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Houston Voice, No.1159, January 10, 2003
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Houston Voice, No.1159, January 10, 2003 - File 001. 2003-01-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2949/show/2920.

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(2003-01-10). Houston Voice, No.1159, January 10, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2949/show/2920

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Houston Voice, No.1159, January 10, 2003 - File 001, 2003-01-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2949/show/2920.

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Title Houston Voice, No.1159, January 10, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date January 10, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Countinq 'The Hours' Gay author Michael Cunningham talks about his three-pronged story - now a movie - revolving around Virginia Woolf's 'Mrs. Dalloway.' • Page 15 ISSUE 1159 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JANUARY 10, 2003 INSIDE Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center readies for a move and other changes. Page 3 Lobo owner Larry Lingle said the local store remafos intact even though he is closing his New York business, the Oscar Wilde Bookshop. Page 3 A comfortable atmosphere and mostly successful servings of food will keep patrons coming back to Dharma Cafe. Page 19 AIDS activists to protest changes Gay Houstonians plan to attend public hearings to voice concerns over cuts in HIV medication program By PENNY WEAVER . Busloads of Houston AIDS activists head for Austin this week as Texas Board of Health officials ready a final decision on potential cuts to the Texas HIV Medication Program The proposals would withdraw AIDS medication funding from thousands of Texans. including many gays. "This lS the last time there wlll be a chance for the board to hear our voic· es," said Tracy Wilson. community coordinator of AIDS Coalition of Texas Now! (ACT Now!) Houston. "We will have buses going to the hearing. We will provide free transportation to get people to this Vl'ry important meeting so our voices can be heard." The board holds public hearings on the proposed changes from 9 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Jan. 16, at the Moreton Buildmg, Room M-739, at the Texas Department of Health headquarter~. 11 - West 49th SL, 1n Austin. The Texas HIV Medication Program (THl\lP) is the primary source for HIV medications for thousands of HIV-post· live Texans, a large percentage of whom are gay men. The department of health has projected a budget shortfall for the program of $7 million in the state fiscal year 2003, which began Sept 1. TOH officials have proposed changes to cut cost, in the program m response to the anticipated budget crunch. The department wants to reduce financial eligibility criterion down from 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines to 140 percent Wilson is a Houston AIDS activist and also is HIV positive. He serves on the Please see AIDS ACTMSTS on Page 5 HI\l:t\JDS activist and patient T ra;y \Wsai is illTlCOJ a rmiler of~ Texans who plan to attend this~ Texas 8o.lrtl of Health ptill'IC heaITT;is II Austit At that sesslOO, bo.1nf ~ will hear liliit C001l1!llts COOC8llll1,l !X1>' posed ruts m the Texas HN Me<iratioo Program Anti-gay violence mars New Year's celebrations Activists say three high-profile incidents highlight ongoing problem By JENNIFER J. SMITH Three bias,motivated attacks against gays and transgendered people, including one in the South, marred New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. But the shooting of a gay man in nor· mally tolerant South Beach, Fla., the sus­pected arson of a transgendered woman's apartment in rural Kentucky and the rob­bery and assault of a gay man in upstate New York are not surprising, said Matt Foreman, executive director of Empire State Pride Agenda in New York. "Let me Sl'e a New Year's, or any other day of the year for that matter, that doesn't have violence against our com­munity, and then I'll be surprised," Foreman said. Statistics bear out that perception. according to Da\id Smith. commumca­ttons director for the Washington·based Human Rights Campaign. "In 2001, 1.663 more hate crime inci­dents were reported than in 2000." Smith said. "Hate crimes based on sexual orien­tation were the fourth highest category, behind hate incidents based on race, eth· nic and national origin and religion." On Dec. 29, in the small village of Haverstraw, N.Y, residents Pedro Zayas Jr. and Luis Pagarr allegedly kicked in the front door of an unidentified gay man, stole $900 and repeatedly punched him in the face, head and upper body while calling him "faggot," according to pohce reports. Police charged the pair with burgla.IJ: assault, criminal mischief and a hate crime, according to John Reill}: Rockland, N.Y., police chief. "This is very unusual for us, Reilly said. "I've been here 23 years and have never seen anything like it, and hopefully won't ever agam." The suspects are well known to local police. Reilly said. Lewis had 105 arrests since 1980. most accumulated for assault and fighting. Pagan had 27 arrests in the same time, most under charges of "quality of life offenses" like open alcohol contain· ers. Reilly said. Local police charged the two \\ith hate Please see VIOLENCE on Page 4 2 JANUARY 10. 2003 with ALYSON ADVENTURES'Nc. 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Stt ~ 011 Moerd! • lnfl'rior &tatuooms from •m.oo· • ~ean \ ~ Maff'rooms from '58$.00' I tlcarnivaI.I Call now for reservations as space is very hmlted and selling out very quickly• Call Travel OUT to resen·e "·our n~afion • 214-824-8765 • 888-813-9947 • info@gayribbean.com \\'WW. J!ayribbeaneruises. eom Trne~~en~ - Call to book your ~lien~! www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I around houston New owners of Mary's plan grand re-opening On Sunday, gay Houstonians celebrate the continued tradition at Mary's .. Naturally, the oldest gay bar in the state, a~ former owners "pass the torch" to new operators of the club. Jamie Carmen, director of operations for Michael's Outpost and Mary's, said a number of people will assist in coordinating the show for that afternoon. In December, Michael Gaitz, owner A FOR INFO of th~ Outpost, purchased Mary's from longtime own· • • ers Cliff Owen and Gaye Yancey. The club closed for a short time Just before the sale, but re-opened as Gaitz and his staff vowed to contmue the Marv's tradition The public is invited to the show. and local entertain· ers are welcome to offer their talents to the event Grand re<>pening 3 p.m. Sunday. Jan. 12 Mary's... Naturally 1022 Westhe1mer 713-527~669 Supporters host campaign event for fonner Vennont governor A kick-off event for former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean's presidential campaign is set for next week in Houston. Supporters of the "Dean for America" campaign will host special guests and also offer a ques· tion·and answer session with Dean via call-in at the fund-raiser. Donations between $100 and $250 will be accepted at the door with a maximum donor option of up to $2.000 via check and Visa or Mastercard, according to event organizers. For more information, e-mail Deanforamerica2004 a yahoo.com, or call Matt Jensen at 202-27~. Dean has waded into campaigning for the Democratic nomination for president in 2004 after serving as governor of Vermont, where he signed into law the nation's first c1vll unions measure two years ago. ct FORINFO Campaign kiclc-off event for Howard Dean 7 pm. Friday. Jan. 17 At the home of Marc Sofia 2323 Branard St Houston. TX 77098 Speaker helps chamber members get the New Year off to a good start The Greater Houston GLBT Chamber of Commerce hosts its monthly meeting this week with special guest Dr. Rosana Scearce this week. Social hour and musical enter· tainment begin at 6 p.m., with dmner at 7 p.m. Cost for members is $22, and cost for non-members or guests 1s $25, according to chamber Executive Director Coy Tow. Sce.'ll'Ce has been involved in the field of psychology for 25 years. She has worked Wlth individuals, families, busmesses, and corporations. Her spectalties are rn the areas of commumcatlon, conflict resolu· tlon, relationshlp-savtng techniques, changtng bad habit~ (overeating, drlnkmg, smoking), parenting seminars, and develop­ing healthy alternative lifestyles, acconling to Tow. Her presentation to Chamber mem· bers includes the topics: Realistic goal·set· ting and the steps to make them become reality; increase personal motivation; learn ct FORINFO 6 p.m Tuesday. Jan. 14 Greater Houston GLBT Chamber meeting The Chamber PO. Box 66129 • Houston. TX 77266 713-523-7576 • www.ghglcc.org to keep promises; healthy commun1cnt1on skills: sane solutions for insane business problfms; and four life-savers to reduce stress and to enjoy every day. Bunnies on the Bayou seeks community groups as beneficiaries The non profit Bunnies on the Bayou 1s planning 1ts annual Easter party and fund· raiser The group started out 24 years ago as a small gathermg of friends sharing good music, cocktails, and conversation on Easter afternoon. and has evolved Into a benefit attracting thousands. according to leaders of the organization. Invited guests are asked to make a generous conttibution to benefit numerous rommunity organi1.a­tions. As expenses of the event are com­pletely underwritten in advance by hosts and sponsors, 100 percent of donations received at the party are distributed direct· ly to Houston based 501(c)(3) community organiz:ttions. Bunnies on the Bayou, Inc. seeks deserving organizations to benefit • from the 2003 event, scheduled for April 20. Leaders of the group invite Houston area 501(c)(3) organizations to apply for funding. To be considered as a beneficiary of the event, Bunmes on the Bayou requires details of the proposed project or activity that the funding would support, including the specific dollar amount requested, a copy of the organization's IRS dNermma· lion letter recognizing 501(cX3) status, along with current financial statements (ProfiVLoss Statement, Balance Sheet) and a summary of the organization's purf)OSe or m1ss10n statement. Brochures, press chppmgs and other types of information also will be helpful in the evaluation pro­cess. The deadline for receipt of the infor· mation listed above is Frida}; Feb. 14. Bunnies on the Bayou members will make selections and notlfy all candidates by mid March. All selected beneficiaries will he required to provide a brtef follow-up report six months after receipt of fundmg summa· rizing the expenditures made with the mon· eys received. Proposals should be sent to: Bunnies on the Bayou, Inc., P.O. Box 66832, Houston. TX 77266, Attn: Charities Committee. For more info.-mation, contact Greg Moye at 713-214-4092 (daytime) or 713- 629-4993 (evenings). ct FORINFO Beneficiaries sought Oeadline to apply: Feb. 14 Bunnies on the Bayou, Inc. PENNY WEAVER PO. Box 66832, Houston. TX 77266 Attn: Charities Committee HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JANUARY 10. 2003 3 I local news Community center leaders plan improvements Facility will re-locate in less than a month and has a new Web site to serve gay Houstonians By PENNY WEAVER Leaders of the Houston Ga,}; Lesbian, Bisexual & TransgenderCommunity Center have announced the facility will relocate by Feb. 1 as it spruces up its services. Formerly known as the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center, the recently dubbed Houston GLBT Community Center adds to its new name and inclusive mission with the move and a new Web site. Center President Tim Brookover said the facility will move on Feb. 1 to 3400 Montrose Blvd., Suite 'lJJ7. Established in 1996, the cen· ter moved•operations into the two~story house at 803 Hawthorne Ave. m early 1998. ''We're thrilled about our new two.year interim location, especially the 140-plus seat meeting room," Brookover said in a press release. "We're also pleased with the more professional setting that will be much more conducive to the work of the cente1: The Houston GLBT Community Center will soon move from its location in this house at 803 Hawthorne to a sU1te in the building at 3400 Montrose Blvd. The Montrose Boulevard location is bright and airy with wonderful windows along the entire northern wall of our suite." Part of the improvements at the center is an expanded presence on the Internet, Brookover noted. "Our new Web site, wwv.:houstonglbt­centerorg. includes a community calendar as well as information on center programs and an onllne donation system," he said. According to Brookover. the large meetmg room at the center's old location on I Iav.1horne Avenue seats 90 people. Completely handi-capped acces.~1ble, the new location also will include at large conference room along with offices for the center's non·profit tenants. In keeping with its mission statement, the organization last fall changed lb name from Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. according to Brookover. That mission statement is: uThe Houston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center provides a home for the birth, nurture and celebration of our organizations, institutions and cul­ture; cares for our individuals and groups in need; educates the public and our com· munity, and empowers our individuals and groups to achieve their fullest potential." "The Tenant Program, although impor­tant, is just a small part of the work of the community center," Brookover said. "Offering low·cost meeting and office space are really important programs that aug­ment the other programs of the center." The facility regularly hosts events including poetry and movie nights, as well as numerous other activities. Center tenants mclude the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus, the Hou.~ton Chapter of Parents, Families & Friends of Le$bians & Gays (PFLAG). the Black GLBT Coalition of Houston. Q Patrol and the Texas Hwnan Rights Foundation. "Over the past few months, we have been very fortunate to benefit from the hard work of our board development committee, chaired by longtime center amisory board member Clarence Burton Bagb);" Brookover said "The committee's charge includes adding members to the center"s board, as well as proposing a restructuring oflhe center's work." Other board development committee members include Mike Bodin, Sara Fernandez, Don Hauboldt, John Heinzerling, Ken Jones. Robert Shane McShane, Blake Weis.~r and Hillary Woest Ex-«Jlcio commit· tee members include Brookover and Houston City Council membef Annise D. Park& The center board plam an ambitious capital campaign in the oommg months that will allow the facility to IDO\'e into a pennanent location in the ne.x1 nm to three years. Brookover noted Q MOREINFO Drop-in hours: 2-9 p.m. Monday-Friday Noon-5 p.m. Saturday • 2-6 p.m. Sunday Houston lil..BT Commtr1ity Center 803 Hawthorne Ave. • 713-524·3818 www.houstonglbtcenter.org Nation's oldest gay bookstore to close its doors Houston owner of New York's Oscar Wilde Bookshop said closure will not affect local store By PENNY WEAVER The Houston owner of the nation's oldest gay bookstore said the closing of that New York business does not indicate the demise of the only gay bookstore left in this city. Houstonian Larry Lingle owns the Oscar Wilde Bookshop, the oldest gay and lesbian bookstore in the country, and he announced this week that it will close by the end of the month. The store opened in Greenwich Village in 1967 with several dozen books on its shelve~. It expanded as the gay rights move­ment in New York gained momentum. and soon became the inspiration for other book­stores devoted to a gay and lesbian clientele. Lingle. who purchased the store six yt'ars ago. said It was difficult to maintain a gay bookstore in New York because of the behe­moth book chains that offer a wider S('lection. "I have lost a quarter of a million dol­lan; over the last six years. And I just can't take it anymore," he said. Lingle also owns Lobo, the only gay book­store remaining in Houston after this sum mer's closing of Crossroads Market Bookstore & Cafe. But he said the closing of Oscar Wilde is not likely to have much affect on Lobo. "If anything, certainly not adversely," Lmgle said of any influence the New York closing might have locally. "Lobo's been suir porting the New York store for six years." Across the country, bookstores, like many other businesses that cater to gay clientele and are gay-0wned and-operated, are struggling in a weak economy. "(Business] was down noticeably in November and December," Lingle said of Lobo. "We certainly did not have a good Christmas. "I think there's defirutely a trend. Historical.l'I it's hard to see a trend when you're in the middle of it," Lingle added. "I've received calls from several of my fellow book­store owners across the country. The big change they're all seeing is that these so-<:alled gay areas, !like Montrose, are) less ga): It's hair pening across the oountry. A lot of gay business has been booted out for higher· paying tenants." A lack of profit sealed the fate of the New York store. "The bottom line was that it just lost money consistently. I really felt we made a pretty good effort." Lingle said. Lobo. which offers books and other mer­chandise, plus a coffee shop, on Montrose Boulevard, remains open for busine. s despite a weak holiday sales season. "We're running pretty close to the mar· gin right noy,;" Lingle said. "I don't make any claims for the future." Gay men and lesbians seem to have changed their thinking when they make purchases, as mainstream businesses such as bookstores have been more inclusive of them, Lingle beliews. "I really don't think there is ns much a sense of huying from gay busine.-;.ses as there once was, but I've always believed that a gay business is not entitled to the business. You have to earn it It's typical retail." he said. "Consumers don't really seem to be that aware of the differences between a small busi· ness and what we havt! to deal with as opposed to a chain. We don't have the bu}1ng powei:" Lingle also said the Internet has become a more popular place to purchase items like books. cutting into business for Lobo and other stores. "I think the Internet is going to increas­ingly be a source ... particularly for gay con­sumers," he said. "That's bound to have an effect. I think there's a lot of trends going on. I don't think we fully understand them." Crossroads Market Bookstore & Cafe. which had been a haven for gays for a decade in Montrose, closed its doors permanently in late July. Owner Joe Rumanni cited decreas­ing profits as the reason for the closure. But according to Rumanni, the Crossroads store in Dallas, the onginal loca­tion in operauon for more than a dozen years, will not close and. in fact, is profitable. Lingle agreed that Dallas has advan­tages that Houston does not have for gay business owners. "My biggest regret lS that Houston does not have the kind of gay business district that Dallas has." Lingle said. "It creates a great atmosphere where anybody, gay and lesbian, can ... do whatever they want. We don't have that in Houston." Crossroads originally opened on Alabama Street in Houston, and had operated from its Westhein1er Road storefront for sevrn years The location was in the heart of heavily gay Montrose, near other gay businesses uch as Mary's .. Naturally and Chances. Last month, Mary's closed briefly before being purchased by new owners and re-opened just days later Former owners of the club cited declining revenues as part of the reason for the struggle. ''We've noticed a definite drop in busi­ness." said former co-owner Cliff Owen. Although Cros.sroads and Lobo offered many of the same products and a similar atmosphere. business at Lobo has benefited lit­tle from Cros.sroads' do.sing, Lingle said imme­diately after the Westheimer shop closed. "The only significant difference l\'e seen since Cros.sroads has closed or is closing is an increase in traffic in our coffee shop," he said. At that time, sLx months ago, Lingle noted that the Oscar Wilde Bookshop was struggling financiall): In 1970, the Oscar Wilde Bookshop's original 0\111ler, Craig Rodwell, helped orga­nize a march to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots The shop is one of only two gay bookstores remaining m New York. Creative Visions, also in Greenwich Village, is the other. "It's sad that the New York community is unwilling or unable to support a gay and lesbian bookstore," Deacon .Maccubbin, the 0\\1ler of the Lambda Rising bookshop in Washington, D.C., told the ~ew York Times. ''If New York can't support two small gay bookstores. I think there's really a problem," Lingle said. The Associated Press contriblrted to um story. Q MOREINFO Lobo Bookstore 3939-S Montrose Blvd 713-522-5156 4 JANUARY 10. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I nati al new Suspects charged with hate crimes in gay, trans attacks VIOl.fHCE. continued from Page 1 crimes, a first in rural New York state. But District Attorney ~fichael Bongiorno's dedication to pursuing the bias charges remains unclear. and the matter will like­ly be left to a grand jury, his office said. "Right now, they're both charged with hate crimes, and it's pending before a grand jury," said Karen Riley, supervising assistant district attorney. New York passed its sexual orienta­tion- inclusive hate crimes statute at the end of 2000 and has prosecuted six cases of anti-gay bias in New York City to date, according to Foreman, but the Haverstraw case marks the first rtiral use of the law. The assault charge carries a maximum penalty of one year in county jail, but the possible hate crime charges would increase the sentence to four years in state prison. Foreman said. South Beach's anti-gay brutality In the most brutal New Year's incident, a gay man was shot outside of a nightclub in South Beach, Fla., after being mistaken for a woman by two straight men. accord· tng to a police spokesperson. Miami Beach police arrested Adrian Miller, a New Jersey resident, and Bllly Ledan, a Miami resident, on charges of attempted murder and a hate crime, officials said. The incident was the most vicious bias attack in Florida in the past five years, said Howard Simon, executive director of the Florida ACLU. While walking to his car, Miami resi- G1vo our roador1 a cha to know youl ........... ,dvorti~ in tho I 1f1]i 1:4(1] ll voice Far Hc>ucioo ~' NII Dant.et 71~529,8400 t.11 1M ta gM yauf bulintll •jump "'tt. right clheflanl This year may see a rise in anti-gay vio­lence in rural areas. as gay populations become more visible, said Clarence Patton. director of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs. dent Earnest Robinson, who was dressed as a man that night but told police he does occasionally dress in drag, was approached by two men, according to police. "They thought I was something I was· n't," Robinson told the Miami Herald. "I said, 'Leave me alone. I'm a man.' His friend was laughing at him and he got offended, and he shot me. I fell to the ground and that's all I remember." The scenario in Florida is becoming more common nationally, said Jeff Montgomery, director of Michigan· based Triangle Foundation, a gay activist organization. "We're seeing more and more of these types of cases," Montgomery said. "These New Year's cases are similar to the Morehouse [College in Atlanta] case recently, and others, where straight men are so insecure that they are unable to comprehend being on the objectified side of the world, and they can't handle it and resort to some level of violence." The shooter, who police believe to be Miller, called Robinson a "faggot" during the attack, according to police reports. Local police charged the two with hate crime violations, but the local dis­trict attorney has not decided whether to pursue the charges. according to Ed Griffith, spokesperson for the state attorney's office. "They're already facing 15 years for the attempted murder, and you go with the heavier, more solid charge," Griffith said. "We don't use prosecutions to send messages." Robinson was released from Jackson Memorial Hospital Jan. 3, according to Griffith. Sandra Norton, director of the Gay & Lesbian Community Center of South Florida, called the attack "the conse· quences of the unrelenting and self-righ· teous preachings of hatred to which we are subjected." The shooting shocked residents of the renowned gay-friendly burg of South Beach, said Nadine Smith, executive director of Equality Florida, a statewide gay advocacy group. "It's a reminder that it's impossible to carve out a safe zone among the homopho· bic and transphobic attitudes in our coun­try," she said. Miami Beach, which includes South Beach. became the first city in Florida to protect gays in housing, employment and accommodations in 1992, according to Smith. Ky. sees transgender attack Less than 24 hours after the Florida incident, the apartment of transgendered Owensboro, Ky., resident CMrlie Glenn was targeted by a possible anti-gay arson· ist, according to Doug Ester, an Owensboro police officer. "That's definitely something we're looking at, and that's what the victim believes," Ester said. Glenn is undergoing hormone therapy to become a woman and identified as transsexual to police. She was home alone at 11:30 p.m. New Year's Day when she heard glass break in another room. Upon investigation, the room was engulfed in flames. according to police reports. The investigation continues, and no arrests have been made. But the police dPpartment "fully expects" to file hate crime charges in the case, Ester said. The case would be the first application of the hate crime statute in Davies County, hesa1d Kentucky's hate crime Jaw "bumps up the classification" of felonies to the next higher level from Class B to Class A, for example. The Glenn case could "easily get a 20.ycar to life sentence," Ester said. The two rural attacks are indicative of a coming trend in 2003, according to rep. resentatives of the National Coalition of Anti· Violence Programs. "A lot of the reports we're getting this year are from places where a couple of things seem to be true, ... said Clarence Patton, executive director of NCAVP. "There Is no kind of community system in place to deal with violence, and they're happening m places where we believe there will be ongoing problems like small towns and rural areas because we know that visibility in our community opens gays up to violence." Transgendered people are especially vulnerable to this violence, according to Vanessa Edwards Foster, chair of the National Transgender Advocacy Coalition. "The perpetrator feels their sexual· ity is questioned by the thought that they might be attracted to someone of the same gender and they lash out in violence," Foster said. "This happens more often to male to female transgen· ders than any other segment of the American population." HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JANUARY 10. 2003 5 I local ne s Budget shortfall means trimmed AIDS funding AIDS ACTNISTS. continued from Page 1 Ryan White Planning Council. Thomas Street Clinic Advisory Council, Houston AIDS Ad\'OCacy Team and is an HIV pre­vention educator Wilson aid the federal poverty level is a yearly Income of $8,860 for an individual. Under current criteria, patients who apply for THMP funds can have an income of up to 200 percent. or two times, the poverty level to qualify for assis· tance. That adds up to an income of $17,720. Also under the current rules. patients can deduct the yearly retail costs of their drugs from that income, called a "spend down" "measure. That results in the adjusted gross income that is used to determine if a person can receive state assistance. But with the proposed changes, 140 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines 1s $12,404, and there would be no "spend down." Wilson explained. So thousands of HIV t AIDS patients whose drug costs can range from $1,000 to $3,000 per month - would be ineligible for state funds. Based only on funding remaining the same, the state expects a $37 million bud· get shortfall for the AIDS medication pro· gram over the next few years. So even if the U.S. Congress and the Texas Legislature do not trim AIDS program funding, there will be less money to assist HIV I AIDS patients. In 2001, the Texas program served 11,138 people with a total cost of $51 mil· lion. In the 2003 fiscal year, which began in September and ends next summer, offi· cials expect to serve 10,311 people at a cost of $62 million. More than 215 new clients are joining the program's rolls each month, Wilson noted. By law, TH~P must balance its budget or face elimination of the entire program. activists note. On Oct. 18, TOH officials received the language that includes the proposed changes from its Bureau for HIV & STD Prevention. The measures were posted to the Texas Register on Nov. 1, and then were open for public comment through Nov. 30. This week's meeting is the final opportunity for public comments on the proposals. Another part of the state's proposed program changes would cut the drug formulary, or the list of medications approved for funding. If new AIDS or-----..---- ---- ft MORE INFO 9 a.m. to noon Thursday, Jan. 16 Public hearing on HN medication program changes Texas Board of Health Moreton Budding. Room M·739 Texas Department of Health headquarters 1100 West 49th St. Ai.stm, TX wwwtdh.state!x.us medications become available, the financial e!lg1bility of patients would have to be revamped again to find the money to expand the formulary, Wilson explained. THMP spends $6 million a month on HIV medications or $200.000 per day for Texans. AIDS activists want health officials to wait and see what federal and state fund· ing is allotted by lawmakers before cutting back the number of HIV I AIDS patients who are eligible for assistance If the new income restrictions are put into place, more than 1.000 Houstonians would lose their assistance for AIDS medications. That prospect has activists calling for action, and an important part of that is showing state decision-makers the faces of people with AIDS, accordmg to Wilson The Houston chapter of ACT Now! continues to organize and will monitor the state program and other issues. Wilson said the group plans several com­munity events, mcluding a Capitol Day in Austin 1n mid· March. ~we hope these upcoming events will increase our visibility in the community and that we will continue to evolve to be a leader for HIV AIDS advocacy in the Houston area," Wilson said. If the state board of health approves the new eligib1hty requirements, they would be implemented for new THMP clients in 30 days Current clients would have six months to re-apply or find other sources to help buy the medlcme they need. Big hair ahead. 25th Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras · March I, 2003 Mardi Gras Package from $1699 · Includes 5 nights accommodation in Sydney, roundtrip air on Qantas from Los Angeles plus The Mardi Gras Party Ticket, Sydney City Tour and Sydney Harbor Gay Cruise. Australia is a great gay and lesbian destination any time. For our affordable year round vacations, visit www.Gay.Australia.com or call toll-free 877-273-5990. 6 JANIJARY 10. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I national news Clonaid claims to make babie for gays Group markets services to gays, also plans to clone people with HIV By LAURA DOUGLAS-BROWN Just days after tantalizing the media with claims of the world's first cloned baby, leaders of Clonaid - a company affiliated with a religious sect that believes ahens created human life announced Jan 4 the birth of a second clone, this time to a Dutch lesbian couple. A gay couple from Las Vegas will also begin the cloning process this month, with that baby's expected birth before the end of the year, accordini: to Clonaid, which has marketed its services to gays since at least 2000. But the company says the couples all wish to remain anonymous, and it has yet to produce any proof of the purported cloned births. Clonaid CEO Brigitte Boisselier initial ly said that genetic tests on the first cloned baby, reportedly born Dec. 26 to an American woman with an infertile hus· band, would be available within a week of that birth. But on Tuesday, Boisselier said that the child's parents won't allow the tests unless they get a guarantee that the baby glrl will not be taken from them. The lesbian mothers of the second baby also haven't decided to allow the tests. Clona1d officials told Houston Voice this week "We are currently discussing this with the parents," said Thomas Kaenzig, vice president of Clona1d and priest of the Raelian .Movement, which beliei.es extrater­restrials made humans through doning. "The parents are very concerned about the baby s safety and their O'\\'Il safety," Kae11Z1g said. "Therefore, we recommend· ed them not to do any inteniews at this moment.' Kaenz1g also refused to say how the lfS· b1an mothers purportedly gave birth to their cloned child - '\\ hether one woman gave birth to her own clone, or whether she carried the clone of her partner - although Boisseher previously said the child is the birth mother's clone. That lack of details and proof has left both mainstream scientists and even cloning supporters skeptical of Clonaid's claims. "Their claims are too good to be true," said Randolfe Wicker, founder of the Clone Rights United Front, described as the world's first human cloning activist group. "They are frauds who are playing a very clever PR game, and all they are really domg IS promoting the Raelian rehgion." That sentiment m turn, has gay n hts r ps omed about .the pos~1b! mpact ' haHng ga) famil1 s imohed 1 h l' rganIZatlon reasmgly He'\\ ed as dishonest at best, extreme and unethi ral at worst "I wasn t sure whether to cringe or applaud when they made their claim that they had done th IS for a lesbian couple," said Lome L. Jean, executive director of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force. "On the one hand, I believe that getting d1Scuss1on out there about gay and lesbian parentmg 1s important," she said. "On the other . all we need is to be associated with this group that the whole world thlnks is nuts." Possible backlash over the cloning claims means gay groups must work even harder to make sure mainstream America gets an accurate view of gay families, according to David Smith, communica tlons director and senior strategist for the Human Rights Campaign. "Human cloning is highly emotional, little understood and vehemently opposed by an overwhelming majority of Americans," he said. "It is why we will work hard to focus public attention on the inequities ln the law that gay families face and the injustice of the misguided efforts of some to ban gay people from adopting children." Cloning a gay issue? While banning human cloning is expected to be a hot topic in the 108th Congress, which opened Tuesday, HRC has not taken an official position on the issue, which Smith said "appears to still be science fiction.~ "The claims from this bizarre group do not seem to be substantiated," he said. Lobbying Congress is a major role of the Washmgton·based group, but "HRC will not weigh in on efforts to ban human cloning unless there ts an attempt to ban stem cell or other medical research that could pave the way to breakthroughs in cures for cancers and other diseases," Sm1thsa1d. Several states - includmg California, Louisiana, M1ch1gan and Rhode Island have already passed cloning bans. But NGLn: which focuses on local and state level issues, also hasn't taken a position. "It's not even on the radar screen," Jeansa1d. The Gay & Lesbian Medical Association doesn't have an offictal posi· tion on human cloning either. according to Ken Haller, president of the group. But both the Raelians and Wicker argue that gays have more to gain from cloning than most heterosexuals. "Human cloning is the only way for gay couples to have children entirely of their O'\\'Il genetic offspring," said Kaenzig, the Raelian priest and Clonaid vice president Wicker, who IS frequently Interviewed by national media outlets on the subJert of cloning and was dubbed by Timfl Magazme ao; the face of clonmg fel"\<or m ti:., U<; 1 also '\'wn, hould 1t he n°crs :u-v ~ r a'! Clona1d CEO Brigitte Boissefier held a press confer­ence Dec. 27 to announce the birth of the world's first cloned baby. Eight days later, the company claimed that a second cloned child was born to a lesbian couple (Photo by Hillery Smith Garrison/AP) infertile couple, since that is what a Jes· bian or gay couple is. to go out and involve the genes of a stranger when It possible to have a child related to no one but you'" he asked. If one woman was cloned and another woman carried the child, cloning would also allow a lesbian mother '"to give birth to her partner's later-born twin." Wicker said. Cloning - accomplished by removing the DNA-containing nucleus from a donor egg and replacing it with a cell from the person being cloned would offer gays and others the chance to have a child with· out outside influence. There ts also the potential that a more advanced procedure related to clonmg could one day allow gay couples to have children genetically related to both partners. Two years ago, Dr. Calum Mac Kellar of the University of Edinburgh suggested that it would be "theoretically possible" to replace the nucleus of an egg cell with a sperm cell which, like th" egg c.ell, would contam only half of the genetic material necessary to make a human. Next, the "male egg" could he fertilized with sperm The resulting embryo would still need to be implanted in a surrogate mother for gestation, but it would have two geneuc fathers. And in a similar process, the genetic material from one woman's egg could be inserted into another woman's egg to create an offspring with two genetlc mothers. 'Enjoy life, enjoy sex' The Raelians hit on the theoretical pos· sibility of creating a child with two genetic fathers when they began market mg cloning to gay ruen more than two years ago In October 2000, Rae I the spiritual leader of the group. held a press confer enc In San FrancL~ro to explam how cloning v. ill allow gay roup' s to have a child v. ho can mhent the g netJc tr a1to; of on or both parmts !iUCh as 1s possible with heterosexual couples." YC't accordmg to Wicker. who has denounced Clonaid's Internet advertise ments for human cloning at a cost of $200,000 as "fraud" targeted at gays, the process \\Ould be more difficult than the Raeltans let on. In basic cloning theory, the embryo would get a complete set of genetic mate­rial from the person being cloned. because a cell with the complete DNA say a skin cell or. hke in the case of Dolly the sheep. a breast cell would be inserted in place of the egg·s nucleus to begin the process. But in standard reproduction, the egg and sperm cells each provide half the genetic material. The male and female halves are like two sides of a zipper that jom to create a complete set of DNA, and successful development requires "imprinting" that can only come from thf' egg's female DNA. That means trying to unite the created "male~ egg with male sperm would be "like trying to close a zipper with two left sides," Wicker said. But while Wicker fears fraud and gay rights groups fear the impact on gay fam· 11ies from being invoked in Clonaid's claims. officials with the cloning compa· ny said their outreach to gays comes from the gay.inclusive teachings of the Raelian religion. "Wf' encourage people to fully express their sexuality whether they are homosexu­al, bisexual or heterosexual," Kaenzig said. '"Enjoy life, enjoy sex' is one of our key sayings, and we encourage people to do this without any feeling of guiltiness," he said. Some gay rights oppqnents argue that gay people should not be allowed to even adopt chlldren for fear that they would "raise them to be gay," but the Raehans are not concerned about whether cloned children of gay people would grow up to be gay themselves, Kaenz1g said. "If It is in the genes and the clone baby expresses h1s1her genes by being him self/ herself, then the clone will most like ly also be gay," he said. 'Unfortunately, due to the fact that homosexuality is still perceived as bemg something '.1bnormal' in some religious zealots' minds, the child, when It 1s growing up, might not express h lmse If fully. "We arc sure that tomorrow's world will be a more tolerant and open world, and it will become easier for people to express themselves, to express their genes,'' Kaenzig said. In Clonaid's press release announcing the birth of the first human clone, the group also said that its scientists "are now working on the next generation of clone babies which will mclude for thP first time clones of people carrying the llTV virus. 'Thanks to human cloning, people \\1th AIDS will be able to have children of the 1r own genrttc offspring without takln" thP n k of passing on the d1sea e to thr1r rh rt"'n, C na1d cla1med HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JANUARY 10, 2003 7 I n tion I news Gays should be in draft, 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' author says Talk of reinstating draft renews debate about gays in military By LOU CHIBBARO JR. The issue of gays in the military returned to the limelight last week when a sociology professor who first proposed the P1mtagon·s "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy said he favors allowing gays to serve openly in the military If Congress t1!lllstates the draft Charles Moskos, a Northwestern •university professor and recognized expert on military personnel matters, said a umversal system of compulsory military service is the fairest means of maintaining the nation's armed services. The "higher virtue" of a military draft outweighs concerns about the privacy rights of straight soldiers that remain a central argument from opponents of gay military personnel, he said, "If an open gay said, 'I want to go into the Army,' it would be his prerogative," Moskos said, in a Dec. 31 e-mail exchange with researchers at the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military The center is a research arm of the University of California at Santa Barbara. When President Bill Clinton first pro· posPd lifting the military ban on gays in Milit~ry personnel expert Charles Moskos. COl1Sld· ered the inventor' of the nulitary's Don't Ask. Don't Tell' policy. says he favors allowing gays to serve nly m the services 1f a military draft is reinstated. 1993, critics said allowing gays to serve open· ly would destroy morale and "unit cohesion" among the troops. Military officials said that openly gay military members would present insurmountable problems ~ithin the mili· tary's close living quarters. including sleep­ing quarters and communal showers. "Of course, there would be problems with that, there would be hassles, but they probably could be overcome," Moskos said in his remarks to the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military. He told the researchers that irn.tituting a draft would require ending all forms of the gay ban. "You can't U$e a gay ban with a draft, because that would make it tOQ easy for people to get out," he said. according to a statement released by the center. Mo5kos' call for including open gays in a military draft came a~ U.S. Reps. Charlb Rangel (D-N.Y.) and John Conyers (D· Mich.) said they plan to introduce legisla· tion calling for the reinstatement of the draft. The U.S. military draft ended in 1973 near the end of the Vietnam War. Neither the Bush admini.~tration nor Republican and Democratic leader~ of Congress mdicated any interest in rein· stating a draft A military draft bill intro­duced in 2001 by Reps. Nick Smith IR· Mich.) and Curt Weldon (R-Penn.) died m committee, with little or no support from their GOP colleagues. But whether the latest reinstatement effort succeeds or not, Moskos' comments will boost efforts to lift the ban on gays In the military, said Steve Ralls, spokesperson for the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, which as.~ists gay military personnel. .. Moskos' most important comment is that the military can overcome the privacy concerns rai~ by straight service members in a draft," Ralls said. "If the military can get around the problems associated with gay ser­vice members in a draft, why can't they get arotmd them in the current situation?" Longtime gay activISt Frank Kamen); a World War 11 combat veteran. agrees with that assessment. ':As a practical matter. it will be utterly impossible to reinstate the draft with the gay ban in place because anyone who wi~he> not to be drafted will sunply 'tell' that he is gay and be excluded,'' Kameny said. "The whole draft will implode before it ever gets started." Kameny said that while most draft-age men would not use homosexuality as a means for evadmg military srrv1ce as recently as the Vietnam War era, the social climate is far different no\\'. "It is a completely different world," he said. "The culture has changed. Now, peo. pie will be completely willing to identify themselves as ga)'." Q MORE INFO· Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military Univel'Slty of California Santa Barbara. Calil 93106 805-89J.5664 • www.gaymditary.ucsb.edu Charles Moskos Departmeat of Soci61ogy Northwestern University 1810 Chicago Ave.. • Evanston, Ill. 60208 847-491-3741 • c-moskos1i nwu.edu 8 JANUARY 10. 2003 City Plaza will refund 504 of your last six months' rent - so it's easier than ever to buy into Houston's smartest intown condo lifestyle~ I Live Smarter to kiss your landlord • IDI ocms •I· ..i2....._ •,mu papsmU!dl . ,.. ...... ....... • ..... 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Leonard requested a legal opinion on whether the liaison would need council approval, something Sardella said he does not He said he asked a new local group, Gay & Lesbian Assoc1at1on of Newport County, Etc to designate n liaison to his office after some GLANCE members accusrd the city of bemg Insensitive when it turned dov. n a liquor hcense for a propo ed gav bar. "Though Newport is an absolutely wonderful placr that I love with all of my heart, tt's not a ter­ribly tolerant or gay friendly city," said Colleen Hopkrns, who took the post. Gay club in conservative Utah city fights license revocation SALT LAKE CITY - Club Blue. a gay pri· vate club, goes to court next week to appeal the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control's decision to revoke its alcohol license. the Salt Lake Tribune reported. DABC revoked the club's license and handed owner Mike Webb a $9,000 fine after a private party in October where a bartender allegedly worked naked and attendees engaged in sexual activlty. Webb claimed the club is being targeted because of patrons' "lifestyle." Salt Lake City police attended a privatP party at the cluh after being tipped off. The club's lawyer said the state should not regulate what goes on at a private party. "I don't have any problem with them [DABCJ regulating public decency at a private club during normal business hours," Marlin Criddle said. "I have a problem wtth them trying to extend that to when the club is being used privately. n Fourth Ill. city passes gay rights ordinance SPRINGFIELD, Ill. The Springfield Ctty Council approved a gay nghts ordinance Jan. 7 over the objections of soml' rcli· g10us leadrrs who said it \\OUld lead to "moral and social confusion," accorcl ing to the Associated Press. The ordmance, pro­tecting gays from discrimination in hous ing, employment and credit, passed 8-1 with one abstention. Springfield joins a growmg list of Illmois cities extending gay rights. Tom Selinger, who abstarncd from the vote, said he expects the Legislature to enact the same protections statewide. At a Jan. 6 committee hearing, Rev. Samuel Hale, Jr. read a Jetter of protest from the president of the Springfield Ministerial Alliance, the Rev. Silas Johnson. "To include [gays] would legally obligate the entire populace of Springfield to accept and endorse a mindset ·and lifestyle that brings moral and social confusion," Johnson wrote. Ordinance supporter Libby King of Springfield disagreed. "We're not asking anyone to say, 'Hey. you're right,' because homosexuality is not right for everybody." she said. "But what we are asking is that we're not pun· ished for it by anybody who has an impor­tant say in our lives." Ind. officials want gay marriage lawsuit dismissed • INDIANAPOLIS - Two lesbian couples and a gay male couple filed a lawsuit claiming the state of Indiana's ban on same sex marriage is unconstitutional, the Indianapolis Star reported. Hut in a Jan. 3 brief, the state attorney general asked Marion Superior Court Judge S.K. Reid to dismiss the case. The state has nn interest to promote heterosexual mar­riage and farn ilies as "sound political ordering," according to Thomas M. Fisher, special counsel for the state. But plaintiffs in the lawsuit, filed by the Indianapolis Civil Liberties Union, con· tend the gay marriage ban violates thP. state conslltution's promise to treat all citizens equally If the court does not allow same-sex marriage, the plaintiffs want a separate legal status for gay cou­ples, such as the civil unions created m Vermont Fight for gay marriage heats up in Calif., Mass. BOSTON The Massachusetts state Jeg1slature is poised to confront the issue of civil unions for the first time Several lawmakers have proposed bills, s1mtlar to a law passed in Vermont, that grant gay couples virtually all the rights of marriage that are granted by state law, according to the Associated Press. "Its tJme, maybe overtime," said Rep. Alice Wolf (D-Cambridge) Also pro posed this year is a bill legalizing gay marriage, which would give same sex couples all the benefits granted under federal law. Some advocates don't believe the bills have a chance of pass­ing. But activists in California are more optimistic about the chances of gaining legal recognition for gay couples in that state after a decision to stop asking for civil unions and instead expand the state's existing domestic partnership law to include all of the rights of mar­riage. Assemblywoman Jackie Goldberg (D·Los Angeles), a lesbian, is expected to introduce the legislation th is month, according to the Bay Area Reporter. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I medical re ort International AIDS fight receives high-profile attention in U.S. WASHINGTON - The State Department is seeking sizable bud get increases to fight the global AIDS epidemic, further evidence that Secretary of State Colin Powell has given high priority to the struggle against the disease, according to the Associated Press. The battle against AIDS overseas. along with combating terrorism. have helped shape Powell's budget request to the White House budget office for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. President Bush will submit his budget for fiscal 2004 to Congress early next month. "We can and must use our voices to convince others of the urgency and gravity of this global prob­Television personality Oprah Winfrey spent much of last month touring AIDS-ravaged South Africa. visiting AIDS orphanages and dispensing funds from her charitable founda­tion. She is the latest celebrity to launch a high-profile tour to call attention to the disease's global impact (Photos by AP) lem," Powell told a group of foreign ambassadors last month. Dr. Paul Zeitz, executive director of the Global AIDS Alliance, said he is encouraged but also said $2.5 billion in new funds, a threefold increase over current spending, is essential to finance prevention, treatment and other programs. The increased attention to international AIDS by the Bush administration comes as celebrities like U2 singer Bono and talk show host Oprah Winfrey took high-profile tours through South Africa to call attention to the disease. Winfrey spent much of December there visiting AIDS orphanages and distributing $7 million in donations from her charitable foundation. San Fran Web site helps feed gay drug market, police say SAN FRANCISCO -A dramatic increase in party drugs for sale in gay personal ads on a popular online service has authorities alarmed, according to the San Francisco Examiner. Dealers targeting the city's gay drug scene, as well as those soliciting drugs such as ecstasy and speed, including crystal methamphetamine, are increasingly turn­ing to Craigslist.com, San Francisco's popu­lar online listings service. "This is a major reason for concern, and it is something we're going to be devoting resources to come the new year," said Capt. Tim Hettrich, head of the police department's vice unit. Dealers use code words to disguise the true nature of their offerings. For example, "Tina" stands for crystal meth and other forms of speed while "420" means marijuana and "Vitamin E" refers to ecstasy, sources told the newspa· per. "It's all over Craiglist," said Skip Spear, associate director of San Francisco's New Leaf, a mental health and drug treatment center for gays. "We're concerned about it." Research on gay teens paints incomplete picture, experts say NEW YORK - The growing battery of stud· ies that show gay teens are subject to preju­dice and at high risk for suicide attempts and other risky behavior is incomplete, experts told the New York Times. The research led some school districts to adopt anti-gay harassment policies. "The research is delivering what I call 'the suffering sui­cide script,' which essentially tells them, 'Hey, look how horrible it is to be gay,'" said Dr. Savin-Williams, an expert on adolescent sexual identity issues. He said a major draw· back of much of the research is that the studies include only those willing to identify themselves as gay or at least acknowledge same-sex attraction. That sample, Savin· Williams told the newspaper, is significantly smaller than the total number who will eventually turn out to be gay, overlooking many teens who may be adjusting well but prefer to keep their sexual orientations pri· vate, even on anonymous surveys. Steep budget increases may slow at federal health agency WASHINGTON The National Institutes of Health, which enjoyed huge budget increases in recent years, would get only a small funding boost under the Bush admin· istration budget being prepared for next year, according to the Wall Street Journal. The agency - which includes the Office of AIDS Research that manages the scientific, budgetary, legislative and policy elements of the agency's AIDS research program - will see an increase of less than 1 percent and perhaps as little as 0.3 percent, a drop from the more than 15 percent increase the federal budget provided in its current fiscal year to bring its budget to about $27 billion, sources said. "Something that small would be of concern to us because it's effectively a cut; it doesn't keep up with inflation," said Kevin Wilson, director of public policy at the American Society for Cell Biology. Federal health officials fast-track trial AIDS vaccines from Vax:Gen BRISBANE, Calif. - The Food & Drug Administration fast-tracked the HIV I AIDS vaccine candidates of VaxGen, giving a boost to the company's AIDSVA.X B'B and AIDSVAX BtE, the only preventive AIDS vaccine candidates to advance to Phase III clinical trials, according to the Associated Press. VaxGen expects to report primary results from the trials later this year. AIDSVA.X, made through recombinant DNA technology, contains recombinant proteins identical to those on the surface of HIV The proteins induce the immune sys­tem to make antibodies. From staff and wire reports JANUARY 10. 2003 9 TOUR CLUB ~~rte.-~F~IR DDAILS! THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Acco111modatio11s Call us for your next out-of-town guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 7!006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! 10 JANUARY 10. 2003 ~~ Lffiu@ ffl®?@l!DiJD ~[hlli][?(SQi) ©~ @®R7~~@1l Just look at what we've been up to! A small group of people can do mighty things ma short time with God's help - but only if they are a people of faith that do more than just talk about faith, love and charity. I. Provide one week of food for 176 people through our Food Pantry. 2. Provide school supphes for 80 cluldren through the "Return to School With Dignity'' mirustry 3. Provide 50 winter jackets for children in grades 1-5 in G.I.S.D. 4. Hospital Visits, Funerals, Utility As~istance, Weekly Services, Volunteering at the AIDS Coalition, provide speakers for the Speaker Bureau on AIDS prevention .. ... and many more valuable services to the people of Galveston County. Most importantly, we have spread the word of God's love! This has been accomplished in only 24 weeks with God's help. Won't you join us? Service.s Sundays at ll:OOam Rev. Tom Martin, pastor 3712 Broadway Galveston, Texas 77550 409.765.8500 C.A LEND AR Offering Pe"dCC & Rtxonciliation to theAlic11atcd 1030 Heii,rilL~ Bhd. l I< >tN.011, ·rx i7<X~ ph. 7rnil'H.1800 w:mikdlJPfm'}d.org Friday • Jan. 10 Morning Prayer 1 Oom Movie Night 7pm "Sum of AD Fears• Saturday • Jan. 11 Breokfast 9 30am Mondoy • Jan. 13 Eucharist 7:30pm Don't worry about your pets when you have to travel without them. I provide in-home TLC for your pets. They get daily walks and play while you vacation without worry! Plan ahead! Call now for a holiday sure to be stress-free for both you and your pets I Established 1995 Friday • Jan. 17 Morning Prayer J Oam Monday• Jan. 20 Eucharist 7:30pm Friday • Jan. 24 Morning Prayer lOom Movie Night 7pm "Bod Compony" loy1l989@1ol.com 713-942-8816 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE international news Spanish politician comes out in mayor's race MADRID - A Spanish politician running for mayor of Madrid under the environ· mentalist Greens Party recently told a gay­oriented magazine that he's gay, according to Agence France Presse. Jose Maria Mendiluce, who is also a member of the European Parliament, .came out In the • January issue of Zero magazine. Mendiluce, 51, told readers that he con· cealed his sexual orientation out of "cow­ardice," and added that publicly coming out could have cost him his career in politics. "The gay community can count on me to defend our rights together," he said Political pundits said Mendiluce is an underdog in the May elect10n. Mendiluce would join Bertrand Delanoe in Paris and Klaus Wowereit in Berlin as openly gay European mayors if he wins. Canadians evenly split on same-sex marriage, poll shows TORONTO, Ontario - Canadians are almost evenly split on legalizing gay marriage and allowing gays to adopt, according to a new national poll. Gay.com reported. The surve)' taken for Maclean·s Magazine and Canwest Global Communications, showed 49 percent of the respondents approve of giving gays the right to marry, while 46 opposed the Jdea. On the question of adoption: 48 percent said they supported allowing gay couples to adopt. while 46 percent said they were opposed. "I think it also shows that we've changed our attitudes toward what 'a family' "is," pollster David Plaxton said The highest support for gay marriage was in Quebec, which has the country's most inclusive civil union law. The poll was conducted by Strategic Counsel. a Toronto-based polling firm. Anti-gay charity under fire in U.K. for role in adoption fight LONDON - An anti-gay charity could have its tax-exempt status removed after launching a campaign to stop same-sex couples adopting children with money raised through its charitable position, the Guardian reported. The Chr istian Institute, an evangelical think-tank, pro­duced thousands of anti-gay adoption cards stating: "In the event of my death, I do not want my children to be adopted by homosexuals." They were published last spring when the House of Lords was debating whether to amend the Adoption & Children Bill to allow unmarried and gay couples to adopt children, a move designed to help find homes for the 60.000 children in local authority care. Lords approved the measure last month. The cards, a key element in the Institute's protest, are now to be investigated by the Charities Commission, the charity watch· dog for England and Wales. George Broadhead, who made the complaint on behalf of the Gay & Lesbian Humanists Association. said his group objects to the institute usmg money raised through its true-exempt charitable status to promote "plain, straightforward bigotry." Jose Maria Mendiluce. an underdog m the mayors race in Madrid, would join two other openly gay mayors in Europe 11 he wins the May election. (Photo by Cesar Rangel/AP) Russian gays still suffer, despite sexual revolution ST PETERSBURG. Russia - When Communism collapsed a decade ago and Russia cast off its Soviet conservatism, the ensuing sexual revolution generated looser pubhc mores and a boom in the sex indus­try. But Russian gays say traditional gender roles and homophobia are still deeply ingrained in the post-Soviet mind-set. Reuters reported. The Soviet ban on homo­sexuality may have been lifted. but gays say they still face bias in modern-<lay Russia. "I don't feel there has been any progress in Russia m the past 10 years in terms of tol· eranci> toward sexual minorities," said Ignat Fialkovsky, president of St Petersburg's Association HS-Gay-Straight Alliance. "I would consider myself lucky to see some progress even iii the second half of my life." In the Soviet Union, male homo­sexuality was punishable by up to five years in prison. Lesbians ran the risk of being sent to psychiatric institutions as late as May 1993, when President Boris Yeltsin repealed Article 121 of the Criminal Code. Scottish gay festival suffers final blow GLASGOW, Scotland - Pride Scotland, which started in 1995, was put into volun· tary liquidation late last month, the Glasgow Herald reported. The group owes creditors about $96,000. The festival, which alternated between Glasgow and Edinburgh, was set up to highlight the nation's gay residents. At its peak, it attract­ed 20.000 marchers to Edinburgh in 1999. However the 2002 festival, which cost about $136,700 to stage and was backed by $32,100 in grants from Glasgow City Council, suf· fered from infighting, bad weather and a switch from free to ticketed events. Although the festival needed to sell only 6.000 tickets to survive. it failed to attract half that number. Alister Blades, organizer of Pride Scotland, said the "rot set in" in the spring of 2002 when Pride's chair quit. crit· icizing staff members in her resignation let. ter. Blades said the disagreement fueled speculation the event would be cancelled, and it failed to regain its momentwn. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I police bea Execution date set for convicted killer in Texas gay-bashing TYLER. Texas A man convicted in the bias killing of a gay man will be put to death by lethal injection at 6 p.m. on Feb. 6, according to 365Gay.com. At trial. the court heard that Henry Dunn, 28, and two other men kidnapped Nicholas West in 1993, forced him into a pickup, drove to a remote gravel pit and shot him nine times. The men picked West, a 23-year-old Tyler medical records clerk, solely because he was gay, accord· ing to testimony. Donald Aldrich was convicted and is also on death row. David McMillan, the third man implicated in the cnme, is serving a life sentence for aggravated kidnapping and rob· bery, The killing led to protests across the state with demands for hate crime legislation. West's family did not attend the court hearing but has indicated they plan to attend Dunn's execution. Henry Dim. one of three men convicted in the bias killing of gay man Nicholas Wesl is scheduled for a Ffb 6 execution in Texas. (Photo courtesy Texas Department of Corrections) Calif. judge arrested following row with domestic partner LOS ANGELES - A county judge was arrested Dec. 21 on suspicion of drunk driving and could face additional charges after allegedly brandishing a pistol dur­ing an argument with her domestic part­ner, according to the Los Angeles Times. Superior Court Judge Diana R. Hall was arrested after sheriff's deputies received an emergency call from her partner of four years. Deidra Dykeman. officials said. A sheriff 's department spokesper· son said field tests show Hall's blood· alcohol content at .18, more than twice California's legal limit of .08. After being held for four hours, Hall was released to her attorney. Drunk driving charges will likely stick. and an investigation will determine if other charges are filed, said Assistant District Attorney Christie Stanley, Santa Barbara attorney William Gamble, who is representing Hall, said Friday that Hall is distraught over the situation, prepared to plead guilty to drunk driving and would contest addi· tional charges. Conn. state trooper suspended over harassment allegations HARTFORD, Conn. - State poh ce Lt. Wayne Rioux was suspended without pay for 30 days Dec. 31 after an investigation found he sexually harassed subordinates, according to the Hartford Courant. Rioux. 49, denies the accusations and plans. to fight the charges. "When the facts are pre­sented through the appeals process, 1 am confident I will be exonerated," he said. Internal Affairs reparted "a prepander­ance of evidence" that Rioux "created a sexually offensive environment." In add!· tion to accusations that he made sexually suggestive comments, Rioux reportedly told an officer to read aloud a newspaper article about two men having sex. The Gay Ollicers Action League of New England said that the suspension was not a harsh enough pun ishment. "I would have thought a demotion would have been more appropriate," said Det. MichaC'l Carney, vice president of the league. The investi gation prompted the department to pro­vide diversity training to supervisors, but Rioux avoided the training, Carney said. Fla. man pleads innocent to sex charges with young convicted killer PENSACOLA, Fla. A family friend of two brothers convicted of bludgeoning their father to death pleaded innocent to kidnapping and sexual battery against the younger boy, according to the Associated Press. Trial is set for Feb. 10 against Ricky Chavis, who was also charged in Terry King's murder but was later acquitted in a case that has drawn national attention. Alex King. now 13. and his 14-year-old brother. Derek. are expected to testify. The King brothers pleaded guilty in November to third­degree murder after a judge threw out their second-degree murder convictions. Both boys are now in juvenile facilities serving multi-year sentences. Derek admitted he fatally beat King with an alu· minum baseball bat Nov. 26, 2001, and Alex said he urged him to do it. Chavis a lso remains charged with being an accessory after the fact to murder and evidence tampering in King's killing. That trial is scheduled to start Feb. 24. If com·icted on all counts still pending, he could face life in prison. Canadian man charged in gay chat line assaults OTIAWA, Canada - A man who alleged­ly a'saulted and robbed men he solicited through a ga} telephone dating service was arrested Dec. 24. according to the Ottawa Citizen. Investigators said Lawrence Pigeon, 37. met at least seven victims through the phonl'i service, then demanded money after their sexual encounters. Pigeon faces 11 counts of rob· bery, nine counts of being unlawfully in a dwelling, three counts of forcible ent11: two counts of forcible confinement, one count of assault causing bodily harm. one count of mischief, one count of ei.1or­tion. one count of possession of a danger­ous weapan and one count of breaking and entering. In some cases, the victims were beaten, and Pigeon returned to the several victims' homes to demand more money, palice said. Pigeon remained in custody pending a passlble court appear­ance this week. From staff and wire reports JANUARY 10. 2003 11 Join us 11t Resurrection MCC for one of our weeltly sewlces: SATURDAY All-Spanish Worship Service/Noche Espiritual, 6p.m. SUNDAY Sunday Services, 9 and 11 a.m. Children and Youth Sunday School, 10 a.m. Chil~r~n's service 11 a.m. WEDNESDAY Sp{Qt al Uplift Wedn~sday 7 p.m. RESURRECTION ---~~----~--~- METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 2025 W. 11th St.@ lC.Jester • 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org January 12th • "There Is No Delay In /.. ~ b- The Word 'Obey'" + ~~ Maranatha ~~ , Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Bui/ding Community Through Compassion • Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/ Children's area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery 1s available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group .. services on Tvesda}'S and We~nesdays. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday 1'.forning Service And E'xperience The Love That 1'1aranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 71..3-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1...net www.maranathamcc.com l1f1iii"1td1i voice STAFF Executive Editor CHRIS CRAIN ElitDr PENNY WEAVER ed tor ' ioustonwtCe com Pnxb:tion BONNIE NAL'GlE Coobilu!ors LAURA DOlx:~OWN. JA CHAPMAN RON PHIWPS. RHONDA SMf"H. EUA TYl.£R. STEVE WARREN. KATHI WOLFE Welrnast!r JED DEMPSEY ~ DALTON DEHART. 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Oll Please $t"ld mad to Houston Voice, 500 LMtt Blvd. Su!tc 200. lous!oo. Tl!lea' 77006; fax (713) 529-IJ531 or Hnai1 to edi' Jr :stOll'IOICUOf. (Jptnons ~ therein ckl '1llt reflect those of the Houston Voa Issue 1159 Bush has mandate to let gay erve Bush has the respect and support to do what Clinton promised but failed to deliver: letting gays serve openly in the military. With an Iraqi War imminent, now is the time to take action. By KEVIN C. NAFF RESIDENT BUSH'S STUN­ning mandate in the November C.ongressional elections, coupled with the nation's urgent need for tal· ented, dedicated Americans to fight the war on terrorism present the Republican White House with a unique opportunity· to succeed where Bill Clinton failed and finally end the ban on gays serving openly in the military. Clinton shamelessly courted gay votes and dollars. only to renege on his cam­paign promise to end the ban as his first presidential art Clinton lacked a man· date, as well as the respect of the armed forces, and he knew that gay voters would follow him like lemmmgs no matter what he did, and so, the ban.remains. President Bush, on th- other hand, Y.On both the respect of the military and the country for his post-9 11 performance and has a clear mandate following th November midterm El"Ctions. It's time for hun to us" his political gams to deliver on his campaign prom1Se of "compassionate conservatism." What could be more compassionate than ending a discrimmatory policy? Besides, enforcmg legal bans on an entire class of people flies in the fare of the true conservative ideal of less and limited government. The unfortunate alliance between Repubhcans y,;ho consider themselves "conservathe" and religious extrem1Sts hke Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell has corrupted the historical defimtlon of the term The GOP will never gain widespread acceptance and support from minority voters so long as the party remains beholden to religious fun­damentalists. In reallt)~ Bush's campaign slogan "compassionate conservatJSm" 1s redun dant A true conservative does not take ISSUe with private sexuai'behavlor or orlentat1on and certatnly does not advo-cate for government interference in pn· vate matters. Bush cannot stay true to conservatism or to h!S campaign promis· es while mamtaining the ban on gays in the mlhtary. PRACTICAL POLITICS ALSO ARGUE for the president and Congress to kill "Don't Ask, Don't Tell.'' Imagine the polit ical ramifications"if a Republican admin· istration delivered gay Amertcans such a huge victory. Scores of gay voters would have to reconsider their allegiances overnight And the pobtical risk to Bush is negbgi­ble. The most extreme right-wingers who would vote agamst him for ending the ban would never vote for a Democrat anyway. Bush still enjoys sky-high approval ratings (a 63 percent positive rating accordmg to a Jan. 7 Zogby poll} and his party now controls both houses of Congress. Bush has even shown a will· ingness to stand up to conservative mem bers of his own part)', as demonstrated by his rebuke of Sen. Trent Lott's recent rac1St comments glorifying s_gregation. He may be 1he best chance we have of ending the ban. Last week brought news that Charles Moskos, the original author of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell "$3.id he now favors allow Ing gays to srrve openly if Congress rem tates the draft Mo~kos reasomng has less to do with eqJality and more to do with prartlral fears of th"' draft system falling apart as thousands of heterosexu als claim to be gay to avoid service. But that's still a remarkable turnabout for a man who many blame for contributing to the travesty of ousting gays from service. History would also be on Bush s side if he opted to end the ban. Although oppo­nents of lifting the ban claim that the mll· 1tarv ought not be used for social experl· mentation, the reality 1S that the military has frequently found itself 1n a leadership role 1n the fight for equal rights. HOUSTON VOICE JANUARY 10, 2003 PAGE 12 The historic Civil Rights Act, which granted equal votlng rights for minorities and banned segregation, didn"t pass Congress until 1964. But the military was at least 20 years ahead of Congress. In 19U, the War Department formed an all· black squadron of the U.S. Army Alr Corps and m 19-18 the armed forces were de egregated. Despite ongoing struggles for full equaht), the military was often nhead of the times on matters of women's rights, too WhUe women didn't get the right to vote until 1920, an estimated 6,000 women worked as nurses in the Union army by 1865. The Navy enlisted women in 1917 and more: than 11,000 women served In the Navy in World War I. There were roughly 280,000 women enl!sted m the armed forces by the end of Worlcl War-II. Sixty years later, Amerlci1 again finds Itself ln a global conflict And again, President Bush would be well advised to read his military history. The military has a long tradition of suspend mg restrictions on gays serving their coun­try m wartime. Ousted gay servicemen and women were re-inductee! into the armed forces during World War II. Gay discharges also plummeted during the Korean and Vietnam Wars. In 1966, the Navy dis· charged 1,708 sailors for being gay; by 1970, near the height of the Vietnam War, that number dropped to 461 sailors. Strong precedents exist for relaxing the ban when the nation Is at war and the current war on terrorism (and Impending war in Iraq) should be no exception. The recent discharge of nine Arabic linguists under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" points to a dangerous and disturbing aberration in that tradition. By allowing such injustices to pass unchallenged, Bush mocks the impor· tance of the war, telling the world that national security and fighting the al· Qaeda network take a back seat to enforcing an archaic and di scrim inato· ry policy. Our allies Jn the terror war have already ended their own bans on gay ser· vice. American soldiers are servmg along· side allies from Great Britain, 'Israel, Australia, Canada and 19 other nations whose mllltary leaders understand that homosexuality Is not an impediment to unit cohesion. Bush should follow suit and use his immense political capital to end the ban on ga}s in the military. There are h1stori cal precedents for such a move. There are political dividends to be earned. And Its the compassionate thing for a conserva· tive to do. A Kevin C. Naff is ~ news editor of the Washmgton Blade, sister pubfication to this newspaper, and can be reached at HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com MICHAEL ALVEAR Taboo topics like race, gender and sexual orientation must be faced on the activist's road to equality What we don't ~A rrr tall< about IN 1971. JN AN "IT SEEMED LIKE A good idea at the time" moment. I went to a Ku Klux Klan rally with the KPFT news group. I was hanging out at the sta tion when they were leaving and when one of them asked me if I wanted to go, I said sure. So off we went, two guys with tape recorders, one other person, whose gender I don't remember, and me. The rally was at a field on the way to Tomball. As soon as we arrived. we acqmred an escort: four men wearing uniforms that looked sort of like Texas Ranger uniforms with black boots. They followed about 10 paces behind us, and when we stopped, so did they, waiting at parade rest until we began walking again. Klan members had set bombs that blew up the KPIT trans· former two or three times by then. so I felt oddly safer with this escort. Almost everyone else there, including many of the children, had on white robes. I think some, or perhaps most, of the men wore hoods, but I don't remember hoods on the women. This was a big deal rally. There were several hundrnd people. maybe more. The Imperial Wizard, whoever he was, spoke, and then there was a cross burning. I remember the cross as being much taller than any of us. l,/\JW.Vyk<aTol,/;11chOutfor.nc1 THE EXPERIENCE WAS SURREAL, NOT because of the robes. the hoods, and the burning cross. but because after a while 1t began to seem like a completely normal outmg. I was chatting with one of our guards about whether he had been a Marine (he had a !\Iarine non-smile) and he said yes, and I asked him why he had joined the Klan and he said the John Birch Society was too liberal for him: As we left, one of our group picked up a wonderful looking coconut cake at the bake sale, and was getting ready to buy it when I shrieked. "You can't do that!" A friend who went to school in Beaumont in t)1e late '60s said she and her sorority sisters used to go watch the KKK from a hill near the Lamar University campus. Her boyfriend protested, saying that the FBI was taking names. And they might have been. One gay male friend of mine was a member of the Klan in his north Louisiana town in the late '50s. "They told me it would help me get ahead in the fire department, sort of like being in the Elks," he said. He gave up his member­ship, he said. because his mother told him, "No son of mine is going to belong to anything where he can't show his face." This man now lives, very happily, in a racially mixed neighborhood. WE DON'T SEE MUCH FROM TIIE KLAN anymore, but sometimes something hap­pens to remind me. And I know, as a white person, that my relationship with Klan could be one of curiosity, rather than fear. The worst they had done to me was blow up a radio transmitter Martha McNeil Hamilton. a writer with the Washington Post, has CO-\\Titten a book, with co-worker Warren Brown. called "Black and White and Red All Over." Brown is black: Hamilton is white. Brown had kidney failure as a result of untreated hypertension. 'When the kidney his wife gave him failed. Martha donated hers. That event was, Martha relates. seen differently by blacks and whites. So the book is about their experiences growing up in the segregated South and about how they became co-workers and friends. Martha said they wrote it to show that affirmative action works. Martha grew up in Park Place I have known various of her family members ever since her late brother Malcolm McNeil, a Houston political activist, and I JANUARY 10. 2003 13 met in 1968 as UT Young DemocraL~. Th!S column was originally slated to be about things we don't talk about, like sex. I'm not quite ready to.do that, but there's plenty of other thmgs we don't talk about: gender, race, fear, \'iolence, for example. And it hurts our causes when we don't. The political and legislative fights that are approaching about ls~mes like gay foster parenting and gay adoption aren't going to be re<olved without honest discussion about what these peo­ple are afraid of. And the issues about workplace protection aren't gomg to be resolved by talking about protecting • white male bankers. Tallc about blue­collar lesbian mothers. Th~ two questions any actwist needs to be willing to ask and truly listen to the answer are ''What are you afraid of?" and "What has it been like for you?" - -- ---- ~ Ella Tyler 1s a freelance writer for W Houston Voice and a longti'.m e political activist in Houston. She may be reached m editor@houstonvoice.com 14 JANUARY 10 2003 3966 Westheimer, Highland Village• Houston, TX 77027 • 713·622-4411 Storewide Sale Now In Progress Unbelievable Values In Every Department Save 20% - 50% Off! Annual Remember the five C's Color, Cut, Clarity, Carat and Christmas. 1wmark1 Fine Fe$hion Jawaky Bridal JflWO!ty and ~Swiss Walcl>n 3&41 Bellaire Blvd.· Houston, Texas n025 • 713-668-5000 Holiday Hours: Mon .• Fri. 10·9 · Sat. 10-6 · Sun. 12-6 OPEN SUNDAY ~) www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I on the record "It's a good thing I'm not his daughter then; maybe it's too bad I'm not." Tennis star Martina Navratilova, who is gay, reacting to news that Damir Dokic, the father of tennis phenom Jelena Dokic, said he u·ould kill himself if he discovered his daughter is a lesbian (FoxSports.com, Dec. 30) "My version of falling in love is borderline psychotic. Should be avoided at all costs. Get obsessed. Can't fall in love and function at the same time. All-consuming. Tunnel vision. Euphoric." Irish comedian and UK. talk show host Graham Norton (Irish Examiner. Dec. 22) "If these are all of gay men, there must have been an epidemic of homosexuality. Of course they weren't all of gay men." John lbson, professor at California State University, Fullerton, on "Picturing ,".fen." a book of ··non-gay" photographs about the "lest world'. of male intimacy (Orange County Register. Dec. 29) "The Trent Lott experience of the last several weeks is a reminder that the Republican Party can take two paths as it heads to the next presi­dential cycle: It can campaign on issues that unite America or on issues that divide it." Patrick Guerriero, newly installed executive director of the Leg Cabin Republicans. a gay GOP group (Boston Globe, Dec. 26) "Do you remember PQpeye in the comics? He used to say, 'I am what I am.' That's the way I feel about it. I have never once tested the atmosphere with a wet finger to see how I should vote.'' Anti-gay Sen. Jesse Helms (R N.C ), who retired on Jan. 6, after three decades in Cangrrss <Associated Press, Dec. 24) "The more 'normal' aspect of gay life does not get covered. Most Americans have a rather distorted view of who their homosexual fellow citizens are.'' "Nightline" host Ted Koppel. on being honored with an award at the Feb. 22 black-tie dinner in l.os Angeles benefiting the Human Rights Campaign, a Washington-based gay political group (CNN, Jan. 7) "Batman and Robin? Not this again. Yes. they routinely shun the advances of Catwoman and Batgirl. And yes, we're talking about a muscular grown man and a limber teenage boy who aren't related to each other and who enjoy spending all their time together. Is that so wrong?" Superman. in a memo to l.ois Lane, reacting to the controversy surrounding the coming out of Rawhide Kid. a Marvel comics character; as i~ined by writer Chip Kidd (New York Times, Dec. 28) "On my hall of 14, I knew nine men that were gay. In my class of 27, seven of them were gay - and those were just people I knew in my company who I had close contact with." Rob Hicks, a 2~year-c/d Korean language student at the US Anny's Defense Language Institute, who was d1SChargedfor being .t:a.>: along with sb: other [)I.f students (Santa Fe New .\fe.xican, Dec 90) HOMEFRONT: Clip out a few home decor likes and start changes for the New Year with a homemade poster. Page 20. DINING: Dharma Cafe serves up unique dishes amidst a comfortable, welcoming atmosphere near downtwn. Page 19. on HOUSTON VOICE JANUARY 10, 2003 PAGE 15 Virginia Woolf remade Virginia Woolf. played by Nicole Kidman in 'The Hours,' would be happy to know that her work is 'still alive to the world.' says author Michael Cunningham, whose novel was the basis for the 1110V1e. (Photo cour­tesy Paramount Pictures) Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Cunningham talks about 'The Hours' going from print to the big screen By KATHI WOLFE W HEN MICHAEL CUNNINGHAM WAS A TEENAGER in a suburb of Los Angeles, he was mto rock and roll. Books weren't part of his world. Cunningham had no idea then that not only would he become an author. but that one day a big-time Hollywood movie would be based on one of his award-winning novels. Last month, Cunningham attended the New York and Los Angeles premieres of the star-studded film "The Hours," based on his Pulitzer Prue-winning novel of the same name. Directed by Stephen Daldry and starring Nicole Kidman, Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore. the film opens locally on Jan. 17. I The Hours' review, Page 17 "The Hours" is three linked stories. each of which takes place during a day m the life of a '\\Oman One, set in a London suburb in 1923, shows real life author Virginia Woolf (Nicol Kidman). with her husband Leonard. as she begins \\Ork on "Mrs. Dalloway." Lailra Brown (Julianne Moore) is a wif and mother in Los Angeles in 1951, who seeks refuge from her depression by readmg "Mrs. Dallowa}:" In present day New York, Clarissa Vaughan (Meryl Streep}, an editor who lives with her partner Sally. is a modern day Mrs. Dallowa}: She is giving a party for her friend Richard, a poet dying of AIDS. "The Hours" made several best movie lists last year when it ' had a limited opening. receiving seven Golden Globe award nominations. CUNNINGHAM DIDN'T THINK MUCH OF LITERATURE WHEN HE was growing up: he first read "Mrs. Dalloway" when he was 15. "I was a kid on a skateboard. too young to know what Virginia Woolf was about," he says. But Cunningham loved the musicality and beauty of Woolf's writing. "I suddenly understood how much a book could be," he says. "I felt that Virginia Woolf did with language what Jimmy Hendrix did with his guitar." Cunningham learned what it was like to be entranced by a book. Loving a book is like falling in love: "Yl'ho knows why we love this writer and not that writer?" Cunningham says. Reading "Mrs. Dalloway" changed "my stupid life." Cunningham received a bachelor's degree in English literature from Stanford University. "I like California. It's where rm from. But I never thought of it as a place to write books. I moved east," says Cunningham, who received a master's degree in fme arts from the University of Iowa In addillon to "The Hours," Cunningham wrote "A Home at the Please see HOURS on Page 16 16 JANUARY 10. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I out on the bayou ' Movie would please even Woolf, gay author says HOURS. continued from Page 15 End of the World" (1990) and "Flesh & Blood" (1995). H~ received the Pen, Faulkner Award and the 1999 Pulitzer Priz for fiction for "The Hours." Cunnmgham and hlS partner of 15 years nov; foe m New York The author also teaches at Brookl:;n College, and the two spend their summers in Provincctown.~1ass The accolades that h.:s work receives belong to his partn r as well as to himself Cunningham says. "Kenny 1s the first reader of all my stuff,'' he says. "I don't think I could \\Tite without him." Originally, Cunningham thought "The Hours would be a gay male version of "Mrs. Dalloway," he says. "It was gomg to be about a gay Chelsea boy who v;as go mg to give a party. Like .Mrs. Dallowa>;" Cunningham adds. London m the 1920s and white, gay male society in New York have some similarities, he says. "They're both about class and status,'' Cunningham says. "About giving the best parties." As Cunningham began vmting "The Hours," it felt like too small of a conceit, like a stunt to him. he says. "It seemed too little an idea to write a whole book about,'' he says. "Very gradually, it developed into a novel about women." BUT HOW WOULD VIRGil'.1A WOOLF feel about "The Hours" -- the novel and the movie? She was a stern critic, Cunningham says. "I don t flatter myself, but I think she would have approved of ihe spirit of the book and of the movie " he gursses. Woolf would be happy to kno\\ that she is still so mterestmg to people, "so entirely alive to the world," Cunningham says. Woolf, who died in 1941, was a femi nist and essayist as well as an innova­tive 20th century novelist. Her half­brother abused her when she was grow­ing up, and she suffered from depres· s1on. At one point m her life, Woolf had a relationship with English writer Vita Sackville-West. "The thing that happens with people who love Virginia Woolf is that each of us wants to hang our O'l\'Il stones onto her,'' Cunningham says. Woolf wasn't really able to have sex, he adds. "She was like Henry James,'' Cunningham asserts. "If he'd have had sexuality, he would have been gay." But to think of Woolf as being only b1- Juliame Moore plays a 1950s housewife who seeks refuge in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway' in ihe Hours. (Photo courtesy Paramount Pictures) polar, or as a lesbian or incest survivor to look at her in only one way is to "reduce her,'' Cunningham says. For himself, the author is thrilled with the new movie. Every "queer" scene Is just presented as "a given,'' he says. "There's every indication that nobody's talking about it as a gay or !es· b1an movie, but as a human movie," Cunningham says, adding that this is a first for a big Hollywood film. The author has been open about his sexual orientation throughout his \\Tiling career. "I don't want [bemg gay] to be treated as if it didn't matter," he says. "[But] I feel I'm part of a movement toward bigger books that are about different kinds of people." He is gratified that both gay and straight readers enjoy his books. "I didn't lose my gay male readers with The Hours,' cvrn though no dirk is sucked (m the book)," Cunn111gham says. Since hlS worked has gotten so much buzz, he's learned to say "no." "You get asked to go to Rome, Paris, Barcelona. If you do all these fabulous things, you won't write a word,'' he says. But Cunningham is not complaining. He concedes that his is a privileged life. His next project three novellas will feature legendary gay writer Walt Whitman. "One will be a horror story, one will be thriller and one will be sc1-fi," Cunningham says. r - C) MOREINFO ihe Hours' Opens Jan. 17 www.lhehoursmovie.com When you think of buying or refinancing a home ... think of Mortgage Associates of Texas! We're the largest and oldest mortgage company ih the community. We've always been here for you - and we always will be! Referred by fine Realtors ... Preferred by knowledgeable consumers!!! 5311 Kirby Dr. Suite 216 Houston, Texas 77005 www.mortgageassoc.com John Frels, President HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com STEVE WARREN Three women in very different eras explore their sexuality through Virginia Woolf s 'Mrs. Dalloway,' including the author herself. As time goes by "THE HOURS'' BOASTS AN embarrassment of riches. The end result isn't embarrassing, but it may be too rich for some viewers' blood. Take the acting, please. Several scenes resemble cage matches as some of the best in the business compete strategically. Julianne Moore shifts into subtle mode while Toni Collette chews the scenery. Miranda Richardson drops back as Nicole Kidman runs for a touchdown. And when Meryl Streep says, "I seem to be in some strange sort of mood. I seem to be unraveling," Jeff Daniels lets her unravel. Nobody unravels like Streep. Strnep and Ed Harris arc more evenly matched in some of the film's best scenes. Stephen Dillane is well paired with Kidman, as Is John C. Reilly with Moore. Gay director Stephen Daldry rehearsed his actors enough to know what he was getting and get what he wanted. DAVID HARE'S SCRIPT IS SO CLEVER that a second viewing is required to grasp all its intricacies. It's adapted from gay author Michael Cunningham's novel, the story of women from three different eras who are affected by Virginia Woolf's book "Mrs. Dalloway," including the author herself, played by Kidman. Visual and thematic links connect the stories. even though most of the charac ters never move between them. Readers of "Mrs. Dalloway" and those familiar with Woolf's life will find bonus points of commonality. Several suicides are threatened in the body of the film, but we are reminded at the outset that Woolf's didn't occur until 1941, 18 years after the day she began writing "Mrs. Dalloway." ''A woman's whole life in a single day" is her plan for the novel, which r.unningham and Hare honor by present­ing the lives of three women, each in a single day. AS WOOLF WRITES THE FIRST LTNE in England in 1923, Laura Brown (Moore) Is reading it in Los Angeles in 1951 and Clarissa Vaughan (Streep) is livmg it in New York in 2001 as she pre pares for a party. The party celebrates a lifetime acl11eVPment award won by poet Richard Brown (Harns), who was her lover hefore they both realized they preferred their own gender Laura Is planning a more modest party for her husband's (Rrilly) birthday with only their young son in attendance. She feels trapped in her outwardly perfect life Meryl Streei> Julianne Moore and Nicole Kidmcrl. plus a heart-wrenching lesbian story line. make 'The Hours· heady. but worth watching. (Photo courtesy Paramount Pictures) Woolf's husband Leonard (Dillane) lives with her in a London suburb on the recommendation of her doctor, who thinks the pace of the city would endan· ger her mental health. THREE PAIRS OF WOMEN LOCK LIPS in this movie. The least passionate kiss is between a lesbian couple who has been together 10 years. Mrs. Dalloway had pas­sionately kissed a girlfriend before she married Richard Dalloway, but she made the only socially acceptable choice of the day by foregoing her lesbian inclinations. Whether that was based on Woolf's experience or not, Virginia plants a good one on her sister before she leaves; and Laura's kisses to console Kitty turn sud­denly serious, perhaps explaining her dis­satisfaction v.1th her marriage. With so much great acting, the per­formers who underplay are to be trea­sured. Harris, Kidman and Moore head that short list. Kidman's makeup is great and renders her unrecognizable. But in an early scene where she lights a cigarette, one fears for a moment that her prosthetic proboscis will go up in flames. If nothing else, "The Hours" should make you glad to live in the 21st century, when people have more choices. ft MOREINFO The Hours' ••• out of•••• Queer Quotient: The director and the author of the source novel are gay. It can be viewed as a story of women of two bygone eras who repressed their gay lea·1ngs and one modem woman who doesn't JANUARY 10. 2003 17 \ omposer and Lyricist of FAIRY TALES" Music~ L\rics m· Eric Lane Barnes tu"sical Di~or Michael Harren Dimtcd b' Joe Watts January 17th thru March 8th Fri. & Sat. only 8 PM L Tickets: $20.00 - Reservations: (713) 522-2204 !£!!1..,• 1415 California St. • Houston, Texas 77006 18 JANUARY 10. 2003 Alone again? Life After Separation, Breakup or Divorce 5-Week Workshop - $150 This warkslwp is abuut pid1ng 11p tl1e pieces after it all falls apart! The rrs11lts are phenomenal with virtually rw dawnsidt. Learn how to: • Identify the drama and eliminate it from your life • De.ii with anger, fear, guilt, and loneliness • Boost self-esteem and build trust • Improve communication and relationship skills • Get up, Jet go and move on • Understand what a good relationship can be • And have some fun along the way! CALL FOR MORE l#FORMATIO# & REllSTRATIO#: 113 .• 61.11•1 OR E-MAIL: t>O##lf@t>O##IEM'l.COM tos JOE PHILLIPS Detroit's auto extravaganza promises showrooms full of hot new vehicles, each in their own exciting way. Tops in their class IF SANTA DIDN'T DROP A NEW Porsche down your chimney last month, fear not. This year, consumers are blessed with perhaps the widest selection of new vehicles ever. Sedans, coupes, convertibles. SUVs, luxo-mobiles and "crossovers" - which blend features of different types of vehi· cles - each offer more hot choices for 2003 than you'll find on an RSVP cruise. What segment to consider? Which vehicle to buy? Our top picks for 2003 will help narrow the selection. SEDAN: 2003 Honda Accord A hot Accord? Sounds like an oxy­moron, considering Honda's penchant for reliable yet yawn-inducing sedans. But this Accord does inch closer to Euro sportiness. There are more curves inside and out, with improved emissions and better handling, horsepower. safety and seating. Of course, it's still not a "date magnet." Look at BMW or VW for that. But Accord is hot because of its pn ce: a 4-<loor. 4-cylin· der manual is only $16.000. That's $5.000 to $15,000 Jess than comparable Euro sedans. COUPE: 2003 Infiniti G35 sport coupe It's slightly shorter than the boffo G35 sedan introduced earlier last year. But the G35 sport coupe also a rear-wheel drive - has edgier styling. a stiffer ride and more power (275 horsepower vs. 260 in the sedan). Choose from a S.speed automatic or 6- speed manual. Stability control (a must with this much testosterone) is standard. Options: 17 or 18-inch wheels, navigation system. heated seats and sunroof. The G35 four-door was the first to go toe-to-toe with European sedans on per­formance, engmeering and handling. This $32.000 "G-spot" coupe goes one better. CONVERTIBLE: 2003 BMW Z4 COIM!f'We With so many automakers trying to be more European, what's left for a BMWZ4 European carmaker to do? Build on per­fection, as with BMW's Z4. TheJove-it-or-hate-it styling is a sharp departure from the 7·year-0Jd Z3. But the $40.000 Z4 Is also larger than its predeces­sor in every dimension. including interior space, engine size and cargo room. The brushed·aluminum dash is just as. well, dashing as the exterior. The inside is surprisingly quiet for a ragtop. except for what amounts to a subwoofer that pumps engine growl into the cabin. Dare we say it sounds like there's a tiger in the tank. CROSSOVER VEHICLE: 2003 Chrysler Pacifica On sale this March, the $30.000 Chrysler Pacifica is a mutt, combining the best of a sedan. an SUV and a minivan. As on most SUVs, there's all·wheel drive and high-seating positions. Sedan­like bucket seats are in the first and sec· ond rows, with a minivan-esque third row that folds flat into the floor. Chrylser cannibalized the competent V-6, 250-horsepower engine from its 300 M sedan and put it here. Rear suspension is from Mercedes' superb E-class. For many automakers, this new breed of crossover cars is all about blending vehicle types and components - V<Jvo XC90 .......,, ,. .----:JUl:r"-----~- in effect, making old dogs do new tricks. www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE SPORT UTILITY VEHICLE: 2003 Volvo XC90 Volvo was one of the last automakers to join the SUV party. But the XC90 is well worth the wait, even displacing BMW's award-winning XS as best in class. This winner has the most sedan-like ride of any SUV, coupled with renowned Volvo safety. Wide doors and a low floor allow easy access, with acres of rear-seat legroom. Everything is user-friendly, including massive cargo room for beach parties or mountain treks. More important are myr. iad unseen elements. such as skid control, antilock braking, a rollover-prevention system and side-curtain air bags for all seven seats (a first). We especially like the $43.000 price tag, which is thousands Jess than the compa· rably equipped Range Rover or Lexus. LUXURY VEHICLE: 2003 Maybach With much fanfare, the Maybach arrived on U.S. shores aboard the Queen Elizabeth II. And for good reason: it is perhaps the finest luxury liner of a sP.dan every built. With 543 horsepower, the twin·turbo y. 12 is faster than a Porsche. Everything ride, steering, braking, leather/wood inte­rior. pillow-like headrests is breathtak· lng. For $300,()()().plus, it better be. There are two models: the "regular" 57 and the more expensive and 20-foot·long 62. The 62 offers a champagne refrigerator and twin flute holders, a glass-panel roof that can be set from opaque to clear (though outsiders can never see in). flat-screen monitors in the front seatbacks and wireless surround-sound headsets. The back scats recline into comfy sci·fi barcaloungers and the large backdoors can be shut only by press­ing a switch in the ceiling or with the help of that handsome chauffeur. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com dinin J.A. CHAPMAN Restaurant's relaxed atmosphere and mostly successful dishes entice Houstonians downtown Cafe offers comfort THE MINUTE I OPENED THE DOOR TO. the Dharma Cale. I felt right at home. The inviting loft ·like space, the warm wooden tables, the eclectic selection of art on the walls and tbe pleasing row of full fruit bowl~ m the cooler all blended together to create an atmosphere of comfortable tran· quility. Settling into my table, I could feel myself starting to relax. Tucked into the end of the old Erie Iron Works building in the arty Warehouse District, just north of downtown, the Dharma Cafe is a small place. There's seating for just 28 inside and three additional tables outside on the porch. The small sire lends an air of familiari­ty and friendliness to the whole place. And indeed, the waiters are helpful and chatty and the white-haired owner and chef. John Gurney, frequently comes out to greet his guests. My first visit was at lunch. which according to my waiter. tends to be the Dharma Qlfe"s busiest time. Given its proximity to downto\\n, that's no surprise. On this pleasant post-holi· day afternoon, the restaurant was nearly full with a mixture of downtown workers, artsy typeS from U1e neighborhood and those enjoy· ing tlle la~t bit of therr vacation time. They start you off with a plate of delightfully herby focaccia, topped with grated Parmesan and chopped parsle}: with a few red grape· on the side. The focaccia is good, but unfortunately it's served in a pool of olive oil and balsamic vinegar, which makes the.bottom layer of bread soggy, The menu is familiar, wlth salads, sand· wiches, wraps, and a smattering of entrees. The soup of the day (cup $2 /bowl S4) is Southwest chicken noodle and black bean, which the waiter warns is spiC): He's right, but it's also delicious. Loaded with chunks of chicken, tomatoes, corn, black beans and substantial homemade pasta, in a rich, slightly sweet, cumin.flavored broth with little bursts of fresh cilantro, the generous cup is almost a meal in itself. I follow the soup with the Thai chicken wrap ($6). Chunks of chicken breast, red cab­bage, rice, and fresh coconut with a Thai peanut sauce are wrapped in a huge, soft sun­dried tomato tortilla. It's an excellent combina· tion of flavors and I polish off the whole thing. I hardly have room left, but when the waiter offers homemade peppermint gelato with chocolate chips ($2) for dessert, I can't resist. I love peppermint ice cream, and this version with its smooth peppermint cream punctuated with crisp bits of candy cane and chocolate chips is excellent. The waiter informs me Ulat the gelato flavors rotate, depending on what they have on hand. AT DINNER, THE LIGHTS ARE DIMMED, but tlle relaxed aura remains. After a comedy of errors witll the wine (our fJrSt two si>lec· tions were no longer available), my friend and I split the Crab Rangoon appetizer ($7) - crab and cream cheese in a deep-fried won· ton. It's simple but delicious and the accom· panying sweet ginger dipping sauce adds zip. My friend chooses tlle outstanding blue­berry chicken breast ($15). A chicken breast filled with blueberries, almonds and ricotta cheese comes drizzled in a smoky-sweet blue­berry brandy glaze and accompanied by deep fried crispy green beans and roasted new potatoes. I keep stealing bites and marveling at the complexity of flavors. My enu-ee from the specials board of coconut crusted salmon with bacon lin· guine finished with Sezchuan sauce ($16) unfortunately disappoints. The linguine is tough. as if it's been sitting under a heat lamp for far too long, and the salmon ts barely seared. I can see how the dish was supposed to work, however. The light sweet ness of the crunchy coconut complements the salmon and the smokiness of thi: Sezchuan sauce sets off the whole dish nice­ly. If the pasta was fresh, this dish would be excellent. I have to think that this particu­lar serving is an aberration, sine!' every· thing else has been superb, and it's obvious that a large party that arrived rather sud­denly has swamped the tiny kitchen. We finish with cheesecake with fresh blueberries and a slice of carrot cake ($3 each). Both are good, and the cheesecake passes my test of being rich and creamy witllout being too heavy or dense. So how did the Dharma Qlfe get is name? Gurney defines dharma as the spiritual work that you do in your life to return to yourself, your center. His dharma is to be of service to others by cooking for them. And the Dharma Care's mission is to create "food for life." As you're sitting in the Dharma Cafe, you can almost imagine you're in Boulder or San Francisco. Soak up the hip atmosphere. Relax a little, and enjoy the good food. You're among friends. Namaste, Dharma Cafe. ~ Dharma Cafe ~ 1302 Nance Houston, TX 77002 713-22U>996 www.dhannacafehouston.com Food. lellellellel Service: lelfe'lel!f Value: lellellellel Scene: lellel!etlel " = Stay home and eat cereal le!•= Well. if you really must le! le!,.= Fine for all but the finnicky le!,. le!,., =Worth more than a 20·minute dnve lellel19'1e!•=As good as you'H find 111 this city JANUARY 10. 2003 19 ON YOUR NEXI VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-GAY B&B we•re right IN the neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bar s . 408 AVONDALE 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montr o s einn.com 20 JANUARY 10. 2003 FREE Workshops I. NATIONAL AIDS COUNCIL FREE Workshops Calling all HIV/AIDS prevention care service providers! KIC TRAINING ... Knowledge .•• /ntersctlon .. Connectlon Community-Based Organizational HIV/AIDS Training Sponsored by the National Minority AIDS Council February 3-7, 2003 Crowne Plaza Hotel Houston, TX Enhance your skills and knowledge. Our workshops will help you to: Make the most of your resouces Raise and manage money Organize staff Develop a board Learn the latest on treatment and care Evaluate programs Publicize your efforts Overcome HIV/AIDS stigma and access to care The training sessions are designed to accommodate your busy schedule, offenng you a choice of attending from one day of training to all five days of the program. Register by January 13, 2002. Space Is limited! For more registration information contact the National Minority AIDS Council, KIC Training Registrar Tel: 202-483-6622/Fax: 202-483-1127 Email: kictraining@nmac.org/Website:www.nmac.org Tom Tinsley Realtor® Associate MONTROSE AREA 1215 Peden Pamela Floyd Realtor® As-ciciate Fabulous JY.10·1 Crajtvnan bungalow Free home service Tastefully r<mod<l•d w11h rvav amnuty Call Pamela contract 1f you 212 w!garag• apartmmt for a FREE purchase a home $349 ,000 Market Analysi> through Tom! Call Tom or Pamela at (713) 622-9339 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE ELLA TYLER Make a poster to preview changes and additions to your home decor for 2003 Map out the· New Year I GAVE UP ON NEW YEAR'S RESOLU· tions when I looked at several old sets and realized they were all depressingly repetitive. Lose weight. quit smoking, get more exercise, stop eating out, save money, be a better housekeeper: Talk about beating yourself up for the New Year. I did quit smoking two years ago, but don't think it had much to do with my resolution list. Instead, I've adopted a New Year's rit· ual of making a magnet map for myself. It's an '80s thing - a visual affirmation list. The short version is that you create a poster of your ideal life. The '80s idea was that you draw these things to your life, which I don't particularly believe, but what I do believe is that we all can use some help identifying just what it is that we want. I also burn a candle from Fiesta. I have several, but my "pas, salud, dinero, suceso, buena suerte (y mas)" one is a favorite for New Year's Eve. The idea of a magnet map is especial· ly useful when it comes to our physical surroundings. Whatever you want is probably out there. if you know what it is and where to shop for it. This is some­thing more sophisticated than cutting pages out of a magazine and taking them to a decorator to decipher, but less com· plicated than floor plans. schematics and fabric samples. Begin with poster board, a variety of reasonably current shelter magazines (not all H & G and Nest), colored pens (I have a set of 36), scissors and tape. The first part is to go through your magazines quickly and tear out anything that has any appeal. You don't want to think very much about this part. After that, look at your choices with a little more discern­ment. When you've decided that this thing, whatever it is, feels like it belongs in your life, tape it up. Everything doesn't have to go together. Nothing has to be practical. tasteful, or useful. Write anything that comes to mind - serene, airy, cozy, more storage, for exam· ple. I was a little surprised to find myself using the turquoise, purple and pink pens a lot. I obviously want more color some­where in my life. Now you have it. What do you do? MY MAPS ALWAYS HAVE FLOWERS, and rve decided that having them outside is not enough. I'm really enjoying my Christmas flowering plants, and bought a bunch of roses for New Year's Eve, so I'm going to make a deliberate effort to have fresh flowers in the house this year. I might even try having a cutting garden, but that's a different column. I'm going to make the kitchen more accessible for my mother. This is one of the items that would have been on a reso­lution list, too. She's having problems with heavy pots on lower shelves, and I think I'll put them on the shelves we used to use as the pantry. I would not have written "improve lighting" on a resolution list, but I kept tearing out pictures of fancy lamps, · which is a clue. One year, all kinds of kitchen gadgets attracted me. I realized that I didn't have a decent potholder, so how was I supposed to enjoy cooking for myself at home? I spent that New Year's Day at K-Mart, buying kitchen basics. I have no idea why some things are on my poster. I fell in love with a dark brown leather sofa, so it's there, and maybe I'll have one eventually. I have no idea why some things are on my poster. I fell in love with a dark brown leather sofa, so it's there, and maybe I'll have one eventually, ~ome of the reason to do this exercise is to end some of the confusion when you shop for home furnishings. Earlier this year, I considered buying some flannel sheets that had a star map on them. I dithered for a while, then decided I really did not want to sleep on navy blue sheets. Then I dithered about the penguin ones. If I'd thought about it, I have never had any­thing that resembled these sheets on my maps. So I've made up a rule. If there is nothing in bright green on your poster, you don't need to look at the bright green sofa twice. ONE OF THE MAGAZINES I WAS working my way through suggested mak· ing a list of annoyances and working at getting rid of these. That sounds like a worthy project, too. The writer of this article managed to come up with nearly 100, which should keep her busy for all of 2003. I think she's wrapped a little too tightly, but I'm sure she'll feel better soon. Seriously, if you have this many annoyances, you don't need to be niak· ing a magnet map - you need to be doing things. Worry about what you do want later. Our home is the one area of our lives where we can come closer to having things our way than any other area of our lives. Try this exercise and see what it is that you really want. Then you can make plans to get it. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I community calendar SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 AssistHets. M• •It 1CJ. 713-521 ·4628. Houston Buyers Wl. Free BIA (Bioelectric.ll ln¢ne Analysis) the mt two Saturdays of the month Hours: 10 am.·2 p.m Hou<.ton Buyers Club, 3400 Montrose Blvd. Suite 604. 713- 520-5288 http/ /www.houstonbuyersciub.coov'biil.. testing.htn~ Houston Outdoor GrotJpc January potluck dmner, 6 pm Bill and Thomas. 713-526·6963. EVERY SATURDAY All-Spanish Woolip Setvice/NOdle Espirtual 6 p.m Resurrection Mdropol1t.ln Community Clwrdl. 2026 W 11th. 713-303-3409 or 713-861·9149. AfUr Hours. KPFT 901 FM 1-4 am Dignity mass. 7:30 pm for gay CathofJCS. 713-88().2872. Free HIV Testing. Montro5e Clinic.11 pm. 2 a.m al VM.1na's. nJ.830 3000. Gay & Usbi.111BrukfastCU>.9-.30 arr. 281-437-0636. Houstoo Wresting CU>. Practice 1:30 pm. 713-453-7406. ~trol Volunteers WJ the strttts to help ~nt hate cnmes. 9 30 pm. Convene at COOllllllnity center. 713-528· SAFE E-mait qpatrolioc <taolcom St Stephelt's EplscopaJ C'1un:h Rosary 8 am.1805 W Alaooma m-528-6665. lbQm LeslU1 & ~ Cumuity Cri.>r. ()qtt\ oo:n5 pn1 • TATS ~ 4 p.m • 803 Haw1hcrne. 713-524-3818. WWW hlgccMj SUNDAY, JANUARY 12 SISTERS of Houston. Support group for African-Amencan lcs b&ans. ~ 3:30 p.m Houston lesbian & Gay Ccnmmity Center, 803 Hawthoml> Vou:e nl.lil: 713-69>8089. EVERY SUNDAY Bering Memorial United Metllodist Church. Services at 8:30 & 10.50 am SUnday school 9·45 a.m 713-526-lOIZ Center for Spiritual L1vi1Q. Serviccs al 11 am. for children at JO.SO am 6610 Harwin 713-339-1808. The center also h.1s convnllment cen?mOnies, metaphysical boolcstore and classes. Conmmy Gospel SeMce at ll am & 7 p.m Sll1dJy School for diildren 10 am 713-880-9235 or wwwCOll1TU1it)1JOS Community of Kindred Spirits in Beaumont Worship al 6 p.m 1575 Spmdletop Ave., Beaumont, Texas. 409-813-2055. E·mait cksrev3(n)nelzero.net Co'll!nanl Clvch, Ecumenical, IJ>etaJ Baptist Service 9-.30 a m & educatlOfl hour 11 a m 7!3-668·8830. Emerson Unitarian Churcl1. Adult education, 10 a m. Service. 11 a m. Lunch at noon www.emcnonhou.orq f'nt Cavegational Cluth {Mmirial). SeM;e at 10 am. Clmti.Jn Ecilcation. ll30 am 713-468-9543 or fcc./1ousloo.crg f'irst Unltarian Universalisl Church. Services at 9:30 & 1130 a.n1 Brunch at 10:30 am 713-521>-5200 church <tfirstuu.orv. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clime. 9 pm-modrught at Club l11Ct1JY 7J3.830.3000. Gay Catholics of St Ame's-Houston. 5 p.m W0111up service. 011111er and SOcial aJexcam 'ilwt.nel 713-623-0930 GLOBAL Gay l!sbi.1J1 Or Bisexual Alliance Unrversity of Houston CLBT student group meeting 2 p.m at the Housten l.tsbtan & Gay Community Center, 803 Hawthorne 713·524- 3818 www uh.edu/-global E-mail global a.bayou uh.edu. Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 a'll. Service 10:30 am 713-528·3269 Houston Rooglm:b RugbY Cklb. Practice from 4-6 pm. For more mform.rtion. loq on to wwwrouqtinecksrugby org Houston Tennis Club 'I am ·noon Mcmonal Par1< at the Tenms Center. tioustonlennisclb(a;aolcom Maranalha Fellowship Metropolitan Cluth.10 a.m seivice. 3333 Fann111, Swte 106. 713-528-6756. Resimc1k1n MCC. Services. 9 and 11 am Children and Youth Sunday School. IO am Children\ scmce.11 am 713-861·'1149. SL Stephen's EplscopaJ Clpdl. Holy Eucharist. Rite l. 7 45 a.m; Holy Eudurisl. Rile IL 8:55 a.m.; Education hour 10 a.m. Choral Eudlar'st.11 a.m 713-528-6665. Sunday l!Nlc!I. For HIV positive men. 11 a.m Rm's.1117 M ssoun St Paul, ru.sso-0690 e-m.111 Poznlluff a;aol.com The Women's Group. Meeting and discussion.10:45 am 7!3·529-8571. Thoreau Unil.irian Unlversalist Congregation. Adult dlSCllS­SIOr\ 9am5eMce,11:15a.m 281-m-8882. wwwtuuc.orv Un1t.vian Fellowship of Galveston Ccunty. 502 Churth Sl Service, 10 30 am 409·765-8330. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum. IO ant Service. 11 am. 713-686·5876 HMlon Lesbian & Gay ConmJnity Center. Drop-In. 2·b pm.• GLBT Com1rumty Churth with Rev Mc!ISSa Wood Bible study. 10· 10:45 a.m.. wooh1p 11 am www.geoatics.com/glbtcc • 803 H.1wtr'"' m-"24·3818 wwwhlocc.MJ MONDAY, JANUARY 13 EVERY MONDAY Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation !dro!Hnll1:30 am·l p.m 6610 H.lrwvt 713-339-1808. Free HIV Testing. Houston Area Communl~ Services. 9 am· noon at Joseph-Hmes Clinic. 1710 W6t 25 SL 713-521>- 0555. ext. 23L 227 or 226. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m.·midmghl Keys West. 7!3·830-3000 Frost Eye Ch. fll'e eye exans IQ- pcopk! With HIV 713-lro 3000 Gay Fathers/Father.; f'~ Support group. 8·9:30 pm Bering Mcmonal United Methodist Chun:h. Tom 713-n6-S736. wwwgeoclt1cs.com!QJydadshouston/ <* & !M:n:e ~ Gnics 7 pm BeiV 713-526-1017. ext 208. Kolbe Project. Eucharist 7:30 pm 713-861·1800. Montrose Clinic. Offers weekly peer support groups for 9JY and bisexu:ll men with HN Spanish speal<1119 group meets. 6:30 p.m 215 Weslheimer 713-830-3050. Crupo de AtKrfo para Latinos gay y biscxuales VIH posilivos. l.unes 6:30 Para m.n mformaaon 'bma al 7J3.830.3025. Queer Voices RalflO Show. B· 10 p.m. KPfT 901 Houston lesbtm & Gay Coommity Center. Dnlp-in 2 'I p.m • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-381& wwwhlgcc.org. TUESDAY, JANUARY 14 Lesbiir1s ~ in Coalition. ~~ting 6:30 p.nt at the home of Arden Eversmeyer 1034 W 1'11'1 St l'll'pose of LUC is to bring lcsbian/leSbian-supportive groups together on a quarterly basis to mer ease cornmonicalion, share ideas and get to know eac'1 other. For grocial information, call Assis!Hers at 713-521-4628. EVERY TUESDAY Bm,i ~ NetwtR. un:h Blah~ 11am713-52b-1017 Center for Spiitual Living. Medit.ltlon (drop-tn)l1:30 a.m·l p.m 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Free HIV Testing. Houston Area Community Services.10 am 2 p.m at Joseph-HlllCS Clil1lc. 1710 West 25th SL 713-521>- 0555, ext 231, 227 or 226. Free HIV TeslinJ. Maitrose Ch:. 8 p.m ~at CUl Houston. Also 4-8 p.m al 6ll C1b. 611 H)G! Pat1<. 713-830-3000. Gay yooth. New program for yoong gay males. ages 18·29. 7 pm. 614 Avondale. 713-533-9786. Helping Cross Dnssets AnonymolJs. Support OJ'Ollll. 7 p.m Hooston Women's Rugby Team. No expcncnce necessary Praclice,6:30-BJO Wl?Stland YMCA. Kay, 713-208-1529. I~ to 8IJdhism All welcome at 634 W Temple 111 the Heights. 7 p.m Carlton. 713-862-8129 Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dallC:e leSsons. Brazos Rrm Bottom. No partner needed Beqinner 2 Step, Waltz. Shuffle & Swing. 8 30 pm. 713-528·9192. Hooston L!Sbian & Gay Convrunity Center. Oroirin 2·9 pm. • Lesbian Cormng Out Group. 7 pm. • 803 Hawthorne 713-524· 3818 www.hlgcc.org. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15 EVERY WEDNESDAY ts1'1?rfor5pitual ~ Mcdt.1tDi !~am·! p.m; SOM Discussion & Exploration. 7 pm 6610 H.rt.'11. 713-339-1808. Bemg Mnn\11 lkiled Methdst <hrdl ~ t~ Pit W:k Di1'1er, 6:30 p.m Viri:u; Stwrt ~ 7 pm 713-52b-101l 8'ble Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m St Stephen's Eplscop.:il 713- 52b-6665. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clime. 4-8 pm at M.Jrys; 9 p.m midnight al Ripcord; 10 pm ·1 am al Els; 10 p.m 1 a.m al Midtowne Spa. 713-83().3000. Free HIV Testing. ThornJs Street CliJlic. 9 a.m·l p.m. 2015 r 10111aS Sl OraSure method Call for appointment. Sharon. 713-873-4157 Hooston Pride Band. Open rehearsal. 7-'I p 'll 1307 Vale. 713- 528-4379. Houston RougllJ1eclcs Rugby CU> Practice from b-8 p.m For more mformatlOfl, log on to www.rooghnecksrugbyorg. Hooston T ennls CU>. 7:00-9 p.m Memonal Parle at the Tenms Center houstonlenniscfb@aol com Spinlual Uplfl serW:e. 7 p.m Rrsurrection MCC. 713-861 9149 Houston LeslD1 & Gay Conml1ily Cen!Er. Orop-n 2-9 p.m • Houston Black Lesbian. Cay, Transgender Coalition off'ice ~ 10 am-noon • Free HIV testing. counseling. 6-9 p.m • 803 Hawlhomc. 713-524-381& WNW hlgcc.org. THURSDAY,JANUARY16 Gulf Coast ArdWes & Musmn. Meeting. 7 pm. 713-227-5973. EVERY THURSDAY BiNel Houston Croup for bise<uals; everyone welcome 7:30 pm. Hobbit Cafe, 2240 Portsmouth. www flastu1eV-bihouse m-467·4380 Center for Spiritual L1vi1Q. Mc'(f1t.illon (drop-in).1130 am ·I pm 6610 Harwm. 713-339-1808 ConmJnity Gospel Service. 7·30 p m ro.aso-9235 WWW comnlll11ly!JOSpcl.Mj Free HIV Testilg. Houston ArrJ. ~Services. 10 am·2 p.m at Josepll-Hn?S Cllic.17!0 West 25 SL Also 11 am·3:30 pm. al Gallery Medical Clinic, 5900 North Freew.iy. and CUl Toyz from 9 pm~ 713-526-0555. ext 231227 or 220. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 4-8 p.m at The Outpost; 8 p.m.• midnight at Brazos River Bottom and Cousins; 10 p.m·l am at Toyz DISCO. 7!3·830·3000. FronlRunners. Running club. 6:30 p.m 713-522-8021. Web site: http/ /home swbellneVlarathon/houfr .hlnl E·mail' larathon Mwbell.nel GLOBAL Gay. Lesbian or Bisexual Alliance at the Umversity of Houston-Central Campus. Weel<ly meeting. 6 p. 'Tl. e-mail: ~n0023 a,hotmail com Heil C Recovery. Support group. 6-.30 pm Bering. 713-520-1017, Ext. 211. Houston Women's Rugby T earn. No expenence nemsary. Practice. 6:30-8'.30. Westland YMCA. Kay, 713-208-1529 Lani>da Skating CU>. 8 p.m Trad.."'Winds Skatil1g Rink. www'1e0Soft.COl1V lrsc. 713-523-9620 Montrose Clinic. Offers wetldy peer support groups for gay and biScxual men with HIV. English speaking group meets. 6:30 p.m 215 Weslheimer 713-a30-3050. Rainbow~ Free C&W dam lessons. No partner reQt&-ed Brazos Rim Bottom 8 30 p.m nl-528-919£ Recovery From Food Addiction (RFA). M.."eting for 12-step program open to all Noon-1 p.m St Stephen's Episcopal Church.1805 W AIJbama St RFA: 713-673-284& WWW~ltics.com/rfa77235/ E·mail: rfaworldsemce a,aol.com Spanish Charla Conwrsation Group. Cafe Agora. 7 pm. E-maU Char1Jhouslon'a;r11S11.Com. 713-4lb-7201 Women's Clinic. Montrose ClinJC. 713-830-3000. Houston lesbian & Gay ConmRty Center. Drop 11 2-9 pm • Houston 8bck Lesbian. Cay, Transgcnder Coalition office hotJrs lh • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. wwv:.hlgcc.Drg. FRIDAY, JANUARY 17 EVERY FRIDAY Center for Spiritual Llvi1Q. Meditation (dlqH1).ll30 a.in l p.m 6610 Harwin. 713-339·1808. Free HIV Testing. Montro5e Clinic.10 p.m-2 am al The Mcatracl<; 10 p.m·I am at EJs and at Midtowne Spa. 713-830-3000. Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clinic. 9 am·! p.m 2015 Thomas Sl °'3Sure method. Call for appointment. Sharon. 713-873-4157 Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people W:th HIV. 7J3. 8.30·3000 -Houston Area Teen Coafrtion of Homosexuals (HA lc.H.) Meetino, 7·10 pm. 713-942-7002. Houston Tennis !li. 7:00-9 pm Merroriaf Par1< al the Tennis Center Houstonlennisclub.org Kolle Project Mormng prayer, 10 am 713-861-1800 MJShpachat Aizim GLBT Jew1sl1 congregJtion. Sabb.1th serv· lees at 8 pm on the second Friday of each month al Baby Bamaby5, 602 f illlVleW Monthly study groops with Congregation Beth Israel 5600 North Braeswood. Mishp.xhat Alizim P.O. Box 980136, Houston. TX 7709& 866-841·9139, ext. 1834. ~trol VW1leers d the sbttts to help pment hale cnmes. 9-30 p.m. Convene at COf!1l1lJnily center 713-528- SAFE. E·maiJ: qpatrofmc(..i<aolcom Houston Lesbian & Gay Comnu1lty Center. Drop-in 2 9 p.m . 803 HJwlhome 713-524-38la www.hlgcc.org. VOLUNTEER/SELF-HELP Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Houston. Vohmteers offer a fnendly ear to caller
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