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Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986 - File 022. 1986-10-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2827/show/2819.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-10-17). Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2827/show/2819

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986 - File 022, 1986-10-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2827/show/2819.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 17, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript OCTOBER 17, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 'Children' An Outstanding Pic of the Year William Hurt and Marlee Matlin break the barriers in communicating despite their deepest emotions in "Children of a Lesser God" By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice □ Children of a Lesser God I have to admit that this film is one of the best I've seen this year. A stunning look at the deaf, Children is so overwhelmingly beautiful and romantic, you want to hold it in your hands and treasure it for a long time. The movie is an adaptation of the 1979 play that won three Tony's, one for Rest Play. Original writer Mark Medoff and Hesper Anderson have worked on the play so it isn't preachy, and the result is a funny, mysterious, and often frustrating film. I think that by watching this movie, many people will go away with a greater understanding of the deaf and signing. James Leeds (William Hurt who won Best Actor last year) is a teacher whose methods are not all conventional. He plays music very loud so that his students can maybe hear (some hear through their nose.). Eventually, the students are making some sounds and dancing in assembly shows. James is an exceptional teacher, but he runs into someone that he can't handle. Sarah (Marlee Matlin) is a beautiful young woman who has been at the school for years and is the cleaning lady. Very withdrawn, humorless, and stubborn, she refuses to accept anything from anyone. James is fascinated by this woman, but all attempts fail. She just runs away if she gets upset and even throws things in fite of frenzy. She's obviously hiding a lot of deep problems, and she doesn't want them to come out. She would much rather keep her lowly job, even though she defintitely has the potential. James has other ideas. His priority at first is to get her to talk, but he starts to get romantic notions that aren't too well received. Shy but cautious, Sarah finally gives in to some romance, but nothing too close or demanding. She does enjoy a lot of sex, but the romance is a hard roller coaster ride where Sarah tries hard to avoid responsibility. William Hurt is so good, I think that this is truly his best performance. His work with the children is so wonderful that I wish I could have been as good of a teacher as he. His devotion putting up with Sarah is both tender and harsh, sometimes forcing this gentle man into a rage. Marlee Matlin is so superb in her debut, you know that she will get an Oscar nomination. Matlin is hearing impaired in real life, and her signing is beautiful and perfect. There is a scene where she swims like a dolphin naked in a pool, and you can hardly keep your eyes off her. She is a deep, powerful woman who can't seem to understand that there is love and tenderness in the world. With an inspired performance by Piper Laurie as the mother, we have a complete movie. This is a great treat, and I hope everyone will see it. You're sure to see it up for many awards. □ Peggy Sue Got Married Peggie Sue has been raved and panned, but \ikeBack to the Future (which the film has tendencies towards), this film is fluff and silliness. No doubt people will be lining up for this easy entertainment but there are so many other good films to see that are stimulating and important. I was disappointed in this film because it's really nothing new or inventive. The savior of the film is Kathleen Turner, a good actress who is stunning even in mediocre films. It's a little bit strange to see this grown-up woman as a teenager goes back to the sixties, but as the film progresses she grows on you. Francis Ford Coppola took over this film from someone else, with a change from Debra Winger to Turner in the lead. This is a very lighthearted effort for Coppola compared to efforts like Rumblefish, One From the Heart, and the "Godfathers," and he doesn't seem to have his heart in this material. I just don't think that the material is there to work with, and Coppola (as great as he is) maybe spent too much trying to make something of nothing. The plot is simple. Peggy Sue goes to her 25th anniversary prom and she faints when she is named prom queen (how quaint). When she wakes up, she is in a blood donor building back in 1960. After this very silly beginning, things get more interesting. Peggy Sue is thrilled with her young parents, close friends, and her grandparents that are dead in the eighties. Everyone thinks she's crazy as, in her joy, she hugs and kisses everyone. Somehow the movie never gets very deep, even with all the potential this film could have in discovering how Peggy Sue could change the future. It's just going back to the past, and a lot of us don't really care to relive our teens. The future is what we really need to look forward to. The very biggest drawback in this film is Nicolas Cage (Birdy) who is a very, very bad actor who is not attractive and cannot speak clearly. Cage is Peggy Sue's husband in the eighties (whom she is divorcing) and her rude insensitive boyfriend in the sixties who always thinks of himself. Complete with popadour hairdo. Cage is not romantic. Why Peggy Sue would be remotely interested in this characteris really beyond me. On the other hand, Barry Miller as the class nerd whom Peggy Sue tells all the scientific accomplishments ofthe eighties is a real treat. The girlfriends such as Catherine Hicks and Lisa Jane Persky are a lively bunch that gives the film a little zing. This film needed more interesting supporting players, because it seems as if Kathleen carries too much of the film. Sorry to say, I can't highly recommend this film. Nicolas Cage ruined the whole film for me, along with the silly story. Not a film to rush to, some might like it for a matinee. As for me, I think it's close to a nothing film. Peggy Sue (Kathleen Turner) prepares for her 25th reunion with a helping hand from her daughter, Beth (Helen Hunt)
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