21.06) was part of the basis for not hiring openly gay recruits." He speculated that such court action would take place if the ruling is not challenged. Schwab said though that once the judge ruled the Jaw unconstitutional, the law is "off the books, even during an appeal process," In an interview withHouston Police Chief Lee Brown in June Brown told MON­TROSE VOICE reporter Ed Martinez that " .. If a peroon io eligible for being hired and there are no legal prohibitions then no police agency would be in a position not to hire them (gay and lesbian applicanta) because they'd (the police) be breaking the law." 'rM~~ S\Mora.: ~BAY ~tisl.'\/it8' \~ ~Dfff.CI ~ ~lie. WUT\fUL PBlf\..E OOLY,~-- )00 RE.N.lY AAVE 10~~-- DOtl'T E.VEK ft.Si(--. ___J Montrose Mouth Tuesday was celebration night in Montrose What would have otherwise been a average Tuesday night in Montrose turned into a party night when word spread that Federal Judge Jerry Buchmeyer struck down section 21 .06 of the Texas Penal Code That's the section that made it a crime for adult members of the same sex to engage in sex in private Judge Buchmeyer didn't just strike it down-he STRUCK 1t down in a 53-page court opinion that took over a year to prepare Obviously, to anyone with two ounces of brains, it is unconstitutional for one person to tell another person how to act sexually with another consenting adult in private So obviously, our Texas lawmakers don't have two ounces of brains And , likewise , neither do the homophobes (many who claim to be Christians and many who wear blue uniforms) who are now ranting and raving over this But let them r- • !nd rave. They've got to do something to stay occupied. Houston gay activists Lee Harrington, Ray Hill, George Barnhart, others, were the focus of attention by Houston's TV stations Tuesday and Wednesday. popping champagne corks at the new Fred Paez Community Center on Avondale (I bet you never knew Ray Hill ever wore a suit. I bet you didn"t even know that George Barnhart owned a suit. But we all know that Lee Harnngton has hundreds of suits.) Well, anyway, the TV coverage isn't over yet Harrington will appear on the Nancy Carney interview show at 6:30 a.m. next Wednesday on channel 11 , and no doubt appearances on other guest shows will follow -·- If you'd like to send a letter to our state atorney general advising him not to waste taxpapers' money in appealing the Federal court ruling, you can write to Mark White, 1705 Guadalupe. Second Floor, Austin, TX 78705 Several thousand ''Christians" have already flooded ~ 1m (as of Thursday) with letters and telegrams telling him that •·God will punish" him if he doesn't appeal the ruling Larry Bagneris of Houston's GPC says telegrams and letters weigh heavy on a politician's mind. So for Attorney General White to get in the right frame of mind, readers of the VOICE need to also write, telegraph and call saying the Federal judge's ruling was long overdue and that you will be upset if he waists your taxpayer's money with a useless appeal. Additionally, as you know, White is the Democratic candidate for governor in November and is "'expecting" the large gay vote from Houston. You might JUSt remind him-in a polite way-that his decision on whether to appeal the ruling could affect your vote Nov. 2. -·- Everything's on schedule for the first big edition of Dallas Gay News in three weeks. says DGN editor Chuck Oberg Chuck wants to thank the .. Dallas Welcoming Committee·• last weekend Michael, Walter, Paulette and the Widow Bill -·- Two worthwhile garage sales this weekend: The Brazos River Bottom's softball team is heading to Tulsa for a tournament and is having a garage sale to help with the expenses It'll be Saturday, 9 00 a.m. to dusk, at 2107 Bisson net And some GPC members will have a garage sale Saturday and Sunday at 1004 California, 9:00 a. m. to 6:00 p.m .• to raise a few dollars for that organization Come on out. ya hear? 4 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 '=satu r~~;~8;er B~-;t, -;, ~ -- ~~? till ... , and ~/ I -Sunday-Beer Bust, 4 till ... ,,_ ~ Monday-Leather Night,! 'I Wear your leather and be SERVED with = happy hour prices _ Tuesday's Movie-In 20-ft. wide Mary-Visi ~ "Lawrence of Arabi ~ Male 1 Year Ago Homemakers Aug. 15, 1981: Bullish on 7-11 Iranian government admitted execution of homosexuals, denied executing children, but said it could The Ira ni an government a nnounced the exe­cution of 54 more people, most charged with armed insurrection or drug smuggling but one charged with being a homosexual. The man charged with being a homosexual was reportedly stoned to death by a crowd. Most of the others were led before firing squads, news reports said Aug. 24, 1981 Van Ooteghem won latest round Montrose gay activist Gary Van Ooteghem had his free speech rights violated by former Harris County treasurer Hartsell Gray in 1975, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. It was the second time the court ruled in fovor of Van Ooteghem, who was an assis­tant t.-0 Gray but who was fired when he threatened to address the Harris County CommisMioners Court of behalf of gay rights. Aug. 25, 1981 City Attorney withdrew objections over gay rights issue San Francisco City Attorney George Agnost withdrew his constitutional challenge to the city '8 gay rights ordinance The announc-ement came at a heated meet· ing of the Harvey Milk Gay Democratic Club Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentscopynght • 1982 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm H,!r;,,;,::,:~,~:,.g Jo~:~:,,~•hl enr•rt:~:,,~~;!~: 9'/1t0t EdMarlfnez William Marberry •dv.,.,1s1ngdir.c.t0t David Petluck .O'f•rril1.11g Lyt Harns ~fHtlSKlfl GeneOlwer ad'ffHt .. ,,,g Found!.'lf/M.,,,bfH GayPr .... Aasoc,al•on =~!....,icea IMeroatJ'()nal Gay N""' ' Agency. Pac1ftt New• $ynd1n1ftdF .. rureSef'fl(:e1&Wt'J!et1-1SanfranciaeolChro­noe .. FNll•rel. Um1ed fu1ure Syndkate Jettrey W•laeo RandyAllreOSIOnl'Wal1f .. rur•Synchcat•B"•"McN•ugh POSlMASTEA Send IMfdreu COf•9CllOrtal03317 M<WitrOM •l05.Hol.lllOl'l_TX77008 Sublcripfion11fe111VS S•9P9f"yHr(521uu•>S29P4f1111 mon1t11(lti-IHU91),0l'S12$perwl'Mtkfle511h11n2615Suoa) N•t1:>n•l•d"e111smgr•prHen/11/1Ve JoeD1S.b•to.A1vendfi M.arkitl•ng. Me 6th Avenue. New York 10011. !212) 2' 2·8863 AdwfHl•tlflf/ a..d1ine Eech Tuesd•y. 600pm. for luue retet!ledHchFridtyeYemng lvol1ce1oedvert1ser1 Advf!rhtlngratetche<!UleF•'f&-A w• oo tn1oetfer.10ct 1, 1$.62 Pacific Newe Service What do men want at the grocery store? It turns out to be: the same things women want, speed and convenience. Market researcher Judith Langer has been studying the shopping habits of male homemakers, who make up 11 per cent of all U.S. households. Men and women use basically the same criteria for selecting products, she says, but there are some notable differences: male consumers don 't buy in volume and they don't clip coupons. They're also more intimidated by super· markets and prefer shopping in "7-11" style convenience stores. Finally, men are sensitive about adver· tisments that imply they lack homemak­ing skills. "A number of men really care about their homes," Langer says. Montrose Clinic Certified by Texas Hospital Association By Johannes Stahl The Montrose Clinic has become a member of the Texas Hospital Association (THA). The certificate stated that it was awarded to the clinic on April 28 of this year but the official presentation was not until Wednesday, August 18, ata Board of Director's meeting. The Montrose Clinic is established as an independent health care provider in the Texas health community. They are now certified as a Type Ill Institutional Member, a free-standing ambulatory care clinic. They are one of two such facilities in Houston, according to THA. In order to receive this certification, the Montrose Clinic met the standards of care AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Montrose Clinic board of directors display certificate from Texas Hospital Association. Shown (left to right) sitting: Walter Strickler, trustee; and Mike White, nursing superuisor. Standing: Craig Litton, corporate treasurer; Richard Adams, acting director; Dr. R. O'Brien, medical dir~ctor~ and Mik~ Steumlwf{er, accountant. and professional practices THA requires of all its member institutions Montrose Clinic Acting Director Richard Adams said that the clinic has already handled medical situations that demonstrate the clinic's ability to respond to an emergency situation. He said that there have been reactions to injections of antibiotics. "We've had three so far, which is not above average considering the number of patients receiving penicillin. One out of three of them would not have had a reac­tion if he hadn't medicated himself (with antibiotics) before coming to the clinic." He urged anyone who thinks he may receive medication when he goes to the clinic to tell the medical personnel if they have had any medication, prescription or "street." All patients which did have a reaction to the injections were quickly treated and in stable condition before the fire department paramedics arrived, he said. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Direct from New Orleans ZELDA ROSE ~ng thru August 28 Domer lloodoAr Tlusdoy 6:00-11 :00, Frldoy & Sotvn:Joy 6-0(). 12:00. 5'xldoy Brunch 11 :30-3:00 Aeservottons Requested. Oosed for llXl<h. Shows ot 9:30, 11 :00 and 12:30 MGM Productions presents a Special Benefit for the MSA at the Copa Friday. Aug. 27. mpm The Mr. Gay Metroplex Houston Contest 1982-83 the Briar Patch 1294 W. Holcombe 665-9678 HAPPY HOUR 12-8 Everyday Customers Pool Tourney-9pm Monday Spaghetti-7pm Tuesday Pool Tournament-9pm Wednesday Buffct-4pm Sunday join Me ... The Water's Fine Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4 8 National Study of the Urban Gay Male Population Underway The first national study of the urban gay male population has been announced by Avanti Communications, a California­based firm associated with The Advocate. For the first time detailed and extensive demographic and consumer information will be elicited on a nationwide basis, they said. Eleven cities, including Houston, were selected to be surveyed during August. Other cities selected were Atlanta, Chi­cago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C. Peter Frisch, president of Avanti and publisher of The Advocate, said, "For years corporate America has been raising its skeptical eyebrow at the prospect of the existence of a gay segment of the market. It is our intention to provide a definitive body of information describing the gay male urban population." "Unfortunately, we have been unable to devise an adequate methodology to con­duct ref'earch of this nature into the les­bian community. It is just simply Iese visible and thus almost impossible to sur­vey," he said. The research is being executed and supervised for Avanti by the Los Angeles research firm of Walker & Struman Research who will also perform the data processing and analysis. Study results will be marketed on a syndicated basis and should be available in September, they said. Grin and Bear It Pacific New1 Service If a smile is vour umbrella, it oculd also be a pam in the neck. Oral Surgeon Dr. Daniel Laskin says smiling can overload your chin joint, caus­ing something caJled-ready?-Temporo­mandibular joint disorder, a jawbreaking word that translates into "a pain in the jaw." He urges doctors to train patients to change what he calls "unhealthy facial habits." As for those who have to smile a lot, like night attendants and politicians, they'H just have to grin and bear it. Lights Out for Fireflies? Remember those little fireflies you used to catch in a jar on summer nights?. . Well, scientists at Cornell Umver~1ty say they may hold the key to treating heart disease, reports Science Digest. The insects put out protective chemicals resembling the heart-stimulating drugs taken by cardiac patients. While there's no plan yet for a firefly heart potion, drug companies are re~rt­edly studying the bugs for future medical All You Need is Love Next time you want to relax, try sitting in a quiet room and repeating to yourself: "love, love, love." The Chicago Sun-Times says researchers have found certain words reduce stress, while others can shoot your blood pressure right through the roof. The researchers claim meditating 20 minutes a day on positive words like "love," "sky," or "fly" can help prevent heart attat'k& and ukers But some negative words can give you headaches and nausea . To be avoided: words like "vomit," "coronary," and "ice pick ." EXPRESS ! OURSELF FA~r".~?' S JERRY'S INFLATI0°N" FIGHTER PRICES HaircuVblowdry or ha1rcu1 & set. $10 Permanentwaves$35 men or women 523-0438 OPEN Monday­Saturday llam-2am, Sunday lpm-2am Gay hours Monday­Saturday 4-7pm AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 8 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 r:J:::,efuxe cf? enouatlon HOUSTON 77006 906 Westhe1mer at Montrose 527-0188 SPECIALIZING IN PAINTING GENERAL CARPENTRY PRIVACY FENCE AND DECK DESIGN COMPLETE LANDSCAPING SERVICE WRITTEN ESTIMATE WITH DRAWING 654-4040 UNITED CAB CO. SAN FRANCISCO s24g Round Trip Air Call Rick for Details Serving the Gay Community 524-0038 JON BARTON •- .tlflllTM~ ......... lllEim ~ .... .., ~~ T fj] f :t INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) j Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ..• Only $3.75 (plus drink) Buffet served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** BAR NOW OPEN All Types of Mixed Drinks Served Happy Hour 4-7, $1.00 Bar Drinks * Professional Bartender ... * Lovely Waitresses ... OYSTER BAR NOW OPEN :1_1_ , **** ~J FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY 4 to 10:30 pm * * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * Chief cook with 20 years experience-just came from China * We will prepare for you a very special Chinese dinner [,,ucia Valeska, executive director of the National Gay Task Force, in Dallas for the leadership conferenu, suggested holding similiar conferences euery two years Bill Nelson, director of communi· cations of Dallas Gay Alliance Houston Gay Pulttlcal Cauczu prpsidf•nt I.arry Bagneris Jr_ in Dallas AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 The Turtle Creek Chorale at opening cerenumies of the National Gay Leadership Conference National Gav Task Fo rcl' members in their Dallas hospitality suite Houston Gay Political Caucus members (left to right) Bob Fisher, Pam Jones, Gary Grant and Terry Harris at the Dallas conference At the [)a/las ronferenre were (left to right) Churk Ren•lou·, publt•htr of "Gay Life" m·wspap<'T in Chicago; Jaf'k Campbell, Miami·based gay busmeasman; and 1'0111 Chorlton of the National Associatzon of Gay and lA!sb1an Democrats. Roth Campbell and Renslow art• board TMmbers of the Ga}' Press Association. Gay activists from 37 states meet in Dallas By Johannes Stahl Nearly 400 leaders representing an esti· mated 175 national, state and local gay organizations met in Dallas August 13 to 15 to provide "a forum to discuss what is important and what goals to address for the gay rights movement," said Bill Nel­son, director of communications of Dallas Gay Alliance (DGA). DGA had organized the gathering, called the "National Gay Leadership Con­ference," which was attended by represen· tatives from 37 states and staged at the Greenelefe Hotel. Representatives of Houston's Gay Polit­ical Caucus, Citizens for Human Equality, and the Texas Human Rights Foundation were among those who attended. Lucia Valeska, executive director of the National Gay Task Force (NGTF), said the goals of the conference "were set loosely on purpose. One of the best things was a chance to talk face-to-face with leaders from all over the country." "We were able to cover the basic issues in the workshops which were of greatest concern to the gay movement." NGTF is the largest gay civil rights organization in tr" co\lntry. A series of nearly 40 workshops were conducted at the conference which dealt with such issues as police relations, public relations, health, lobbying, networking, the Family Protection Act. Democratic party politic• and Gay Pnde Week. Ricardo Medrano. pro-gay Dallas city counciJmember, called the effort for the national conference "monumental" on the part of the DGA. Medrano'• district includes Oak Lawn, an area in Dallas where many of the city's gay people live. He rode in the lead car of the 1982 Dallas Gay Pride Week Parade. Nelson said the DGA planned the event because "we wanted to send a message to gay and non-gay people-the gay rights movement is very much alive in the Heart· land," He believes that Dallas was the ideal location for the conference because "Dallas is neutral. .. He feels that if this conference had been held on either the East or West Coast it would have made people from the other feel slighted. He also explained that travel coi:;ts were more equitable since Texas is centrally located. Nelson estimated the total cost to the DGA for the conference at $12,000. Valeska feels that the cost of any future conference might be shared by national organizations. She said that the event should be every two years because of expense and planning involved. "For NGTF, this has been a tremendous opportunity. We would support any effort to see it continued," she said. Concurrent with other workshops, a forum on Acquired Immune Deficiency (AlD) was presented. AJD's are a medical condition affecting mostly homosexually active men, involving impairment of the body'~ immune sl'.stem. ~~ major mani· festations of this condibon are rare cancers like KapoNi"s sarcoma or rare infections such as pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, according to a report made by the forum The report also indicated a plan_ned effort to lobby Congreas for funding mto research on the disease. Morris Floyd. AID Forum Hpokesman, said, "The key concept is to generify the concern for the disease. It is not just the gay mah• who develop~ it." ••we need to look into a risk-reduction statement ... hafll'<i on facts, not specula· tion and without moral Judgements.'' ?'oielson said that response to evaluation forms from those attending the conference will be made available at a later date. A site for the next Cflnference ·was not imme­diately decided, nor was a date. !\el&>n indirated that the conft"rence "has been grat.f);ng but we"re not going to do ttnext year'' 10 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Advertising in 1982 in Montrose has changed from the days of 1979 and before. The switch is to the Voice because we don't play games with your advertisements by limiting the number of copies we put in circula­tion. We saturate Houston's gay com­munity every week-with news, entertainment, and the ads of commu­nity businesses that are getting ahead. Call your Voice advertising represent­ative (David Petluck, Gene Oliver or. Lyt Harris) or advertising director Biii Marberry, at 529-8490. We'll show you a difference! If your advertisement is in the Mon­trose Voice, you can relax. Your message is appearing in over 7700 copies (guaranteed) being distributed through 110 Montrose clubs, restau­rants, shops and stores, and it is getting into the hands of an estimated 21,600 readers! On the other hand, if your ad is elsewhere ... well, you're reaching far fewer people-and paying more money to do it. The Voice brings results for its adver­tisers because we saturate the com­munity every week with more copies through more distribution points. In fact, the Voice now circulates about twice as many copies each week in Houston as does the other publica­tion. Surprised? You shouldn't be. After all, the Voice has better commu­nity news, sports and entertainment coverage, nationally syndicated wri­ters, great comics, a professional attitude-and thousands more copies distributed each week in Houston through dozens more distribution points. lU' Billows of Pillows Frothy lace and eyelet. crisp polished conon. and dee~ fc:x the den have jl.J51 orrived and orf:> wait­ing to help YoU fo<get the heot and humidity cJ 0 Hous1on summer. Soft eve·pleoa!.ing~d eou, rno.JVe, beige ond bluewillcoolyourtOOmS and bring thooghts of on eortyfall. S<opinnowfof theben5e'lec:tion from '12' 0 to '4000 WESTHEIMER INTERIORS 1727 Westheimer • Mouston 713/ 520-1357 Gay Press Association's 'wire service' grows By Joh.nn ... Stahl Th" G•y PrHo Ao1JOCia1ion (GPA) announCtld01panoionandf..Uorutili ... tionofi1&win.....nc.011heNationalGay ~do,..hJpConf0ttn<>0inDallaoA.,..l3- J-.>h DiS.b.to, p...Od°"t of GPA, ufi~,inedplonofcrr,.hothe .. lleda"t•Y DiSabalOl>eldaoorinofd.....,..otta· ti.,...ofthewin .. FVK.atthe"°"ferenoe. Heal~on"""nCtldpJ.no for "GayVoC< '82."Th11pr.,.,.....wi!l...,i.,ilnet•orili .... wilhindivld ... JGPAme1nbttt...,.....tho ::'.'!'?...rn:~on~o~e":i~: k>w<11"'1idalflo'1'Nu.lUlha tha.,.1(1>1ten Ft. Worth activist and 4 neighbors killed llicUyLoeBry.nt,31,aFt.WOl'l.hO....... <notp1'11tinctchainnanand f.,.,,....,;.-hi­< lubo11tort.inerunder1he11a"'" "P-h•,""'H-ofll•opeoplefound brv.ta!lymurd.TedA.,..IOinaFt.Wonh nMchbori>ood J01tV.S..l»<o.p,,..;,u,n1o(tiNGoyi'reHA•_..,...,,,, do.-..1ro1n !INCPA Wi~S.rtii«fOt"l"Y""fi<ia'""!k..J<,.. llN Noiiotool Goy Lttul.<ro~ip Collfe~nct """ /J./~ /,, IJ.U... ""ollheword"olympia""intheatllltlic .••.-.o_ch. .e..d uled in S.n t'ranciocoin 41>eyputthertor)'onthe~oervW>o in &n Froncioco Wed......iay mominf, theMONTRO!lf. VOICE picked it up in H.......,.,U..t evenir11,andif•inlheFri doyodilion." TV Ads Don't Sell n..manwho .. ot<h .. ....,...TVcommor· cial.athat1on:ronee1"inA....,rietdoubto the)rhovem...,,innuo""'(Wfr whlchpro­d-- buy. Aooonlintto•rtoportinlheNtwY"'• Sunday, August 22 8-JOpm John Day &Company :=::~1~ft..!.8a!;.~ 1213 RICHMOND • 621·9071 ~'UL"tC::..•= Nalionaldi.Mributionofno.,..affoodi,.. =thel-.,""" '"'""ltywu~.edyi• b.r:'.:i.."":1;"'.:;·:!"'G~= "AtlouttwodouBolherJ*penlui•• u.pnoooed•nin-tinjoini,..(lhewire __.;,,,,,1"he•id Timt1,Do.YidV.odohra-..U-!N.n oi1ho11rud.o.y.,udyina-TV.odoforMfl<li· -A-.n,..clienta.Hiacond..;on:poopl.o .,.,.,..,h......,~ko!Jrtobl.y•pn>d'*"'•ft<r cLippin1anowa1*Pft"C0<1Poll. H• la. i--.n. qUdi to Point oat thU lho•1ablllion.od-•pontonTV com....-dol•lut-rwunot"""1p~ly wutH. C-.......U.la tho! IMY'll • dH!>. lutina lm....-on. he uyo, de-ffiop • 1ood1"'indl_..w111m1.a_,tialfor itol<>,,.·tft"nl•-· eon..i .......... 1urnf!doflby.odo-ie­in1" binor.battor ........ ndimpo"O•od.''he :=;,~~..=i"-th•ta,.non· H;.....,........,.,~.,vethehish..t marhtoColte'onew"Cobi.oi1,"andtho lonc·ninnina"BeaP_..ti.e-oonp. Motor-Skating A.T•l*n-inventor,....oddedont"W­• nd PoMiblJ .. rrifyiq--di--..,.to .ro..ll.o.r. . ..a tiq, repono N~w Scotnfi.ot ; .... lt'• aMOtoriudpropuloiondevioothu looli:1-.el.hin1~kelhefrontendofo motor<:yde.Allyo11dolooc.rtit•p. ond ~i: :~ ::.~"' life at 1peed1 up to 26 * EXOTIC BIRDS * FRESH & SALTWATER * 'LI"V"E FOOD & PLANTS * SET-UPS &SUPPLIES * PERSONALIZED SERVICE 52fi.8940 2011 S.W. FREEWAY (GREENBRIAR/ SHEPHERD EXIT) 12 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Inhalants: Quick Route to Danger, Says FDA Editor's note: the following article-in an expanded version-was originally pub­li• hed in the "FDA Conoumer, "May, 1980. Admittedly, this article contains "offi· cial" Food and Drug Administration thought. Neuertheless, we thought our readers would be interested. By Annabel Hecht Food and Dru• Admini•tration Public AffainStatr Inhaling certain substances to get "high" has been risky all the way back to anbq· uity, and is no less dangerous in modern time8. Adding to the problem today are a couple of substances that have enjoyed a certain amount of social acceptance: butyl nitrite, sold as a "room odorizer," and nitrous oxide, better known as "laughing gas." They are examined in this article. The Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, says it is very much concerned about the increasing abuse of these two inhaled substances. Because the respiratory system pro­vides a quick route to the bloodstream, inhaling a volatile substance is like hav­ing it injected into the body. The effect can be immediate with loss of consciousness, heart irregularities, or even death. After a time, those who inhale substances such as solvents may develop organic brain syn- ~~:~1!rc~=~:na~o8:,a~~~ ~~':b~~ ity, confusion, or disorientation. Inhaling volatile substances also can lead to peri­pheral nerve injury, and liver and kidney disease. Long-range effects, which may not show up for 10 to 30 years, include an increased risk of developing cancer as well as genetic changes. The 70s saw a surge in the abuse of nitrous oxide-mainly by health profes­sionals and college-age youth-and of butyl nitrite, close chemical kin to a drug used to treat symptoms of angina pectoris (a heart disorder). Just who is sniffing this array of sub­stances? Statistically their numbers are small. The National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) e8timat.ea that about 7 mil­lion people over the age of 12 have experi· mented with or are chronic users of inhalants. In contrast, 42 million have tried or used marijuana. However, experts in the drug abuse field believe that many inhalers just don't get counted. For instance, thoRe most likely to abuse indus­trial solventa. often school dropouts or tru­ants, aren't likely to be covered in M:hool aurveya of drug abuse. In the past, surveys frequently did not include questions about inhalants, or they lumped everything under "glue sniffing." In addition, inhalant users seldom seek medical attention for problems related to their sniffing habit. so they don't often show up in emergency room reports. The picture that emerges of the abuse of butyl nitrite and nitrous oxide is much dif­ferent than that of industrial and commer-cial solvents. When amyl nitirite was made an over­the. counter drug in 1960, it became a prime candidate for abuse. Called "poppers" because of the sound made when the mesh-covered glass vials or ampules were cru.shed prior to inhalation of the fumes, these drugs gave the user a quick "high." FDA reclassified amyl nitrite as a pres­cription drug in 1969 and butyl nitrite became more readily available. First pop­ular in homosexual communities, butyl nitrite is now used both as a sexual stimu­lant and euphoriant in heterosexual cir­cles. Sold as a "room od:orizer" or "liquid incense" under a variety of names that are auggestive of its odor-Banapple Gas, Locker Room, Rush, Jae Aroma, Satan's Scent, Locker Popper-butyl nitrite is available in novelty stores, some record stores, and "head" shops that cater to drug-oriented youth. How many people are using butyl nitrite is difficult to say. It is estimated, on the basis of sales data published in the pre88, that 4 to 10 million vials of "the drug are sold each year. Primary users are older teenagers and young adults of both sexes. From what is currently known, there have been some deaths from butyl nitrite and several of these resulted from inges­tion of the substance. Users generally experience headache&, dizziness, perspira­tion, and flushing of the face. Lees com­mon reactions include nausea, vorhiting, and fainting. There is a risk that over a time the heart and blood vessels could be damaged. Inhaling nitrites could be fatal to people with heart disease. Nitrous oxide is even older than amyJ and butyl nitrite. Diacovered accidentally in 1773 by Joseph Priestly, nitrous oxide was one of the first volatile substances to be abused. In the 18th and 19th centuries "ether frolics" and demonstrations of "laughing gas'' were common par]or games among the upper classes. The fact that the participanta in these events were feeling no pain eventually led to the reali-zation that these gases have a legitimate use in medicine. Ironically, Dr. Horace Wells, the man who introduced nitrous oxide to dentistry m 1844, died as a result of chloroform abuse. Today, nitrous oxide has a number of commercial uses including that of general anesthetic, particularly in dental offices; propellant to manufacture whipped ~h:afu~;~!e~!~~l~;~to~: ~:!be~~-v~!! be abused . Abuse of nitrous oxide as an anesthetic has a long history. One medical historian has recounted cases of misuse of the gas by American medical students in the late 19th centry. How many people in the health profes­sions today may be abusing nitrous oxide is not known, but reports in the medical literature and other sources suggest that anesthesiologists, doctors, nurses, dent­ists, and inhalation therapists are among those who do. When nitrous oxides is a propellant for making 1'whipped cream,'' it is either in an aerosolized spray can where it is consi­dered a legitimate food additive, or in a small 8-gram metal cylinder, int.ended to be used with a dispensing machine. These cylinders are popularly called "Whippet.a," since that is the brand n~e of one version of thia product. The cylmd­ers are being purchased-often at "head" shops-by young people, particularly col­lege students, who have no intention ~f whipping anything edible. Paraphernalia used with cylinders include ballons from which the gal!I is inhaled. One man has come up with a device called a "Buzz ::i:~·~~ :~h ac:f~ifoers s~:~~;.us oxide Damage to health from abuse of nitrous oxides is a problem however. Death can result if the gas is inha led with insuffi­cient oxygen. Abuse of the gas over long periods of time can resu]t in nerve dam· age, including loss of balance, le~ wea­kness, tingling, and numbness m the fingers and toes. Shortness of breath, n_au-io:~ :1:~~~~~nh::~~t~:~~~:ff: '~ of nitrous oxide abuse. Studies of health professionals who are exposed to the gas in their work-<lentists, dental techni­cians, anesthesiologists-have shown that these people have increased risk of kidney and liver disease, s.pontaneous miscarriages, and other senous health problems. Controlling the abused_ products is one approach in controlhn~ mhal_ant abuse. Obviously is would be 1mposs1ble to ban industrial solvents that serve a useful pur­poise, especially since those sniffing th.ese substances will simply tum to somethmg else. However, other steps can be taken such as the addition of oil of mustard to airplane glue to make it smell bad, a move made voluntarily by glue manufacturers. Warnings on labels is another way to help stop product abuse. FDA took this step in 1975 to curtail abuse of nonsbck frying pan sprays. When it was deter­mined that aerosol cooking sprays were food additives within the agency's juris-r~~ t~~·s~~h' ;:c!!ie:c~o::~:~~!~;1ng wam- 0Waming-Use only as directed. Inten­tional misuse by deliberately concentrat­ing and inhaling the contents can be harmful or fatal." As for butyl nitrite, manufacturers of the so-called room odorizers follow the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) labeling requiremens to the letter. Despite extensive labeling and wa~ings such as 0 Avoid prolonged breathing of vapor" sales and abuse have not dimin­ished.' It would have to be proved that injury or illness occurred under recom­mended conditions of use-that is, as a room odorizer-before CPSC could take additional regulatory action. FDA has been aware of the recreational use and abuse of butyl nitrite for several years and is exploring wha~ course of action can be taken to halt this abuse. A key issue is whether butyl nitrite is a drug within the meaning of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Determing whetheritquali­fies depends on how it is labeled. A butyl nitrite product properly labeled as a room odorizer would not be considered a drug, even though the person who bought it did so to get "high." However, if the manufacturer or distributor suggests in labeling that the product is an aphrodi­siac or euphoriant, the product could be regulated as a drug. In the meantime, many U.S. communi­ties are seeking to impose legal bans or at least to limit the sales of this product to adults. Georgia and Connecticut, for example, have established controls on odorizer sales, and Houston has banned their sale to minors. Nitrous oxide as a medicinal gas is regu­lated as a prescription drug by FDA and many of the states. Nitrous oxide as a whipped cream propellant is regulated by FDA as a food additive. Where the 8-gram cylinders fit is not so clear. ~sin th~ c~se of butyl nitrite, the agency 1~ examm1.ng the options for controlling nitrous oxide abuse. In 1980, a meeting wa_s held with manufacturers of the gas to discuss steps that could be taken on a voluntary basis. Changes in labeling on r:iitrous oxide con­tainers were being considered. Materials al80 were being prepared to alert the medi­cal community to the danger or inadvert­ent or deliberate exposure to this gas. Whatever regulatory steps eventually are taken, FDA cautions those who have access to nitrous oxide to use it only as the manufacturer intended. Nitrous oxide is a safe anesthetic in the hands of trained medical and dental personnel and an effective aerosol propellant. But expe­rience now proves that abuse of nitrous oxidt" ia no laughing matter. Midnight at the Oasis LIVE REGGAE BAND DIRECT FROM JAMAICA "THE YARD BAND" Friday & Saturday, Aug. 20-21 & 27-28 ioU:~~~~r:is lady's rnght, Free drmks Ji H a rra r's Wednesday Happy Hour all rnght Thursday $1 Drinks 10pm-2am Sunday-the ADQ Jazz Quartet. 8-12 Ethiopian Cuisine and Club 526-28:'------------ ---------------------------------- FRIDAY 9:30-1:30 The Happy Trail Riders Country & Western Boogie Band SATURDAY 9-MIDNITE SUNDAY 5-BPM Dixie Kings Sunday Happy Hour 12-3PM 715 Fairview 521-2792 THE proudly presents Keoki Kana at the keyboard, Top of the Hole Wednesday-Saturday 5-1 Sunday 3-8 Happy Hour 7am-7pm Monday-Friday Join Dee every Saturday morning 7am-1pm Schnapps 50¢ Amaretto 75<t 7-10am 109 Tuam 528-9128 A UGUST 20. 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 UNDITICTIBLI With your natural weave-you're going to look ~. ~. and act better. You'll be a winner. And everyone loves a winner. What arc you waiting for? The Hair Weavers, Inc. Houston Off ice 1200 S. Post Oak Rd., Suite 420 Houston, Texas 77056 (71J) 622-3290 Call our Representatives Call tomorrow for a no obligation personal int en ie" . r----------------------- 1 T HE HAIR WEAVERS I I Suite 420, 1200 South Post Oak Rd., Houston 77056 I I [ ] Plt'aR ~nd frtt Ji1er.uurl' on ,·our hair wca,·ing ttchnique. I I Name I I Address Phone I I City State _ zip _ _ I -----------------------· 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER Kings, reg. $600.00, now s179oo Queens, reg. $400.00, now •149°0 Other Sizes Available Appearing Sunda_1s & Monda1§ thru August LIUNSHARJi, 402 Lovett 527-9866 Our Chef Has Done It Again! Elegant Dining b Wonderful Prices A Few En.trees from our Dinner Menu .. . Filet of Sole-deep butter fried .............................. 7.95 Chicken Chaucer-breast of chicken sauteed in a brown sauce, with mushrooms .............................. 7.95 Calves Liver-simmered in shallots and red wine with sauteed onions .......................................................... 8.50 Beef Stroganoff-served on a bed of spinach noodles ........................................................................................ 8.95 Chicken Fried Steak-served with mashed potatoes, com and black-eyed peas ........................................ 8.50 Beef en Brochette-beef cubes and vegetables marinated in a burgundy wine sauce .................... 8.95 Serving Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch Now Af>Pearing Sheila Ceasar and Joe Thalken Tuesday thru Saturday beginning at 9:30 p.m. HAPPY HOUR 4-SPM POOR DADDY'S 3416 W. DALLAS (NEAR DUNLAVY) 528-8922 An "unusually" line dining and relaxing experience. Small and Intimate with the kind of service you deserve! Moderately priced. OPENING SPEC'IAI. Poor Daddy will treat you to a bottle of house wine WITH THIS AD and your dinner for two or more Lt•NC'll, WEEKDAYS DINNER, E'VERY NIGllT RFSERVATJONfi WEJ4CO!\IE NOW SHOWING Exclusive Houston Engagement Free Validated Parking Greenway Plaza Underground Highway 59 at Buffalo Speedway 626-3339 AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Behind the Big Glasses and Cute Bow Tie: Kathy Whitmire Speaks to the Voice Photostory by Ed Martinez Early in 1982, a petite woman in her 30s overcame formidable political opposition in the person of the Sheriff of Harris County, Jack Heard, to become the Mayor of Houston. The first woman to hold that position, Kathyrn J. Whitmiretooneanall,had two terms as City Controller under her belt before tackling the establishment to wrest the top city job away from the pols and pros who were convinced they could hang her out to dry in a contest between Heard, the good old boy, and Kathy, the nice young lady. The good old boys were dead wrong, and they were the ones left with egg on their faces as Kathy Whitmire swept to a con­vincing win. This was not accomplished without con· siderable blood on the precinct floor, how­ever, as Whitmire's opponents worked diligently to make political hay over Whit· mire's endorsement by Houston Gay Polit­ical Caucus. Whitmire sought and received the support of the gays of Hou& ton, and Heard's supporters felt he had a cross on which to crucify Ms. Whitmire Wrong again. A last minute attempt by a supporter of Jack Heard blew up rudely in the faces of those trying to portray Whitmire as a future militant gay libber, and the forces using the smear tactics went down to thunderous defeat Ms. Whitmire then proceeded to step adroitly into the political quagmire of problems facing Houston by doing the unthinkable: she appointed a police chief who was a) black, and b) from Atlanta. She then had the audacity to get his appointment approved by the City Coun­cil in an 11 to 3 vote. Then she wooed the man who had built Atlanta's subway-transit system away from that city in an effort at solving Hous· ton's monumental transit mess. Then, as if all that were not enough, she took on the police and fire departments in an open battle to free top administrative jobs from the stagnant clutches of civil service to make those departments more responsive to wishes of the fire and police chiefs. Not only that, she won those battles handily, by means of sheer political clout and clever negotiations with the organiza· tions representing the firemen and police­men who realized that they had been outmaneuvered. Not really Wonder Woman, just a smart young lady who does her homework tho­roughly and never faiJs to give credit to those around her, Kathy Whitmire is prob­ably one of the shrewdest politicians in Texas, and that puts her in the same league with John Connally and a host of other 1Hck politicians. She met us in her capacious office and answered questions candidly and thoughtfully. Are you enjoying being mayor as much as you thought you would? Oh yes, I really am. I feel very good about it, for three reasons: one, I have a very good staff, which has been a tremend· ous help to me. Tw,q, the City Council has been very cooperative, and three, because of both those things we've been able to get some things accomplished. We've been able to set some goals such as getting our budget approved on time, getting the fiscal year changed, bringing in a new police chief, getting some changes in civil service ... I'm really enjoy­ing that. What do you thinlr. the biggest probkm facing Houaton ia right now? It'• hard to pinpoint one thing, but the Mayor Whitmire it.em that comes to the top of the list for most Houstonians is the mobmty prob· lem, the difficulty that people have in get· ting where they're going ... as big as this city is and as much territory as it covers and as far behind as we've gotten in public transportation and in our public thor· oughfare system, I would have to classify mobility ae our number one problem that provides that daily irritant to people in Houston. This is not to minimize the crime prob· !em that we're addressing through the police department. l• it poBBible that with the cuwff in fed· era{ funds, theaheersizeofthecityand the influx of people in spite of the recession, mobility may be one of those problems that have become chronic, that Houston may just sWw down, or do you feel that it is soluble? Well , all those things come in degrees. You can't eliminate traffic in any big city but you have to find ways to make it more workable and more tolerable to keep it from getting worse. That is our more immediate goal, to keep traffic from get­ting worse that it already is. We think that a first step in that direc­tion is to have a substantially increased bus system and that has been the first goal of Alan Kiepper since he's been in Houston. That'• just one •tep. We're still looking at more advanced means-rail transpor· tation that we believe that we can develop as a feasible a lternative in Houston. At the same time, the city is presenting a uni­ted effort to the state highway commission to encourage the development of more free.. ways in the city of Houston. You're our mayor, and a lot of people wonder: what's the lady behind the big glasses and the bow tie really'like? How do you spend your privat,e time, or do you have any time leftover foraperaonal life? I think that's the key to it. A job like being mayor is a very demand­ing job and I do spend a great amount of time on it; 75 or 80 hours a week are dedi· cated to my responsibilities as mayor of the city so that doesn't leave a whole lot of time for a private life and personal activities. But I am a very private person and do tend to keep my private life to myself. Has living in Montrose helped you understand the probkma that gays face? I would say that that's probably true. Certainly I know a lot of people who are gay, and because of that personal associa· tion, any time you develop personal aBSociations with people who have differ· ent lifestyles, different backgrounds, dif· ferent economic positions, you become more familiar with their problems, and more sen•itive to the difficulties they face. Now or in the future, at any time in your tenure of office as mayor, would you sup­port an ordinance that prohibited discrim­ination on the basis of sexual preference in the area of jobs, housing, or credit-a gay rights ordinance? I think we've seen some ordinances that cover some of those areas passed by other cities, and I certainly believe in that phi­losophy, that we should not tolerate dis­crimination against people because of their background or lifestyle or whatever. I believe that all people should be consi­dered as individuals in employment and in all phases of their lives. The question becomes one of what should the city's role be, to what extent does the city have the authority to involve itself in various transactions that occur, whether they have to do with housing and employment or credit and what role should a city government play. It's not an i88ue that I am sure about at this time. It would depend on the attitudes of the city council and the legal authority that the city has. If the issue arose, if an ordinance were introduced by OM of the city councilmen, would you support it? I think it would depend on the specific way that it was written. I would not want to tell you in advance that I would support an ordinance that might be projected by a council member, because I don'tknow how that ordinance would be framed, what kind of enforcement it would have, what it might cost to enforce it, whether it would be legally enforceable and all those kinds of questions I will tell you that in concept I certainly support equal opportunity for people with­out regard to their lifestyle. Your opponent nailed you, or tired t.o, in the last election, over your endorsement by the Houston Gay Political Caucus. Would you seek the support of the Gay Political Caucus in another bid for mayor? Certainly, I always seek the support of all the groups in the city. One thing I was going to teU you is that you were talking about my opponent nail­ing me about the GPC support. I saw a poll recently that was done after the election, where they tried to analyze why it turned out the way it did. Eighty-seven per cent of the people who voted in the election were aware of my support from the Gay Political Caucus, but the overwhelming majority of them said that it made no difference one way or the other. I think that is very interesting, that it made no difference one way or the other. I think it is very interesting, that it did become a very high profile issue, and everyone was aware of it, but the majority of Houstonians did not consider that a sig­nificant factor one way or the other. ls there anything you would like w say to the people of Montrose? I think that we have a lot of potential in this city, and the thing that I want to say is that we can make Houston the kind of place that we want to live from the stand­point of addreBBing our problems with mobility and crime and park space and improvements in the streets and ~of the iasues that need to be addttssed if we get citizens involved I think that the active civic organiza· tions that have been formed in the inner city have certainly been making the differ· ence towards the upgrading of our city and I believe that'• really the strength of the city, the people that take the time to get involved. The thing that strikes a person listening to Mayor Whitmire is that she is, for all her savvy and intensity that is evident in her manner, not that most damning of adjec­tives, strident. She has the ability, almost unique among top women executives, to remain quintessentially feminine. The office of mayor hao failed to harden or make coarse 90meone who is, obviously, very much a lady. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Letters Reader Says 21.06 Decision Should Cause New Initiatives From Neil lsbin The gay community of Texas, and the entire nation, owes a great debt to the vision and hard work of individuals like Robert Schwab and Don Baker. The fed· eral court ruling declaring the unconstitu­tionality of State Penal Code 21.06 validates the argument that major advan­ces in civil rights are initiated by the fed­eral courts and not by local politicians. The universal values of liberty and equality, inherent in the U.S.Constitution have provided the basis for continual civil rights reform. Unfortunately, local politi· cians, throughout the Civil Rights era, have either been openly hostile at the worst, or at the best, well intentioned but without the courage to lead. While the GPC has gained influence in city politics by demonstrating its effec­tiveness in turning out the vote, it has remained ineffective in pressuring local politicians. When local politicians expreeRed a fear of voting for various pro­gay ordinances, the GPC leadership backed down. When local politicians, while making promises to the gay commu­nity, he behind 21.06 as an excuse to delay action, the gay leadership said nothing. Due to the heroic efforts of the Texas Human Rights Foundantion, 21.06 has been removed from the books. Our local politicians have no more Jaws to hide behind. Their actions in the next few months will demonstrate the sincerity of their past promises. Police Chief Brown should begin plans to immediately hire gay community lead· era as instructors in the Police Academy and as instructors in post-Academy train­ing. Plans should also be made to open the next Academy class to gay applicants and to screen all future police applicants for prejudice against gays. Furthermore, the City Council and the Mayor should begin work on drafting a comprehensive Civil Rights ordinance that would include protection for gay citi­zens. among other minorities. It is no longer enough for local politi­cians to say that the prevention of nega­tive initiative is enough-it is time for positive initiatives. It is also time for the GPC to use ita influence, out.side the ballot box, to pressure for the basic reforms it has advocated for years MCC National Official to Hold Services in Houston From the Reu. Dee Lamb. assistant pastor, Metropolitan Community Church of the Res,;urection Rev . Elder Freda Smith, Vice-Moderator of the Universal Fellowship of Metropoli­tan Community Churches (UFMCCJ, will be conducting spiritual renewal serviceti at Metropolitan Community Church of the Ressurection (MCCR) Friday, August 20, and Saturday, August 21. at 7:15 p.m. in addition to Sunday, August 22, at both regular worship services (10:45 a .m. and 7:15 p.m.). Rev. Elder Smith is an Honors Program graduate from California State Univer­sity with a degree in psychology and a minor degree in woman's studies, a department she helped found . She is cur­rently meeting requirements for a mas-ter's degree in communication studies. Long active in gay rights, she received the 1977 Eleanor Roosevelt Democratic Club Award for "Out.standing Contribu­tions in the Field of Human Rights." From the moment she first heard of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches, her loyalty and tal­ent has been focused on the UFMCC vision of liberating the world through J esus Christ. Joining UFMCC in 1971, from a Salvation Army background, she was licensed as a minister at the 1972 General Conference. Ordained as the Fellowship's first woman minister, she spearheaded the effort to change the by-laws to include women in all categories, and subsequently was elected as the first woman elder of UFMCC. Repeatedly, re-elected as Elder. Rev. Smith was active as a member, the Chair of World Church Evangelism from 1972· 1979, when she was elected as Vice· Moderator. She has served on the Board of Campus Ministry on the University of California, Sacramento Campus and is listed in the second edition of Who's Who in American Religion. Rev. Elder Freda Smith has had an hour-long debate on prime time TV with Dade County, Florida's Rev. David Ren­frow, been i;,een nationaHy on the ''Tomor­row Show;· and nationally(in Canada) on the "Canada AM ... show, as well as numerous local appearances in the many MCC churches she visits around the world . She lives in Sacramento, California with her spouse Kathleen, where she has been pastor of the local MCC continously since 1973. Each of you are invited to hear this dynamic, spirit-filled minister of God. Don't miss it. Playgirl Follies This Saturday, Aug. 21 , 10:30pm, $1 .00 cover, starring Laura Lee Love with special guests Eydie Mae, Veron ica Lake, Dee Shannon Happy Hour Saturday m1dnight-2am Sunday noon-m1dn1ght Mon-Fn 4-8pm Open 10am Mon-Sat. Noon Sunday New Bualneu man'• Happy Hour. M-F 10am-1pm A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant "Oldest& }3 Friendliest • 'fj)r\ m Texas" \'· ' 1218 Leeland ~~- 659-0040 INTRODUCING HIM Vitamins, Minerals and Herbs tor the Sexually Active Male odlvemen • Ma:11,T"l":zJnQthe,mrn.,an.esy*m10 !IQtil.,:ectlOft · ~~~~J:1'9Wtll"-JO!vrtoltyand • M:i~~:-Jiaio!Ht-rJ»1111tU1 • ~"'p:r1~ ~:::,~:-:S ~y1=1ana - ~~ ~~~!~~~:;~ • ?rf!~;~r.oQ•'lQ'Pl'OCeSSOt!ne .\CompleteNutr11lono!Suppleme111 ;u. · :.e :eonon:iemeoicolpf'O'- =~~~-~.a~ ~~~~fy re!emei~r: ~ocomp1&tef'IUln hofia;11.1pp6Llmenllhal1Shywaiter gimK:a:lfj<::onf'l.:~ wt..e7tsab.~ arunoalJ::i'Wsel'W11Vfi.CoionngO:- :=:~i:.e:~~~4 arnonlb1upplyol.'Klpa< e.Jt;"'ltletJ M1dtowneSpa. 3100Fannin A Moveable Feast. 3827 Dunlavy Studz News. 1132 W Alabama Gary Treese. MSW. 524·0888 Health Seekers. 29465 Shepherd •!"' ~ (]I ..\'I b W' ~, , jt . 1y :=!~_;:~:E-E .. mon bairn wi!h ru~pec1 l<l H~rpes ~1· '-llM1.heonlyrnu111p1e 1~~~~1~1 ~~:J~er.1~ !tine O."lopStienh1i1to.ac• t'TM holpp"9\1191,lllren · :IUL"ed 1 eple1i®bypr<~Vldlng ~~' -~~r~~cH~~~ir £11N!herOeoc-:-.;sse~tJC.OMJS.some11mff .:!ed5'benan'i.'1Mng animporla b'40=~=~ ::le nr.Jed Slt•:'J1~:nl~u~~ 'J'I rttp...jty~·~·rwm.. rrontier rne<:hc~J 1rMtth~ "'.1-.r~uw ~~~~~1;.':n. u:udaog1tie~1vee1~ L'l:l:IO!ef!W"Arlbe:oniek1Ilen1 711 ln:t11:11rrinto:71po1er.cJt11St>1Theo E~:~~:;;:;z :~r:re rw Sefte ~l""""8U igtill!\oW *. Mc a ur1lc m'>'Ml11 1010~ b,)IJ q11ldc.. nold1s.ruptlhe del1COteec-otog1calboJanceo1r,ur :;;~~~~~s1 Ydeplo.te iur ;ystem IA~=~~M~~;:~1~~1ns MMJra! ingred1ents10octueveholmonol bol onc.andsexuolresponsiveneumthe rnale O"mlo-unnarysystemThecom ~~~~!.1 ~~~~!~:::1100 oh;Ml-nio11unc · on~ KIM NowA•ollob~Plwntt Poller! M . rernorkcbl9nulrr.:aa1 t <Jk "W< NJbetngl!"llroduc:ed l~le!$ d~\:~~!:\=!i relo.lenltl'fO\lreotnfll!JnjyAndlor ll ~:-=ru=~~1 :1t. ~~= '\ )} Houston's Friendliest Country&. Western Bu Serving Breakfast 7:30-10:30am Mon.-Sat SUNDAY Buffet for MDA. KON-SAT: Open 7am. liCONDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. - 710 PACIFIC 628-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Labcrr Day BBQ Sept. 6 with entertainment by the Montrose Country Cloggers & Ab & the Rebel Outlaws AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Warts in Your Shorts? By Harvey Thompson, M.D. 1982 Stonewall Featuree Syndicate There is "gay" cancer, "gay" pneumonia, "gay" gonorrhea, and the "gay bowel syn­drome," so why not "gay" warts, too? Maybe. The viruses of warts from various body parts may look aJike, but analysis shows at least five different human papil­loma viruses (HPV1s ), which cause warts. Genital warts have been found with nucleic sequences different from the garden-variety "common" wart. And, for what it's worth, genital warts may be of multi-cellular origin, whereas common skin warts come from a clone (pardon the expression) of cells that originate in a sin· gle infected cell. How warts spread isn't clear. The medi­cal books usually say they are extremely contagious. So, why in some couples who are versatile in sex roles does one of the guys have them whiJe the other doesn't? A famous example of this was Tom Saw­yer and Huck Finn. Remember, Tom had warts, Huck didn't, and they did spend a lot of time in the woods together! Dr. Oriel of the University Hospital in 1...-0ndon writes articles on warts every few years. He must be one of the authorities, judging by the frequency with which his name appears in the wart bibliography. In a recent month, in the $fxually Transmit­ted Disease Journal, he wrote that 40COn· tact tracing studies have shown little evidence of the sexual infectivity of the anal warts." He has written about wart.s since 1970, so he ought to know. His conclusion was that "no satisfactory explanation of the natural history of the anal warts has yet been given." Just what I thought. Warts are frustrataing. I would rather have syphilis or gonorrhea anytime; either is easier to treat, and the cure rate is higher. The treatment for warts seems to depend upon their location and the physi­cian's enthusiasm. The usual treatment for anal warts is podophyllin. There is also salicylic acid, cantharides, liquid nitro· gen, cautery, radiation (in the old days}, or surgery. Experimental treatments include topi­cal anti-viral agents, topical chemother­apy, or vaccine injections (using old wart parts mixed together in a blender). Folk remedies include rubbing a copper penny over the wart, or burying a potato under a stump. Hypnosis or suggestion has been known to work in ridding children of warts on their fingers. Back in med school, we used to give them a quarter for each one in dermatology clinic; between inflation and location, anal warts must cost much more. Worts frustrate both doctor and patient. Treatment with podophyllin is disap­pointing; only 509& are cured in the first or second treatment. The applications have to be done weekly, which can get expen­sive at $15 per crack. Warts often recur, even with those who have given up anal sex. The incubation period ranges from one to 20 months, with four about average, so new warts might pop up after others have disappeared. The range of incubation makes epidemiology difficult; your lover of the past year may have nothing to do with their popping up around your rectum recently. Condylomata lata of secondary syphilis can look a lot like a wart and is also found perianally. Experience has taught me to 'ceep this in mind. Patients often call in to be seen for their "hemorrhoids," which tum out in exami­nation to be warts. Why shouldn't rectal self-examination with a soapy forefinger be a monthly event in the shower? Warts will usually feel rough on the surface and nontender, while hemorrhoids will be softer and tender. Rectal cancer is the most common GI cancer in the American male. So, why hasn't the American Cancer Society got­ten into pushing rectal self-exmination? The ACS calls colorectal cancers "the cancers nobody talks about." One of their longstanding recommendations is an annual rectal exam for people over 40. Why not start doing these exams on your­self much earlier? One of the great advances in breast cancer detection is due to women being taught to look for lumps in their breasts by themselves. An additional benefit would be your ability to check your prostate for early nodules or cancer there. It's doubtful that the situation will be "rectified" and the omiBBion is part of the "rectal taboo" or even homophobia. After all, can you imagine the ACS doing TV spots that advise men to stick their fingers up their rears? Why do anything about anal warts at all? Well, often patients want them treated for aesthetic reasons. Like those men with non·pathogenic amoebas, they just don't want them around. I think, though, that if the wart is small and doesn't bleed or hurt, you could just sit on it and apply "tincture of time." One of the ''wart articles" claims that they involute spantaneously within two years any way, and may need little attention. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Has Added Costs By J ohannes Stahl The manufacturer of Heptavax-B, a vacci­nation to prevent hepatitis-B, announced that the cost at which they sell the drug is around $100. This price reflects what the Health direct buyer pays to Merck Sharp & Dohme, the manufacturer of the drug. However, by the time the recipient is injected with the vaccine, this price can increase significantly. Bob G. Howell, Houston registered phar­macist, said the drug is usually sent first to a "wholesaler and then to the phar­macy, clinic, or hospital." The price of the vaccine is increased at every stage of han­dling between manufacturer and patient. Howell said he couldn't commit anyone to an exact price but estimates that the pharmacy will charge about $140. This figure does not include the cost for the three tripe necessary to receive the injec­tion series from a doctor. A conservative estimate of $20 per office visit brings the total so far to nearly $200. Medical authorities state that gay males are in a "high risk" category of contract­ing the disease and should be tested before the vaccination to see if they have already had hepatitis-B infection. Those who have had the disease don't always show symp­toms and the vaccine would be ineffective for those who have a history of the disease, whether they knew they had the disease or not. The vaccine is effective only for hepatitis-Band not for hepatitis-A or non­A, non-B, say the manufacturers. The Houston City Health Department says they conduct free screening for hepa­titis infections in their mobile units, but not in the actual clinic. The units go to different locations in the gay community for four hours about once a week. If the patient goea to a private doctor, add the cost for the office visit and the cost for the required lab work. This could add another $60 to the total bill. If a private physician is used exclu­sively, the cost could run as high as $260. Those people using public health facilities for the screening could pay $200. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ) New Hours 11to2 J.) New Happy Hours 11-7. ooc drinks ' :; (~ Drag Queen All-Stars Soak the Sponsors By Billie Duncan The Drag Queen AJJ.Stars proved that they could bat more than eyelashes last Saturday, August 14, when they trounced the team made up from the sponsers of the MSA Softball League by a score of21to13. The irregularities of the game made it all the more fun. In the first inning, the umpriretj were having such a good time that it took four outs to retire the Drag Queens and get the Sponsers up to bat Billie Duncan (moi) oftheSponsers hit a bouncing single that put a man in scoring position in the bottom of the first. Other members of the Sponsers team also hit the ball with more or less success. Moi was injured in the second inning and got to sit out the rest of the game. For the DQs, Donna Day was clearly an asset. Although Donna's official position was catcher, he also doubled as a wall, strategically blocking passage to home plate with his formidable girth. Miss T on first and Nikki on third were outstading for the DQs. The Sponsers also The case and crew of the Drag Queen All·Stars had people on first and third. Grant at Jackson 528-8234 Outside Sales part-time or possible fulltime Established, well-known Montrose business needs out­side sales personnel. Expe­rience preferred but not required. Send letter or work experience summary c/o Blind Ad 95-A Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose# 306 Houston, TX 77006 The excellent catches that the DQs made were generaJly puctuated by squeals of delight and a dance step or two. The DQ• wore red tops with white shorts and dis­played a stunning array of footwear. This is the second year in a row that the Drag Queen AJJ.Stars have won over the Sponsers. The DQ• predict that they will win again next year. In other action on Saturday, the softball team from the MSA Tennis League played a select team made up of players from four teams of the MSA Women's Softball League. Surprisingly, the Tennis League team won 6.J. Racquetball League forming Buzz Smith said that a new raquetball league is forming. He said that he hoped that new players as weH as experienced players would join. Once the league is formed, instruction can be given to new players, he said Ln order to organize a group to start play, Buzz has planned an organizational meeting for 9:00 p.m. Tuesday at the Barn, 701 Pacific. He urged anyone who was interested to please come by for the meeting Some of the sponsors' team r------------------------ Lowest Prices on Alterations S 1.00 a FF ~~hpon Trouser Waists & Bottoms Regular $3.75-Special $2.75 Coupon Expires October 1, 1982 THE DESIGNER'S ROOM 224 Westheimer 522-7106 Open 8 to 6 Tuesday-Friday 10-3 Saturday (closed Monday) ------------------------~ GYRO GYROS SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westhe1mer 528-4655 A UGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Houston, Dallas Take Top Volleyball Spots By Billie Duncan The West End Stars did it. They swept the Texas volleyball tournaments by winning all four The last one was here in Houston on August 14, but it was not that easy. Some­times the Stars have been known to com­pletely smash their opponents with no chance of the other team even looking like they were on the same court, but Dallas' Pegasus I gave them a run for their money. In the final• when the West End Stars and Pegasus I were playing for all the marbles, the Sta rs won the first game 15-3 and were leading the second game 14-1 when Pegasus came back. Pegasus pushed the score up for their team to 13 points and were heading to a possible win when Mike Gonzalez of the Stars spiked down off of a block for the winning h it. So, in the A Division, the winners were Houaton's West End Stars, first; Dallas' Pegasus I, second; Austin's Boathouse, third; and New Orleans (no team name), fourth . The B Division teams had a bit of a con· troversy when Pegasus II of Dallas was entered as a B team. They had been play­ing as an A team previously. Marcus Watson of the Pegasus II (and MSA 's West End Stars, fi rst place A also the president of the Dallas Volleyball team Association) explained that the team was recently reorganized and he did not feel it would be fair to play them as an A team. "We've had two practices as a team," he explained. He also said, "The average age of my team is 36 .. No, 33. They'd kill me if I said 36. There are three over 40 and one is deaf. For that we should be considered a miracle." Well , the miracle came out just fine for Dallaa with Pegasus II defeating Hous­ton's Diehards in the finals to win the B Division. So, the results for the B teams were Dallas' Pegasus II, first; Houston's Diehards, second; San Antonio's Blazers, third; and Dallas' Renegades, fourth . The Renegades of Da11as are proud of the fact that they have Mi88 Piggy as a mascot, and even insisted that she be in their team picture. One interesting aspect of the tourna· ment was the respect that the out of town team1 expressed for the Montrose Sports Association. "We have no sports league, no volleyball league," said Nick Rippon of the New Orleans team. uwe have eight guya who play volleyball ." "When the Raacals (from Montrose) came to play us, to scrimmage, we didn't have enough money to buy a new ball It was so embarassing." He explained how they started. "We used to play in a field and the people from the bars would come out a nd stare a t us like we were monkies in a zoo." Nick added, 0 ln New Orleans, we have very little class and almost no shame." New Orleans team, fourth place A team Dalla•'• Pegaaua II ready for action in Rerntgade• from Dalla•, fo urth place B the {mat. team MSA '• Dieharda, second place B ~am Sports MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK"S GAMES HIGH GAMES Monday. Au:::' ~~IES Rich Corder 234 Bob Akins 620 Bob Akins 230 Steve Stepleton 593 Steve Stepleton 230 Rich Corder 585 FINAL SUMMER SEASON STANDINGS D1111s1onA 1. Daddy"s 2. Eurotan lnt"I ~Lowest Lane 469ers Dtv1s1on B 1. E/J.:JProtein Supphments 2. Bushwackers 3 F1veEasyP1eces 4 Hole E Rollers D1vis10n C 1. Cock-Ta1lers 2 Citizen Pain 3 Slow Hand •Semen Recru its D1v1s10nD 1 HappyTra11s 2Galleon0ne 3 Gator-Aid "4Jnterect ROLL OF RESULTS HappyTra•lsOYerEurotan3-1 Daddy"soverCocit-Ta11ers2-2 (124 pins) Bushwacke~ °"er Citizen Pain 4-0 Galleon One over E!J"s Protein Supphments 3--1 TOTAL PIN HANDICAP TOURNAMENT RESULTS 1 Cherry Pickers 3027 3 Next-T-Last 2895 2 Untouchables 2949 • Eurotan International THIS WEEK"S GAMES ( A lf g-atStachumBowl . C'OOB<~•"') Monday. AUQUSt 23 Second round Rolf-Offs. 9pm Happy Traits vs Galleon One Bushwackersvs Daddy's Second round Total Pin Tournament. 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursday. AUQUSt 19 RMUltsnext'llllHk Thursday, August 12 HIGH GAMES 2884 Lou•s SChnetder Rachael R1charte 220 296.200 Bob Schulman 213 TerryWOlbef226.200 STANDINGS !Tt"irOo,Jgt\Aug"*t 5) 1. JustManon&Lynn·s 7 Chases Tropical Fruit 8 Hang 10 2 For • Few Dadd1e1 9 Thursday Night More TnckS 3. The Rockettes io. 4to 1 4. Kindred Sp1r1ts 1 t . Gutter Sluts Aces High 12 Kindred Spirits 5 Salt & Pepper II Leather & Lace 6 Thursday Knights NEW SUMMMER SEASON RECORDS HIGH GAME (SCRA TCHJ HIQM GAME (HANDtCAf't Men Lows Sehneider Men. Louis Schnetder 296 317 Women. RachMff Women: Rachael R1charte 220 R1charte 273 HIGH SERIES !SCRATCH) HIGH SER1ES !HANDICAP) Men: Louts Schn•der Women: Rachael 669 Richarte 658 THIS WEEK"S GAMES .... 11 oarr-atSt.ilUITI1ow1 aoo •-•"l Thursd•y. August 26 Regular compet1hon. 9pm Pool Tournaments Mondey AUQ'Ull23 Kindred Sptflt9 (52'5 ButfalO Speedw.y. 865-97545) •I S30pm.aing1••hmiri•hol\.S29fltry.wfnnertahart R9!'1Ch (8620\t Mam. ~9730) •11pm,1rrigle •hm1natJOn S29n1ry. w•nn.rt•keaU(S50gu1it•nt•J Tll9sd•y. AUQ'utt 24 L•IT'lpO&l(2417TimN81Y'd , 528-a921)at8prn, 1mgle .. 1mt­na1ton. S2entry. 'k•nn«IU.•all Wkl',.,.,day. Avgwt25 BnwP1tcf'1 (2294W Ho6comb9. tl65-9678) at9pmamgi. .. l!Tlin.at10n, S2entry, S50pr1t1 GB I (1419 Rtchmond. ~l at 8pm, amg .. el•mtna· lJ()r\$2.ntry. w•n,.,.,tu.1arl .,.,dMWpootcue Thcndly Ai.vustM Barn1710Pac1ftc . S2&-IM27)atipm.ctou~•1min1t1orl.S2 91'1try. S25t1tMroundpnaS15sec:orMfrtM.inclpnz• JuttManonandLynn1 ( 917f"a1tV,.... . ~9110 l at8pm,_S2 «1tryfM. wm,.-tak1all E/J"1 (1213 Richmorld.527·I071 t • 10pm. do1.1bl9elim>na­llOll. S2entry. W•nMft•-•&1· MSA Tennis LAST WEEK"S MATCHES Sunday. Augoust 15 Danny Casillas over Eddie Chaves &-0. &-0 RobertAmagaoverPeterlee&-7 (7·5) , 6-2. 6-0 Jim Scott °"er- Larry Coll1n1 6-2. 6-3 TOP TEN STAND!N~!EFI 1 Rich Ryan 1. Donny Kelty 2. Fred Lopez 2 Rich Corder 3. Jim Kitch 3. David Garza 4 Aon Landrum 4 Robert Amaga 5. John Ryan S Peter lee 6. Dr·11d Robicheaux 6 Danny Cast11as 7. Le1terVela 7 Edd1eCh.._.ez 8 JOf'ICOlbert 8 Jim Olsen 9 Michael Homtnn 9 Jim Scott 10 Mike Green 10 Lany CoU1ns THIS WEEIC 'S MATCHES (CounslDcllladMtc:Gr-.orPWtc.Tenn.~Tak•Gu# F,.....-r'IOUlt\.Ullc.lhcu!JuS!pelllUHC:#!lpUIOfl._,.I Sundey, A~22 Regular competition 10:30l.m 20 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Another Woman's Alternative 523 Lovett, Houston Lee LaForge presents Kim Yvette & Dianne Christon Every Sunday in August 9 to 1 Thursday, August 26 C&W Night & Dance Contest HAPPY HOUR 4-7 TUES-FRI WELL DRINKS 2 FOR 1 BEER 85¢ Live DJ 4 nights a week Every Friday & Saturday evening, entertainment by Maryanne Mahoney and Mata Hari Marquerite at the piano for Happy Hour Wednesday-Friday We're open 6 days a week for your rinking & dancing pleasure (closed Monda (713) 523-3396 We wish to welcome Richard Kurtz to our staff as our Montrose Design Consultant (also serving River Oaks and West University). Watch for the change that's coming 11316 Westhe lmer 531 -9600 Open 10-9 M-F, 10-6 Sat, and 12·5 Sun for browsing 520-5560 531-9600 A&A FURNITURE CENTER We carry the fine SEALY POSTUREPEDIC line '\ . · ' 1'lllf. shoppers & ~r • com"'m'"'" .. : . •· . . . . . · .• ·._· ·. . ~-,,1. I margaritas to our • . ~ ' 1 1 \· \ .' ·. ~J browsers --------------------- : THIS WEEKEND 20% OFF : all special orders : Must present this COUPON : --------------------- Intimate moments can make for pleasant memories, but occasionally. someth ing a lot less pleasant lingers as well­crabs. for example. Now there's RID.• a liquid treatment that kills crabs in IO minutes and provides rapid relief of itching. RID contains a safe. medically proven natural ingredient at al­most twice the concentration of the leading non-prescription product. Each package also includes an in struction brochure and fine -tooth comb for c lice and nit removal. You can buy RID at your pharmacy without a prescription and begin treatment at once. But remember. 38% of the people with g;u.,.,. crabs have been fou nd to have something 1llir EtP worse, like VD. So if you think you may have !!'~~ been exposed to something more than ~~....- . .co crabs. see a doctor RID!....Safe, =-Comlt effective ~::=~:~ ~ P•pblln'nets r-NislonolP nll'IC NewYOJJ. :--; • ..,York 10017 Quality Dent Care. The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Care, we've discovered an important fact No matter haw well we do our job, you're not going to appreciate your beautiful teeth if you hove to go through a lot of discomfort to get them So we use the latest comfort systems available ''Happy gos,• premed icotion ond 5..channel stereo headphoi:ies. And because your time is important, •f you have to wa1 t More than 30 minures for your appo1ntment-we'1 buy you lunch It's os simple as that. Quality Dental Core. Complete dental services 1n comfort. Now that's something to 1imile about. Quality Dental Care Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway at Kirby 523-2328 Bnng in this od and get your teeth cleaned fo, $5. Offer eKP"" September 30. 1982 AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Zelda Rose Appearing First Time in Houston By Lyt Harris Contrary to what one might believe at first thought, Zelda Rose is not a female impressionist who Jives deep in the heart of Montrose and appears on Sundays at the Copa. In reality, Zelda resembles Mama Cass Elliot of the original Mamas and Poppas. Wearing a long, flowing maroon gown interspersed with patches of glitter, Zelda was seated at a stageside table for this pre-show interview. "It was made by my mother," Zelda commented proudly about the gown. "Do you like it?" Seated with Zelda was Corey Fleming, her youthful accompanist. She and Corey have been a team for about a year and she describes her style as "a combination of blues, torch and pop." Born and raised in New Orleans, Zelda has been singing professionally for five years, appearing at such well-known French Quarter spots as Chelsea's on Bourbon, the Bourbon Pub, and most recently at the Old Absenthe House Bar. Zelda was "discovered" by Rascals big· wig Les Blair on a recent trip to the Cree~ cent City. After hearing her perform at the Old Absenthe House Bar, he was able to convince her to bring her act to Houston. ·:r didn't need much convincing at that pomt," Zelda exclaimed. "I was ready for something new-a change of pace." Her only other out-of-town appearance was two years ago when she performed at Verelli's in Povincetown and at the Pied Piper on Cap Cod Bay. When not on stage, Zelda is employed by the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans as a PBX operator. She is also a housewife and is quic'k to mention that her husband is most supportive of her career. Zelda's first _set at Rascals on opening night began with "Rocket Man" by Elton John; followed by "Empty Bed Blues," recorded by Bette Midler; "Duncan," an American folk ballad by Paul Simon; and "Come in from the Rain" by Malissa Manchester. Zelda's voice has the power and range of an opera singer. She has the ability to use this great 1>0wer when necessary, but can adapt very easily to soft and mellow selec· tione. She has a commanding stage pres­ence, but at times enjoys coming down off stage to sing and mingle with the audience. She has great stamina-her first set lasted an incredible one hour and 35 min­utes! "I've gone on for over three hours before," commented Zelda when asked about the length of her set. Between songs, she enjoys keeping a running dialogue going with her audience, giving her a great rapport with her admir­ers and putting everyone at ease. When someone in the audience yelled, "Take it off," Zelda quipped, "No, I don't do that anymor~I'm an artiste!" Regarding Zelda's style, she perfers to sing m08t songs more slowly and with more emphasis on each word and note than one would normally hear the 80ngs sung. Sometimes you find yourself trying to speed up her delivery, but then you real­ize that many of those songs that you've heard rushed through on a three-minute recording by a popular entertainer now take on a new and special meaning when performed at this slower pace. Unfortunately, people who prefer fast­paced, active and hvely preformences might tend to get bored with Zelda, as most of her selections have the same slow, meloncholy pace. In order to broaden her appeal, Zelda might be wise to mix with her selections with a few more lively and upbeat numbers just to keep her sets moving at a faater pare. Corey Fleming and Zelda Rose now on stage at Rascals But whatever your personal taste Zelda the song Rebecca sang lead and looked Rose is a great discovery and definitely a much like a fashionable amazon blessed welcome addition to the Montrose cabaret with a voice of slick silk. The group dis-scene. coed wildly during the instrumental which delighted the crowd who responded The Flirts at Numbers By Nick Fede The three gorgeous Manhattanites called The Flirts sang to a packed and enthusias- ~:::~:r!:r~ August 15 at Numbers, 300 The group, garbed in matching tlours­cent yellow, orange and lime skirts that were split daringly in back, began with their newest dance hit "Juke Box"-a tune that was rousing as an opener and had the crowd ~lapping along. After that number, lead singer/ choreographer Andrea Del­Conte welcomed the crowd with "Alright Texas!" Before starting their next number, the statesque beauty Rebecca Sullivan dedi­cated the 90ng 0 Passion" "to all you sexy Texans out there." While singing passion· ately, Andrea slowly stepped down off­stage to coyly croon at some crowd member& who were seated on the step.s. Throughout the tune Andrea sang while making good crowd eye contact but Rebecca and third member Holly Kerr cruised the crowd with looks of steel indif­ference. Andrea adopted a defiant cross­legged stance when singing the song's chorus. The group stood with their backs to the crowd and singly, then in unison shim­mied their shoulders before whirling around to sing "Calling All Boys." During with whoops and cries. Singing their newest release, "We Just Want To Dance," the group offered flat­tened palms toward the audience in a plead to which the crowd responded by dancing along with them. The Flirts Montrose Live After that song, the group sang the monster hit "Boy Crazy" while rolling their eyes in wide delight one minute, fol­lowed by gripping their heads in frustra­tion the next. Encores can be boring if they are a reprise of songs already sung, but the group managed to get most of the crowd clapping along at a steady rate as they sang "Passion." During the encore, the trio's skirts glowed under the lighting like a 1968 black.light poster, while lasers rapidly shot the song's title on the wall The group was formedeightmonthsago and their producer Bobby Orlando writes all of their material in addition to having written for other entertaniners including "Native Love" for Divine. "We initiaUy were a recording (studio) group that went on to performing," said Andrea in a post·show interview. She said that the group's "concept was to perform originally but indicated that they waited to see how their record releases were publi­cally received." When asked to describe the group's sound and hits she said, "They're all dance oriented." When asked if she had been taken out sight·seeing while here she said, "I've been in the South three or four days, and seen lots of airports, motels and highways." When it was suggested that the group is reminiscent of a 60s type singing trio in both dress and choreography she said, at one point we were (jokingly) called The Shangri-La's Andrea's musical background was shaped by performing with numerous rock bands, while Rebecca modeled profesaion­ally and Holly was one of the lead dancers in "Hallelujah Hollywood" at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. When asked how it feels to perform with the group in compari­son to Vegas, Holly replied, "It's different and a little more intimate." The group has a new album "10 Cents A Dance" that has been released on the "0" label. Andrea said, "I like to see faces, it stirs something up inside of me. I think most disco groups are too distant from the audience, they're afraid." . When asked if she ever personally expe­nenced a fear of the crowd by referring to a crowd member dressed in leopard and posed in a cat-like kneel as if ready to pounce o~ the stage steps she replied, "No, moat audiences won't." Rebecca continued saying "they (the crowd) want to be close but they won'thurt you." When the group was aslced if any member longed to sing lead consistantly except Andrea, she replied, "What's differ· ent about our group is that we all aing." She pondered for a moment then said "We're not like the Supremes." ' 22 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 The Comedy Workshop resident company (left to right) consists of Fred Greenlee, Ken Polk, Toni Potts, Paul Menzal, Sharon Menzal slurping old biddy to a tender girlfriend on the drop of a cue. Vicki Farrell combines warmth, honesty and a sharp sense of comic timing. Steve Farrell has a good sense of concen­tration and a developing sense of flair. The Best of Comedy Workshop, Volume JI is exciting and refreshing and (most of all) exceedingly entertaining. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (Fnday. Augu1t20. throughThurld1y,August26) •PIANO Zelda Rose 9pm Tuesday through Saturday & Mary Hooper & BUI Hudson 9pm Monday at Reseats, 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 Jim Cater &Jeff Longino 8pm Friday: Tom Williams & Jeff Longino 8pm Saturday; Greg Davis 8pm Sunday & Monday; Tom Williams 8pm Tuesday; lee LaForge 8pm Wednesday; Mickey Rankin & Roxie Starr 8pm Thursday at Keyboard. 3012M1lam, 528-6988 Richard Askin & Dana Rogers 10pm nightly (except Monday & Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar), 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Sheila Ceasar 9pm Tuesday through Saturday & l1on1hare 9pm Sunday & Monday at Baja's. 402 Lov· ett.527-9866 Alexandra Haas & Michael Balley Fnday. Saturday, Wednesday & Thursday at Arno's. 4002 Montrose. 528-2993 'I"' Keok1 Kona 5pm Fnday & Saturday. 3pm Sunday & 5pm Wednesday & Thursday at the Hole. 109 Tuam 528-9066 • COUNTRY I COUNTRY/ROCK The New Happy Trail Aiders Country-Western Bog­g1e Band 9:30pm Fnday & Saturday at Happy Trails 715 Fairview. 521-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & 830pmThursdayattheEx1te.1011Belt. 659-0453.& 830pm Sunday at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos 528-9192 Flying Blind Band 9pm Tuesday-Saturday at Miss Charlotte·s. 911 Drew_ 528-88<1Q The Best of Comedy Workshop: Insightful Humor Mustang Band 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & S 30pm Wednesday & Thursday at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Happy Trial Riders 9pm Wednesday at E/J 's, 1213 By Billie Duncan Aichmond. 527-9071 They exist in a netherworld somewhere between the Twilight Zone and your funny bone and they enter each with amazing frequency. They are the actors who Populate the stage of the Comedy Workshop, 2105 San Felipe, with everyone from the ultimate commuters to Mexican musicians to ama· tuer Shakesearean actors With five woooden chairs, a wonderful unseen sound effects person and superb imaginations, the cast of The Best of Comedy Workshop, Volume II creates a variety of settings that serve as spring­boanls for their particular and pecular brand of humor. Some of their characterizations and ideas work better than others. All of them have a sense of insight into the way that poeple feel , think and behave. Although some of the spots (segments of the show) border on complete absurdity, they are anchored by the very human reactions and manuverings of the characters in the situations. The opening number, which was a live musical feature, was apparently about the Workshop. The lyrics were almost impos-sible to understand. It is possible that it was titled something like "Big Laughs" and might have explained about the exit signs in some clever way. The next spot was a very, very funny look at what motivates the·average com­muter, played in the absolutely serious style of such films as Damnation Alley and Godzilla. The sound effects in this one added immeasurably to the sense of absurd reality (or real absurditv). The next spot also used sound effects, but with a less satisfying result. This scene played on the basic irratation that moat people have when rude and noisy nurds sit next to them in a movie and pro­ceed to make it impossible for anyone to hear or see what is going on. Even with the super comic talents of Kenneth Polk, this scene lacked punch. Pulling the show back on track, the next scene was a warmly intelligentduetoftwo old men in Tranquillity Park. The scene opened with one of the men feeding the rats. As the dialogue progressed, the char­acters commented in a gentle and humor­ous way on Social Security, Preparation H, sports strikes, the PLO, budget cuts, senior citizens in the army and over-crowded prisons The actors managed to portray older people without being strident or mocking. A scene in a Mexican resaurant showed off the group's musical abilities and was a laugh riot at the same time. The last spot in the first act concerned a guy involving his friends in a lie in order to get out of a marriage proposal. It was excellent, showing very human and natu­ral interrelationships that formed the basis for roll-over laughter. After a much needed intermission, the second act opened on a European train ride that featured Steve Farrell as an over­bearing young novelist who carried most of the scene in a direct address to the audience. The sound effects on this one were superb and probably involved more than one person. The next scene featured two actressee in much the same way as the scene about the two old men featured two actors in the first act. Set just after a bridal shower, the two Houston housewives talked about the other guests and traded personal secrets. The only bothersome part about this was what went into the crock pot. With everything else on the level of hon· est humor with the laughs coming from the sense of the truth about the situation and the people, the bit of absurdity with the food just did not fit. It was probably funny to the cast in rehearsal. As a change of pace, a slide slot was next, with music backing the slides of a cowboy mowing the lawn. The concept and execution combined to provide a real rib-tickler. The closing piece was a presentation of the Betty Furness Memorial Theater's pro­duction of MacBeth. Enough said. The cast on opening night was com· posed of Paul Menzel, Ken Polk, Sharon Menzel, Vicki Farrell and Steve Farrell. Alternating on other nights with Steve will be Fred Greenlee. Paul Menzel is solid and intelligent in his approach , while Ken Polk is a total wacko, adroitly walking the tightrope between truthful humor and complete insanity. Sharon Menzel has a keen sense of char· acterization and can &Ylritch from a soda- •GUITAR 'L · 9pm Fnday & Irish Folk 9pm Wednesday at the Parlour, 2402MandeU, 529-8069 Susan Chr1111an 5.30pm Friday. Reynolds & Rand 5:30pm Monday: Rawslyn Ruffin 5:30pm Tuesday; & Lyra 5.30pm Wednesday & Thursday at Kindred Sp1t­its, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665--9756 • SHOW GROUPS Dixie Kings 9pm Saturday & 8pm Sunday at Happy Trails. 715Fa1rv1ew, 521-2792 Mata Han 9 30pm Friday & Saturday & Lee LaForge, Kim Yvette & Dianne Cha1ston 9pm Sunday at Bac­chus. 523lovett, 523-3396 John Day & Co 6pm Sunday at E/J's. 1213 Rich· mond. 527-9071 • JAll. The ADO Jazz Quartet Spm Sunday at Harrar's. 428 Westheime<.526-2895 Rober1 Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday & w11h Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday, Saturday, Wednesday & Thursday atlas8nsas.614W Gray, 528-9959 Wrndrose930pm nightly (except Sunday & Monday) ; & Horace Crisby 9:30pm Sunday & Monday at 81rd­watcher1. 907Westhe1mer,527-0595 • NU WAVE/PUNK The Jitters & Random Culture 9:30pm Friday, lhe Haskells & the Explostves930pm Saturday. theLeap 9:30pm Wednesday, and Us. Vernal Abuse & Dooms­day Massacre 9·30pm Thursday at Omni, 1540 West­heimer. 528-4230 •DISCO LindaCl1fford 10:30pm Fnday at the Copa, 2631 Rich­mond. 528-2259 The Best of Comedy Worksh1p Volume 118.30 & 11 pm Friday & Saturday & 8 30pm Wednes.day & Thursday, Manuel Labor 1s the Not the President of Mexico e 30pm Sunday & Monday at Comedy Workshop. 2105 San Fef1pe. 524-7333 Stand-up comica n1ghtty at Comm1xAnnex. 2105San F~ipe.524-7333 Jeff Allman, Robert Aguayo & Adnenne Tolsch s & 10 30pm Fnday, 7:30, 10 & midnight Saturday, & 8:30pm Sunday; & Gabe Kaplan. Barry Marder & Adnenne Tolach 8.30pm Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday at the Laff Stop, 1952-A W Gray, 524-2333 • IMPRESSIONISTS Donna Day, Naomi Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday evemng at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Little Bobby. Tracey. & guests Sunday evening at Exile. 1011 Bell. 659-0453 "' Playgirl Folh91" 10 30pm Saturday at Pink Elephant 1218 Leeland. 659-0040 • MISCELLANEOUS Talent shows Tueaelay eventng at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259. Wednesday evening at M1dnite Sun. S34 Westhe1mer, 526-7519. & Thursday even mg atTw1n1, 535Westhe1mer, 520-0244 AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Montrose Art 'In Sequence' at Museum of Fine Arts Shows 'Conquest of Time' By Steven Cunibertl The Museum of Fine Arts, at Montrose and Bieaonnet, offers selection from the Target Collection of American Photo graphy in a show entitled "In Sequence" until September 19. Informally categorized according to their treatment of time, panorama, mon­tage and narrative, the selection of photo­graphs, lithographs, books, graphics and sculpture which comprise this show illus­trate artists' concern with the problem of rendering the moving time frame of life in the medium of still photography. In 1887, before cinematic pioneer Sergie Eisenstein gave us Film Form and Film Sense, Eadweard Muybridge photo- • KINDRED -..-.-- A CLUB FOR WOMEN AND THEIR FRIENDS Live Entertainment weekd•Y• '5:30 • 8:00 H•ppy Hour, Monday thru Friday 5 :00. 7:00 Cherry Wolfe, D.J . Appearing Thuradaya thru Sundaya Pool Tournament every Monday 8:30 winner take• all 1 at Monday of every month Free c & W Dance Leaaona 8:00 Last Sunday of every month C&W Night, featuring the Mustang Band 7:00 • 11:00 SECURITY I NO COVER (l .D . required) "Horse and Rider, Gall-Oping," from "Animal Locomotion," 1887. PAfitc­graphed by Eadweard Muybridge. graphed his still fascinating Animal Loco­motion Project , sequential still photograph& of animals, including humans, in chacteristic activity. Muy­bridge had found a way to stop time and let viewers control its passage by the length of time they allowed themselves to be absorbed in studying each exposure. About ten years later the "cinema fan­tastique" of the early French filmmakers (unmentioned in this show) demonstrated the fledgling medium to be the king of the time machines by allowing action to be speeded up, slowed down, or even reversed at the filmmaker'• direction. After almost one hundred years, some artieta are turning, or returning, to non­cinematic methods of considering time. Athena Tacha used Muybridge's continu­ous action sequential display form to present the discontinuous changes of Ges­ture I, A Study of Finger Pooitions (1981). She further recalls her predecessors in the use of photographic process resurrected from Muybridge'a era. The artiste represented by "In Sequence" seem to fall into two camps: those who are primarily developing new techniques for documenting traditional notions of time, and those who present methods of seeing time in a new way. Ester Parada'• Past Recovery (1979) is a panorama through time. It is a family album photograph with personal associa- MONTROSE TRAVEL 522-TRIP The Search for Alexander September 17-19, $159 Round trip air, 3 days, 2 nights, French Quarter hotel, round ~ tr i p transfers, pri­v• te museum showmg, weekend of Knights d'Orleans "Mr Knight Contest" Ott>er weekends available. Call for info Denver Weekend 3 days, 2 nights, Hotel & Round Trip Air Fare, Welcome Cocktail, Many other special attractions Hosted by Charlie's Bar of Denver $199 based on double occupancy Call for details. 2506 Ralph, 522·8747 tions and events marking the passage of time gently exposed over the primary image. With his Newsweek (1974), Robert Hei­necken evokes the crush of simultane­ously occurrin& current events by cutting and interweaving images from the weekly news magazine without having removed the pages from their binding. Heinecken is also responsible for the satiric Socio-Duo­Habliment Studies I, Il, and III (1981). Muybridge'a studies are not the only cJose bruahea uln Sequence" has with the narrative cinematic form. Rober Frank, a sometime award-winning filmmaker, offers a proofsheet exposed with footage from bis film, ''The Sin of Jesus" (1969); and Duane Miachaele, a muter of narra­tive, is represented by hia 1973 work, "5:15 a.m., April 22, 1904," an example that unfortunately does not illustrate the artist's ability to develop a plot both horiz­ontally and vertically. Film plots develop horizontally while proee can develop in both directionP. A film on the relationship between cinema and still photography is to be shown aa part of the regular film series at the museum Friday, August 27 at 8:00 p.m., but the excitement of discovering new views of the phenomenon of time is afforded by the show itself, Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., and Sunday, 1:~:00 p.m. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 20, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG AUG 20 21 AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 22 23 24 25 26 Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: Interact'• Commu­nity Coffeehouse 7:30pm­rrudnight, 3405 Mulberry mFR/DA Y: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •MONDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Montrose Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm·midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN I WEEK: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fran· cisco begin Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. 5 •IN I WEEK: Gay Softball World Serie& begins in San Francisco Aug. 31, lasting to Sept. 4 •IN I WEEK: Integrity Inter­national Convention opens in New Orleans Sept. 2, lasting to Sept. 5 • IN 2 WEEKS: "Tubs for Two Thousand'' benefit for Montrose Counseling Center and Kapo­si's Sarcoma Committee at Mid­towne Spa, 3100 Fannin, Sept. 4 •IN 2 WEEKS: TeI&.8 Gay Conference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 UIV 2 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 6 •IN 3 WEEKS: Midwest Gay & Lesbian Convention in Chi­cago, Sept. 10-11 UN 4 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Arts Festival in Chicago openB Sept. 17, lasting to Sept. 30 •IN 7 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference Oct. 8-10, Chicago •IN 7 WEEKS: Columbus Day, Oct. 11 •IN 8 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national convention in Houston, Oct. 15-17, Americana Hotel, 3301 Southwest Fwy. •IN 8 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 •IN IO WEEKS: Halloween weekend, Oct. 29-31 ~~r:.~o WEEKS: Elections, BUSINESS owNERS-I i"t We ht! frM Uiti Week in th11 d•fKtOry l•l bul•r\llU •t•bhshmenll ..vlf'GUdtSlribul10flpOinlalOflt1eNIW19t1pef (b) CUlf9"1 di&pley adver1IMl'I. (C) 1tlHOU9tOn grfbars&ptrv1teduM(lortMbetlelrtofOYt-of· t<>W'!1ns•torl).,..d!dl~ptoMcommunity 0tganiz1tion1 •lndicMff MonttoH Yole4 dflltrlbuOon point. DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Roommate to share 2 bedroom apt. near Med Center_ $200 month plus deposit. Call Tony $200 plus dep­osit. 523-2372 ~m•;192s_.-309_Se(;111or3bd7m·h0u .. ~2_::tffd Hwy &. 43rd arN Cell 1f'ter 9pm Montrose/St. Thomas area Lg. 1 bedroom. hardwoods. track lighting, central A&H. $375+. J, Ross-Sid. 521-1400 ·----~ Shepherd/W Gray area Nice 1 bed­rooms. some with private patios $275•. J Ross-Sod, 521-1400 Support, join your community organizations EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice GAY BARS (>.) HOUS1on Tavern Guild member 1nd1C.11ton. placed1nthild1rectory1ttne1r1eques1 ~~~~~US---523 Lo..ett-523-3391t5 t. .. et.ter· See our ad elsewhere this issue :~t:~•;;=.~~;!~l-527=iee& W11h rntau- See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice e l 9AAN-710Pac1hc· .529:-D427 country See our ad elsewhere this issue iBRAZciSRiVER-BOTTOM~ci'- s2s-9192 country ~~:IAA PATCH..:2294 w Hoicomt>e--M"s- See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~~==;1~~:~~:;-fsd~!~~:r d~~ See our ad elsewhere this issue :,;.os':!;,2631 Aichmond-52s-22"Si d1tc1 See our ad elsewhere this issue 6_?VE~SS~herd-52....-0170 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment 9THE o·e_e_p: -2212COti ... er..-52&-&234 :K~F~:i=T DAUM -1132-wH1n.1nw-52a:. 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Sorry, but we cannot bill and cannot accept classifieds over the phone. :~~-o.=1SuN~53' Westhe•~er-526--7519 i M1SS- C-HARiOne·S-911 w or--s2&- 88.40 coun1ry ~4~NTR0Se MINING CO".:SOSP•c1t1c-529- ::~MHAS 2 -300 Westheomer--526-6551 See our ad elsewhere this issue eOFFICEJU CLUI -2701 Albany- -523-408-C See our ad elsewhere this issue • ONE ON ONE- 1016 W Griy--528-8503 ~~,'~:h:;:PHANT -,·21e LMiind--=M~o See our ad elsewhere this issue =~~~~~~: 9-n2t~':t2.,~~i -524-62ff w•lh res- See our ad elsewhere this issue Support, join your community organizations e RocKYS~-JA1-6w 0·1Hu- -52s=-8922: ._b••" :.::1N·s:...m westheimer-s~"1 91t>.8n .-VeNTuRf:"ri°:2923 M1in~22-oooO ORGANIZATIONS ~I ~~~.~~LA ChOfut J>llrt ol {Montrose) Church ACLU=-1238-WGr1y-~--­AMER1cAN LEATHERMEN (1ocl1I club)­"""" 11 Olllerent Orum, 1732 Westhelmer- 528-8528 clu!>nlghtW_ed_ ___ Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ASTRO A11nbow Alhanc.-524-4793 (voiee & TTY) BERING Mem0f!i1 Mel~ ~:;:.,-,5~~1Su~n1ted Method11t wor- ~~f;:rtTWOWor1c11-sa.1e13-meeuevery ~~M-~~TEMENToeether (BWM T)-5~ (Montroee) CHURCH OF CHRIST-520-K W•t· ~~r-n7-8218 WOl'lhlp MfYlcM 12:30pm CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FAITH-413W•I,.._. ~~.:'°!!~n';,8'r::!~~~1 Tue1evenlng1,cholrJ)f'actlceWed.evenlng There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice CiTizENS FOR HUMAN EQUALITY (CHE)­OOl Fannin# 1301-2•8&66 board meeting 2nd Tuelday1 ~~~~!~O:::!:~~u~b~ at Bruo.Rrver • COMML•N'TY COFFEEHOUSE pro}ece of I/Hine 730plnFrlday1 at3405Mulberry CONG AYTZ CHAYIM-meet1 at MCCR, 1919 Oecatur-552-1340, 688-8997 HrYI~ & .oclal 89r'l't2nd&4thFrldaya CONROE AREA Gay W Max CRlsiS HOTL1Ne--:.na:1505 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment ~:~;.~~r_:~~r;:it~;;:.!;;-~~2222- pro1ec1 OiGliy DIANA FOUNDATION-2700 Muon-524-5791 DIGN1TY-mee11 at C.inO!ic Student Ce;;j.,. g,?; J!f~~~;~·-520-9269. 52&-7644 meetings Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 , ~:!:~ ~~~~~~ ~o~·~~-~,::t,~~~~~ 3405Mulberry F-1ASTuNiTAAIANC:nurc,,_S210F1nnin-526- 1~1 w~sh~rvice 11 tf m - FM1960/GREENSPOINT FAR AWAY FRIENDS MEETING SUNDAY, AUGUST 22ND. ~::~~~f~;FM1i60 ArH Fu-Away ~~:f; 1~;~~~9~aring ExpenenC. (GASE)- The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice GAYARCHIVES-olTe)lu pro1ec1 Ot""1ri1W.C1 ~:i~~;H~~:.Ii~~~u~ "f~w•-,;~:;~~ Hotel.3301 Southwe1tFwy .• Hou1ton GAY HlSPANICCAUCl.is.::.2i22N9wman #12- 521-0037meet13rd Thursctay1 GAYITALIANGroup-5~ g~~~2~~r~ PHYSiCIANsofHou11on-:cJO GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPC) P0B 1566&4 V~~!11~~w~iw:.i:ya4600 M11n ,t217 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations HEPATITUS HOTLINE Jim Of David at n7- 2287. a proi.ct of GPC'1 ~lcal CommlttM HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Alliinca-7211 Manor-523-8969 ---- Support, join your community organizations Houston Ar .. GAY & LESBIAN ENGINEERS & Sclen1i1t1-52&-73M mMt1 7pm 4th Wecln9- doY' HOUSTON COMMUNITY CLOWNS-862--6314 HOUSTON DATA PROFESSIONALS- meets in EMt Room, Holiday Inn C....1r11. 4640 South Maln-523-e922 meeting 1·30pm 2nd TueMHiy• ~~~~~<:_~~~~l CLU-B-:...:c/oM1fYI HO....ston TAVe-RN-GUil6-: metnb.r1 aieB.m D1rtySa11y·1 E)l1le.M1ry·1.M1dn1teSun l/Hlnc_..:-3405 Mu1berrt-52e-7ci-14. -694-1732 Community Colleehouae 7 30pm-mtdntght Fn board rneetong 7 30pm 111 Thursd1y1 (¥1r1ed kxat10N), educatoonal forum 7 30pm 3rd Thu,. "" INfEGRITV:1HO"uston (formerly E°p•icop-il lntegnty)-meets 11 Autry House. 6265 Main- 526--0555 meet1ng730pm2ndTueldays INTERACT-edUcat;On lubgroupol 1/H1nc 3405Mulberry-529-7014.694-1732 Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice • KPFT Radio. FM-ii>--4111 L0¥911 a .... ;;-~ 4000'W11<1e·nstein··gayr1d1011\ow10pm· midn~htTl'lu,. LA"°i4eOA-A°LANoN-mee11 at 111 Urut1nan ;~~52tOFannin--52t-9772rneet•ngFr• LESBiANs-& GAY PEoPlE:-,n M9d1c1ne-6M- 4760 meet1ng730pm l1tS1turday1 LUTHERANS CONCERNEo..:meetl a1Grace lutheranChurch.2515W1ugh-521-oe63.453-- 1143.rnMt1ng2nd&41hTu• evening"". METROPOLITAN coFnmun1iY c.u;-rct; ol lhl Ae1urr1c11on (MCCR)-19111 Decitur-861· ~1~ ro'4~~ tn;~S~30Fun 5:1 7 ~~~1~:·; membership lnqulrert clus 7 30pm Mon Al1non meeting 8pm Mon . AlcOholte& Anonym­ous meeting 8pm Mon &Thurs There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ~i~Rg~~~~:l~~b~=j'h1~~°522~~1 meet1ng730pm4thTue1daya MONTROSE CLINIC t(M Weslt'llimer 521- 5531. open 6-10pm Fri., 1·5pm Sun, 8-10pm TIAl&Thu,. ~l~~~~NSELJNGCenter-900L.ovett =~~~ERS-rneet1 •I MCCR, 111111 ~a:.ose SPORTS ASSOCIATION (MSA)­MontrOM Sports BOWLING-plays at S18dlum Bowl, 8200 Br .. ma1~1518 , 1181-1523 ~Mon. & Thu,._ ..-.nlngs 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment Montroaa Sports SOFTBALL-523-8802 daya, 523-04t3evea-GaySottblHWortdS«l•lnSan FranclacoAug31-$ept4 ~.:~~~2~'3~~s WOMEN'S SOFTBALL Montrose Spotta TENNIS-524-2151 MontroH Sport1 VOLLEYBALL-880-2930 g&IMl730pmTu• Gregory-llncolnschool, 1101Taft MONTROSE SYMPHONIC lwld-mMll a1 k ­ing Church, 1440Ha'llflhome--527-teee meet­lng7: 30pnT"*- MUSTANGS (IOClal ciub) mMtl a1 tM Sam, 710P8Clflc-526-9427cfubnlgl'ltTllurt. AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Dateline S.F. Busy Week 1982 by Randy Alfred Silver Lining: Carol Ruth Silver is a progressive member of San Francisco's Board of Supervisors, the legislative branch of our consol­idated city-county goemment. She is highly individualistic, some might say idiosyncratic She is pro-feminist, anti-gun-control, and pro-gay. For many years, she shared a household with a gay man prominent in city and state Democratic politics, Jack Trujillo. Silver is the unmarried mother of two children. Last year, Silver had the clerk of the Board send a letter of sym­pathy to U-8. &presentative Jon Hinson CR-Miss.), after U_S. Capitol Police arrested him in a House Office Building men's room and charged him with attempted oral sodomy. Hinson later resigned. Silver said she meant the letter to point out the waste of police staff power involved in patrolling restrooms. However, a public furor and an outcry by her colleagues on the Board caused her to apologize for their embarrassment. She then pointed out her own disapproval of sex in public restrooms, labelling it "disgusting and dirty and unpleasant." That was last year. Last month, Silver sent a letter on her own "Member, Board of Supervisors" stationery to "Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Elizabeth IL" (The Hinson letter wao sent on behalf of the entire Board.) Silver wrote, "I beg you to reconsider your decision to accept the resignation of your bodyguard, Commander Michael Trestail." Treo­tail had resigned after admitting an affair with a male prostitute. Silver pointed out that if people couldn't looe their jobs because of such exposure, then they couldn't be blaclanailed, and thus wouldn't have to lose their jobs. Silver aoked the queen "to strike a major blow for freedom and personal liberty, humanity and decency." Her Majesty has not yet replied. I do not believe, however, she is either naive or squeamish about such matters. When the great composer, Benjamin Britten (Baron Britten of Alde­gurgb) died in 1976, Elizabeth II oent a condolence letter to his lover, operatic tenor Peter Pears. God save all the queens! Granted: Lia Belli is another of our non·gay friend&. She io pr<!sident of the California Democratic Council, the most powerful progressive force in the state Democratic Party. She also sits on the board of the Kaposi's Sarcoma Research and Education Foundation. (Incidentally, she is also the fifth wife of famed S.F- trial attorney Melvin Belli, the "King ofTorta." Belli celebrated his 75th birthday in late July with a gargantuan, free-<lrinlring street party open to all comers. That occurred amidst a controversy that began when Belli perhaps too candidly told a meeting in Toronto that Asian juroro voted for skimpy damage awards_ That didn't sit well in this city, which has the largest Asian population of any city outside Asia.) In June, Lia Belli visited Washington with a friend who has KS­They saw Richard Schweiker, &agan'o Secretary of Health and Human Services, and Bruce Chabner, acting director of the National Cancer Institute. Belli oaid they were able to "dynamite a logjam" in the bureau­cracy, and research funds (to study the immune-deficiency diaea.sea now striking gay and other population•) will start flowing by this autumn. Belli said funds would go to researchers in New York, Hous­ton, Loe Angeles and San Francisco Belli oaid a New Right member of Congress is reported to have remarked about KS patients, "Let 'em die." Our own sources say it wao Senator Jeremiah Denton (R-Alabama). Dealing with Discrimination: The Jewish Gaily Forward, newsletter of San Francisco's gay and lesbian Jewish Congregation Sha'ar Zabav (Golden Gate), had two interesting items this month. Firot, the Seventh International Conference of Gay and Lesbian Jpws, held in Los Angeles, postponed a vote on whether the World ' f"""lgre&s of Gay and Lesbian Jews should admit men~nly and ~n~nly organizations to membership. & ond, New York's gay synagogue, Beth Simchat Torah, withdrew from participation in the Jewish Peoplehood Fair, after the West Side Jewish Community Council asked the Beth Simchat Torah's banner not identify itself as a gay and lesbian synagogue. Other participants in the fair had threatened to withdraw if the gay congregation participated. Hi There, Sports Fans: S_F_ Chronick sports columnist Lowell Cohn reported last month, the Oakland A's are playing well on the road but poorly at home because their home uniforms are too tight, specifically in the crotch. Cohn suggested beefcake baseball, in which the uniform would consist solely of shoes, cap, and jockstrap. Speaking of which, David Lester suggests the Gay Games (formerly referred to as the Gay Olympic Games) could raise a lot of cash by selling used jock straps in The Advocate's pink pages. 26 M ONTROSE VOICE I A UGUST 20, 1982 " Step on it, Arnoldi Step on ill" " Say . • . Now l'M starting to fHI kinda warm!" Gary Larson " The golden a rches! The golden arches got me!" "I say fifty, maybe a hundred horses ... What you say, Red Eagle?" "You know, we're just not reaching that guy." g~RATl0N -DOCUMENTATION pro1ec:i. Of ~r~~;~:!g~: ::~:. f~;s~~,;FIEA G•rs· ·332-3far-mM11;tg Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 r~i£~~1Cf~~~:~~~~d:~~1f~.~~ TE~sGAYTASKF~ORCE::S-2f00-1•.S22=1659 ~~~!ndH_~~:~1:1GHTS . F-00nd81100::1-519 ~~~~;:i:~s-.:Cio M•tY·a. 1022-w. .t nei-r; r~~~~~~~j~~~;£~~:;~~7~ WESLAYAP.£FELl0wSHiP- ~8899- The n-~mb;,. ~ne sou;;e of community news in Montrose-the Voice PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS W•nt 1 tut, d•rk tan? It's as easy es taking a pill. Safe, non­toxic 80 tablets, $29.95 ppd. Check, MC, Visa MAIL WAREHOUSE POB01t53395 (713) 523-6927 Hoo1ton.TX77052 (3305Yupon,aulteS4) Anyone knowing t~ of Warren Hastey please call collect his father at (804) 359-6557 or (817) 481-4951 For HI•: LHther allng with ret­tralnta. $200. 523-5998. Relax your tense muscles in your home. Call Tony, 523-2372 12-noon to 7pm. $25 Greentpoint1960 area II yOu-resingle, val..oe =t!'W~-~l:e ·~:k Po~. ...1 ;:;"· 1et gee ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ~~~1,f;~~~~!.7.~~~F.~~;~.;.~ Gen!~ lam2eyearaold.HS grad-:-innM'd ~l~C~ ~;:.7o~-:o: ~nd~Qc~~~I havalocalreleritne•cxpersonalcharacterand ~~g~~~~;:;::;=:=:,;~;:,: BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 Support, join your community organizations Thanks Eddie and Jeff and crew for such a great place. And thanks to a wonderful mother, Bob. Love, Chuck Relax and enjoy the Bodyworks massage Gift certificates. Call Bill, 526-2470 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS :~x OFFICE 162S RIChmoncl- ·522-1625 :~u:.~OUITON Battia-~22i>S-F8nnon-f6i- 5ee our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ::.R~m~7~2u~~~ER Th9•ter-3201 LOUI;. ::~DTOWNE I PA -3100 F•nnin-~522-2:Jii See our ad elsewhere this issue e2308Clue--=-23oeG«ieuee-:SZH2'35 m•i• eaAJA"l-402LO¥ett-52Ml866 See our ad elsewhere this issue =AS-SERiE-Too--=;J22weiihe1mer-S26-­i" C"HAPULTAPec::.e1_3_R~ ~.:ANKIE'S -MonirOie'lit WUll'letmer-529- See our ad elsewhere this issue e~ff~K~LANQ. a02"Tuam-~22-1040- There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice :.!it!en.~~:2~!es~•ndwlc~ See our ad elsewhere this issue :!!~t!i~!r~:~2~~opl•n Culalne-428 See our ad elsewhere thls issue eHoNGTHoNG:......2• W•thelmer-52&-8275 eHOUSE OF-PiES-3112 Klrby-529-3816 :.:;~!i~~:2:!~:7'9s Club RHlaurant-243 See our ad elsewhere this issue e JAOE OAAGON--~22iwM~ ~:,TRY KITCHEN~ See our ad elsewhere this issue • 9~RS:.....1~Whthe•m9!'-~ e O~l-52&-3569 • POOR DADOY"l-3416 W 0111as-521-8922 See our ad elsewhere this issue eAAICALl-2702K;tby_::~ See our ad elsewhere this issue. :,:~:::.;Y~fS- RUBBING-iliW 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment eSPuO--u-:L1Kf:--• 1e-W•1ha1mer-s2(H'.)554 HT.iR PIZZA .-2-111-Nortolk-523-0eoo- See our ad elsewhere this issue. e STEAK·N·EQG=.i2J1M~ :2~M;gC01i.e-Sho;=;-s25~ e WINf SEL"LER-=1409 W•IM•mer-52&-3878 SERVICES Attorney •t L•w General practice. John p_ Barnich, 523-5006. Evenings 528-5566 LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nonette Bruckner, P1ychok>gl1t, 523· 2180. 'MIEReilily-..:-:)30F.1rv1ew--524·1871 See our ad elsewhere this issue OELUXIE R!NOVATION-52Hl038 See our ad elsewhere this iss1.1e DUIONER'I 1110011~-224 W•the1"'18r-522·7108 See our ad elsewhere this issue e FITNESS EXCHANGE l•tnM~I Richmond· 524-9932 :~aco·s heir N10n--ii1 R.dimond- See our ad elsewhere this issue ~!:;::AVERS-12005-POi"t Oek Rd •420- See our ad elsewhere this issue H~:~~~~-~~7;,o•r -rep1ecemen1=710-A See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay.Switchboard, 529-3211 :~~~.~~20-~~i7ST HOusf-k>dg1ng-106 :~~,:~~~1~:ruly SChOol-327 :2~~~KA-LL M.-ileoUi=-331~ 5~~~~:SNDS-He1r Dellgn--908 W•l~!Tlef- See our ad elsewhere this issue !~ONEL Heir 0..lgn-3220 Voekum-52&- The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice a~~ONT111011: TRAV!L .2509 A••ph-=522- See our ad elsewhere this issue :::~'f:Z:!!'~!n..,.pepet~ ~~k~l~~S~~~~- at<ANf"" 11torneY=3Jii ~77jl~~1~~~~5~EMS meil bol .. - ~~~~r o!NTAL CAR! -:-i315SW"FWY= See our ad elsewhere this Issue tk~~~~o. locktmlth-1620 cOmmom ... eelth­~~ AKI OPTICAL- :,947 w·o ;:.y #1o1- See our ad elsewhere this rssue ~uS.:tL?;:.~1fL heir cere -1628- Cherry· ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations Support, join your community organizations ~~~~ Tr.CH trevef .gency-S711 K."rby- See our ad elsewhere this issue 'UNITED CAl-654-4040 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~Lri~:u~t:;4'.~~ocle1 ... ed~- See our ad elsewhere this Issue SHOPS & STORES A&A FUlllNITUJI! Cent•- 11318 W•IM•mer--531-9600 See our ad elsewhere this issue eALL-STAR Adult ~ ·1407 -Richm0nd :~~Afiii.ITTERSQ;ni~MontrOM-The Number One Source of Community News in Montrose­the Voice ::~~Rok.LENFiOnSt--1&48wi.1he;mef­pUlitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice :~~ICISLE pet st;op-2(111-Sw-Fwy • ASYLUM Adull Bookl!Ofe-:--12o1 Fhchmond e BALL PARK Adult Bookitore-1830 W Ale­bamo ::.~h~:~r.!:2~-T~RS clothlng-1220 e lED HOUIE -2115 Norfolk-523-8278 See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice e BLUE IRIS-38111 S Sl'lepherd-523-1827 THE BLUE IRIS FLORIST, 3618 S. SHEPHERD, 523- 1827 • BOOM TOWN BLOOMS flowef'l-3210 s Sl'lepl'letd-~110 :uB~~~~~iW.,'i!~!,~~ Fine e CARGO HOUSE-1802 Perk-529--0334 ~~°"~ :,;~,:.~~~~7J;1nt1ry wur-5366 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment =NER"S Adult N.-....::-240 Wntl'le•m«--528- . oouBRAVA JONES. the Mentiol• dolr.7.ii= 1983W Gr•y-522-1089 e OOWNBEATRecords-2117Richmond-523- 8348 -- -- • DRAMATIKA grlts--3224 Voekum-528-5457 e FACETS gifts 1412 Wn!MtrNf 523-1412 Got a question? C-~ Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ::!!'!.r~~:1~RENCE fr1m1ng 1533 ~:IOAV"S Florill-1338 Wflthelmer--S2•· "OJTA'IJeW91ry-M0--35711 See our ad elsewhere this issue e KIRBVNewst•nd-3115K1rby-520-0246 ~~~h'!.':e~~~~~LRV end Lo•n 1218 The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice :a~~V• Leetner GOOdl-i12we.1he7rn"er ~~!:~~~~e-,.u .. bou,;qu;=,--..os e Pl..ANT HOUSE--812 w .. thflllYlef-52&-7795 . ~-R-=408-wnlheimet-527-904" ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations :a~~O RACK mu11c 3109 S Sttepherd-:._ ~~~H CUT jeWtllry-520 W•the1mer- See our ad elsewhere this Issue :2~ INAA!HOUI! -2024 W•ll'leimer See our ad elsewhere this Issue • SPORTS LOCKER clottling-311 w .. 1het­mer- S~S5 e STUOZAdultNft1-1132W Ale~• e TEXASCARAVAN&Aml8dil'OFIOwers 2115 Oun1evy-S20-70111 e TIMELESS TAFFETA clothlng-1823 W•tl'letmer-.5211-e299 e TOTALITV STORE-1121 W Gr'!.-526-8780 Support, join your community organizations ~7WntMtm.---523-022i ~~ JACK clothing 1212 W•ll'letm8f"- t~ffil-M",.;R-KET-1133 wei£- Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice e wrLDE & STEIN bOOk 11ore-ao2 W•lhet­met"- 529-7014 gey TRAVEL KNOXVILLE WORLD'S FAIR Eleanor Guest House. rooms from $28 50. (6151 523-5831 AUGUST 20, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 By Tycho Fortunes For Fnday evening. Augu.st 20. through Friday evening. Augu.st 27. 1982. The Moon is in VIRGO as the weekend opens. enters LIBRA at 6:23 a.m Saturday morning, enters SCORPIO at 12:22 p.m. Monday afternoon and enters SAG ITT ARIUS at 10: 12 p.m. Wednesday night. staying there until the following Saturday morning, Aug. 28 ARIES-The ram's hooves are planted firm on the ground, but his head ranges high above the clouds to a world of fantasy and dreams. What was exotic and mystifying last week is more easily understood now. TAURUS-Your words have that magic touch, so be careful who you're talking to when you whisper of love and lust. You could tell almoatanyone anything and they'd believe it. Say thoee sexy things you love to say, but be sure you mean them! GEMINI-Self improvement week. You can clear out the cobwebs of the psst and figure out what's bugging yourpresentif you sit down and talk it all out. September, coming up, can be a super month if you take care of business now. CANCER-All that aupport you got which made you feel like Number One last week has grown into the confidence you need to go after what you want. Share your future plans with the one you want to share the future with. LEO-In your sign this u.oeek: The Sun (leave& Monday evening} and Venus. Trying to impress the impreBSionable can give the wrong impression. AB good as you feel about yourself, don't brag; it's confusing to the braggees. Be clear. Be specific. Be quietly authoritative. VIRGO-In your sign this week: The Sun (enters Monday evening) and Mercury {leaves next Friday, Aug. 27). Coordinate. Combine. Get it all together. Whether it's a family reunion or an orgy you're thinking of, your talent-this week is thinking about who or what goes together and seeing th&tit'sdone. LIBRA-In your sign this week: Mercury (enters next Friday, Aug. 27), Saturn and Pluto. You feel like the master of your fate; no matter what the ill winds blow your way, you know where you are, what you 're doing. Don't take anything for granted, ~hough. Share your surety with your first mate. SCORPIO-In your sign this week: Mars and Jupit,er_ Don't let your mind work overtime at the expense of your body. Take care of it. Be good to it. You do have a lot to think about, but don't forget to think about you. SAGITTARIUS-In your sign thia week: Uramu and Neptune. Picky, picky! Everything has to be jsut right. That's OK, but don't be B;OObaessed by every little thing that you miss out on the big picture. By the way, a part of that picture should be a little romance. CAPRICORN-What a windup! You Capricorns can be so silly. You've taken all that you discovered laat week and made jokee of it. Trickster, teaeer, practical joker, your friends will enjoy t.hie lighter aide you show. AQUARIUS-Moet of the sign.a are working overtime tbia week, but none more than yours. The advantage iB in your ability to seek out others for help. Knowing whom you can truat and rely on can make all the difference. PISCES-Are all the old wives' tales true? Can sex make you blind? It might just be that way for you this week if you don'tgetyourheadoutof ~h:1~~:~:N::L~:~u~se:v:i~~alism, Pisces, realism! Last Word Let me see if I've got this straight By Henry McClurg Bill Elkin, president of the Houston Police Officer's Association, heard last Tuesday like many of us that a Federal judge struck down Texas' so-called sodomy statute. Then reporters asked him what he thought of gay people becoming police officers, and he said, "We think it would be bad for our image." Now, wa-a-a-i-t a minute. 04We think it would be bad for our image"? This man, head of the largest Houston police officer's group, in the U.S. city probably with the worst national reputation for its police force, said that. Well, Mr. Elkin, let me
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