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Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986
File 010
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Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986 - File 010. 1986-10-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2827/show/2807.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-10-17). Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2827/show/2807

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986 - File 010, 1986-10-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2827/show/2807.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 312, October 17, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 17, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript Africa Badly Needed a Successful U.S.-Soviet Summit OCTOBER 17, 1986/MONTROSE VOICE 9 By A.M. Babu Pacific News Service Commentary Special to the Montrose Voice Despite shrill accusations of superpower collusion by some Third World leaders, poor countries had much to gain if the recent summit had been successful. Third World countries, especially in Africa, are inherently unstable—many are artificial colonial creations suffering from economic stagnation, border conflicts, coups and counter-coups, liberation movements. Again and again, the superpowers have exploited these conflicts for their own global interests, further destabaliz- ing the Third World. That is why genuinely non-aligned African leaders had wished for a Reagan-Gorbachev summit that would have minimized world tension. Africa contains two of the most dangerous trouble spots that could trigger superpower confrontation: the Horn of Africa, with its proximity to oil-rich Saudi Arabia, and South Africa, with its Cape route through which oil supertankers pass on their trip from the Gulf. Moreover, a large part of Africa is Arab and therefore directly involved in Middle East conflicts. The urgent need to resolve any one of these conflicts must not he underrated. But the most important step the superpowers could take would be to tackle Africa as a whole—to end their rivalry on the continent and work jointly to stop its deterioration to utter misery and degradation. The most glaring examples of countries in deep trouble are those which have identified themselves with one or another superpower. Not accidentally, these also happen to be countries with intense internal conflicts: Mozambique, Angola, Ethiopia, Zaire, Sudan, Somalia, for example. The conflicts not only are sharpened by superpower meddling, they feed off the frustrations and impatience of an emergent youth who see the older generation as having messed up their lives and left them with unbearable debt and mangled economies. It is sickening to see an ambitious man like Angola's rebel Savimbi received on a red carpet by top U.S. officials simply because he makes anti- Soviet noises. But it is even more dangerous to international stability for every ambitious braggart to be assured of superpower support if he delcares war on his own government so long as it happens to be a favorite of the other superpower. m MISSIS ^ (pipwr 'EM* tzeBtoev anew - WITH Hf£ ftsrio.. On the economic front, the situation is a question of life and death. If millions now perish either through starvation, malnutrition or related disease when the continent has only 400 million more mouths to feed, what will happen by the turn of the century when there are 400 million more? A tiny fraction of the superpowers' expenditure on arms and space exploration could transform even the Sahara into fertile and lush green fields This is a question which requires the superpowers to go beyond minimizing world tensions to some form of real constructive cooperation. The greatest and immediate need is water. Though Africa abounds in rivers, water is scarce on much of the continent. The United States and the Soviet Union have accomplished miracles in water works—the Soviets have just embarked on another gigantic scheme to redirect water down a 2000 kilometer canal to arid parts of Soviet Asia at a mere cost of $10 billion. A tiny fraction of the superpowers' expenditure on arms and space exploration could transform even the Sahara into fertile and lush green fields. ^ I umTK mxt $eav m FEIFFEFT urn® s.v.\.fg&Ba\? -ftSffiO.: mm With their combined expertise and resources, the United States and Soviet Union could embark on a joint enterprise to change the face of Africa through irrigation canals, land fertilization, reforestation—and even guarantee it future rain. The responsibility for such a project could be extended to include other permanent members of the UN Security Council, Japan and Germany. If the summit process had gotten the discussions going, the UN could have then mm*. 1420 Westheimer Houslon. Texas 77006 522-4485 WE DELIVER VIDEOS Heads and Tails Above the Rest -Lage Selection of All-Male VHS Tapes —Tues.. Thurs and Sun. Rentals $2 for Our Members —Now Open Sunday 2 to 8 OPEN 7 DAYS ■ Amex, Visa. MC summoned a special conference of the Security Council and the Organiztion of African Unity to work out a 20-year program for water and land transformation for Africa. This was the best and only way to end the Cold War in Africa, rescue the continent and further world peace in the process. PNS associate editor A.M. Babu. a former economic development minister of Tanzania who has taught a! Amherst and other U.S. colleges, is a veteran analyst of African and Third World affairs. NCOQTni IN i iciii\ i uuii i »1 fjac and Gene\ Servicing the Montrose" < ( 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER)-? ...» 524-8601SSSSST i Owned & Operated _ .eneral Auto Repair Tune Ups • Oil Changes • Brakes • Tues.-Sat Texas State Optical—Village has moved to 6737 Stella Link at Bellaire Blvd. 432-1137 Mon.-Fri. 10:00-6:00 Saturday 10:00-4:00 Five Pines Apartments MONTROSE—BISSONNET— MUSEUM AREA Efficiencies at S200/mo.* Totally Remodeled All NEW carpets, drapes, mini-blinds, lights All Adult. Secured. Quiet Neighborhood. Covered Parking '$200 monthly for first 3 months, then increasing in increments to $225 monthly. Hansen Management 795-0478
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