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Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987
File 017
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Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 017. 1987-02-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2906.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-20). Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2906

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 017, 1987-02-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2906.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE/FEBRUARY 20, 1987 Even the 'Hard Core' is Learning Statistics Show AIDS Education Works Commentary by David Strange Pacific News Service SAN FRANCISCO—If done right, AIDS education works. That is the clear conclusion to be drawn from a key, plummeting statistic in this city hard hit by the deadly virus. Two years ago 142 cases of rectal gonorrhea were reported each month here, with 95 percent of the victims male. The number now has dropped to 20 per month, according to Dr. Dean Echenberg of San Francisco's Department of Public Health. The decline has been general, affecting both males and females, in all racial groups and in all neighborhoods of the city. While there is no relationship between the bacteria causing gonorrhea and the virus thought to cause AIDS, both are transmitted by unsafe sex, and rectal gonorrhea is generally considered to be a marker showing possible exposure to AIDS. The evident explanation for the steadily decreased number of rectal gonorrhea cases is a decrease in high risk sexual practices. That major change in human behavior must hearten the various groups in San Francisco who have placed their faith in education and grass roots mobilization as a way to combat the AIDS epidemic. About two years ago the Stop AIDS Project, for example, noted research showing that "gay men were very well informed about the dangers of AIDS and the need for safe sex, but they weren't really acting," says the organization's executive director. Bill Folk. In the face of that news, some might have been tempted to write off education as a failed remedy. Instead, the Stop AIDS Project decided that a differ, n' kind of teaching was needed. "Information alone won't get people to change—look at smoking," says Folk. "What was missing was some kind of peer support and communica- ... the power of education, proven with these latest figures, may give us a glimpse of a light at the end of the AIDS tunnel. tion component that would motivate people to make changes." He says that in developing its curriculum, the Stop AIDS Project drew from "everything from humanistic psychology to market research." Project volunteers invite about 15 men at a time to their homes for evening discussion groups, where the talk centers on "the whole idea that we can stop any epidemic by stopping transmission of the virus. We are not powerless or helpless to do something," Folk recounts that newcomers would say," 'it seems like safe sex is what I should he doing, but I can't talk about it with my partners. I don't have any support.'" The meetings would invariably change their minds, convincing them that they were not alone in their thinking, says Folk. "It gets them out of their isola tion." Scores of other Stop AIDS Project volunteers comb gay areas, inviting passersby to the evening discussion meetings. Some 6000 primarily gay or bisexual men have taken up the offer, and by Folk's estimates at least 15,000 others have paused long enough on the street to hear the safe sex message. At the same time, San Francisco's Department of Public Health has funded its own aggressive education program—and again group discussion is a key component. For the "worried well" there is an eight-week course called "Hot and Healthy Sex." Meanwhile the San Francisco AIDS Foundation has blanketed the city with pamphlets and advertisements. One ad, headlined, "Congratulations to Eighty Percent of San Francisco Men," praises the vast majority of local gay and bisexual men who told a survey they now engage in safe sex. "It takes a lot of guts to make major changes in one's approach to life, health, and sexual expression. Keep up the good work," reads the copy, adding, "If you aren't part of the eighty percent, we'd like to help." The hypothesis has been raised that there is a "hard core" of individuals who will never respond to education on safe sexual practices. But the steady downward march of rectal gonorrhea cases would seem to refute the idea. As Dr. Echenberg points out, the number of such cases would be expected to begin to level off as this "hard core" is approached. Statistical analysis ofthe data shows no leveling off to date, and suggests that we have not yet reached this "hard core," if indeed it exists. Of course, as long as there continues to be any cases of AIDS, or rectal gonorrhea, more remain to be educated. But the power of education, proven with these latest figures, may give us a glimpse of a light at the end ofthe AIDS tunnel. It also suggests that with more such efforts at education and preventive medicine, a host of other serious health problems could be seriously cut down in size. GENERAL REPAIRS AUTOMOTIVE SPRING SPECIAL o Transmission Service 29.95 Oil & Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 Talt (gaggl) 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers maybe male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 7QQ-^^7
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