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Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987
File 012
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Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 012. 1987-02-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2901.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-20). Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2901

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 012, 1987-02-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2901.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript FEBRUARY 20, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 It's About Time for a Good Laugh Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice This has been a rowdy week with lots of drinking, hooting and belly laughs. □ The Comedy Workshop I had the most fun over at the Comedy Workshop watching their new show, Menzel plays a poor schnook who tries to fit into the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. This doesn't take out after real westerners. Shucks, no! It lampoons the groupies and the shysters that are a gunnin' fer 'em. Don't forget Sharon Menzel and Brooki, Bill. If you don't like to be seen laughing in public, avoid this show like the plague. And the Outlaw Comics, too. Li Fritz Dickmann and Sharon Menzel are part of the hilarity at Comedy Workshop "No More Sequels: Part Two." These people are at the top of their form. They're picking out targets that we can all agree deserve it. They're broadsiding them without turning cynical and bitter. They're the funniest, silliest though also most intelligent, they have been in several months. Warning: They have one segment. Ask Dr. Duke (played by Fritz Dickmann) which answers questions from the audience. So please go prepared with a question for Mr. Mustache that is somehow related to medicine. This bit is limited to being only as good as the audience. But for the rest of the show, they are self-sustaining and awesomely hilarious. They will sweep you up into their good vibes and propel you helter-skelter through the dangerous curves of a rol- lercoaster of laughter. There are only two movie take-offs, but they are delicious. The ever-gracious Jennifer Noble plays Mom-bo, able to survive tall obstacles with her superhuman knowledge of household hints. Bill Fagan is even better in "The Good Seed." Remember "The Bad Seed" where a little girl terrorized her mom by turning homicidal? Here a little girl (Fagan) terrorizes her family by turning the whole neighborhood, one by one, into the police. The rest of the evening focuses on local targets. There is a spectacular. Jack Lemmon-esque routine where Paul □ The Outlaw Comics The Outlaw Comics is a large (too numerous to mention) group of stand-up comedians who do very risque, topical material. In addition to a weekly "talk show" over at Blythe Spirits, they often do nights supposedly devoted to one subject at various places around town. I caught "The Outlaw Comics Get Political" at Fitzgerald's. People have been really hitting close to home for me this week. Comedy Workshop has a skit about a small weekly newspaper. The Outlaw Comics have one about the world's greatest critic. The Outlaw Comics are very, very funny on the whole. I was laughing so hard at the good one I forgot to take any notes. In the line of duty, I'll have to return. Most of the comics actually only started out with a minute or two of political bits. These all tended to have a national scope and somehow no one thought to tackle LaRouche. Then they'd go on to their regular routines. There were a lot of jokes about men's (Dee Macaluso was the only woman.) relationships—all of them involving girlfriends. There must have been 20 entertainers. Are they all hetero? Or is it that no one has the guts to stand up and say "Take my lover—please!" One man telling another to bend over is still good for a laugh. But the best of Marsha Carlton and Randy Jobe in Houston House's Thing Off" Call the Whole them—Huggins and Moore in an improvised talk show, Epstein in the closing monologue—carried the joke on far enough that it was obvious that they were making the audience laugh at bigots who persecute gay men rather than gays themselves. □ Sirrom School Belly Dancing For a more decorus rowdiness, you might want to look up the Sirrom School's belly dancing show team. Three nights a week they perform at Zee's, over behind the Shamrock Hilton building. Once every month or two they have a special performance at the school. It's at Fairview and Tuam. The night I attended there were no male dancers other than the guest star from New York City. But this is an art that, if done correctly, will make any woman wonderfully sensual to any man. Sure, there were some over-dressed women who'd forgotten the dance's roots. This dance must have been designed to help a man pick out his favorites from his harem. This glorious fight for sexual power was occasionally transformed into a club function for sorority types. But they were, thankfully, in the minority. The traditional audience responses are fun to do. There is a lot of clapping along in time to the music. Especially good turns are greeted with cries of "Hopa!" or a high pitched trill, "Lililili ..." And when they turn the steam up without letting it escape, you can hiss in appreciation. □ Torre-Garcia Exhibit I also made the opening of the Torre- Garcia exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts. First, the artist would set down a grid based on the golden section. Then he would fill in the boxes with symbols. Some of the paintings are so well modeled that they look almost carved. But all of them look to me like doodlings of some highly intelligent mind. All of those symbols obviously mean something. A heart or a human silhouette is often at the visual center with other objects—religious (fish and sea paraphernalia abound), natural or Laurence Olivier and James Date in Noel Coward's 1933 Broadway hit, "The Green Bay Tree." Photo from "We Can Always Call Them Bulgarians: The Emergence of Lesbians and Gay Men on the American Stage," by Kaier Curtin.
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