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Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 001. 1987-02-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2890.

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(1987-02-20). Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2890

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987 - File 001, 1987-02-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2919/show/2890.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 330, February 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose VOICE It's About Time for a Good Laugh Bill O'Rourke, 'Houston Live,' inside HOUSTON WEATHER Friday night 20%chanceof more showers, low 45. Saturday Still cloudy, high near 50. But it will be a great weekend in Montrose ~,,,,~~~i~~l1] _-= FEBRUARYi01987~E330-1~;1~3 L__an-yw-ay_. --------~ Health Care Nrm Buys City Block in Montrose news, inside Here's Patti LaBelle Fighting AIDS with Love Jeffrey Wilson, inside NEWS FROM THE HEALTH CRISIS o Catholic Church's 'Fitful' Response to AIDS o Statistics Show AIDS Education Is Working ADVENTUROUS? PLACE A PERSONAL AD IN THE VOICE CLASSIFIEDS 2 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 PREMIERING IN DALLAS AND HOUSTON TEXAS HOT TALK FOR TEXAS MEN! Texas Hot Talk is LIVE and UNINHIBITED • Make New Friends • Develop Relationships • • Exchange Phone Numbers • • Or Just Rap With No Restrictions • DALLAS ( 2141 976 2211 HOUSTON (713] • Only $2°0 per 3 min. Call + Toll (if any]. No Credit Cards Necessary. Recommended for 18 years and older. FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Business Guild May Change Direction, A void Gay Issues ~-------- ..... -..., s10°0 ! I off i By Sheri Cohen Darbonne M1mtro1w V()ice The new administration of the Greater Montrose Business Guild is hoping to change the group's public image by con· rentrating organizational efforts on business·oriented projects and avoiding involvement in gay community issues. Frank Turner, newly-elected presi­dent of the guild, said he feels identifica­tion as a gay/ lesbian business organization has hindered GMBG's major purposes, advancing member businesses and promoting the Montrose area as a place to live, work and trade. "We certainly aren't trying to exclude anyonr," Turner said, noting that many member businesses in the guild are gay­ownt- d. "It's just that the reason most members join is to promote their busi· nesscs. There are other organizations, like the Gay Political Caucus, that members can join if they want to get involved that way." Turner claimed an informal survey of about 40 members indicated they per­ceived only an average 20 percent of their tot.al business to come from the gay community. The survey, which Turner said he conducted last fall as chair of the guild's networking commit· tee, was intended to determine what the "real" needs of the membership were, how mem hers could most effectively network their businesfies, and what type of advertising would be most bene· ficial. The guild also has a "traditional" problem with membership renewals, according to Turner. Of 123 current mem hers, 69 are new members who joined in 1986, he said. "Some members have told me they joined to advance their businesses, and they didn't get any increase in business from their membership," Turner said. Others said there was too much discus­sion of gay/ lesbian issues and social programs "flavored."with gay opinions, even though the group usually took no position, he added. Turner said a listing of organizations and helplines in the back of the guild's directory also contributes to GMBG's image as a gay group. The listing includes mostly gay community re­sources and does not list family· oriented services or government agencies in the "Greater Montrose" area, he stated. The directory listing will be reviewed for possible changes before the next publication, Turner noted. Under past leadership, the Greater Montrose Business Guild has been aggressively involved in activities promoting non·discrimination, although the group is conceptually non· G PC Endorses Pride Committee's Effort By Sh eri Coh en Darbonne Montrose Voice Members of the Houston Gay Political Caucus passed a motion Wednesday, Feb. 18, to support efforts of members of the Gay Pride Week Planning Commit­tee to petition for an amendment or waiver of a city ordinance, in order to allow planners the option of consider­ing a nighttime gay pride parade. Ray Hill, who introduced the motion, strC"ssed that the caucus would not he voting to endorse the concept of a night parade, only to give the committee time to pursue Holutions to legal difficulties. Under current ordinance, neither a parnd(• nor a festival, also being dis­cussed by gay pride planners, could be held at night. GPC board members pointed outthat the QU<'Stion of an after-dark parade was brought up during a recent board retrt'at in Galveston, and that the board agreed to oppose the idea because of potential problems, including violence and vandalism. Evening rallies held at Spotts Park in recent years have bet'n plagued with this type of problem, they noted . Current sentiment among members of both the caucus and the planning committee favors holding all Gay Pride W('('k activities, whether during the day or at night, in the Montrose area. The night parade' idea was mentioned at the first GPW meeting last month, but so far no debate on the issue has been held in either forum. "If (the GPW committee) can't go to the Gay Political Caucus for help with a political problem, then who ran Wt' turn to'!" llill said, udrling that he felt cur rent leoclc·rship wafi trying to direct th<• caucu!-l "likt• a ship alone," avoiding mtnnc·tion with other community J(rOUJ>N. Memht•rH vott•d 14-7 with four abstaining, to endorse the waiver request. Action on another motion introduced by Hill , that the caucus establish a com­mittee to urge action by Mayor Kathy Whitmire's office on promises report· edly made by a mayor's representative, was tabled until the next GPC meeting. Hill said Clintine Cashion had twice promised that Whitmire's office would help facilitate dialogue between the gay community and the Houston Chamb<'r of Commerce. Annise Parker, caucus president, pointed out that the GPC board has already n•quested a meeting with the mayor on the subject, but has not yet received a response. Delaying the dis­cussion would give the board time to ascertain whether the mayor will meet with them, she said. Jn other business, members present were deputized as Harris County voter registrars. Don Hrachovy explained the registration forms and the information needed for GPC's purposes. The caucus' $42,000 1987 budget was discussed and approved. Estimated exJ)<'nses totalled $16,723, with a 1986 balance forward of $12,000 and a pledge of $13,277 allotted for the Texas Les­bian / Gay Right Lobby. A projected income of $14,450 leaves a fundraising obligation of $27,5!i(J for the year. Lou Vnnech was named the new chair of the documentation committee, and the possibility of changing the name of thP committee to better convey its pur­pose was mentioned. "Crisis response comm1ttC'e" was sugge!-lted. as an alter· native name. A nC'w "m(•dia watch" program was announr(>d . Jim Owens urged members to shnre nnd respond to information rt>O<'Cting eaucu!-i concerns that appears in gay und ~Wnt'ral print media, techni· cal journa)t;, or on tt')('vision or radio. political and non-aligned. In January, 1985, while Mike Ne1son was president, the guild supported the vote by Houston City Council on non·discrimination in city jobs based on sexual orientation. Also in 198.5, under another president, Thom Rourke, the organization adopted a non·discrimination policy and com· mitted to actively seek membership of businesses whose policies support non· discrimination with respect to sex, race, national origin, age, religion, creed, sex­ua] orientation and physical disability. The most recent president, PhyJlis Frye, maintained that the policy of non­discrimination made GMBG's focus and direction different from that of other business organizations. Frye was personal1y active in gay/ lesbian com· munity issues. The first guild meeting directed by the new officers will be held Wednesday, Feb. 25. M. John Curcio, a certified pub­lic accountant and guild member, is scheduled to speak on the 1987 tax law and its implications for business owners. Other planned changes for the guild this year include frequency of commit· tee meetings, size and function of com· mittees, and increased activity in promotional and area development prcr jects. A 24-hour hotline number, 528- 1111, wi11 provide personal or recorded information on committee meetings times and locations, gui]d projects, membership and other information for the local business community. I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I any of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing • Hyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes • Amouncements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying • Invoices MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD MEMBERS 10% DISCOUNT SPEEDY --:" PAINTING SCR VICE OF TEXAS Fast. Rel1a~ Service, Excellent Duality, l.oY.t Cost @ ~::: ·~ 5400 BELLAIRE BLVD. bOck r~=:~~~~l.o cation I CALL 667-7417 I PICK UP AND DELIVERY I M~~T~~~:~tw1c~~; I 1 =~~~i::s~cx::=.= 1 L----------.J BACCHUS Friday, Feb. 20 Go Texas Night with $1 25 long necks and all of your favorite C&W music No Cover Sunday, Feb. 22 & March 1 Mary Ann Mahoney & Mata Hari 5-9pm, Happy Hour 'till 6pm Friday, Feb. 2 7 1st Annual Mardi Gras Ball Costumes Requested-No Cover 50¢ Well Drinks & Beer 7-9pm Drink Specials All Night Long Happy Hour Tues.-Frl. 5-9pm Steak Night Ever( Thursday 523 Lovett -·· . .. --· __ -·- ... ... . - 523-3396 4 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20. 1987 •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS BETTER LAWns & QARDEns Total lawn maintenance Commercial-Residential • Lrndscdpe • Trdsh Removul • Ch1mne4 Sweep • T rce Service • Slumps Removed • Cj 1mpleh- Spr nk ler S4stem: FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN ~Pl"y ~Safe! Attention Members: J.O.E. J.O.E.'s Admission Times Tues. & Thurs. 8-9pm Fri. & Sat. llpm-2am Sunday 6-9pm .J.0.E. 1s a private organization for memhers only (adult gay men).J.0.E. is not a publicclub. 'J.'here are membership re!ilrictions. New member inquiries may he made durmg the above listed hours. .J.O.E. currently met'ls at lht· Cottage Pla.vhouse, behind the lot at 611 Pacific Entrance is at rear of house. Look for the Pla.v Safe fla1:. I montrose VOICE HOU~TON TEXAS ISSUE 330 I FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 20. 1987 Publtshed weekly during February and March Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours 8am-6pm Henry McClurg pub~ •Nrw Linda Wyche ma~onq ~tor Oav•d Roumfor1 product•on Elroy Forbes social a"ec'"' Shen Cohen Darbonne,.,. ... , SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ----- ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland adv.,r,sin9 d<rKtrN Ken Boge .tc:counr ••«ur- POSTMASTER Send .odress correcl'°"S lo 408 Avon­d• le HoutlOf\ TX 77006-3029 SuOKnp#O"I rat• lf"I US /by V01u camw tX US Ma.-1 St 15per.,....l..,PS021SIUft).S6S~yNr1S2w9".1). 0f Sl2 SO per ... rnQf'l!IW 126 ""'""''! Nal•Oft•I ~rt•SlttlJ fllP'H~tar- R1vendefl M•rket.ng PO Boa 12'N P\a•nlield NJ 07061_ !200 Ts-4-434 F,,,al adlf~t~•t'tf1 dHdl,,.. Al d•l-P••y .OS Spm 2 dliys Pf'OflOpubllUhOf'IOlil• AllC,QS!fied..:Jt2Pfl'lldliyP"!Of to publtQhOn dlll• Nol>e• ro "°"'erttMl'S AOwef11S""9 r•le schedu .. E>gnl-A w• ef'lect·~• Aprll 11 HIM RNptXIS•bl•ry W• do not ....,me ""ancaal rnpot191bltity lot clai ... by .,,,_art,~ but r..;ers at• Uk.0 IO adv•M th4I roewsp•pet ol any tutptCIOf'I ol trad!.olef'lt Of deceplove .,..,.,,,.,ng .-Id sutpocio,. w1!1 be lfl\lnhgated "'-~ .JMY>C• Uruted Pr•• lnter,,.tional Call 529-8490 and 1 ~011 will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Nobody Goes Western Like 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 Lary Thompson D.J. 0 Morning 7am-Noon Monday-Saturday ~ "t.:-:::::J Aflernoon: 6pm 8pm Monday- Fnday Evening 11 30pm 12 30am Every Night Can Beer St 25 Orafl Beer 75C Well Or mks S l 75 Shots 51 25 FEBRUARY 20. 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 5 Catholic Church's Fitful Response to AIDS Op inion by Bill Kenke len Pacific- News Service As AIDS spreads in the Catholic priest­hood, it will become increasingly diffi­cult for the Church to treat AIDS as a disease that afflicts "them" because the epidemic has now hit home. Sadly, the impetus is needed. Individually, many Catholic priests, nuns and lay people have responded heroically to what may become the cen­tury's worst epidemic. But as an institu­tion, the Church is still making only fitful responses to AIDS. But the fact that at least a dozen, and perhaps many more, priests have AIDS or have already died of AIDS underscores the human fra ilty within the Church itself. Its failures are particularly glaring because the Church prides itself on tra­dition. For centuries, the Church led society in responding to disease. Some religious orders were created to fight particular diseases, and the Church built the first hoi:;pitals to treat the great mn!-'s of people who did not belong to the nristocrac·y. Their legacy is the Church's current worldwide system of Catholic hospitals. But AIDS has stifled what might have been expected of the Catholic Church, and many other churches as well, because of the perceived moral is~we of its transmission through homo­sexual behavior. Four years ago, for example, a priest in San Francisco refused to give the sac­raments to a dying AIDS patient because he was a homosexual. And Catholic bishops declined to heed the pleas of gay leaders to counter the asser­tions of right-wing fundamentalist preachers that AIDS is "God's wrath." The changes that have occurred since then are often due to close personal con­tact with AIOS patients. San Francisco archbishop John Quinn becamt> the U.S. Church's most prominent defender of AIDS patients after making regular visits to an AIDS hospital ward. One widespread, but little noted, change has been the greater availabil­ity of priests who can, and will, minister to dying AIDS patients. This is proba­bly the Church's most important role: Helping a person find goodness and meaning in li fe as he or she struggles to find peace at death. In the earlier years of the epidemic, many priestf.; who have since learned to minist<•r to dying AIDS patients didn't know any openly gay men. For them, the issue of sexual orientation, and hen ct> 8exunl morality, was more impor· tant than people dying of AIDS Today, that issue is lt·Hs relevant as more prit•sts experience the courage and love of so many dying AIDS patients. The fullest rc·sponse to AIDS from the institutional Church has occurred in Sacramento, Calif. The bishop there, Francis Quinn, has ordered all the dio· cest•'s uwmries to provide services to AJl)S patients. The diocese held a Church convocation on AIDS-the fi rst in the nation-last October, led by Quinn and Sacramento Mayor Ann Rudin. At a healing service during the convocation, Quinn anointed an AIDS patient. He then asked the AIDS patient to anoint him. And Quinn regularly visiL' the Cali· fornia Prison SyRtem\ medical facility in nNtrby Vacaville wht•re California's prisoners with AIDS are housed. He celebrates mass there and spends after· noons with the AIDS patients and their families. In a statement last May, Quinn issued what may be the strongest statement by any Catholic leader on the epidemic. HJesus' harshest words," he said, ''were reserved for self-righteous people who condemned and rejected others Jesus was not controlled by a niggling inner guilt that makes some of us come down judgmentally on 'sinners' to con­vince ourselves that we are on God's side." Other dioceses on the forefront of Church response to AIDS include Mil­waukee and New Orleans. Milwaukee Archbishop Rembert Weakland is chairman of the AIDS Resource Council of Wisconsin. New Orleans Catholic Charities is coordinating that city's social service response to the epidemic. In contrast, the Philadelphia Archdi­ocese responded to a request late last year that the archdiocese become involved in AIDS ministry in a letter written by Cardinal John Krol's secre­tary, Father Joseph McFadden. "Please be advised that while the Church oppoS('S sin and sinful activity," McFadden wrote, "it nevertheless extends its love and help to the ~inner, urging convrr~ion to a life of virtue." For Mark Prutner, a Philadephia gay Catholic, th(• letter was actuallv "a breakthrough . It's the first time ~e've gotten any rC"sponse from them at all. We've had people die who wanted a priest but couldn't get one becauise we uren 't allowt>d to have priests from the archdioceise." The record of other large dioceses is mixed. Last year, the archbishops of three of the largest Catholic dioceses­Boston, Los Angeles and Ch1cago­issued detailed statements condemning prejudice against AIDS patients and insisting on, in the words of Boston's Cardinal Bernard Law, "a spirit of lov­ing care and non-iudg-mental charitv." Yet in each statement, Church leaders felt compelled to preach about chastity and marital fidelity. For critics like Larry Kessler of the Massachusetts AIDS Action Committee, such state­ments only underscore the distance between heterosexual people and gay people-a distance that must be bridged before there can be an effective AIDS ministry. Late last year, the Vatican issued a strongly worded letter to all bishops warning against support for homosex­ual groups, and describing gay people as instrinsically disordered. Some observers believe the Vatican felt com-pelled to issue such a statement pre­cisely because of the limited rapprochement that was occurring between gay people and many Cathol­ics sparked by the AIDS crisis. Since the end of the year, four dioceses have responded to the Vatican state­ment by expelling gay Catholic organi­zations from parishes in Buffalo, Pensacola, Atlanta, and Brooklyn. But the fact that at least a dozen, and perhaps many more, priests have AIDS or have already died of AIDS under­scores the human frailty within the Church itself. For the growing number of lay people and clergy within the Church attempting to address the AIDS crisis, that might mitigate the arro­gance that leads to condemnation and enhance, instead, the humility that leads to service. PNS commentator 81!1 Kenkelen. a correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter wrote the first national story on priests with AIDS Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Commun ity Groups .. Bacchus I Takes Over Pool Lead Bacchus I replaced Mary's II as leader >f the M1 1tro 1e Sp<frt~ Ass 1c.1at. "81 1ards League following play Feb 11 Mary·s II 1s 1n ~econd ond Ad..,enturers round out the top three The finals of The 611 tournament will be held this Saturday at The 611 Play begins promptly at 1 00 p.m. Those placing first or second 1n the preliminaries will be competing BE FAMOUS. BE SEEN. ADVERTISE IN THE MONTROSE VOICE. ~ Spruce Up Your Home lfii/, for the Holidays ~1i'l HSK CONTRACTING Something Different: /; I • A Full Service Contractor • Roofing (All Types) Remodeling • Sheetrock/ Painting • Plumbing/ Electrical • Foundations Repaired • Tree & Trash Removal • Tile/ Masonry • CarpeVFlooring • Cabinets • Decks/ Hot Tubs • Room Additions • Concrete • Insulation • Water Proofing • Chimney Sweeping & Repairs • Pest & Rodent Control • Fully Insured • Heating/AC • References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 ~:--:::: --=- \I Superior Service Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed & Regulated by Structural Pest Control Board of Texas 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 * * * * UP TO 50%0fF ALL WINTER WOOLS ~ 11 THE FlllST IN INTERNATIONAL MILITARY FASHIONS ----..: .. 1._1 FOR HIM FRENCH* GERMAN* ITAUAN FOR HER * wwn VINTAGE * COME ~DI THE FASHION ARMY AT ..... 11 ·6 ... IL ROY'S HOUSTON ,TEXAS77006 MON··SAT ~~ ® 1723WAUGHDR. ... ~ 528 - 2818 INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. * * o Results of Valentine's Weekend Curti.-; Dickson, left, holds a certificate of appreriation prrsented by AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc .. to Baba Yega restaurant for a Vah·ntme 's u·rl·kend benefit that rais('d $2,907.07 for th" foundatwn. Clara Spear and Trish Kotus of Baba Yega presented contributions includmg $1,192.0.J, ,'JO percent of the restaurant's safrs from the u.:eekend; $200 raisl'd in bids on a leather and barbed U'tr<' floral arrangement: and $7·1/i donated by employees and customers. Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. GLHU Plan Garage Sale Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidos will hold a garage sale Saturday. Feb. 21 from 10 00 a.m -6 00 p.m in the parking lot of Studio 13. 1318 Westhe1mer The event will benefit the organization's Spanish ·'play sare·· workshop and the statewide "Latm Lesb1ana Retreat" project Persons with items for pick·up may call 521 ·0114 ••Garage Sale to Benefit Hospital Team There will be a garage sale at the corner of Castle Court and Dunlevy across from Dunlevy Park on Sunday. Feb. 22. 8:00 a m.·4 00 p.m The sale will benefit the AIDS Foundation Hospital team All proceeds will go to AIDS patients at Jeff Davis Hospital and Omega House The best in masculine fiction, photography and art, presented most forthright manner possible. 12 issues by the privacy of FIRST-CLASS MAIL ONLY $70°0! (by bulk-rate mail, a ridiculously low $50) DEMAND THE B&ST! SUBSCRIBE NOW! Desmodus, Inc. PO Box 11314 San Francisco. CA 94101 ·1 314 VISA. MASTERCARD. AMERICAN EXPRESS ~ Phone ~'Y-lj~~ ~'-~ ~'~~~ in the FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Letters to the Voice From the readers of the Montrose Voice rEJ Time for Second 1987 Gay Pride Week Meeting From Ray Hill It 1s February and time for the second Gay Pride Week meeting for 1987 lf you missed the first meeting 1t is not too tate to get mvolved GPW decisions are made by tho Se who attend the meetings and your next chance 1s Sunday. Feb 22, 6·00 p.m at Dignity Center {near Elgin an Fannin) All those attendmg may join the discussions and vote The agenda includes· closrng the theme and logo; approving most of theofflc1al GPWevenls. electing GPW co·cha1r. media coordinator. and outreach chair. reports from the parade committee and other items GPW plannmg requires the efforts of hundreds of people each year Your help •s needed and wanted Please in us Sunday at 6 00 p m al D1gn1ty Center rEJ Write the Voice Items 1n the 'Letters· :olumn are opin1 ins of readers and not necessarily those of the Voice Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of mterest to Houston Please keep letters brief and mail lo ··Letters to the Editor" Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 All letters must be srgned and include address and phone number to venfy authenticity The Best Little Guest House in Town Reasonable Nightly & Weekly Rates Private Baths Free Parking For Reservations Call (504) 566-1177 lll8 Ursulines, New Orleans, LA 70116 DllUMMEll PllfVIEW MRTY The Leothermon·s Guide to Texas Saturday. February 28. 198 7 10 PM at CHUTES 1732 Westhe1mer. Houston (713) 523-2213 8 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 Patti LaBelle-Fighting AIDS with Love Hot Wax By Jeffrey Wilson It was late in the evening and we were both pretty exhausted. Patti just came off the road from her European tour and a grueling two­shows- a-nigh t stint in Las Vegas. I was just getting over the flu. We chit-chatted for a while, mostly about the successes of her Winner In You album and various other new projects and accolades. La Belle's a perfectionist and ask­ing her if the platinum selling album and singles met her expecta­tions, Patti laughed, but in all seriousness said, "No, but they will. Things will happen the way I think they should." Nominated for two Grammy Awards, I asked Patti about the possibility of finally win­ning after so many years of nomina­tions. She turned the question back to me, "What do I think? I'd rather keep it to myself," and with an earthy giggle Patti confided, "Maybe I'll share it with you the next time I see you." The succe" of her first album with MCA Records as well as the duet "ith Michael McDonald has made LaBelle highly visible to an entirely new realm of possible colla boratoro. "In Vegas I worked on a new video for my song 'Something Special' with George Carlin ," she began to explain. "It's for Bette Midler's new movie Outrageous Fortune. Although I had just met Goerge the day we shot the video and we only worked together for an hour, he was very pleasant to me. It was great fun and he's a very crazy guy. A most unusual combination even for LaBelle fans to imagine is the pairing of the Queen of Rock & Soul "'ith labelmates the Oak Ridge Boys?' "Rainbow at Midnight" is described by Patti as "sort of like a ballad, and you know any ballad will catch my attention. I never thought I would work with the Oak Ridge Boys. So when the opportuni· ty came I said, 'Let me listen to it.' When I did hear the tape, I fell in love with the song." Curious if it took all those Oak Ridge Boys to overpower LaBelle in the studio, Patti amusingly laughed, "No, we shared' They were very sweet to me. It was an enjoya· Cut 'PeJUtt Both knou·n for their outrageous hairstyles and u·ild stage antics. Patti LaBelle and Cyndi Lauper have again bren nominated for the music industry's coveted Grammy Award. ble session." LaBelle fans will have to buy the Oak's new album due out in March entitled Where the Fast Lane Ends to hear the blend, because as Patti says, "I plan to have a new album before the year is out, but I haven't even chosen the songs yet. I hope whatever the new project does. that it comes out like Winner'" And was she the toast of Europe" Patti, ob,iously delighted, gushes, "It was an exciting brand new thing. Going to London after 15 years. it was like I had never been there. It was a thrilling experience for me! The audiences all over were in a party mood, they were up. They shared a whole lot of love with me which showed that they wanted me to come back soon, so I'll go back next vear.'' After playing 'catch-up' we delved into the real purpose of our conver-sation which was LaBelle's trium· phant return to her hometown (and mine) of Philadelphia to play the Forest Theatre. What makes this especially heartwarming is I..aBelle's gracious donation of the proceerls from the engagement's final show to AmFAR, the Ameri­can Foundation for AIDS Research, In a som her tone Patti reflects, "I've been aware of the crisis from the beginning. Many friends have come down with this dreaded dis· ease and passed away." LaBelle is not afraid to get involved or jump in with both high-heeled feet, gal­lantly stating, 'Tm doing this benefit because I feel it from the heart, not because anyone else does them! Whatever I can do for the cause, here I am!" LaBelle feels very strongly that the entertainment industry has been so supportive, but there is more .;::;,.. c.J'j{im/i (;ms PANCAKE DAY fii/fi.:Of SAn.ROAV. fEBA\.IAAY 25. 1987 7AM ~2PM AU M PANCM1S WITH SAl..ISAG( N<J KON 'l'OIJ ON EAi s.100 ·AOl.lf 5200· IZN<ll..t«R J CotoJt l l • l f I 1212 WESTHEIMER 528-9600 to be done. Patti says, "They sup­ported Live Aid, they should do the same thing to fight AIDS. They should do what we're doing to fight AIDS and support the cause. I can't speak for those entertainers who haven't come forward yet, or say they're wrong for not doing so, it's just I know it would help us if more of them did participate." Patti LaBelle, with her very diverse concert audiences com­prised of any combination of black, white, gay, straight, or as she would say,whateuer, is very concerned about the growing anti-gay senti­ment stemming from the unedu­cated AIDS hysteria. "I don't know if AIDS can ever be looked upon as a disease that anyone can be stricken with. I guess it's like when you look at certain people, and unfortunately you see just how prejudiced they are against gays, blacks or any other minori­ties. I doubt if that kind of sickness (prejudice) can ever be cured. It's a sirknPss of its own for anyone to think this is just a pay diseas<' That's a higot!'d opinion and a bigoted way of thinking. In fact, to me it's racist for people lo be anti­!( ay and think that way about AIDS." "Unfortunately. there will always be people who are prejudiced against something. Once they have it in their minds, they're probably going to be that way until they die. I don't know if it can ever be explained, even through education, that this is a disease that anyone can get. You see, AIDS isn't bigoted, it's a disease thatdoesn'tcareabout the color of your skin, or where you live, or who you sleep with. It's a killer that doesn't pick and choose." On tht• bright side, LaBelle believes in the power of positive thinking and says to those who are ailing or who have lost loved ones, "Think good thoughts, use positive thinking. No matter how difficult it seems some days, it's possible you ~an beat it. A positive way of think­ing might just help your body to fight it. In closing Patti says bravely, "Never give up, I still love you!" Special thanks to Jill Larkin and Armstead Edwards • 1986 Hot WA.x MUSIC All nght9 reserved FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Rendezvous Club (The Old Boobie Rock) Tel. 527-8619 1100 Westheimer Monday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Wednesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Friday & Saturday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Disco Beats of George from early hours and after hours til dawn! Eictro1 Tuesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Thursday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Sunday 50¢ Schapps & Drat Beer 2pm-9pm After Hours Every Night Dance until Dawn Daily 10 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 MAKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION • • on Houston's outrageous New conference Call our exciting phone service has become the rage In callfornla, Phlladelphla, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It available to gay men right here In Texas! We are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! 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I 1' rf I • 'U )Lrc: > ll tn l JI ( FEBRUARY 20, 1987 /MONTROSE VOICE 11 It's About Time for a Good Laugh Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice This has be<>n a rowdy week with lots of drinking, hooting and belly laughs. o The Comedy Workshop I had the most fun overatthe Comedy Workshop watching their new show, ·' Menzel plays a poor schnook who tries to fit into the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. This doesn't take out after real westerners. Shucks, no! It lam· poons the groupies and the shysters that are a gunnin' fer 'em. Don't forget Sharon Menzel and Brooki, Bill. If you don't like to be seen laughing in public, avoid this show like the plague. And the Outlaw Comics, too. Fritz Dickmann and Sharon Menzel are part of the hilarity at Comedy Workshop "No More Sequels: Part Two." These people are at the top of their form. They're picking out targets that we can all agree deserve it. They're broadsiding them without turning cyni­cal and bitter. They're the funniest, silli­est though also most intelligent, they have been in several months. Warning: They have one segment, Ask Dr. Duke (played by Fritz Dick­mann) which answers questions from the audience. So please go prepared with a question for Mr. Mustache that is somehow related to medicine. This bit is limited to being only as good as the audience But for the rest of the show, they arc fielf.~rnRtaining and awesomely hilar· iou8. They will Rweep you up into their good vi hes and propel you helter·skelter through th<' dang<'rous curves of a rol lercoaster of laughter There are only two movie take-offs, but they are delicious. The ever-graciouR Jennifer Noble plays Mom·bo, able to survive tall obstacles with her superhu­man knowledge of household hints. Bill Fagan is even better in "The Good Seed." Remember "The Bad Seed" where a little girl terrorized her mom by turning homicidal? Here a little girl (Fagan) terrorizes her family by turning the whole neighborhood, one by one, into the Police. The rest of the evening focuses on local targets. There is a spectacular, Jack Lemmon-esque routine where Paul o The Outlaw Comics The Outlaw Comics is a large (too numerous to mention) group of stand-up comedians who do very risque, topical material. In addition to a weekly "talk show" over at Blythe Spirita, they often do nights supposedly devoted to one subject at various places around town. I caught "The Outlaw Comics Get Politi­cal" at Fitzgerald's. People have been really hitting close to home for me this week. Comedy Work shop has a skit about a small weekly newHpaper. The Outlaw Comics have one about the world's great.est critic. The Outlaw Comics are very, very funny on the whole. I was laughing 80 hard at the good one I forgot to take any notes. In the line of duty, I'll have to return. Most of the comics actually only started out with a minute or two of polit· ical bits. These all tended to have a national scope and somehow no one thought lo tackle LaRouche. Then they'd go on to their regular routines. There were a lot of jokes about men's (Dee Macaluso was the only woman.) relationships-all of them involving girlfriends. There must have been 20 entertainers. Are they al1 hetero? Or is it that no one has the guts to stand up and say "Take my Jover-please!" One man telling another to bend over is still good for a laugh. But the best of Marsha Carlton and Randy Jobe in Houston House's "Let's Call the Whole Thing Off" them-Huggins and Moore in an impro­vised talk show, Epstein in the closing monologue-carried the joke on far enough that it was obvious that they were making the audience laugh at bigots who persecute gay men rather than gays themselves. o Sirrom School Belly Dancing For a more decorus rowdiness, you might want to look up the Sirrom School's belly dancing show team. Three nights a week they perform at Zee's, over behind the Shamrock Hilton building. Once every month or two they have a special performance at the school. It's at Fairview and Tuam. The night I attended there were no male dancers other than the guest star from New York City. But this is an art that, if done correctly, will make any woman wonderfully sensual to any man Sure, there were some over-dressed women who'd forgotten the <lance's roots. This dance must have been designed to help a man pick out his favorites from his harem. This glorious fight for sexual power was occasionally transformed into a club function for sor­ority typeo. But they were, thankfully, in the minority. The traditional audience responses are fun to do. There is a Jot of clapping along in time to the music. Especially good tumR are greeted with cries of "Hopa!" or a high pitched trill, "Lililili ... " And when they turn the steam up without letting it ef'cape, you can hiss in appreciation. o Torre-Garcia Exhibit I also made the opening of the Torre­Garcia exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts. First, the artist would set down a grid based on the golden section. Then he would fill in the boxes with symbols. Some of the paintings are so wen modeled that they look almost carved. But all of them look to me like doodlings of some highly intelligent mind. All of those symbols obviously mean something. A heart or a human sil­houette is often at the visual center with other objects-religious (fish and sea paraphernalia abound), natural or Laurence Olivier and James Dale in Noel C-Ou:ard's 1933 Broadway hit, "The Green Bay Tree." Photo from "We Can Always Call Them Bulgarians: The Emergence of Lesbians and Gay Men on the American Stage," by Kaier Curtin. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 geometric-arranged in proportion to 0 Celebrate! their importance around them. There are many clocks-all of them within an hour or two before midnight. Today is the feast day of Saint Sebas­tian, patron saint (so many feel) of homosexuals. B'days: 20-Robert Altman, Amanda Blake. Sidney Poitier. 21-Joana Russ, Lige Clark. 2.1-Peter Fonda, George Frideric Handel. 24-Michel Legrand, Pierre Auguste Renoir. 26-William Frawley, Jackie Gleason, Victor Hug-o, Tony Randall. "We forfeit three.fourths of ourselves in order to be like other people."­Arthur Schopenhauer (born Feb. 22). Tucked away around the comer of the first archway to the left is piece No. 121 This is a li:;ting by the artist of the sym· bols he commonly used, arranged in groupo and labelled in French. This could serve as a Rosetta stone to the rest of the show for those so inclined. He was a modernist of his day and in some rooms directly behind his, the MFA has arranged pieces by modernists of our day, especially Frank Stella. These are free flowing, open and colorful, though often still geometric. In comparison, D Openings Torre-Garcia's works seem cramped and stuffy, full of doomsday gloom. Falstaff (Jones, 2())-Houston Grand Opera's production of the brilliant Myra Hills (le{tJ, Jim Jeter !center), and Bobby Harden are featured in this scene from the play "You Can't Take it With You," playing nou· at Actors Theatre o Notes Chris Wilson and Jim Jeter have opened a new 108-seat theater at 2.506 South Blvd,justoffKirbyin Rice Villge. It shares the building with their acting school. Their fir~t production, You Can't Take it With You, is already open and will play through Sunday It's about llme Houswn got to see Marsha Carlton and Randy Jobe together again. Check it out on Mondays-Wedn°'days at the Houston House. Diverse Works is currently showing works by five local artists: Cowie, Miller, Paul, Portman and Suhr Inherit the Wind, the tale of the Scopes Monkey Trial, is ever so timely now with the ban the book movements making a resurgence. The HCC Fine Arts Department is pre8enting it at the Heinen Auditorium for six per­formances only, starting Feb. 24. Kaier Curtin has researched and writ­ten a fascinating new book, We Can Alu·ay• Call Them Bulgarians. the emergence of le!>bians and gay men on the American Stage Evidently the first openly lesbian character in the English language theater didn't come onstage until 1926. Then she was quickly booed off. By 1933, people were willing to start talking about it. That's the year of Lau­rence Olivier'• Broadway debut, play­ing the pampered gay ward of a gay fo In father in The Green Bay Tree. BulRarians has been published by Alyson Publications. Next month they're finally bringing out a book by my neighbor, L.Neal DePalma. comedy based on Shakespeare, music by Verdi. For Who is Silvier (Actors Workshop, 20}-Houstonian Reba Butler's new play about James Joyce and Sylvia Beach. A Chartres Production. Historic Collection of Festival Gowns (Ashton Villa, Galveston, 2120-311) Houston Rodeo Parade (Downtown, 21, 10:00 a.m.l-Freebies. ON01 Smithey, Livingston. Paden and Dun· lap (U. of H.-Oowntown's O'Kane Gallery, 23)-Watercorlors and metal sculpture. Opening on 26, 7:00-9:00 p.m. Full Tilt (Chocolate Bayou, 26)-a magazine writer digs into a long·past accidental killing. Arrival of King Neptune (Eli•sa Dock. Galveston, '27, 10-5) PARALEGAL Plan A Career in The Legal Profession. • Natlonally Accredited • TEA Approved • Tuition Financing • Day & Evening Classes 529-2778 Ca-ee- lnsiilule THE PRARlEGRl PEOPLE 3015 Richmond Ave. Houston, Texas 77098 Crystal's 911 W. Drew 522-7524 Monday- Friday 12 noon-Spm All Well Drinks Positive Lifestyle Ron E. Davis, Director An Evening of Love & Entertainment benefiting The Center for Positive Lifestyle Thursday evening, Feb. 26, Bpm (on time) Kindred Spirits, Richmond at West Loop 610 a diverse show Mistress of Ceremonies, Lana Kuntz Mr. Tracy-Robbie Roberts-Outrageous Arby Concert flutist, Steve Warren-Pianists-Randy Neill Gerry Pipes-Singers-Arron Ellisor $3 donation at door Table Reservations Available For More Information Call 497-7729 FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 ((( Stop Struggling with Your Automobile Over the High Cost of Insurance •••• We May Have the Key to Savings. Call Today for Free Quote Cynthia H. Mansker 3311 W. Alabama Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77098 (713) 522-2792 24 Hours Auto • Fire • Farm • Commercial 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20. 1987 n --------~ cl~ -·- ~ -·-- Today's Television is Oversexed The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe Are the children out of the room? Good. For the subject today is one that should only be di!'lcussed between consenting adults. I'm speaking of-let the chips fall where they may-condoms. Many of us par· ent;; are fnghtfully concerned over what effect condom advertising on tele· vision will have on our impre~sionable children. Congress is studying the threat at great length The qut-stion, of course. is what we parents can do to prote<:t our children from such corn mer rials. Actually, they are already run· ning on the screens in my neighborhood. And I "ill b., glad to tell you of the sane. sensible precaution I took: "Hi. there, Malphasia," l said to my only daughter the other evening. "Thought I'd watch tee-vee with you Mmd if l hold the old remote control? That way I can change channels in case something comes on . . . [ mean if there's something offensive or Hey! What are you watching, some kind of wrestling match?" "No, Daddy," said Malphasia, paint­mg a fingernail, "that's 'Heat in the Ashe!o>.' C'indy and Carstair are making mad, passionate love in the gazebo. It's kind of historic because it's the first time they've done it in the gazebo." "Oh," l said. "Maybe I'd better switch to Channel Seven." "Right." agreed Malphasia. "They w<•re better last week making mad, paH sionate love in the wheelbarrow. Of course, they had Pietro, the gardener, in there with them." l hastily hit the Seven button. "Oh, look," I said, "there's that exciting spy fellow. James Whatshisname. Thev'vC' got him strapped spread-<?agled on ihat drill pre" table. But the door's opening and a mysterious figure's entering. My gracious, from the back, that lady look. stark naked, and she's appro3ching Jamr-~. and now she's ... Oh, my good· ness~" "Yeah," said Malphasia, blowing on a fingC'r, .. I think shr's into bondage.'' I hit a suC'cession of buttons which brought forth scenes of various folks making mad, passionate love in back seats, gondolas, fishing boats, balloons, front seats, a giant clam shell and even beds. Finally, I pushed some button or other, and there on the screen appeared-would you believe it!-a young couple merely holding hands! • Houston Challenge • WE TRAIN FOR SUCCESS * * * * * * ******* • Don't Like Your Boss • Need Cash for Dash • Play But Can't Pay • Hamburger Blues • Star Quality-Joker Pay • Paid on Time, No Excuses We Can Help You Help Yourself Many Positions Open Up to $1000 a Week Call 271-6736 or 271-9455 or apply 7324 Southwest Freeway and Fondren 12th Floor " I hate old movies," said Malphasia, It was at this point that my neighbor Mr. Crannich pounded on the window. "Your garage is on fire!" he cried through the glass. "Sit right there and don't move a mus· cir- or change a channel," I ordered Mal· phasia I should have known. The garage fire was only my son. Mordred, having a party with his friends and their funny, brown cigarettes. But by the time l got back to Malphasia .. Oh, cursed fate! For as I entered the living room, I heard a woman's voice uttering from the sl'.!t thosr terrifying words that every parent dreads: "I'd do a lot for love." she W81i saying, .. but I'm not ready to die for it." 'Malphasia!" I cried. but I was too late. She sat staring at the 8et, her eyes wide, h<·r iaw agape. her whole hody trembling. " [ didn't know," she said slowly, as though hypnotized, "that were such things." And before l could stop her, she rushed up to her room, put on a pair of black, lacey, strapless sandals, and vanished out the door. We haven't seen the poor, Jost soul since. • 1987 (SF) Chronc11e Publishing -Co General Auto Repair Tune Ups • Oil Changes Brakes Tues.-Sat. Fortunes Fantasies for Capricorn By Mark Orlon Yr ~ Jff Jpj fr1 )'1'1 the Voice For Friday e11enrnq. Feb 20, th1ough Friday f1"o" 1g. Feb 27. 1987 ARIES From out of the blue comes an offer. a 1ob. or even a pleasure that you hadn't even thought of (What in the world can that be?) Shuffle your thoughts and rearrange your priorities Being able to react to it quickly and decisively will be important TAURUS -Time to be a team player You learn that 1n being part of a group: being able to work with others doesn't dimm1sh your mdividualtty. You're a star in the midst of other stars. shining your own special light GEMINI -Aren't you getltng friction burns yet? I just keep seeing sex. sex. sex in your stars, with no end-make that letup -in sight It looks like things may take a more romantic. though. CANCER A lot of people need help from you. and the best way to help might be to get away If only for a day, for few miles. you need to recharge your batter­ies with a new view and some distance Then come back and help. LEO You've got something to explain to authority figures. and though you're pushed to do 1t, you're in no mood for compromise or denial. If you're firm. but not angry. you'll be heard Try d1gn1ty, not denunciation VIRGO Your words have that magic touch, so be careful who you're talking to when you wh1sper of love and lust. You could tell almost anyone anything and they'd believe it. Say those sexy things you tove to say, but be sure you mean themt LIBRA If recent blues are still hang· ing around. someone would dearly love to help you get nd of them Don't be too hard and cold to let someone sweet and gentle 1n Who's that knocking? SCORPIO If you weren't so smart. you might be arrogant. In sex, it's nice to tell someone where to put 1t and when you want it done, but in other areas. being an example rather than a dictator works much better SAGITTARIUS Self improvement time You can clear out the cobwebs of the past and figure out what's bugging your present 1f you sit down and talk it all out Not this time. but the next, can be a super time 1f you take care of business now CAPRICORN It's explore your fanta­sies time' Rummage through all that stuff in your head and see what would turn you on But don't keep 11 to yourself. let love take a hghter touch and share the fun AQUARIUS Let the moon be your guide this time Take chances, trust your hunches. follow that dream• En1oy the release that comes from laughter or tears. A time for partnerships to be fruitful Can you taste tt? PISCES All that support you got which made you feel like Number One recently has grown into the confidence you need to go after what you want Share your future plans with the one you want to share the future with v tCE ~Pl"y ~Safe! JUNE 12-13-14 MR. ~u r DRUMMER 19 87 FOH INPOHMA TION OR APPLICATIONS CONTACT CHUTES 1732 WESTHEIMER Ho u ston, Texas 77098 DEADLINE FOR ENTRY JUNE I Ith 1987 $5.00 DONATION llEQUESTED AT TllE DOOR JUNE 14Tll llENIWITING "TllE All>S FOUNDATION OF HOUSTON" Premiere Texas Tough Customer Edition of Drummer Magazine Feb. 28-10pm A Representative of Drummer Magazine will be here to meet Houston's Tough Customers. FEBRUARY 20. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 COLT45 MAY 30, 1987 6P.M. INFOIUIATION Al'l'LICATIONS: 1732 WESTllEIMER 1 louston, Texas 77098 (713)523-2213 l'HIZESAWAHOEDTO Tl-IESLAVES Male Strip Finals Friday, Feb. 20, 11pm \'1-~o Cash Prize to Top Stripper with M.C. Brucella 16 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 20. 1987 Even the 'Hard Core' is Learning Statistics Show AIDS Education Works Commentary by David Strange Pacific News Service SAN FRANCISCO-If done right, AIDS education works. That is the clear conclusion to be drawn from a key, plummeting statistic in this city hard hit by the deadly virus. Two years ago 142 cases of rectal gonorrhea were reported each month here, with 95 percent of the victims male. The number now has dropped to 20 per month, according to Dr. Dean Echenberg of San Francisco's Depart· ment of Public Health. The decline has been general, affecting both males and females, in a1l racial groups and in all neighborhoods of the city. While there is no relationship between the bacteria causing gonorrhea and the virus thought to cause AIDS, both are transmitted by unsafe sex, and rectal gonorrhea is generaJly consi­dered to be a marker showing possible exposure to AIDS. The evident explanation for the stead· ily decreased number of rectal gonor· rhea cases is a decrease in high risk sexual practices. That major change in human behavior must hearten the var· ious groups in San Francisco who have placed their faith in education and gra& roots mobilization as a way to combat the AIDS epidemic. About two years ago the Stop AIDS Project, for example, noted research showing that "gay men were very well informed about the dangers of AIDS and the need for safe sex, but they weren't really acting," says the organi­zation's executive director, Bill Folk_ In the face of that news, some might have been tempted to write off education as a failed remedy. Instead, the Stop AIDS Project decided that a difft·n·nl kind of teaching was needed. "Information alone won't get people to change-look at smoking," says Folk. "What was missing was some kind of peer support and communica- ... the power of education, proven with these latest figures, may give us a glimpse of a light at the end of the AIDS tunnel. tion component that would motivate people to make changes." He says that in developing its curriculum, the Stop AIDS Proiect drew from "everything from humanistic psychology to market research." Project volunteers invite about 15 men at a time to their homes for evening discussion groups, where the talk cen­ters on "the whole idea that we can stop any epidemic by stopping transmission of the virus. We are not powerless or helpless to do something," Folk recounts that newcomers would say," 'it seems like safe sex is what I should be doing, but I can't talk about it with my partners_ I don't have any support."' The meetings would invariably change their minds, convincing them that they were not alone in their thinking, says CRAB LICE STUDY Folk. "It gets them out of their isola· tion." Scores of other Stop AIDS Project volunteers comb gay areas, inviting passersby to the evening discussion mPetings. Some 6000 primarily gay or bisexual men have taken up the offer, and by Folk's estimates at least 15,000 others have paused long enough on the street to hear the safe sex message. At the same time, San Francisco's Department of Public Health has funded its own aggressive education program-and again group discussion is a key component. For the "worried well" there is an eight-week course called "Hot and Healthy Sex." Meanwhile the San Francisco AIDS Foundation has blanketed the city with pamphlets and advertisements. One ad, headlined, "Congratulations to Eighty Percent of San Francisco Men," praises the vast majority of local gay and bisex­ual men who told a survey they now engage in safe sex. "It takes a lot of guts to make major changes in one's approach to life, health, and sexual expression. Keep up the good work," reads the copy, adding, "If you aren't part of the eighty percent, we'd like to help." The hypothesis has been raised that there is a "hard core" of individuals who will never respond to education on safe sexual practices. But the steady down­ward march of rectal gonorrhea cases would seem to refute the idea. As Dr. Echenberg points out, the number of such cases would be expected to begin to level off as this "hard core" is approached. Statistical analysis of the data shows no leveling off to date, and suggests that we have not yet reached this "hard core," if indeed it exists. Of course, as long as there continues to be any cases of AIDS, or rectal gonor­rhea, more remain to be educated. But the power of education, proven with these latest figures, may give us a glimpse of a light at the end of the AIDS tunnel. It also suggests that with more such efforts at education and preventive medicine, a host of other serious health problems could be seriously cut down in size GEMERAL REPAli'lS Transmission Service 29.95 011 • Lube 24.95 Cooling System Seivlce 27.95 1411 Tait i< :·:;:. ·t~ 522-2190 TRANSM!SSIONS ( Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers maybe male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 799-613 7. ------ FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 FEIFFER® •4 EXPRESS LANES DAILY 18 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 20. 1987 Good News from the Heart Around Town by Elroy Forbes M1 trr \loice 8ocial Director o Good News A large crowd complete with media repre1'entatives were on hand at noon on Valentine's Day for the grand open· ing and celebration of Stone Soup, the , cupboard for the AIDS Foundation's food program. Officials Eleanor Tinsley and George Grcanias made short state­ments before the open house tour began A buffet v.ns provided from area busi· resses. The ribbon cuttmg ceremony was short but the meaning was deep. The mvitat1ons read, "Come join us in the ribbon cutting and celebrate what dona· tiLns and love have built. a wonderful Stone Soup for all to share." The be:;t part of the tour was to see people leave the pantry with sacks full of grocE:-ries. You can help. Fresh pro duce is one of the hardest thing1' to get. Maybe you might think of picking up extra bags of oranges or apples on your next shopping trip. just for Stone Soup. o Valentine's Day The Galleon celebrated Valentine's Day with a special singles gathering. Couples celebrated with a whole week end of events. The Jolly Rogers had ~evera1 outings planned. But nothing beat The 611 's Breakfast Club and the Pacific area tour and parade. Cltv CouncilmPmhen; George Gr;anias and Eleanor Tinsli'Y attf>nded thP opening of AF H's Stone Soup Smith . Mike Edgar, San Ferna11do Pete, Trucker Bill, Gene. Ronnie and Photo Bill. o Names in the News Krewe of Hydra 1s fill mg up a bus for the Feb. 28 Gal veson Mardi Gras. Tickets can he had from Krewe memb(•rs or at Timeless Taffeta and The Ripcord. Welcomt" to Montrose, Pat Holle· man's antique shop at 2403 Montrose. It's called Happenings. Leu· Hondras i.s doing fine and wait· ing word from the last big operation. He could ui-e your get well cards. If you want to leave cards at the Montrose V'oice, I "A-ill send them to him. Movematsers• Terry Hughs is enter taining form(•r C'alil(ula a·nd Drummer magazines model, Chuck from l.A Welcum1• hack, Zack from Lorado. Poland o Out and About Valentine'"' Day saw big crowds fit into Crystals and The Rench. Rock 'N' Horse celebrated their first anniver· sary. The Zoo, not Houston's, but.Mont· rose's, Zoo had a big dress rehearsal for an upcoming AIDS benefit featuring some of the troopers who will soon be regulars at Exile II. I talked backstage to one of my favorite performers, Zack. I rememl><'r him carrying a note from his mother so he could perform at the old Scene I. Zack's shows were the talk of the town Funny. o Correction Did I scare Thl' Ripcord? Anyway the Prime Choice Contest, for hunks over 40, is Memorial Day Weekend. o In Closing The Colt 4.5's u·ere featured at Cousin's Customer Appreciation. N~"ght. Here members recewe an au.•ard from the Montrose Clinic in apprecrntwn for work done for the clinic. There will be a giant Garage Sale Fund­raising for Montrose the first weekend of May. A small fee of $5 or $10 will include your organization or you as an individual in cooperative advertising and promotion. George Benedict will head up this evenl Call 528-0443. 'Til next Friday, I hope to see you Around Town. A 611 Breakfast Club Hostess Cupcake The costumes hats and spangles were once again oustanding for this crew of pleasure seekers. Spied holding the fort were John, along with lee and Robin Gibson. MlsS Kitty. a leaning Terry Fuxxi. Dilbert and many others were waiting for the big birthday celebration for Rick. Over at the Venture-N, V.D. was not limited to hours, but a running mara· thon the entire weekend. I overheard Larry Frazier mention how many "sweethearts" he had seen over the weekend. Spied in the festivities were Craig. the Goud Fairy, Larry M. B.U. Sam, Roger, Harold, and Bruce. Rumor has it that the Brazos River Bottom was so packed. people could not get in the door. T he Barn was festive with a John Owens Look Alike Contest won by Vince. In the fuss were Ditsy, Dale, Buzz. Roh<>rt. Tid. Im. Paul. Bart. J.J. & Burt. Then it was over to the Ripcord to view the bodies from the St. Valentine's Mas.sacre. People wore gang8ter.Iike attire: Dat'id. ''Hoppy" Boots. Mitzl, Gary, Terry, and Doug. Spied in the crowd were Mo. Rick. Paul. Randy o Events, Events Today is Go Texan Day. Tomorrow at 9:3(J a.m., the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo Parade winds through the canyons of downtown Houston. This is one of the nation's largest youth chari· ties. Backstreet Cafe is the site for the Wednesday, Feb. 24, general meeting of the Greater Mo ntrose Bus iness Guild. Following the meeting, you can rush right over to the B.RB to enter the Houston preliminaries of the Texas Country and Western dance contest. Houston winners will compete in the Texas conwst and hopefully go on to the national finals Happy Valentine's Day at thR Ranch THE VIET NAM RESTAURANT 3215 Main St. at Elgin 526-0917 Lunch Buffet M-F 11:30-2:30 $3.75 All You Can Eat Your Host and Bartender Andy Mills -------------------, I 10% Discount with this Coupon on All Menu I Items I - ------------------~ ~u ifmcmoriam ALAN C. BRENT November 28. 1949-February 4. 1987 Alan was a resident of Houston for rnne years Graveside services were held for Alan on Feb_ 6 in Arlington. Texas Alan left behind many fnends in Houston He also knew people worldwide. We will not mourn his death. but celebrate his life Rest in peace my fnend until we meet again DAVID MITCHELL David Mitchell, 35. of Houston died Feb 13. 1987 at Park Plaza Hospital after a long illness David was active in the Houston Dance Festival and many other dance organiza hons He will be missed by his many friends ·we need to have people Who mean something to us People to whom we can turn knowing that being with them 1s coming home." A memorial service will be held at MCCA at 4 30 p.m., Sunday, Feb 22. 1987 In lieu of flowers. donations may be sent to MCCR in David's memory GREGORY LEE CLARK Gregory Lee Clark. 28. died Sunday Feb 15. 1987 at the Omega House Greg is survived by his parents. Mr and Mrs Beauford Clark of Waynesville, Mo , three brothers and two sisters. the many friends he made while working at the Copa the loving friends from Omega House. South Mam Baptist Church. and St Anne·s Church who became his support group Funeral services were held at 8 00 p m , Monday. Feb. 16. 1987 at Earthman·s Fan­nm Chapel. Rev. Robert Carter. offlc1at1ng Further services and interment to be held in Waynesville. Mo For those desmng, memorials are directed to the Omega House. 616 Branard Houston. TX 77006 LANCE L. CARMEN Lance L. Carmen. 33. passed from this earth. Thursday, Feb 12, 1987 at 9:00 p_m A Houston resident smce 1980. Lance 1s survived by his partner. Mike, his parents. Darold and Janet Carmen of Pleasanton . Nebraska: and his sister Cindy and three nephews of Trenton. Nebraska Lance was a loving. caring, and dear friend to many m Houston_ We shall all miss him In lieu of flowers. the family has asked that donations be made to the AIDS Foun· dat1on Houston, PO Box 66973. Suite 115. Houston. TX 77006 All fnends are invited to attend a memor· ial service to be held at 2:00 p_m Sunday, Feb 22. 1987 at MCCA. 1919 Decatur, Houston OURf'OllCY TM Mon OSftV pa,•ongol .......-. ...,... "'lf'ICh0tr.i-'- I ... ~.id9n ..... rnan •n "lUnCefTlen rif'f'dlor•....,1...,.. .. :iuld~ 11Mtu1w ror .... 1 .:.non .Jt h-\l•NU Ol'OWl'• h ~ Tl'J~ ... Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community I~ :·i;;;:l B . ~ Direct unal or Cremation CREIDAT!On SERVICE InTERnATIOnAL® Operated by James H Murphy Funeral Homes prf~~~ $395 <ID 363-9999 FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Another DVittJ S~A Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm $1 50 Well Is $1 Beer FRIDAY Midnight Happy Hour 12-2am s1 50 Well and s1 Schnapps SATURDAY $100 Cash Drawing- 12 Midnight SUNDAY Free Beer Bust & Bar-B-Que 3-7pm $3 Cover Lip Synch Contest 10pm, Anyone Can Enter, Cash Prizes MONDAY Airline Night- s1 Bar Drinks and Beer for Airline Employees 11830 AIRLINE-445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine-Bender) 20 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20. 1987 "Oh, Thak! You've done ii' .. II only we had a camera - but, ol course, I'm getting ahead ol myself." Voice Comics '1hanks tor coming. Samethlng's wrong - everything just seems a little too quiet and normal today." This year's Irrational Fears Grand Champion worries, from her home in Madison, Wisconsin, about being caught up in a deadly lava flow. "Come away from the tools, Eugene!" I THINK THIS GOO: A LONG WA'{ lllWARP f'11DYI~(), t'N POIN\ nurr NOf All woiIDJ Af<E C!.lf-()J\ 1D i;o l\Ol)Sf\>JORK . MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 21 BEER BUST 25A DRAFT All DAY, All NIGHT 115~ ~ 7 Days a Week I-SATURDAY & SUNDAY LIQUOR BUST 15~ All the Well Liquor You Care to Drink 4pm-7pm 220 Avondale '' 1-\El.P ME μOSE I EM DOWN ~NP, DR~ 'EM OFF Wet Jockey Short Contest $200 Cash & Prizes Starring Maude Thursday Evenings 529-7525 22 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 New Stallone Movie Doesn't Make It 'Over the Top' Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose VotC'f" Sylvester Stallone and his friends, looking for new film sports to con­quer sponsored the first World Armwrestling Championships. That way they helped a fledgling EE of Stallone's letters, everything. Now Michael is graduating from a military academy. His dying mother realizes that he's become a horrible snot and a cold fish. She arranges for Stallone to pick him up in Colorado and drive him through say is not a sport for sober specta­tors. It has been inter-cut with Michael's exciting escape, mean· ingful reaction shoLe and some really stupid interviews with the contestants. It was really exciting at times. This movie left me laughing. It was partly the laugh of victory with Stallone, but I was also laughing at the movie. You won't hate yourself for loving this movie, but you won't totally forget that there are better things you could have been doing. Notes The deadline for entries to the I Ith Annual San Francisco Lesbian and Gay Film Festival is April 15, 1987. They accept nearly any format, except regular 8mm. For info a nd entry forms, contact Frameline, P.O. Box 14792, San Francisco, CA 94114 or call (415) 861-5245. Openings The Good Wife Death Before Dishonor-Marines fighting terrorists. Billy Galvin (Belair)-Karl Malden and Joyce Van Patten in the story of a turbulent father-son relationship Home of the Brave (River Oaks, 20)-Laurie Anderson Lincoln Hawk (Sylvester Stallone) congratulates his son Michael (David Mendenhall) after the boy u:ins an armu·restling match with an older opponent m "Over the Top." Sweet Charity and All That Jazz (Rice Media Ce~ ter, 20) La Tosca (MF A, 20) Le Bal (Rice Media Center, 21 & 22)-following fiO years of French history by watching dancing in a ballroom sport. Though it has a long tradi­tion, so far only 10,000 enthusiasts have squared off in tournament competitions around the country. The filmmakers also got themselves some real top-flight armwrestlers for the staged championships in their movie, OL'er the Top. Stallone is conspicuous as the only one among the final eight who doesn't have a body like a Russian power-lifter. You may have heard that this is a film where Stallone really acts. Well, he's almost allowed to. Direc­tor Menahem Golan keeps the pace up, whisking us past those moments when Stallone nearly makes us cry so fast that, although they stir our sympathies, they verge on the maudlin. The scnpt, by Stallone and Stirl­ing Silliphant, is predictable. The two-dimensional rich villain (played by Robert Loggia) is maneu­vered into a position where he will lose totally (at least for a while) if Stallone wins the competition. Meanwhile, at the competition, an announcer tells us at least six times before it happpens that Stallone will lose before he wins. But I get ahead of myself. That's so easy to do with this show. The real find is David Mendenhall. This handsome young man plays Stal­lone's son Michael. His rich grand­father has kept them apart since the boy was four or so. He's blocked all the Rockies to California. Gorgeous scenery and beautiful acting as Sly tames Michael Mendenhall is going to go places as an actor. Bravo. Film editors Don Zimmerman l,uci de/ Varieta (MFA, 21) Claymation (River Oaks)­festival of shorts Domenic D'Agosto (MFA, 22)- "Place of Weeping" addresses the apartheid situation in South Africa. Here, Joseph's widow (Thoko Ntshinpa, left) is distraught and embittered at the loss of her husband. She is seen with Gracie !Gcina Mhlophe), the voice of the nation. "Place of Weeping" is being shou·n at the Belair. and James Symons deserve much of the credit for this film 's success. fuither than keep the cam1>ra mus­ing on armwrestling, which I still Sunday in Aug ust Tosca 's Kiss (Rice Med ia Center, 26)-life in a home for retired opera singers & ?'{. u·~.., ;- ··-" --),, ·. .'. ... :'{ "lJ'. l\!QR\.0 • Gourmet Cotf" •Fine Tea • Accessories • Delicious Cakes • PntserTes • Jams • Order bf Mall (713) 524-8516 3939 Montrose Houston, nr: 77006 /l"(lf('l/07 (I .lllW .. ,1·• L-. ' ( 1o/f<';' f- (·NI" Stop by Sat. Feb. 21 From 2pm 'til 6pm tor a tasting of our Texas Gounnet Wine Jellies FLOWERS & GIFrS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Frun & Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Sluned Toys Available. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted r----------- Spanish Flower Mexican Restaurant 4701 N. Main 869-1706 A Taste of Mexico 24 Hours Daily Luncheon Special llam-2pm SpaJl!Sh Flower Dinner Beef Enchilada. Chicken Tostado. Chile con Queso. Rice. Beans. reg 5 75 Specia l $3.75 Chicken Fajitas for 2 $895 Good Any Time With this Ad Expues end o f the month Closed Tuesday 10 OOpm, LR~l!~~~l~~_J FEBRUARY 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 24 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20, 1987 Gay and lesbian reading =============from============= A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS LOVE SEX LOVESEX: The horny relationship chronicles of Max Exander, by Max Ex­ander, $7 00 Ex:ander gives a vivid description of his personal six-month odyssey toward establishing a lasting 1::3Y relauonsb p which incorporates afer sex SECRET DANGERS, by John Preston, $5.00. In this latest installment of t':te Ala Kane !>er eo;, ex-manne Kane and his young partner Danny Fortclh, battle a world·w1de terrorist nag that is using vioh."'llcc against gays to promote its own enc BELDON'S CRIMES, by Robert ReiQ­hart, $7 .00. A gnsly sex mUider and a homophobic job dismissal suddenly tum Dave Beldon's life upside-down. When he decides to fight for his rights, he becomes the country's most recognized gay man. But soon the question arises· Will Dave Beldon ultimately be the vic­tor or victim of the three-ring media circus that surrounds him? A new and original novel from the author of A Hmory of Shadows. --Now for my ned Irick .• , " NOW FOR MY NEXT TRICK • by ."! chael Y.tllhoue, 5.()(1 Michael W1L hoitc's cartoons ba\.·e been entt·rta1mog readers cl The Washington Blade for many years ow, c;ome {(Q ot his best cartoons have been collected inco tbl.S book EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7.00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engrossing - and funniest - you'll ever read MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patnoli, $12.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo--erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback) THE MOVIE LOVER, b}· Richard Friedel, S7 00 Burton Raider'.:; problems begm in t-1gh school when he realizes he's in love with his fncnJ Roman. As he gets older, the problem.:; mcrca«e - and so does the humor of his situation, in what Chns· lopher Slreet calls the funmest gay novel if the year" QUATREFOIL, by James Barr, $8.00. The year is 1946, and Philip Froelich faces a court martial for acting insubor­dmate to a lazy officer during the closin~ days of World War Il Then he meets Tim Danelaw, and soon the court mar­tial 1s among the least of Phillip's con­cern . , . This classic novel, first published m 1950, remains a romantic and suspense­ful read, an intelligently-written love story that gives a vivid picrure of our re­cent but often-forgotten past. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely~ Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet instead he finds himself pursu­ing the handsome and unpredictable Mark. L~ Tm PiSSilf. UV(S II 11*1' L(salans LONG TIME PASSING: Lives ol Older Lesbians, edited by Marcy Adelman, $8.00. In their own words, women talk about a.i;e-related concerns: the fear of losing a lover; the experiences of being a lesbian m the 1940s and 1950s; and ivmcs of lonelines<> and community ACT WEU YOUR PART, by Don Sakers, $5.00. When Keith Grail moves with bis mother to a new town, he feels like the new kid who doesn't fit in. Then he joins his high school's drama club and meets the boyishly cute Bran Daven­port REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $5.00. The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when he t0ok a gay date to his high school prom SEX POSITIVE, by Larry Uhrig, $7.00 Many religiou~ leaders have distorted Biblical pa<;sa~C'\ to condemn homosex­uality Herc Uhri~ fights back, discuo;s ­mg positive' Riblical views of same-sex rclationo;h1ps, and ar~uing that sexuality and spirituality arc closely linked THE SPARTAN, by Don Hamson, $6.00. In the days ol the lirst Olympie>, J:'.ay relationships were a common and valued pan of life The Spartan tclb the ~wry of a you~ athlete and bis adven­tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our lllitory A BLACK GAY ANTHOLOGY I ~ T HE LIFE ~ (OlllDIY.luSl"'11UJiol INT~llOOllYIYiY(lt(lll IN THE LIFE: A black gay anthology, edited by Joseph Beam, $8.00. When Joseph Beam became frustrated that so little gay male literature spoke to him as a black gay man, he decided to do some­thing about 1t. The result is this an­thology, in which 29 comributors, through stories, essays, verse and art­work, have made heard the voice of a too-often silent minority THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Heinz Heger, $6.00 Thousands of gays were thrown into Nazi concentration camps for the crime of homosexuality. Heinz Heger is the only one ever to have told his story. Here is a chilling recollection of one of the most frightening chapters of our gay past WORLDS APART, edited by Camilla Decarnin, Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo, $8.00. These collected science ficuon stories present a wide array of imagina­tive characters, from a black lesbian vampire to a gay psychodroid . Here is adventure, romance, and excitement - and perhaps some genuine alternatives for our future. -----TO ORDER-----j Enclosed is s_ - Please send I the books I've listed below I (Add $1.00 postage when order- I ing 1usl one book; if you order I more than one we'll pay postage.) I Visa and Mastercard accepted; enclose acct. no., exp. date, and signature. Send me these books: name address City state Zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept P-5 40 Plyr~ton St. Boston,A 02118 L--------------- I I I I VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 1t l1sted herein the Vo1cewherel1ter· ally thousands turn each week TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure, newsletter promotion can help our business larget your goals and reach your market Call 524-0409 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional seNice through a VoiceClass1hed Cati 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club, MasterCard Visa or Carte Blanche ADVERTISING Layout­Design- Copy 229-0759 ANNOUNCEMENTS KELLY BRADLEY, M.B.S., A.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lndw1dual, family and group practice l1m1ted to coping-stress. role relation­ships and self-concept 1ntervent1on O!lice 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news· paper having pubhshed conllnuously for over 5 years. is quallf1ed to accept legal nohces ANSWERING SERVICES HARD TIMES MESSAGE CENTER 933 1945 SU OUR OISPUIY AO PAGE MEi COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS. 622 .... 240 !;ff OUR Dl"";PUIY AO Page Me!'" Electronic Telephone Answ ering Compulf•r1.rf>d Answe1 inq Service For Your PersonAI and Home u .. • ~4 Hour 7 Day Service· • Your Mess:iqt·s <Ufl Private • No LIVf' 0pl'rfl10rS No M1slakes Only 5q 77 monlhty A•k About Frff Tu • I Otter CidlJ•milt 622-4240 011,,f•Ho r '"' ipm,,.,• f ANTIQUES YESTERDAY'S WORLD ANTIQUE$. 1715 Westhetmer. 52&2646 ~E OUR PISPUIY AO Yesterday's World Antiques 1715 Westheimer 526- 2646 Sm.ill Shop Small Pt 1r<•s ATTORNEY PHYLLIS FRYE, '123-8368 General prac­tice of law ELAINE SHAW, 222-7772. 645-3159 '>ff OUR PISf'tAY AO ELAINE SHAW : ~~f~81r!~.t~~: • Pos~sion • Family Law • Ac1 •dP.nt 222-7772 or 645-3159 N•otC !>ylo 8d >I AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2516 Genesee ( 101 Pacific), 526-3723 SH OUR PISPLAI' AD SAL VIN AUTOMOTIVE. 524-82 19 Sff OUR OISPl.AY AO i"AF-T AUTOMCfr1ve. 141·1 Tait. 522-2 190 SH OUR OISf'tAY AO WORRIED ABOUT YOUR CAR? Let Bruce or John check 11 out fapenenced. Dependable Mechanic. Reasonable Rates SALV1N AUTOMOTIVE 120 W. 111h 524-t21t 811-2841 To advertise. coll 529-8490 during business hours NEARTOWN KARZ. 1901 Taft. 524-8601 Sff OUR DISPLAY AO WEST GAAV-AlJTQ.238 W Gray. 528-2886 SEE OUR DISPl..A YAO r I I I I I I I L - - - - - 1 Brake Special $59.95 per axle Tune-Up Special 4 cylinder $49.95 6 cylinder $59.95 8 cylinder $69. 95 West Gray Auto 238 W. Gray-528-2886 • Uectrlca l Wonr • Converten =~~a~ • Mum.rs • TirM Cor I • A/C Repak $fM<:lallst •Flats Axed I T• a• State lnspectton Station &om-5.JOpm Mon.-Sot ------- J MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 CarburelO< Sp c1ol1st Electrical Repairs All Broke WO<k BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS Haircuts, etc. by Mike Shampoo Cut & Blow Dry $14 by Mike ~~ SALON 1515 ~ Dunlavy 522- 7866 Oino·sBarberShop.302W 11th Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 tor appo1nlment Tommy·s Barber Shop, haircuts $10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appomlments 528- 82 16 HAIRCUTs--ev MIKE~ 522-3000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD JON BARTON. 15-tS•,; Ot;n18vy. 522-7866 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO BARS Knew Mood Nu-bar Second drink com­plimentary with mention of this ad 1336 Westhe1mer 529-3332 GAY BARS The lollow1ng hst are only the gay bars which have placed a recent advertisement m the Voice For 1nformat1on on these bars. please see their ads For1nlormat1on on other bars tsuch as type of chentele). call the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 or see their ads m other pubhcattons BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM. 2400 Bra­zos. 528-9192 SEEflUROISPt..AYAD CHUTES: 1732 Westhe1mer. 523-::.2213 SEE OUR OISPt..AY AD CRYSTALS. OVER-LOoKING­MONTAOSE. 911 W Drew. 522-7524 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO DiRTYsACl Y·S.220 Avondale. 529-7525 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO KJ·S, 11830 Alrlnie. 445-5849 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MAAY:S~ 1022 Wisthe1mer. 528-885-1 Sff OUR 01!>PLAY AO M1CHAELS~ 428 Westhe1mer. 529-2500 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO AENDEZVOuS.-1-100 Westheimer. 527-8619 SEE OUR OISPl.AY All ROCK N·-HoASE. 5131 Kirby. 520-9910 S_EE OURDl~lAY AO THE~~ 1{>,~~A~~~e. 528-9079 VENTURE--N~ 2923 Mam. 522-0CXXl ;>EE OUR DISPLAY A( BONDSMAN A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fast couneous discreet. all type of ~;,~~~~~= v~:~z~~~ ~2~1~~fda~?:~:?.ri~ bonds 678-4488. 621-8452 CARS AND BIKES "79 Fiat X19 hard top convertible 46.000 miles. good condition. St.395 520-6166 - - SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose Voice class1!1ed ad Call 529-8490 CHURCHES K1NGOOM -C-OMMUNITV CHURCH. 6U E 19th. 88(}-3527. 351 .... 217 SEE OUR DISPt.AY AO CENT-ER FOAA.Pos1T1ve LTF-ESTYLE~ 531-6600 SEE OUR D1SPUIY AD Kini::dom Community Church Jom Our Family in 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays llam 880-3527 or 351-4217 CLEANING SVCS BRIGHTEN UP WITH BRIGHT Excellent housekeeptng service. Reliable Reasonable rates 529-6798 SERVICE PLUS A Ou•llty C~e.nlng S9n'lee R~denll•I • Commerclal e BONDED • Jeff Cunnlngh•m 522-3451 FEBRUARY 20, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 25 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES EARN $6,00- $18,000 MONTHLY LET ME DESCRIBE ME •n ~ $1f JO 1 lf'Ol"l111""' • ..- t1 t.,... Tl'" rest ol tile t me basked•nth4'sunandflo;>Wmy .11r1- ~·n M11w,1e1nd 1wt. nl.$.penendtheOlher3 IUSI ple11•"9 wrth "'e .(months 190 .nd What The~ >< •nd :eme 1 d~lr.bulor tor th• hcttest Network Maf11.9'1ng Deal '" ll11Jt.:Jry P()("l1"111 Sure. f worked nard lor : n'!0n~~~~:w~~ ~=~:,: Em~~IQM fOf LIFE' Tn.s 1s not USA. HERBALIFE. AM'W"Y Of MARY KAY II yQUC81t 1t'l1$wt!e'k I will •.C:nJ•t and tr••" you into tne g1eatesl hneneia1 oPQOrh.1n•ty ot yOUr M• In"' or 5 montt11 yOUll be eemmg more money then you can spend. but more •moonen\ly you W• J have ttie FREEDOM TO LIVE RE,.LLY FOR PRIVATE 1 HOUR INTERVIEW CA.LL (713) 147-5633 DO NOT CALL UNLESS YOU ARE WILLING TO llE INTERVIEWED. LIVE1 I refuse to d•SCUH 1h1S opponun•IY over the phone The Otlly tturigyou h•ve to IOM is 1 hour Ind you ire tos1n9 8 to 10 everydey roght n0w" <ill mootl\I ~o I was worrying •bout my FoleyS b•ll loclay I'm negot1at1ng IOf •see nd nome•n "'pen lsten~w•the$185n•vestmenl Now 1&n·11hat OUTRAGEOUS! COFFEE c0FFEE&TEA WORLD. 3939-A­Monirose. 524-8536 SEE - •.qDf<;Pt..AYAD COMMERCIAL SPACE Health c1ub tor lease. 3207 Montrnw 661- 9774 CONSIGNMENTS fin~~!~~1- . Antiques, Estate ·soles On and Off Premises 203 7 Norlolk (b«W..n Hmord ond SMph"d) 522-3662 CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING All AMERICAN-CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 -FOUR °'5Pl..AY AO HsKcONTRACTTNG. 52'1-9064 --E OURDrSPLAYAD COUNSELING OR N-ICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Wetch. 527-8680 >EE OUR DISPLAY AO DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. 0 D.S 4°'27 Westhe1mer. 524-0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO RONALD A PETERS. DDS s2Ci W Ala­bama 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe11ner t-km~r'M"l. TX 77006 M• lfl<'lay lhru Sa1urddy Hour~ by Appc:•oritmi "'' (713) 524- 0538 DWELLINGS. RDDMMA TES. HDUSES/ APTS. FDR SALE. RENT. LEASE Medical Center Midtown. Monlrose 1920s bungalow. separa1e hving. dtn1ng rooms. 3 bedrooms. kitchen. bath. hard­wood floors. fireplace. yard. 9~· ceilings off street parking. 526-8634 654-7766 Honest. dependable roommate to share 2 bedroo"m Monlrose $200tmo plus 'b ut1h- 11es 526-0756 GwM desires same to share 2-1~ apt Montrose area $175 plus~ bills Must be neat, malure. respans1ble 523-6004 early morning/ after 11pm AVONDALE SQUARE APTS. Cl r 1 bdrm & 2 bdrm apanments $235 & S~ mo Pool 2nd month free Call 5~14t- 105 Avondal FREE APARMENT L OCATING Htn ston Gatveston area Let me help­Cal Rob (713)981-5560 ROOMMATE WANTED Respons1bte GWM Private room. fully lurr1shed apt Reasonable rent 870-9509 Montrose one bedroom apt 1n small quiet complex with pool. security gates. laundry tactlit•es. cable available Adults No pets S 100 dep S265pluselectnc 713- i21}-8178 3 pools, free coble, utilities poid Only o few units left But still Worth a Call 621-7880 Another Fine finge.- Property VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Voice Classtfted Call 521}-8490 And ~~:rg~~~~C!~~r ti:n~~nM~~~r~1 ~; Visa EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED Part-time young man or student with TDL for hght duties 1n building and antique shop. 523-9996. 3714 Main. 77002 E XPERIENCED CABINET MAKER 1mmechate opening 445...t141 - KEEP YOUR PRESENT JOB Supplement your income Earn financial freedom 1n 6 mos I need 10 d1stnbutors 1mmed1ately Call 868-4608 Gr"""eenspo1i-ti area. g•"rl-o-,g-u-yF-,-,d-ay-M-uSI rype and be lam•har with general office skills Only experienced need apply 445- •141 DIALING FOR DOLLARS Our representatrves shared $10.000 last week Mak1ng their average mcome $500 per week Cat The Money Makers 271- 6736 PERFORMING ARTS Box office seeks qua11f1ed personnel. excellent verbal skills required After­noon. eYer>ing or both. Call Mr Schwanz 52&5323 !MISC.I FDR SALE FOR YARD SALES See ads undef ··vard Sa1es· at the end ol the voice c1.ss1f1eds 26 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 20, 1987 FUNERAL DIRECTORS 5oUTHWEST FUNERAL OIAEC..;ORS t219 wercn. 528-3851 E If P Ar'AD CREMATION SERI/ICE INTERNATIONAL 3400 Mnntr-w 529-6666 SEEC ·R PlA 'f AO FURNITURE REFINISHING GIFTS GYMS PARKWAY ATHLPIC CLUB. IY" Rosine. 52&-5467 INSURANCE BRIAN LOHSE ~ •16 0~ 1r~. 266-6832 UE OUROSPl..A .Al INSURANCE Ma1or medical health (no AIDS exclusion·, and d1sab1h­ty insurance available for 1nd1- v1duals and groups Reasona­ble rates For more info cal Brian Lohse at 260-8832 LAWN CARE BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS. S23-LAWN SEE· 'AOISPl.A~AO STIXX ANO CHIPS 1NC 665-6294 332-444~ SEE - , Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards. repair and build wood fences. light hauling, lawn care. light mov­ing. house cleaning. p a int in g . g u tters . small house repairs . Free Estimates LEATHER LEATHER BY Bl 'T '11 Fairvtew • ·2668 I - - - LEATHER BY BOOTS ~ Custom Oe619n ~oom 7HF01rv1ew 8 Adorns Lid -The 611 leothef By loots-the Ripcord -Houston Texos-ll" s leothef-Cho1n Duve -Austin. T•os- MEDICAL CARE STEVE O MARTINEZ Mo 12 Oak Tew"'°, 4126SW Fwy •1000 621 7771 FABRE CLINIC 5503 Crawford. 526- 2320 SEE OU MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS RX: RELAX Massage by 8111 0 RourkE M~'T State registered masseur N<' '0431 24 hoors yw rates In :>tout 869-229B Houston handsome healthy honest and mascuhne (713) 98&-0402 Marc ~bdown your place Chet '3. preferred van 531 9952 No overwe1ght A PREMIUM SERVICE Body Rub 24 ~n ~26--371 For an e•c !mg tun-fiUed body rub (arl Peter 404-'8 181 THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David O of Et (713) 5~2'32 STOP getting rubbed the wrong way Call Carl 62V3942 Shmulatmg body rubs Out calls 529- 1970 ;ensuous massage 1n :>' 524- '97( MOVERS MOVEMASTERS Boio:es toott Visa. MC. Ameio: Wf lcom~ 1925 Westh 1m 1r 6.I0-6~ ;5 PAPER HANGING All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 -- LAO AD Pa per Ha nging ariCJ Vinyl Residential and Commerc1ol All Types Remodeling All AMERICAN CONSTl1UCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 PERSONALS Wanted Raw sensu littl Buck 29 waist or tess. that l•k01 hug and k1:a es. capable of total submission to6· GentleS­tud. 30"' waist 529-3983 ~~d,;11 ~G~~- 12~~3~~;~Pe~~~~:i::n: moustache) 11vmg wesl ol Gessner to share common 1nleresls and a possible relationship I am 24. GWM good looking hairy. clean shaven. professionally oriented and a l•ltle shy but fun Inter­ests include mov1es.1ravel. d1n1ng out and all ty~s of music Send• letter and phOto 11 poss1bte) to P 0 Bo• 820056 Houston T eio:as 77282-0056 LEATHERMAN SEXLINK Get olf w•th tOOCh of Leathermen like you• No phony actors Private conhden· tial No bill to phone bu! tng··dist One-on­one. man-lo-man connect.ans Low-cost 24-hour S&M HoU1ne 415' 146-8747 Professional, career minded, GBM 33 I am mleresled 1n meeting GWM who are career minded and also have time for the romance •n hie Ou1e1 times and maybe dinner for two? Reply Blind Box 330-M Clo Voice A ll fetish uncensored adllst•ngs Body ~::;~~e:~Y1~,~~=c~e5~h~ ~~:x~a;g :~~ 10th. NYC 10011 CELEBRITY STATUS Thirteen-year study ilslS cut.- uncut status ol 1200 celebrittes Lisi and newsletters available II sub1ect interests you. write Chuck Thompson. Boio: 691024_ Holly wood. CA 90069 MALE MODELS WANTED Profes..,1ona1 phorographer w•th the nght connections Sf"f'kS attractive gay men tor ad work and !or subm1ss1on 10 national gay mate magazines If sefecled tor a phOlo sess.on. you will ~ paid Call Henry at the Montrose Voice 529-8490 GOOD DAYS BAO Improve your cham es n romance finance busmen lhru biorhylhms Send name b1rthdale •netuding year wtth se 00 to Konrad. 2615 Waugh •2948 HP'JSton TX 77006 GwM 32 5 8 •50 lbs brown hair and eyes. looking tor that spec:ial perman enl person rm sens1!111e. caung hOnest 1y and stable I 11ke music danong _,ports. home Ille, ea1in9 out. and rehg1on This ad is for those as serious as I am Write 2470 S Dairy Ashford •116 Hous· tjm 77077 LIVE ACTION NETWORK 976-IJ500 l JRD Pf.AYA/) ATIRACTIVE GWM s·11r 1501bs 3Z enlQysagoodl•mew•th \11meone wtlO cares Loves to cuddle and 11are trtt•mate momen1s 1oqe1her Look 1ng lor a professional GWM 27~37 14( 180 who en!OyS lhe same Ad 327 A c Vooce PLAY safely a1 " 0 E M~hngs $ nights a week And •Is lun (See our otner •ds 1 RULES FOR THE PERSONALS Person­als (and other 9d11er11s1ngJ should not describe or imply a description of seio:ual >rgans or acts No P8fsonats should be directed to minors Advertising mus1 be po11t1ve. not negative (JI you have certain preterences .n other people. It.I lhe qualities you desire Please don·1 bl N•gat•ve by hstmg the kinds of people or qua1111es you don I desire Thank you and happy hunting AN EROTIC ADVENTURE The Soc ety ot J OE a pri11ate organiza t.on for reasonably attracl•ve adult gay men meets 5 nights w~ly Admission times are 8-9pm Tues & Tnurs 11pm- 145am Fn &S.at 6-9pmSun attheCol tage Playhouse 61 t Pac1hc (Rear ol house ook for Play$ale flag ) CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry s One--Hout PhOlo has moved 10 408 Avondale 1n 1he same bu Id ng as ·he Monuose Voice Open Monday-Friday 9arn-6pm SAFE SEX? ForyourmentaJhealth havese:o: Furyou• physical health make •I salesex Salesex is where there are no b0d1ry fluids exchanged The virus which leads to an AIDS cond1t1on •S believed usua !y trans· milled from one person 10 another lrom blood or semen ThOSe who are recep­tive · are especially a1 risk Do condoms protect? They carta1nly tie!P Bui con· doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant llhe new prOducl Lubrasepl1c is especially reeommended) Petroleum or vegetable-based lubricants will actually dn">olve the condom and eliminate ttle f t• 1n Pl .ase ·p1ay 'Safe A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their book ·c1ass1!1ed Alla1rs .. they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to eio:pect when you prace or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny htUe abbreviations mean Send $,­to ··c1ass1!1ed Allairs. Alyson Pub . Depl P-5 40 Plympton . St Boston. MA 021 t8 !Also included w•il be a coupon for $5 oft on your neio:t Personals 1n your choice of 25 publ :at• )'"' ,.,.r udmg th Voice t PEST CONTROL AESUL TS HOME CHEMICAi & PEST CONTROL. 251; Elm<'n. 524-q41~ 223-4000 >EE OUR DISP~.AV AD PETS ANGELS TO ZEBRAS Petworld 11725 Eastex Freeway at East Mt Houston 590-0471 TOM"S PRETTY FISH 224 Westhetmer. 520-6443 ~EE OUF DISPIAV Al PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT All" Pri'lt1ng and dev ip1 lg. enlargements. 1umbo pnnts film Kodak paper. 2615 Waugh Or 520-1010 HENAY"S 1 HOUR PHOTn 428' W~I· he1mer. 529·0869 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PRINTING SPEEDY PAINTING 5400 Bellaire Bl11d. 667-7417 SEE OURDl,,PLAYAJ PSYCHOLOGISTS DR NICHOLAS EDD. 2 128 Welch. 527-8680 SEE OUR DI ;PLAY AD Dr. Nicholas Edd, Psy.D PSYCHOLOGIST Insurance Acceptffd- 2' Hour Phone Service MP.lnOr•~I City Prot Blctq 1 -,,2 F twood Sle 269 I- • •65 2377 M•introse 212 We. ·t- 527 '\6fl"' RESTAURANTS CHAPUL TEPEC. 11 R1 mi 1d 522-2365 S.El OUR !1 SP A1 Al CHARLIE"$. 1102 Westhe1mer ~22- '3332 ff OUR DIS,. AY ACJ CAFE EDI. W Alabama at Shephard 520-5221 ">_E( OUR DISPI AY A(> NICKY'S PLACE. 2109 Dunlavy 520-8039 <>fEOURD'SP AJA(> PIZZA INN 3105 S Shepherd. 522-5676 SH OURDS. AYA(> Par PIE. 15l5 W~the1mer 528-4150 -r· - - - A Ar Pizza inn. .ft Delivery (Hotline) 522-5676 11115 St · ·phPrd 'tHE J>O't VIE Open 24 Hours a Day 1525 Wes1helmer 528-4350 CAFE EDI-Chicken Fish P11ta 2tar1 Anytime with this Coupon per P•rty o l Two Orders to Go, Call 520-5221 -W-. Ala-bam-a a-t Sh-eph-erd STORES [MISC. ITEM SJ - iE EAG .E t544 Westl 5 !4-7':13 SEE r Peeved at Urinalysis?? Alcohol • Drug Free Urine Specimens $2A.95 pet CallEve•-eds 450-1761 We Aim to Pteose SUPERMARKETS KROGER. 1300 M11ntrr TAX PREPARATION BILL ROBERTS CPA. 871- 1329 TIRES THE TIRE- PLACE~ 1307 F81r\118W_ 529- 1414 - SfE 1R 01. :l'l.A Y AD ··~ 529 1414 $\HE 1 U\ £ PlA4:E ALL BRANDS 1307 Fa1rv1ew hlkSW€ 1 :;!~< TRAVEL NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOI ;E 1118 Ursuhnes. (504) 566-1177 Sf" OUR DISPlAY AD FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE 1620 Frankhn. Den11er. Co f303) 33 1-9106 Sf OVR - ,PtAYA,- FRANKLIN HOUSE DENVER :lO:! ·:l:! i- 9106 520-8108 in Houston for info A Guest House at 1620 Franklin Den ver, CO 80218 Rato- ~ -, S1 From !) TYPESETTING JAME DAY TYPE-iETTERS. 408 Avondale, 529-084~ SfE l')CJfl OISP'AYAI UPHOLSTERY. REFINISHING FURNITURE STRIPPING SHOP In the heart ol Montrose_ Rehnishmg. repairs. upholstery 529-7833 ALLEN WADSWORTH co_ INC- 9830 Sweetwater. 445-4141 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VIDEO LOBO VIDEO. 1424-C Westhe1mer 522-5156 SfE OUR DISPLAY A{) WE DELIVER VIDEOS. 1420 Westhe1mer. 522-4485 t I JR OISPLAV AD WILLS STOP PROCRASTINATING Protect your loved ones Complete per· sonalized w•lls. most only $50 Call 522· 2485. evenings or write People's Will. P 0 Boio: 66541. Houston 77266 YARD & GARAGE SALES SUPER GARAGE SALE 1208 Willard. between Waugh Dr & Mont­rose. Sat Feb 21. Sun Feb. 22. 9am-6pm Furniture. household and miscellaneous items Prtced lo sell HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 here then stand back for the crowd Call 529-8490 or 111s1t the Voice at 408 A11ondale to place your yard sale announcement ADS BY THE INCH In additi on to o ur reg u lar classi fied rates of paying "by the word ."" you can purchase space here •·by the inch." Since these are considered ''Display Ads," not "Classified Ads," you can include special art, logos o r fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 Above rates apply to Weekend Edit io n Rates for Midweek Edrt ion are 1/2 above rates February is Gay and Lesbian Media Awareness Month- Sponsored by the Media Fund for Human Rights and the Gay and Lesbian Press Association . FEBRUARY 20. 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 27 We're Houston's largest Cay Alllience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice. We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewher~ around $6,000,000 weekly on the things we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartments, cars and repair. hair care, serious things and silly th11 " . C Y~s . that's $6 million weekly.) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 for ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY Heres"'""""" tig.,;red thil ti.qure S.. dWnbul )n 10000 copies ffl<'J&y . 5000 CoP* TUftd•Y temporanly suspended I Assumed pas >n ret'l lactcw 2 9 Thul ft& 1n111ed fHder.riip appro~ 27 000 C5'11o alki "'ed lor returnt.I It..,. atsum& me 8"'909 amono ''* IPPndS S225 a ..,......,..... ron everyt'1WWiJ n I tel then - couect~ly ~ $~985000 ~ THESE FIGURE -IAW: BEE"< AOJVSTlO FAt:'.A lAAl £A PU8i.. :SH£0 FIGURES WHICH HAD ALSO AE.FlEClEO THE "JESOAY EO.T Tt-ESE FIGURES AHLE.CT 0""LY TH£ fAIOAY £OIT10N 28 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 20. 1987
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