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Houston Voice, No. 996, November 26, 1999
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Houston Voice, No. 996, November 26, 1999 - File 001. 1996-11-26. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2713/show/2676.

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(1996-11-26). Houston Voice, No. 996, November 26, 1999 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2713/show/2676

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 996, November 26, 1999 - File 001, 1996-11-26, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2713/show/2676.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 996, November 26, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date November 26, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 996 Openly gay Rev. Bill Clark finds home in a small Fort Bend County church, using a mix of compassion, humor and open­ness to find suc­cess in his first full-time position. Page 5 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE . 'Boogie Nights' actor Philip Seymour Hoffman garners high praise for trans role, discov­ers a new empa­thy and respect for drag queens and transsexuals. Page 19 NOVEMBER 26, 1999 Bradley, Gore spar over gay rights For the first time, a viable candidate for president has called for 'sexual orientation' to be added to the land­mark 1964 Civil Rights Act, but his opposition may surprise you by l.At.:RA BROWN When Democratic presidential candidate Bill Br.1dley first issul'<l a call to amend the landmark Ci\·il Rights Act of 1964 to include "Sl'Xu.il orientation," the campaign stand­while evidence of the greatest c<1mpchtion for g.1y votes ever in a pn•sidential race­newrthdess drew fi•( trom some g.1y rights supporters Rep. Barnl'Y I r,mk (D-~lass.), the most sel'ior openly gay representative in Congress, <;a1d Bradley was "wdl-inten­tioned but very incorrect" in suggesting the C'1v1I Rights Act be <1mended "I .1dm1rc hts instinct," Frank s.11d .it thl' time "But he is mistaken about the way to do it What Bill Bradley has proposed ignon.•s the very careful legislatin~ work we've been doing. I wish he had checked with us." Several African-American civil righ ts leaders, including Rev Jesse Jackson, also too dangerous m a consen'ahve Con!,~css that could use the opportunity to re~tnct affirmative action or other means of addressing discrimination agaire;t minon­hes. Spurred by black caucus leaders and oth­ers who support Vice President Al Gore, Bradley's only opponent for the party's presidential nomination, the publicly disagreed with Bradley's pro­posal. ~---~- Democratic Opening up the 1964 Civil Rights Act, they said, is :--.: at ion a I weighed m-€xprcssmh strong support" for the Employment l\on-Dt~cnmmallon Act, a federal bill to ban job d1scnmmahon on the basis of sexual orientation, wlule urg­ing the 1964 act "not be re-opened for debate or amendments." The \'isceral reaction against adding "sex­ual orientation" to the landmark civii rights law by gay rights leaders and others gener­ally supporttve of gay nght has rw.ed eye­brow: s for several reasons: • UntLI E.'\DA was introduced m 1994, amending the 1964 C1\il Rights Act was exactl} the str.:iteg) supported by gay avtl nghts leader~. • While national gay Cl\ LI nght<; groups ha\ e kept it mum, a bill was mtroduced 1ust thts vear to add ::.exual orientation to the 1964,act, as well as the Farr Housmg Act • Whate\·er concerns there may be about opening up the 1964 Civil Righ~ Act to hos­ttle amendments, a n.imber of other, Ul're­lated b1lb have been mtroduced th:5 year that would .imend the ... ct, without the out­cry from c1v1l nghts leaders gener.ited by Bradley's suggestton to .-:Jd sexual orient.i­tion. Among thee .ire se\eral by progres..,1\e Democrats lookmg to expand the act's pro- > Continued on Page 16 Houston prepping for World Aids Day A New York professor highlights local events Dec. 1 with lecture on how gays were persecuted in Nazi Germany Taking port in a tree lighting ceremony and candlelight vigil to mark World AIDS day last year in Galesburg, Ill., are, from left: Justin Dennis; Denise Axcell; Nikki Axcell; Wayne Dennis; and Barb Dennis. Several activ­ities are set for next week in Houston. by KAY DAYUS A lecture on the pcrsccuhon of gavs in Nan Germany hig~ghts a week's worth of l'\'ents in Houston as people around the globe mark\ Vorld AIDS Davon Dec I for the 12th time smcc 1988. The a~nual commemoration comes amid mixed signals from the front m the fight agamst AIDS. Some people" 1th AIDS contil'­uc to enioy 1mpnwed realth ,1s <1 result of m•provt:d drug combination thC'rap1es, but most people II\ mg with A.OS can't access basic therapil'5 that others t.1ke for granted, AIDS experts said And now, some 316 nulhon people world­\\ 1de· mcluding 1.6 million children-are mfoctcd with Ill\'. This 1s up 200,000 people from last year, according to a report releasC'd Mondav by the U.N. Program on HIV I ATOS and the World Health Organization. Thi> year, 2 6 million people are expected to die of AIDS- the lughest anr.ual death toll ) et. To date, I 6 mil hon people ha\ e died of AIDS. In Hnuston, from the d1SF av ot the AIDS MemC'nal Quilt to a luncheon t ness and candlel.ght \ 1g1ls, \ lions ha\ e stepped k rward 1, c t• nt n to HIV I AIDS, which has killed some 48 l(I peo­ple in kx.is and nearl) 4JO,OOO John foul, a professor and social r1Stonan at B.1rd (o.lege m N cw York, \\ ,II de I\ er a lec­ture at Holocaust l\1u!>t!um H uston on Dec. 2 and show that· w~ and others \\ere att.icked in :-\az1 German\. "There were other \'ICtim grours-the old, the sick and homo~exual-. It ~howed the ferocity again~! their \er} own people in Germany," Fout ~aid in a telephone mterv1ew Some 100,000 homo~e:xuab were arrested :.- Continued on Page 15 2 Insuring Commercial Real Estate? We're the Perfect Location. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Kotv Freeway @ TC Jester • Houston, Texas 77007 713-961-94 55 fax: 713-850-0856 s249/sO/s16,499 PER MONTH! DO\NN ! Stl<t800105 •Only SalePrceS17749·S• >< &• S16.499 Pmtbasedon$0down +TT&L 4B ""'"of $249 wttt> tt P""' SI 620 0 7 5'1<. APR WAC Rl6HT ON TAR6ET PRICIN6! ~~"""' • #1 RANKED METRO MAIDA DWER IN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN THE U.S. • WINNER OF THE 1991 PlllSIDENT'S AWARD • MAIDA CrmnrD Sws Srm! • KIND, FRIENDLY PaonssiolW. bus Pl1soNNU NEW 1999 MAZDA B2500 A C d c . S'· ' 990525 -1 Only Sale Price $11 415 ·$1500 Rebate Contact Vic King DM' AR£H~R;S ~445·6440 naz'Da mazdausa.com • www.archermazda.com 8455 1-45 North Between Shepherd & Gulf Bank Z6:..:.=...~':","'.=t:.~.:=~== CC<ytqU NOVEMBER 26, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE MUSCLE MECHANICSSH PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO ~~,, 1 tl',"f fU ,.:r,...1,,.0 I /t' , c,,l'?,.fJI' " 4316 Yupon - By Appointment - 713•523•5330 ~~DAEWOO 0.9°10 Affordable Luxury! a;llVl'T1!tm1p lntroducint Daewoo. You'll be Surprised At How Much You Can Get For Your Money! Our Cars Came Well Equipped With Features Others May Consider Options. E•ch Of Our Amazing~ Rehabi. And Comfortable Cars Is So Well Bui a We Cover Them For 1he FN'st 3 YNr9 or 36,000 M1lest on All Regularty Scheduled Maintenance (Even Oil and Wiper Blades) At Absolutely No Cost To You! NEW 199 DAEWOO LANOS ·~ooo73·•0ntr $6999 For the Flr•t 3 yNrs or 36.000 Miies Should You Need It. tt Daewoo ... Styled In Italy ... Engineered In Germany ... Research & Development Done In England ... Provides An Exceptional Value For Your Car Buying Dollar. HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 26, 1999 c~ LL Li. HIV Lrl{~ some SUSTIVA' is the first HIV drug approved to be taken once-a-day as part of your combination therapy. )1 11' · ~ ··ee 200 mg capsules togett laily. wrth or wrhoi.• food: hgr fat meals should be avoided. Your doctor may suggest taking SUSTIVA at I > reduce cmy side effects you rnay expenerce SUSTIVA, an NNRTI', must be used in combination with other just did! Once Daily SUSTIVA efavirenz Pregnancy st>ou1d be avoided r womero receMr>g SUSTIVA becai.se b1rtt> deferts have- !:>eeri seen r pnmates dosed witr SUSTIV A BarTJe' cortracept100 should always be used 1r cOfllb natJOP wrth other metrods of contraception. Talk to your doctor when you start taking SUSTIVA. SuSTIVA may change t'le effect of other med ones \Inc ud r HIV). Awa:>fS tel your docto:- HIV drugs. SUSTIVA is tough on HIV. educes the al"'lOunt of virus in your blood anc t'l~ l"umb<- c.e Is. SUS flVA can even be Jsed 1n young ct> dren. 3 yt'..TS of age or older Th s 1s based on resJ1ts from controlled dirncal tnals at :.M wt>eKS. Presently. there are 'lO resi.tts from controlled chr1c.al tnais shoo. ng terrr effects of SvSTIVA Now listed among preferred anti-HIV drugs in government guidelines. 1 you .ire taking. starting or charY.! ng any presc.r ption o~ non-pre .cnptiol" l"1ed al"e whel" takl'."lg SLSTJVA. Your doctt>r may chal"ge your rped c s or change their dose You should dtSCuss your ;>nor medlCal cond 011s (s<Jch as mental 1 lness. substance abuse he~"'tltls. etc) Wltl> your doctor before t.!lting SUS'l\'A. We know that coping ~ HIV difficult rnou;;n Your tr'eatmef'lt docsn t SUSTIVA has manageable side effects. Most side effects are mud to have to be.As!< yoi.r doctor about SUSTIVA For mcxe TT'portant fOM"'atJo'."I 'T'OC 1r can be ,,...._naged. fhe most s.grnfical"t s de effects associated with SUSTIVA trcrapy tiavc been nervous system symptoms (d1zz1ness. troub!f." ,:ecping. drows l"ess. trouble concentrating al"dlor abnornal drcJ'ls) and rash. Tt>ese <Jsually subside wrth1r> the first two to foi..r weeks of treatl"'l('l"t In a small number of patients. rash may be serious. ~Jkirg SUSTIVA at bedt1rre may ti!'lp 'T'ake rervous system symptoms less 'lotceable ' NNRTI no.'l 'lucleoside rellel'5e tranSCPptase h1brtor. For man lnlonn>oon on SUSTIVA. all I ~MA or """ our ...bs>te at htlj>Jlwww MISl•v> com For man inforTNoon on tho upcbtod DHHS c;..w.a. • POf ftlt ol tho &'id<hnes '' a.>ibble ••hap:/ wwwlmtiuw1 see the next page for Patient Information about SlJSTIVA FOR HIV Finally, a once daily medication to treat HIV. SUSTIVA. It's about time. www.sustlva.com C.-.lorll'<U..ol--~n olerudMlllsR ~ o1 He.l.".h ..i tV1W1 s.r.c.. ~ Doctrrber m SUSTIVA"' ilnd U.. s.r.tu.1 Lgo ft tradenwi<s al~ ~-~ ~ o m DuPont Pharmaceutois c""l*"l' DuPont Pharmaceut1cah, 3 4 Once Daily SUSTI"~ efavirenz SUSTIVA™ (efavirenz) capsules Patient Information about SUSTIVA · -EE ·vah) tor HIV (Human mmunodeficiency Virus) lnfecllon Gener c name efav"renz (eh-FAH-vih-rehnz) Please •ead lllrs nformatro.~ before you start l:lkrng SUST VA Read 11 ago " eaell time you refill your prescnpUon "case there IS any new rnfo:-natrc" Oc't !real th s leallet as your only source of mfC1111alron about SUSTIVA. Always dlSlllSS SUSTIVA wrlll yo: r doctor wllen you stall lai: ng your med. cme and at every VIS!! You should re!T:a n tr.def a doctors care when using SUS.'IVA You should not c/'ange or stop •reatment without first ta ng to your docto· What is SUSTIVA? SUST'VA IS a r.'ed one used to hep treat li!V the Vl"!.S 'hat causes AIDS (acqu red rrrm;:ie def!Clency ~rome) :iUSTIVA IS a type of li!V dr. ca fed a ·non nucleoside reverse transcrptase 1-h b tor" (NNRT ) How does SUSTIVA work? SUSTIVA WJrks by owe ng 'he arnoun: of HIV 1" !he blood (ca ed "Vlra load" SUSTIVA be cen v; • ot er .ii: Iii\' !"Jed ones W n taken w IP. •ant -HIV med c1 es SUSTIVA has been show to red Vlra load and ncrease the number o CD-1 eel s (a !ype of mmune cell 1r. blood) SUSTIVA may ot >-m these tteds rn every patren• Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SLSTIVA ot a cu:e lor fi V or AIDS Pee~ tak ng Sl.IST VA may $1 1eve op other mfect1on~ associated w HIV Beca c t s r 1s very rmporta t that yo: •ema n ur. 'he care of you· docto· s Cont nue t pracl!Cf! st ..ex How should I take SUSTIVA? IVA r A side effects of SUSTIVA? • s~ :w SJ5 T VA w water fU ~ rr k SOda y ;ay take Sl.ISTIVA WI'" or wi!llout meas howevt: SLS TIVA shou d be taken w ll1 a h gh 'at meal • Do JI '11 SS d dose SUSTIVA n you forget •o take SLSTIVA taK!l the ISSed dose nght av;ay f you do m ss a dose do "lll daub e ll1e next dose Car'Y c with your •egt;lar dosmg sched1.'3 II you ::1 p n prann ng the best limes to take your med c ne aSl\ your doctor or pharmacist • Ta!<• Ille exact amo<. t of SUSTIVA doctor prescr bes Never crange tt'e dose C" your own Do not stop h s med1one unless your do'."or tel - you to stop • When yo:. SUSTIVA s;.pp y starts !o ru- low. get 'llOle •rom you· doctor c pharmacy Thrs 1s very fl1lOrla because the amount c;j VI' IO y ur b ood may ncrease l~e med One S Stopped fO:­even a silo; I me T'le v-rus may deve op ' stance to SUSTIVA and become harder I" treat . Can children take SUSTIVA? Yes ch 11.'ho are abie •o swa ow ca:;::. es can taKe SUSTIVA. ~h may be a• prob err. 50me ch • Te you ch 1s doctor r ght away I you ce -.sh or any other side effects 11.t e ~our Id IS tak g SUSTIVA The dose of SUSTIVA 1or "" die!! riay be t1Mll than 'ie d~ for adults Capsu ng ower doses o SUSTIVA are avai!ab e You· ch ~ d w de ne the r ght oose based your cf, we gt.: Who should not take SUSTIVA? Do no: • SUSTIVA t ye;. are al erg c to SUSTIVA A ary ol ts mgred ents "SUSTIVA"' and Ille SUNBURST LOGO are irademall<s QI Dul'Onl Pharmaceuticals ~ny Copyrigllt 11199 Dul'Onl Phannaceulcals Company .. The brands l:!ed are Ille ~ered ~ ol llleir respec11v9 - and are 001 lr3<lemorl<s cl Dul'Onl PhannacelllicaJ Company NOVEMBER 26, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? Ta k lo yc~r doctor right away r you • Are pregnant or want to become p•egnanl • Are breast-feeding • tlave problems with your iver, or have had hepatrtrs • Start or change any medicine • liave side effects wnrle takirg SUSTIVA (elav1renz) • Have a hrstory of 'nental rllness, subslance or alcohol abuse What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? Many patients have dlZZlness, t·oub1e sleeping drowsiness, trouble concentralrng. and/or unusual dreams a few 'lours after star!ing treatPJent w1tr SUST'VA These leelrrgs may be less noticeable If you take SUSTIVA at bedtime They also lend to go a ... ay atler you ve taken lhe med1cme tor a lew weeks Rarely. pat•ents have r.'Ore serious side effects lllal may affect mood or abr lily lo thrnk clearly l'iese srde effects occur more often r" patients w th a hrslory of mental illness or substance abuse Tell your doctor promptly 11 any ol these srde effects continue or 11 llley bolller you There 1s the poSStbrlrly that theSe symptc!'lS may be more severe II SUST'VA IS used wit/' alcohol or mood altering (street) drugs You should avOld dnvrng or operating machinery rf you are having these side effects One ol the most common side effects IS rash These rashes usually go away without any change m treatment 1~ a small number of patients, rash may be senous ff you dewlap a rash, call your doctor p~omptly Other common side effects rnclude lrredness. upsel stomach, vomiting. and d1ar•hea. However, lh1s Is ~ct a complete lrst :I side effects reported with SUSTIVA when laken w1lh other anli-HIV drugs Do not rely O" thrs leaflet alone for rntormation about srde ellcels Your doctor can discuss a more complete lisl of srde effects w1lh yo~ Please contact your doctor 1mmedratety before stopping SUSTIVA because ol srde ettects Tell your doctor or other healthcare provider you notice any s de ettects wllrle taking SUSTIVA What about birth control, pregnancy, or breast-feeding? Women s_hould not become pregnant whrle takrng St.STIVA Brrth defects have been seen 1n animals t:-eated with SUSTIVA 11 1s not known v.telller this could tiappen n h~mans You should use a condom or d phragm m add1t v to 01her metrods of b1r'h cor.••ol wMe takmg SUSTIVA Inform your doctor rmmedialely 11 you are pregnant II you want lo become pregnant talk to your doctor Do not take SUSTIVA r you are bleast-feed ng Ta k •o your doctor I yo:.. are breast-leedrng your baby Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? SUST VA may cha' ~e the effect ol other med crnes (rnclud1ng ones lor >ilV) Your doctor may change y r r.d1cmes or change therr doses For tl'rs re::'iOn, rt rs very Important to • .et al. your doctors and ptiar'llac1sts know lhat yo~ ' ke SUSTIVA • Tell your docto. Hnd ~'larmacrsts about all medrcines you take Thrs ncludes !hose yo buy over-the-counter ard herbal ~r •atural re.,ed1es B; ng 111 ym.r ':led crre> v.11en yo· see a doctor or make a lrst I therr names how ll'uch you take and how oft ~ r- lake !hem ·h s w II giver- r doctor a complete ~rcture ot 'he med • nes you use T'len he or she .;an dee de t"e best approach for you s l!Jal on wt SUSTIVA How should I keep SUSTIVA? SLS~IVA s 5() mg 100 rig and 200 mg capsules Keep SUSTIVA al room tc:'lperalure (77 F: m the bollle give~ to you by yOLr pharmac1sl The ~lure car rarge lrom 59" -86 F Keep SUSTIVA out ol 1.'1e reach o childr How can I learn more about SUSTIVA? ra k lo your dcttor or ot theare prOVtdel II ycu rave QL ions aboul erther SUSTIVA o HIV For aad t ona nf :-nat on you can vs t 'he SUSTIVA webs teat httpJ/lw.w.sustrva com This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use it for any other condition or give it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. If you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. ~ DuPont Pharmaceuticals Wtlmingten. DE 19880 ISSOOd Septembef 1998 HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 NEWS 5 INSIDE NEWS Around the South •.... . .•.... ....... .7 Public park targeted for gay cruising . . .... .7 Strip dub indictments allege 'lesbian sex show' ...... .. ..... .. .... .7 1.0uisville guy rights ordinance challenged . . .7 Ky. commission coils for non-discrimination low . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. .7 Bush soys no lo guy Republicans . .•. . ..... 8 Around the Notion .. ...... ......... ... 9 Gty councils okay OP mandate ... •....... 9 Calif. governor reverses ban on adoptions by gays . . .... ... . ...... .... 9 Colorado lo conies! win for lesbian couples . .. 9 Po. lawmakers ban some-sex heiihh benef ils . 9 Quote Unquote .. .. ......... . . ... ... l 2 School superintendents lo receive goy'primer' .. . . . .. .. • . .. . . . .. .. . 13 Flexology: Beating the holiday blues • . . . .17 VOICES & ECHOES Editorial: Thanks for the giving . . . ..•.... 10 De la Croix: This queen don't like snakes .. l l OUT ON THE BAYOU A 'flawless' role for Hoff man • . . . . . . . . .19 No justice, no reprieve on Showlime ...•. . 19 Eating Out: Feeding your chip oddidion .. •. 25 Oul in Print: 'Cinnamon Gardens' .... . . •. 28 Bestsellers ••....••.•............... 28 COMMUNITY local groups lop new leaders ....... 29 Community Colendor ..... .. .......... 30 Occasions ..•............ . .. . ..• . .. 30 Purse Strings: Proled your pocketbook .... 31 My Stars! .. .•... .. . ••... . . . .... .. .35 CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . .32 CARMART ..•.... . ... ..... •. . ....•...... 33 BUSINESS DIRECTORY . . . .• . . .. . . . . . .••. ... 34 Issue 996 Al material In Houston Voice Is protected by federal copyroghl law and may not be repro· duced without the written consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers. wr11ers end cartoonisls pub· hshed herein is ne1lher inferred or Implied The appearance of names or pictorial repre· sentatlon dOes not nece"311ly indicale the sexual orientaflon of that person or persons f1ouston Voice accepts unsolicited ed1tor1al llll!lertai but cannot take responslblllty for ils return. The editor reserves the nght to accept, re1ac1 or edll any submission All rights revert to authors upon publication. Guklehnes for freelance contributors are available upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713- 529-8490 Ministering in Houston subu~b Openly gay pastor finds home in small Fort Bend County church, using a mix of compassion, humor and openness to find success in his first full-time position by ROBERT B HENDERSON An openly gay rookie minister with experience caring for people with AIDS has found an unlikely home-a small church in suburban Houston in Fort Bend County. Rev. Bill Clark began his duties as the first full-time minister of Henry David Thoreau Unitarian Uni\'ersalists Congregation in Stafford in September. Since then, the 80 or so members of the congregation have been nothing but sup­portive, Clark said. "Bill as a person puts his whole heart, mind and soul into the work of ministry I le is very authentic, a very good listener, \'cry caring and has a terrific sense of humor. I think he definitely affected me and others with his sense of humor," said Joe Sullivan, president of the church's board of trustees. ~ In becoming the congregation's first full- ::;. lime minister, Clark, 47, also gamed lus ~ first position as a minister smce graduating in June from I brvard Di\'inity School. lie was ordained last May at the First Parbh UnitJ[ian Universalist of Brewster, Mass. Being an openly gay minister has broad­• ened Clark's outlook, he said. "I think it has made me more compas­sionate, more understanding of people, more accepting of differences, far more open minded," Clark said. "! think once you struggle with accepting who you are fi nally demonstrates such a freedom you learn to celebrate li fe." Appointment as the congregation's min­ister is not final; members must vote to affirm the hire. Clark first visited the con­gregation m early July and spent a week getting to know its members, Sullivan said. Clark, raised a Roman Catholic, became increasingly aware that he is gay during high school. " I was supposed to have a girlfriend and I had a girlfriend, but it was not where my feelings were. So the mask and the game playing really started to take shape then I didn't actually come out to myself until I was a sophomore in college," he said. Before Clark set his course for ministry, he was a teacher working with deaf chil­dren. It had been his vocation since 1974 when he received his baccalaureate degree. He later n.'ce1ved a master's degree with an emphasis on working with deaf children. "To me I felt a \'cry strong calling com­ing from around my working with the AIDS ministry. Initially a lot of my min· is try call came into working with people who are dying. Thefl• was a comfort level of being at the bt•dside of a dying person I felt that is where my ministry work would lead me until 1 started a lot of my work in the church in Brewster," Clark said. llt• also worked with teenagers who were struggling to come of age ~ Rev. Bill Clark, wha is openly gay, has found support and encouragement from suburban church members since he became their minister nearly three months ago. "It was very life-affirming. This hap­pened a lmost simultaneously while I was working in Provincetown with the AIDS ministry. It was life altering. 1 decided after I graduated, rather than continue in the work with the dying, it felt really positi\'e to develop relationships with people in one church over a period of time," Clark said. It was his change of ministry focus bringing him to look at a more traditional family congregation and specifically to Thoreau Congregation in Stafford. His "second language" is American Sign Language, and while enrolled at Harvard Divinity School, he pushed to have officials there accept American Sign Language as his required second language. "The catalog read 'a language of theo­logical scholarship or a foreign language which has a use in your ministry.' I had to convince them it would do that. I also tried to make the argument that American Sign Language, and I believe it is, could be used as a language of theological scholarship," Clark said. Clark credits coming to terms with being gay to his practice of Christian Science. When he came out to himself, he also outed himself to a Christian Science practi­tioner. She responded by offering to heal him of the "disease," describing it as a "hell hole," Clark said The episode pushed him away from Christian Science and more toward self­acceptance. "I came out to my family many years later, to my siblings first and then to my parents. My siblings were pretty accepting. My mother struggled and my father w.ls silent, which was the way they always were," Clark said. His mother later suffered a stroke, and her ill feelings of her son's homosexuality surfaced, Clark said. "She became quite nasty. My father became quite protective ot me. I don't know if he fell into the role or I was his son, no matter what. My mother would tell me I couldn't bring my friends home. He would say, 'He can bring anyone home he wants. He's our son,' Clark said Church members are pleased with Clark's work, Sullivan said. "He brings a lot of energy and a terrific commitment. One of the themes Bill is car­rying to our church that resonall's with us, especially since we were a congregation that was lay led, it is important to us to maintain or help nurture this 'shared min­istry' within the church. Bill seems to have a tremendous appreciation and sense for that," Sullivan said. 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ZenibOlil1-15cc 1qu11us SUSDIDSlll 19 Hr 5 lftlr1Stenedl1I Paradeca-12occ 11qu1d Sublinuual Deca Durabolin oecavar nest and Deca Combol Labrada lean aodv .... $30.95 Next Nutrition Des Whev 2.2 lb .. ........ $18.95 Muscle Linc • Muscletech Nature's Best • Pro Lab WorldWide Bars & Drinks New Growth Hormone Product ..... the strongest potencv in the lndustrv 30ml. l2111 aan11r1ms per ml.J contains biotropln HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 NEWS Around the South DeKalb County public park targeted for gay male cruising arrests ATLANTA-DeKalb pohce are conducting undercover operations at a Tucker park that police say men are using to solicit sex from other men, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Nov. 18. Some complaints were filed with police by visitors, including families An undercover operation at Henderson Park has resulted in arrests despite DeKalb prosecutor Gwen Keyes' statement earlier this year that her office did not intend to prosecute the state's sofi<itation of sodomy law except in cases involving prostitution. with children, to Henderson Park, which the newspa­per reported is a quarter-mile from a DeKalb County elementary school. "Henderson Park has been a recur­ring problem for years," Maj. Bobby Ethridge told the AJC. "We've had a resurgence of complaints down there." Undercover officers working at the park report­ed a number of parked cars with male drivers who were observed speaking briefly before leaving their cars and walking together into the woods, the newspa­per reported. A 58-year-old man was arrested Nov. 1 after he approached an undercover officer, spoke with him briefly and invited him into the woods for sex, police said. The man, one of several arrested, has been charged with solicitation of sodomy. That charge comes after DeKalb County prosecutor Gwen Keyes said ear­lier this year that her office would not prosecute solici­tation offense unless they involved prostitution. That policy was Keyes' reaction to the Georgia Supreme Court dec1s1on finding the state's sodomy law uncon­stituhonal. At the time, Keyes said DeKalb's vice unit • did not focus on gay men soliciting consensual sex. "They have never focused on the gay community or this type of crime," she told Houston Voice. "They are not the moral majority, and that is not their job to try and pursue anybody for that, so here in DeKalb County we don't make an issue of it" Strip club indictments allege 'lesbian sex show' for athletes If you are seriously ill, money shouldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. As one of the oldest viatical settlement brokers, we have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. M. lryan Freeman f !llllde! l CliB (}eof Advoun * One quick, simple application * Competitive bidding process among multiple funding sources * Any size policy * No cost or obligation at any time * All policy types considered, including some less than two years old * HIV and other serious illnesses * Qualify up to 900 kells * Your settlement may be tax-free * Confidentiality, now and always _ ~BENEFITS ~AMERICA Retl.m YOU' completed applicabon and receive a free videotape: Exercises for People with HIV by Peopk W'ith HIV. 800-777-8878 Celebrating 10 years as your advocate. www.benefitsamerica.com Member Viatical Anac1atian of Amenca Benefit. America NA, Inc ATLANTA (AP)-Federal prosecutors say a local strip club arranged for strippers to perform a 'lesbian sex' show for professional basketball players at a Charleston, S.C hotel. Steven Kaplan, owner of the Gold Club, is one of 16 people named in a federal indictment unsealed Nov. 18. He and 11 other defendants pleaded not guilty that same day before a ft•deral magistrate. Kaplan was released on $2 million bond and the others on $50,000 bonds. The indictment states that in or about April or May 1997, Kaplan and the other ddendants "transported fem,1le dancers from the Gold Club to the Francis Manon 1 lotl•I in Charleston, so that dancers could perform a lesbian sex show and have ~ex with members of a professional basketball team." Kaplan has declined to comment, but .1 statement released by his attorneys said they "vigorously deny" the government's allegations and expect a "complete vindic.1tion" in court. @.lf1vrreafment '141'7e! Louisville gay rights ordinance challenged in federal court lOUIC,VILLE, Ky. (AP)- Jefferson County's gay rights ordinance has come_. under Jttack in a federal lawsuit challenging its constitutionality. The lawsuit was filed in US. District Court by Dr. J. Barrett Hyman, an obstetridan and gynecologist who previous­ly challt•nged Louisville's gay-rights ordinance, which is narrower in scope than the county version. The county ordinance bans discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing and public accommodations. The city ordinance bans d1scrim· ination against gays .ind lesbians in employment. Following the same argument as his suit against the city law, Hyman says that his Christian beliefs prevent him from com­plpng with the county ordinance. Because of those beliefs, l lyman says he is compelled to deny employment to a homosexual or fire any employre he learns is gay. Hyman 1s being rl'presented by the Amencan Center for Law and Justice, founded by conservative tdevangC'list Pat Robertson. "This is a case of government attempting to legisl,1tc its own view of morality at the expense of the fundamental rights of its citizrns," said Francis J. Manion, who is representing 1 lyman. Russ Maple, a Jefferson County com­missioner who votl'd for the ordinance, said he w,1s confident the law would withstand the challenge Bowling Green commission calls for non-discrimination law BOWi 11\IC (,RFEN, Ky (AP)-The Bowling Crel'n I luman Rights Commission voted Nov. 18 to n•commend that the City Commission and st,1te legislators enact laws ban· ning discrimination based on sexual orientation. lhl• I luman Rights Commission, how· ever, voted not to rl'COmmend the exact wording in an ordinance proposed b} the I ouisvilll'-b.lsl·d Kl'ntucky Fairness Alliance and a student group at Westl'rn Kentucky UniVl'r::>1ty. The wording of the proposed ordinanet• authored by the alliance and 1 ambda Socil'ty, a gay-students group at WKG, worried commissioners. They feared it would require not just equality but special trl•atment for homosexuals. City Commission membl'rs haw said, however, they will not support surh an ordinance. -Fram staff and wire reports prtsents BOOSTING IMMUNE FUNCTION: THE NEXT STEP IN HIV THERAPY? A FREE INTERACTIVE TELEPHONE TELECONFERENCE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1999 5 PM Pacific • 6 PM Mountain • 7 PM Central• 8 PM Eastern rime TELECON,..F .E..R..E.N..C..E, PANEL Ronol4 laker, P~D , ...... 1 Eilitor·ill-Oiial, HIV cod Htpofiti. co11 CaM1 Ce~11, MD leseanh Oimto~ c-ty lneonli lnitiotiu of Ntw foglnd o.d hsaor<li Comulta11, Hanord h•p«d Mnictl Anooot15 11 IOSloa Erl< S. Rt1tabert. MD l1strv<101 of Meclicint Hanard Uru1tnfty Olld Cfllli<ol A11hla11 In MeclioH at Mossa<hontns 6tnnl Hospdal .. Michael S. Saat. MD Professor of Meclitine, Division of lnft<liaus D;uo,os, Unlwtnily of Alaba111 al lir11itlglto111 IUU} ond Oirl<1ar of the AIDS OulpClfltnl ctrnic ol UAI To join tht telephone teleconference, you must register in advonce (first nomes only). To make your reservotion, pie~ coll th~ fol-free number Monday-Friday, 9 AM-S PM Eastern Time: 1·800·88 Support•• liy 11 11r11tri<ltd tdouritntl 91111 fro11 Ag .. 111 Ph1rwa<1tli11h 7 8 NEWS NOVEMBER 26, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Bush says no to meeting with gay Republicans Leading GOP candidate challenged to say the word 'AIDS' for the first time in public (;, .. .s 01rst Ii ;e :a.K snvw mlerview Sunday, George W. Bush said he would probably not meet with the gay group Log Cabin Republicans. "I don't believe in group thought, pit­ting one group of people agamst another," the GOP presidential front-runner said from the Texas governor's mansion when asked if he would meet with gay Republicans. Asked about rival Sen. John McCain's recent meeting with Log Cabin, Bush replied that he would "probably not" meet with the group because it would create a "huge political nightmare." "I am someone who is a uniter, not a d1v1der," Bush said during the hour-long interview on NBC's "Meet the Press." :-.1cCain said on CBS's "Face the Nation" that members of Log Cabm are "part of our party," and Republicans "are an inclusive party, and we should main­tain the principles of Abraham Lincoln." And on CN~'s "Late Edition," pub­lisher Ste\•e Forbes said, "If people want to talk to me, that's fine. They might not like what I have to say on issues such as same­sex marriage . I'm open to meeting a lot of people." Log Cabin leaders have condemned Bush's statements, particularly after the cand1datl has "cultivated an image as an inclusive Republican who reaches out to minorities," according to a press release. "If Governor Bush wants to be the next President of the United States, then he needs to reach out to the moderate gay vote," said LCR/Texas President Steve l.abin,k1, president of Log Cabin Republicans Texas. "Bush 1s clearly getting bad advice on how to be a mainstream con­servative There is nothing un-Republican about opposing discrimination Bush's atti­tude demonstrates that many Republicans still do not realize the potential returns of gay and lesbian voters." Mixed messages Bush s response surprised some Log Cabm leaders, who had received positive signals from campaign officials about a possible meeting with the candidate. It wasn't the first time the Texas governor has zig-zagged on gay issues. In April, Bush told the New York Times that he would have no problem appoinhng openly gay people to his administration "As a general statement, 1f someone can do a job, and a job that he's qualified for, that person ought to be allowed to do his )Ob," he said at the time. But by September, Bush reportedly SCRIPT Pharmacy • One source for all your medication needs • HIV certified pharmacists to help manage your therapy • Private one-on-one consultation with your pharmacist • Nutritional service and support available • Confidential home delivery available • Coordination and filing of insurance benefits www.statscript.com Please join us Larry Harrison, RPh Monday 4101 Greenbriar, Suite 235 9:00 - 6:30 in recognition of (713) 521-1700 Tues - Fri. 9:00 - 5:30 orldAIDS Da William Southward, RPh Mon -Fri on December 1, Jeffry Fe/cman, RPh 9:00- 7:00 3407 Montrose, Suite AS Saturday 1999 (713) 522-7373 9:00- 1:00 pledged to a group of religious conserva­ltves that he would not "knowingly" hire a gay person, but would not fire someone who was later "discovered" to be gay. His inconsistency is frustrating to some gay Republicans. "What we saw in this interview b that Bush is not living up to the image of an inclusive candidate that his campaign has been pushing," said LCR Executive Director Rich Tafel ~ "He was all over the place in his ~ responses. }le met \Vith scores of groups, 3 including the Christian Coalition, ,ind Ice- 3 lures the Republican Party on the impor- ~ lance of reaching out to minority groups < like Latinos and African Americans, and :r -~--- now says he won't meet with gays because Texas Gov. George W. Bush relaxes before his we are a 'group,"' Tafel said. interview on NBC's 'Meet The Press' last Bush reiterated his refusal to meet with Sunday. gay Republicans at an appearance at Timberland Co. on Monday, according to a report in the Dallas Morning News. He said he strongly disagrees with the group on issues including gay marriage and gay adoption. "There is no need to debate the issue; l"ve already made up my mind,"" he said . Say the word 'AIDS' ~ush has also been challenged to address problems related to HIV I AIDS, starting with saying the word "AIDS." AIDS Action, an advocacy group, released a statement Monday challenging Bush to at least utter the word in public, something he's never done, according to AIDS activists. "Millions of Americans affected by I UV and AIDS deserve to hear the voice of a lead­ing governor and presidential candidate," said Daniel Zingale, AIDS Action executive din..-c­tor "Compassion begins with a willingness to talk." Bush's reticence has been compan.'CI to for­mer President Ronald Reagan's similar silence during the early years of the epidemic, a silence that was loudly criticized by activists. -From staff and wire reports Sa NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE NEWS Around the L.A. city council okays ordinance mandating partner benefits LOS ANGELES (AP)-The L.A. City Council voted to extend rules for domestic partner benefits so they also apply to companies that do business with the city. An ordinance unanimously approved Nov. 17 would require municipal contractors that offer health insurance to workers and their spouses to also extend the benefits to their gay, lesbian and heterosexual domestic partners. A similar ordinance passed in San Francisco resulted in hundreds of companies adopting DP benefits for the \·ery first time. Council member Rudy Svonnich at first voted against the proposal. That would have pushed adoption back one week:. But he agreed to leave the chamber so the council could pass the proposal unopposed ;ind send it to Mayor Richard Riordan for consideration. R10rdan is leaning toward approval but wants to study the proposal's impact, an aide said. On Monday, the city council in Seattle also voted to require its major private contractors to provide domestic partner benefits to gay employe.e s . Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan is leaning toward signing an ordinance modeled after the historic law passed in S.F. requiring all businesses with city contracts to offer DP benefits. California governor reverses ban on gay foster parent adoptions SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)-A state policy of automatically opposing adoptions of fos­ter children by gay and other unmarried couples was quietly dropped this week by GO\'. Gray Da~is . The move rescinded a 1995 order by then-Republican Gov. Pete Wilson. Gays applauded the change as a victory for families. Conservative religious leaders condemn it as "a disaster for children." Even with the earlier policy, judges could overrule the state opposition if the would-be parents hired an attorney and appealed Attorneys representing gay and lesbian groups challenged the regulation earlier this year. State Department of Social Services attorneys "concluded that it was an underground regulation, or one that did not go through the proper legal process," agency spokeswoman Sidonie Squier said Nov. 17. Gov. Davis approved the agency's decision, but that doesn't mean he supports adop­tions by gay couples, spokesman Michael Bustamante said. "The previous administration took a position on adoptions. This administration is not," he said. "This governor has made the determination that the professionals, not the state, are best suited to decide" which couples are su1t,1ble adoptive parents. Colorado to contest listing lesbian couple on birth certificate DI l\VI R (Al') The state Attorney Genl'ral's office 1s challenging a judge's ruling to allow two lesbi,rns to each be listed as !ht• natural mother on a birth certificate. In a motion filed last week:, Attorney General Ken Salazar's office said Boulder District Judge Roxanne Bailin erred in ruling "a child can have two legal, natural mothers." Bailin issued the ruling in September in a case involving two women identified by the court only as Anne G. and Jane K. Anne G. was pregnant with a child she conceived through sperm implanted from an anonymous donor. Gay rights advocates cheered the ruling, silying 1t i!llows gay and lesbian couples to offer their children the same legal rights as those enjoyed by children of heterosexual couples. Barbara Lavender, the cou­ple's ;ittorney, said the state has allowed two women to be placed on birth certificates in the past. "We did this five years ago with same-sex adoptions," Lavender said. "The state has issued certificates with two mothers before, so they are confused now." But there is a differmce, state officials say. "(This] was the first time two women [were list­ed] as natur,11 mothers on the certificate," said Cynthia Honssinger, director of the Office of Legal and Regulatory Affairs for the state Department of Public Health and Environmt•nt. If Bailin refuses to reverse her order, tlw state registrar could take the case to the Colorado Court of Appeals. Pa. legislature bans same-sex health benefits for college work­ers PITISBURGI! (Al')-The Pennsylvania Legislature pushed through a bill to ban ~ame-sex health benefits for workers at state-financed colleges and universities, poten­tially ending a legal fight for the University of Pittsburgh. The legislature passed the measure Nov. 16, also exempting colleges and universities from any municipal ordinance that requires institutions to provide health benefits to unmarried, same-sex partners of employees. Gov. Tom Ridge said he would sign the measure, which will take effect imme­diately. "The governor believes marriage is a heterosexual institution," said Tim Reeves, Ridge's spokesman. "We see what's happening in Pittsburgh as an [intrusion] ... on the institution of marriage." The American Civil Liberties Union said 1t plans to challenge the bill in court. Since approval of the measure, the University of Pittsburgh has moved to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the school's decision to refuse to provide health benefits to same-sex partners of its staff and faculty. Opponents charged the university policy ran afoul of a city law that bans discrimination based on sexual orientation. -From staff and wire reports ff - e11 llLLl81 teLLAISI*• • Prices May Vary. See Store for Details. @ru~~~ ml ~OOlb~ ~m~~m\19Y.IBmdl~~~ mwcm.cwww..r_,. cc..,..=··-__ i.-___ ... ...,......_ 9 10 STAFF Associilte Publisher Mike Fleming m1i: eOhoustonvotee com Editor Matthew A Henme ed1torOhoustonv0tce com Prod uction Bethany Bartran GraphK Designer Mike Swenson - GraphlC Designer Contributors R1th Arensch1eldt. Kay Y Dayus. Trayce Diskin. Ead Dittman. D L Groover. Robert B Henderson, Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Photogrilphers Dalton DeHart. K1:""1 Thompson. Terry Sullivan Advertmng Sales Richard B Hayes Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Cliiuifieds & Directory Carolyn A. Roberts carolyn White Nat1on111I Advert1s1ng Representative R1vendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 A Publishers Chns Crain Rick Ell.a"" ra ........ ~p•pu Gea1d MEMBER CH ARTER MEMBER GREATH HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (713) 52!Hl490 (800) 729-8490 Fax (713) 529--9531 Contents copyright 1999 OffKe hours. 9 am to 5:30 pm. weekdays To submit 111 letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the nght to edit for content and length We will withhold names upon request. but you must include your name and phone number for venhcation Please send mail to Houston Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200. Houston. Texas 77006. fax (713) 519-9531 or e-mail to ed1torOhouston­vo1Ce. com Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice VOICES AND ECHOES by MELI:-.JDA SHELTON It was a splendid fall day when the extended, and exten­sive, Shelton clan gathered out­side the small East Texas com­munity of McLeod We met, more than 70 of us, at the gym· nasium of the Good Exchange Baptist Church The occasion was 1oyous. Fvelyn Shelton's 90th birthday We stood beneath towering hickory, oak and pine trees, multi-generational relatives who have taken, in some cascs-cspcaally mine-starkly different life paths. Cousins who once romped through the dense forests around our family's homestead that we called "Bcbce's house," either embraced With great gusto or stood shyly aside, embarrassed to admit we didn't recognize one another. Still, Shelton blood IS thick; elapsed decades melted away like the gallons of homemade ict• cream we shared as children. My grandmother arrived to cheers befitting the family matriarch that she is. Resplendent m a brightly col­ored blouse, fire-engine red slacks, shoes, nails and lipstick, she laughed a~ she must have back when this century and she were young. 1.1maw's dimming eyes sparkled, and her thick Southern drawl became thicker and more drawlmg as she dis­pensed vivacious greetings. With a dancer's grace, she mant•uvered through the crowd giving bear-hugs and lipstick­laden kisses on countless cheeks, never forgetting a great­grandchild's name, or that of yet another new grand-daughter- or grand-son-in-law. "Mamaw," I asked, "how's it feel to be 907" "WcccccllUllll, child. I guess it feels purty good," Mamaw replied, giV1ng me yet another breath-taking hug. And then came the predictable aside, fol­lowed by that schoolgirl laugh: "Sure beats not bein' here and not makin' 90!" When the dmner call rang out at precisely I p.m., we moved inside the gymnasium to share what surely was our 1,000th- 10,000th-meal together But in.~tead of the women folk labor­ing in hot kitchens with babies at their feet, my grandmother's children opted for the '90s ver­sion of a reunion they ordered out. Trays of smoked pork, beef and sausage, topped with tangy barbecue sauce. Barbecued beans. Potato salad Cole;law. And loave. of white bread to sop up the barbecue :;auce. A slice of heaven came that day on a paper plate. My cousin Darren, whom I remember as a little boy with sparkling blue eyes, held his toddler son's hand and said grace. I couldn't resist a quip to my brother at the end of the lengthy prayer: "He must be Baptist." It was a good-natured insider joke from the lone CJtholics in the predominantly Protestant Shelton clan. As my eyes swept ,icross the filled tables, I thought of my grandfather, who died a decade ago, and not long after my e1ght­year- old niece, Wendy. Papaw reveled in gathering his off­spnng together, much as my own father does to this day. "What do you think Papaw would think about today?" I asked my grandmother. NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Evelyn (left) and Melinda Shelton came together with dozens of family members in East Texas for a folksy birthday party and reunion. For a flC<'ting moment, her faced saddened Then Mamaw's eyes settled on her five sons and lone daughter, and i;hc smiled, broad Iv. "Chlld, I cain't say for sure, but I think he'd be havin' the time of his life, just like I am." And then they gathered, my grandmother and her children, for a priceless family portrait: Dale, the elde.t, followed by my fa ther, Ted, then C.L., David, Linda and Mike. Remarkably, miraculously, each is in good health, particularly my aunt, who is a brc.:ist cancer survivor. The inevitable "group shot" followed, and the sight was stunning. Mamaw's six children produced 20 grandchildren, and the grandchildren have pro­duced, well, I can't even remem­ber how many great-grandchil­dren. Suffice 1t to s.iy a couple of dozen, probably closer to thn..'C Surprisingly, there arl' no great-great-grandchildren ... yet. Next, prl':>l'nts were opened and the four-tiered cake my grandmother dt'Clared to ht! "Just grand, graaaaa-and," w.1~ cut. As we reminisced, gos.,iped, and laughed---6pecially at the antics of my ~till-dcv11ish Aunt Sue-my grandmother held court. More than once I saw her shake her head and laugh, no doubt amazed at the ''fruits of her loin," as those Baptists would say. Outside in the bnlhant sun­shine, my father led a tour of the Good Exchange Cemetery, where he insisb thilt I will be laid to rest somt•day in one of the plots he and my mother pur· chased. As he walked among the tombstones bearing our family names-Shelton, Johnson, Blanchard, and oth­ers- he explained relation­ships- not an easy task consid­enng the way country families "mix and mingle," <is he so dcli­c< itcly puts it. I paused at our beloved great­grandmother's grave. "Cecil 'Bcbie' Johnson, 1893-1983," is etched on the gray stone. Bebee (grandkids' spelling), Marnaw's mother, raised many of us, just as she helped to raise her grand­children. Bebee was a soft-spo­ken woman who dispensed love as freely and predictably as the fresh-water spring that flows to this day on our family's propt·r­ty. I can still hear her voice, smell the Pond's beauty cream she religiously used on her smooth face, feel the soft pi.'<'k on the cheek she gave to l'ach of us. As the sun's shadows drew long across the cemetery, I watched the Shelton clan lc.iv­ing for their respt'Chvc homes in Texas, Louisiana and Colorado--or a nc.1rby campsite to do some more hunting. My still-effervescent grandmother waved and kissed and laughed and hugged all the way to the car, thrilled with her day .ind happy to return to the retire­ment community where "I live the life of Riley." Some of us older cousins long ago I.liked about lc,iving those piney woods of East Texas for good, eager to escape what we-I-thought were backwoods ideas and ridicu­lously simple ways of life And some of us did leave, myself included. But that thick Shelton blood, mixed with my mother's, made its way through my thickt·r head and back to my heart. l lappy birthday, Mamaw It's good to be home. Melmda Shelton is edllor of IMPACT News 111 Nen Orleans, a si~ler 11rw paper of I/it Ho11sto11 Voice HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES 11 AN ENGLISHMAN ABROAD This queen don't like spiders and snakes by SU KIE DE LA CROIX l'\'e seen e\'l'rything now Two doors down from my office, there's an antiqul' store In the window, they have an interesting item for sale in a glass box; a lesbian sep· .iratist stick insect: "Thcv can be found in thick bushc-. m tropical Jungles. Their name rl'\'eJls tlwir beha\'1or and appearJncc. By day they take up J motionle.>s, rigid posi· hon, with only a mo\'l'mcnt giving them ,1way. The Malaysian stick insect c,111 ml•asure up to 30 cenltmeters in length. They can n•produn• p;irthl•nogemcally (without fertiliza­tion) with only females being <level· oped." around and lunging at your throat! You see, I have a terrible, morbid fear of "n;iture." I want the countryside to just go away and lea\'l' me alone I date thb back to my years in England, when I was twice bitten by snakes; one poison· ous and the other was just bored and looking for something to do. The poisonous one - a male dper - has a story behind it. It was circa 1972. I wJs living on ,1 housing estate, and I had thl' biggest gardm, which was a com· plete waste, as I'm the 'runt of the littl'r' when it coml's to English people and thl'ir precious gardens. I ha\'e no inter· est. You should see this thing; it's huge and very creepy. It's like something out of a bad 1950s sci-fi movie, and so far as I'm conn:rned, it has no place bl'ing on this planet. It's ugly, and it has to go. It's neither use nor ornament. I mentioned this "thing" to my lover, and he said, "Did you know that the m,1le sea horse gives birth?" Then he told me about lungfish, fish that ha\'e lungs and which waddle out of one pond and into another. Then he really creepcd me out by telling me about some fossils recmtly found in Australia of an Jnimal that, th;inkfully-so there 1s J God!­" died out." It w.1s some kind of flesh· e.1ting kangaroo Imagine that bouncing My 'manicuring the lawn' neighbors (read snooty Brit bastards) Wl're jealous of my big yard and really pissed that it looked like a jungle. I overheard thl'm say one day, "If it was mine, I'd put a vegetable patch down that side O\'er there, get rid of that old washing machine, maybe plant an apple tree " Eventually, guilt got the better of me, so one day I snorted up a mind/body shattering quantity of amphetamine sul­fate and ran ~earning into the yard, yanking up handfuls of weeds as I went. I was the Wild Woman of Wongo. WARNING: Snake venom, speed and queeny hysterics do not mix. In fact, they clash horribly, and can put the fear of God into people working in a hospital emergency room. - '' '_ 1 0' 1 1 c1 1e11~, That's when the viper got me. It only nipped my hand, but I saw its tell­tale black and white diamond back slithl'ring away mto the undergrowth. Oh I was sick! WARNll'\G: Snake \·cnom, speed and queeny hysterics do not mix. In fact, they clash horribly, and can put the fear of God mto people working in the emer· gency room at the hospital. They were backing away, waving crucifixes. That was what really crystallized my loathing of nature. l'\'e avoided ti e\'er :;mce, which is why I never go camping. Let us know what you think Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). J.J A Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions ~f!l~~.~ Q must include a name and phone number for verification. _ ~ Houston Voice, Suite 200, 500 Lovett, Houston, TX 77006 [==~~~iiiiii;'·r'-/- ---fax: 7-13-5-29-95-31 • e--mai-l: edi-tor@h-oust-onvoi-ce.co-m -" So you sit m a field rn a tent-and then what? Where do I plug in my Play Station, or my electric nose-hair remowr? My ideal planet would be hke Cher's tits-<:ompletdy artificial and plastic. !'\ature would be something you watch on TV. And 30-centimeter female .\1alays1an sttck msect:. who fuck them· seh·es silly and only ha\e girl babw:; would be a thmg of the past Pl<inet Suk1e would be creepy-crawl) free zone Sukie de la Croix 1s a Clncago-based free­lance wrzlcr and can be rmclred vzn llus pub· llcalzon or by t·ma11, ~11kiecro1x@aol com 12 • ... best recalls the mood of 'My Life As A Dog~' ·Tom Biss, IN LOS ANGELES "Marvelous screen actresses have created two girls whose discoveries about themselves feel organic and true. This is a lovely film!' ·Olud< Wolson, LA WEEKLY "A delight!" BAY AREA REPORTER Two girls. One love. ~@ STRAND RE LEAS I NG PRESENTS A Fll.M BY LUKAS MOODYSSON www.str1ndrelcom ~ ,,,,,,.,,.. EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT GREENWAY sc-,,P1w . (71l)G2&-0402 STARTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26 NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE ote un uote'' compiled by REX WCX::KNER and STAPF "You can have sex with a sheep in Wyoming, just don't tie the shepherd to the fence." -A popular Wyoming joke in the year since the murder of gay college student Matthew Shepard, who was beaten and left to die on a fencepost, as reported by JoAnn Wyp1Jewski for Harper's magazine "I would like nothing better than to see you die, Mr. McKinney. However, this is the t ime to begin the heal ing process. To show mercy to someone who refused to show any mercy . ... I give you life in the memory of one who no longer lives. May you have a long life and may you thank Matthew every day for it." -Dennis Shepard (left), addressing his son Matthew's con­victed killer, Aaron McKinney in court Nov. 4, the day McKinney was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences "He's got a built-in gay vote, and I don't have that. It's like a frater­nity." -East Point City Council member Johnny Fowler, about his openly gay run-off opponent Bobby Carnes. in an interview with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution "My best friend is gay. So, many of my friends are. One slowly becomes sensitive to how big of a deal homophobia is." -Actor Wil:1am Macy (right), who plays the gay character Sheriff (happy in the film "Happy, Texas." to Boston's Bay Windows, Oct. 7. " Heterosexuals could not have made a bigger mess of the whole marriage thing if they had inten­tionally set out to do so. In fact, it often occurs to me that it would be a very good idea to just give the institution of marriage exclusively to the gay community for six or eight years and let them refurbish it, like they do with rundown neighborhoods. Then, once they've fixed it all up and made it cute and appealing again, we can have it back to defile and degrade." -Humorist Merri Markoe, n a Nov 18 posting from the on-hne magaz111e Slate "I don't mind the homosexuality, I understand it . ... Nevertheless, goddamn, I don't think you glorify it on public television [on 'All In The Family'] even more than you glorify whores. We all know we have weaknesses. But, goddamn it, what do you think that does to kids? You know what happened to the Greeks! Homosexuality destroyed them. Sure, Aristotle was a homo; we all know that so was Socrates . ... You know what happened to the Romans? The last six Roman emperors were fags; neither in a public way. You know what happened to the popes? They [had sex with) the nuns, that's been goin' on for years, cen­turies. But the Catholic Church went to hell, three or four centuries ago. It was homosexual, and it had to be cleaned out .... Let's look at the strong societies: the Russians. Goddamn, they root 'em out. They don't let 'em around at all. I don't know what they do with them. Look at this country. You think the Russians allow dope? Homosexuality, dope, immorality are the enemies of strong societies. That's why the commu­nists and left-wingers are cl inging to one another. They're trying to destroy us." -From newly released tapes of former President Richard Nixon's conversations with White House advisors "The upper class in San Francisco is that way. The Bohemian Grove [an elite, secrecy-filled gathering outside San Francisco), which I attend from t ime to time, it is the most faggy goddamned thing you could ever imagine with that San Francisco crowd. I can't shake hands with anybody from San Francisco." -From newly released tapes of former President Richard Nixon's conversations with White House advisors HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 26, 1999 NEWS 13 School superintendents to receive 'primer' on gay youth by LAURA BROWN A 12-page guide mailed Tuesday to the almost 15,000 public school supenntendents in the U.S. will help educators create environ­ments where all students, including gay stu­dents, can succeed to the best of their ability, organizers said. • The first~ver publication, titled "Just the Facts About Sexual Orientation and Youth," was produced by a coalition of 10 national health, mcnt.11 health, education and religious organizations, including the National Education Assotiation, American Psychological As.c;ociation, American Academy of Pediatrics .1nd the Amencnn Association of School Administrators. "Just the Facts" includes sections on sexual onent.ition development; "reparative thcrilp};" "transformationill ministries," and relevant legill principles, as well as a long list of l\.':>OUTCL-:;. "Rep.1rativc therapy," which attempl~ to change sexual orientation through psychother­ap); is b.1sL.J on "an understanding of homo­sexu. 1lity th.1t has been rejected by all the major health and mental health profes.,ion.~," the books say!'>, oting il long list of groups that "h.l\'e all taken the pa.ition that homosexuality is not a mmtal disorder and thus there is no need for a 'cure."' "Tran.~formational ministry," according to the guide, is a term used to describe attempts to change ~xuill orientiltion through religion. "Although 'trilnsformational ministry' pro- Kate Frankfurt, GLSEN advocacy director, helped spark the idea for the new pubr.cation when she convened a coar.tion of national organizations to discuss the ex-gay movement's plan to get its message into public schools. motes the mes.sage that religious faith and acceptance of gay, le-Oian and bisexual sexuali­ty are incompatible, that mes..~ge is counten..'<i by the large number of outspoken clergy and people of faith who promote love and accept­ance," according to the pamphlet. A "n.'Ccnt upsurge in aggressive promotion" of reparative therapy and transformational ministries prompted the creation of the publica­tion, the primer's introduction reports. 'Protecting children' from gays But while "Just the Facts" was only dis­tributed on Tuesday, the guide has already drawn heated criticism from groups supporting the idea that gay people can be changed. 'This is another attempt by the homosexual lobby to silence any \iews on homosexuality but its own," said Janet Parshall, spokesper,;on for the Family Re;earch Council, in a pres.~ statement al'iO released T uesdav. "The primer does not acknowledge the unhralthy con..-equences of homoscxualil): It pn.':iC!lts a one-sided ca-;e that promotes homo­~ xuality by advocating cen..'iOrship for informa­tion in school~ about the opportuml)· of mdi­\~ duals to experience a healthy changr and lmve the hom~·xual lifesl',1e," she said. According to Parshall, .;children's physical, spiritual, and mental well-bcmg 1s at ~take" To counter the "Just the Facts" guide, FRC announced that it would release two publica­tions of Its own. "Top IO Strategic::; u. ..".' ci by l lomoscxual Actinsts in Schools" and "I low to Proll'ct Your Children from Pro-Homosexuality Propaganda in School~ " Jim Anderson, communications director for thl' Gay Le;bian & Straight Education Network, said the vehemence of FRC's reaction demon­strates the powerful mes.-;age of the brood coali­tion supporting "Just the Facts." "What I ~'C here is the nation'~ l'<iucators saying clearly that when 1t comes to lesbian, gay and bisexual students, then.' L~ no 'othrr sidl>'-penod," Anderson said. 'The anti-gay organizations are reacting exactly a~ you would expl'Ct them to, and it is unfortunate that they continue to tum students into pawns in their anti-gay games." GL<;E.\J, a national non-profit organization dedic.1ted to "teaching respect for all in our schools," began the process that led to the "Just the Facts" guide after members attended an C\:tober 199S conference sponsored by Focus on the Family that encouraged promoting "repara· live thL'l'ilpy" in public schools, Anderson said. "We were highly alarmed becatL'iC it repre­sented a much moreorgaruzed attt.'Illpt to dim."! the c\-gar messige to young pt'Ople," he said. After the m~g, Anderson said, GLSE.1'\ orgamzed a meeting of national education, hL'alth and mental health organization, where GL'>E.'\J Ad\•ocacy Director Kate Frankfurt -hared what was learned at the Fo.:us on the l'anuly conference "\\'c brought them together and let them know what we had di.....:overed, and we also ~pent a lot of time educating them on the L-..,ues gay, k'Sbian, bbe,ual and transgcndered youth face m gmeral," Ander.;on ~d. GL'>E.'\J and the coalition member.; hope 5Chool superintendmb will read "Ju~t the Facts" them-,cl\'e;, then share it Y.ith ot~ sch(x1l per.-0nnel. The publication b not mtcnd· cd for children, AndeNln said. 'Just the Facts' Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network copies of the boolc are available on-line at www.glsen.org VtvffitvGU P~OPO(liOtvS Bec:IU'tlful an urban fatrwtale -r r ) ~ r 1 ~ by Jonathan Harvey Opens Thursday, November 18 at 8 p.m. Pla)s Thursdays through Sundays until December 12 Tickets $20 Call 713-398-7577 for tickets and more information All shows at The Little Room Do" nstairs 2326 Bissonnet Produced by special arrangenumt l\ith Dramatists Pia> Sen1c .... Inc. 14 Selling your life insurance is a maior decision. Shouldn't this option be discussed face-to-face? When you're gay, living with HIV and thinking of selling your life insuronc111, shouldn't you be given a face-to-face consultation? Linked V10ricol Bene~its is proud lo be the only gay owned and operated vioricol broker witn a local office in houston. We believe 1n providing you the personal attention you deserve and gelling you the most money in the shonest ~'">E!! Call 1-800-275-3090! LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS 3701 tORBY SUTEtOJo HOUSTON 713-528·6777 A dmission· Free for members, non-members $5.00, students nd seniors $3.50 Seating is limited. Reservations required. For more infonnation, please call 713.942.8000, ext. 104. Continental llOlOCAUST MUSIUM HOUSTON Airlines E~ Wlet ar.i Menard is the official airline of Holocaust Museum Houston. NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE 2000 Join Us For RESURRECTION TUESDAYS Featuring workshops to foster wholeness of body, mind, and spirit. Tuesday, November 30th, 7-9 PM. "Sexuality and the New Testament Scriptures" presented by Rev Ralph Lasher, Assistant Pastor Worship Services: Sunday 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. Wednesday 7 p.m. All programs are free and open to the community! Resurrection MCC 713-861-9149 • 1919 Decatur, Houston, Texas 77007 www.mccr-hou.com Cefe6rating 25 'fears in tk Community Saturia!JS at 7:30pm 1307-J{ ')Me • 713 880-2872 YOUR WEEKlY FIX HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 NEWS World Aids Day ,... Continued from Page 1 by Germ.my during World War II. Betwt'en 5,000 and 15,000 were sent to concl·ntrahon c,1mps, wherL' somt' wert' killed and others dit'd m l'uthan.is1a programs in mental insti· tut1ons. The rl'st went to CJ\'ihan prisons. But tlw1r punishment did not rnd tht.>rt', Fout said. < "One!' n!ll•asrd from Cl\ 1han pnson, they ;: Wt'rl' dr,iftl'd mto thl' w. . hrmacht (German E.<. army)," hl• s,iid. :; L-::::!....;:..!~==:r:ii:uiiiiiiil:: M.iny were tht'n assigned to "cannon fod· der units," whl're thl're was slim chancl' of :.urv1\'al. Thl'se urnts were told not to retreat at any cost. As an aside, Fout said the American military dunng both World Wars d .. alt harshlv with gays. Raising awareness ScVl'ral other events are scheduled m Houston to mark World AIDS Day. • AIDS found.ihon Houston is sponsoring a lunch·~m to r,11St" .w ... irme~~ and pro\'1de funds to a~'ist tho~ impacted by HIV I AIDS .. "It is important for Houstoruans to take hme out to understand that we still ha\'e an incredible pmblem. We ill\' shll Sl.'emg alarming mcrea~s m new I llV mfod1on mall commuruties," said Sara Sl'lbl·r, l'Xecuj1\'e director of AIDS foundation 1 lou,ton. • The NA~1F.S l'n~ect I louston plans thn't' ewnb to honor the memory of AIDS victims, mcludmg ,1 candldight march Nov. 30. Other l'Vt:'nt5 include di,playmg portion.' of the AIDS \ilt·monal Quilt and the lighting of the Tree of Reml·mbr.rncl'. Sara Seiber, executive director of AIDS Foundation Houston, flanked by panels of the AIDS Memorial Quilt during a World AIDS Day observance in 1998. • Resurrection Metmpolitan Commurnty Church 1s hosting and co·spon.'4.1ring an ecu· menic.il World AIDS Day workshop st:rvice Nov. 28. City Council member Anrnse Parker will open the si.n ice and Rev. Bruce Folker of Bering Mcmonal Uni!L'Cl Methodist Church will deliver thL' S(·rmon. • AIDS Co.ihhon of Coastal Texa~ 1s hosting a c.ind lchght cen'mony in Galveston's Saengerfl'!.t Park Dl'c. 1 at 5:30 p.m. Houst('n Comet Sheryl Swoopes will be the guest speaker. Other gue:;ts include Congressm.in Nick Lampson and G.ilv~ton Mayor pro tern Dan.ny Allen. • Rice Urnversity's gay student organizahon, l'ndl', is sponsonng an evening <'f films nnd dis­cussion bt•ginnmg at 8 p.m. at the Kyle Mom'w Rmm of the Rice Library. Call 713630.8667 for more mformahon. . • The Thom,i.s Stn.'('t Clinic will host ib first MARANATHA l '"'ELLOWSHIP MCC Rev. Janet Parker, Pastor "A Libaating Church Serving a L.tbcrating God!" :\E\\ Sunday Celebration lune IOJO ,\\1 (hep.inning June 6th) .WOO \1ontrose, Su11e 600. Houston. Ph. 71J·528·6756 :-;urscry provided Bible Study 9:30 AM Home Groups on Tues. & Weds. ASK I I 11: Pi\5f0R /~ Q:."l low do y1>u bl'gm to forg1n• and how c"<in you tell ~~'I\ whl'n you h;i\'e forg1wn7 " (Part II of II) Maranatha •~\)) 1\ L.1st Wl'l'k we talked about the fir5t two stl•ps of for· Fellowship r giving others: Step One w<1s rc<1liz1ng wh,1t God has done _..,,,.,.,.,, : ~ - • . . • Comm"'1try Churdl tor me. Step fw11 w,is fnrg1\'1ng 1s a d1rnn•, nnt ,111 emo- .. - ... -_._ ... lion I lw third st1•p is to underst.111d the consl'<]Ul'nces of ,in unt. irgl\·ing hl'.irt. Thl' price vnu pay for 'O I fnrgi\·ing is wor~e than thl' bold, humbling stl•p of forgiving. Tlw acids of bittl'rness ,ind resl'ntml'nt that comes with unforgin·ncss will rob us of our pl·ace ,ind ioy. The fruit of unfor· g1n•ness is brokl'n relation,..hips, wld m.irriages, ,ind estrangl'd parents and ch1l· drt•n. It is not wnrth this price! Forgin•m•::.s is given to us by God acrnrdmg to the dl•grl'l' to which we forgi\'c others Jesus s.1id in the I ord's Prayer, "forgi\'e us our trespassl'S AS WI: FORGIVE those who h.wl' trl'<.passed agamst us.'' Fourthly. forg1vl' th.it pcr:;on nght now. If Cod 1s pricking your hl'art to make that move, tlwn do it S.1y tlw magic words, "I'm sorry." Dnn't dl'l,iy. Jesus encourages us not to ll'I thl' sun go down on our anger. }L'SUs knnws that unforgivcness eats away ,1t nur lin•s. It is too temptmg to procrastin<Itl'. Do it today. ,\nd finally, view oth· l'rs .is ,1 tool for gniwth. You will learn ~o much from this experience of forgi\·e· nl·ss. l'ro\'l'rbs tl'lb us th.it friendships .ire like iron sh,irpl'nmg iron. We arc hen• h> rub off the rough l'dgcs of each otlll'r's livl'S. Thl're 1s no better way to do thi$ th.111 through the cxpenencl' nf fo rgivl•ness. You will know th.it you have suc· Cl•ssfully· forg1\'l'n when the cxn•ssb.igg.1gl' of bittl·rm•ss .ind resentment falls to thl• ground ,ind exits your life. Reml'mbl•r th,1t the first step is one of faith. It is b.1~l·d on facts (God's Word tells us to do it). Our emotions will fall m line with our actions. You will know you have forgiven by the peace you receive, and prob· ably the re::.ponse of the one you've fo rgiven. health fair Ot>e. 1 fmm 10 a.m. uni 2 p.m. to prm·ide mformahon about HIV I AIDS and a free lunch to the first 100 people that am\'e • Thl' um\·~rs1ty of Houston has ~\'era! t'\'ents on tap, accottlmg to Sh1lp.i Smgh of the sch(l(>l's \V(lrld AIDS Dav Committee. Pien-s of the Quilt will be e\h1b1t.!d m the \\brld Affairs Lounge. A workshop on risky behanors and h(1\\' to lowt?r the risk 1s ~t tor 10 a.m. m the Atlantic/Pacific room m UC Cndergmund. HI\' World .AIDS Day Worship Service Nov 28, 6:30 p.m. Resurrection MCC 1919 Decatur St. The NAMES Project Houston Candlelight march, quilt dedication Nov. 30, 630 p.m 4617 Montrose, Chelsea Market 713-52-NAMES www.namesproject.org Tree of Remembrance commemoration Dec. 1, 6 p.m. Metropolitan Multiservice Center 1475 West Gray Open House Dec. 5, 1 p.m. • 5 p.m. 4617 Montrose, Chelsea Market AIDS Coalition of Coastal Texas Candlelight vigil Dec. 1, 5:30 p.m. 15 mformabon will al~ be s..>t up amund the cam­pus with free red AIDS ribbons available The Blaffer Gallery Art Museum of the Um\·ers1ty of Houston has an exhibition "Ho,p1ce: A Photographic Inquiry," showing the gmwmg importance of hospice care The C.1thl>lic Center will have a 5:15 p.m. mas' honoring tho'e who ha\'e died from AIDS, and KUHT Channel S will air a documentary on HIV I AIDS Dec. 1 at 9 a.m. Saengerfest Pari<. Galveston 400-770-9-077 Health Fair Dec. 1, 10 am. to 2 p.m. Thomas Street Oinic 2015 Thomas St. 3rd floor 713-793-4026 AIDS Memorial Quilt Dec. 1, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Texas Instruments Building One Auditorium 12203 Southwest Freeway Stafford AIDS Foundation Houston 'ull!heor> Dec. 1 Grem111ion & Co. Fine Arts 2502 Sunset 713-623-6796 Professor John c. Fout Dec. 2. 7 p.m. Holocaust Museum Houston 5401 Caroline St. 713-942-8000 Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer 16 NEWS NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Democrats split over gay inclusion into Civil Rights Act :;... Continued from Page 1 tections or applicability, including a bill by Rev Jackson's son, Rep. Jesse L Jackson Jr. (D-Illinois), and even a bill by Frank him­self. So why has Bradley's proposal garnered so much opposition? ln published reports, officials with the Gore campaign have said the Vice Prestdent's opposition to Bradley's plan has helped him v.ith black voters womed about any threat to affirmative action. But some observers say the difference is one ba~ed on principle and leg15lative strat­egy, and one that pits gay rights allies-and gays-against one another. The debates and what's at stake 0e.~p1te the heat from the Democratic National Committee, whose presidential nomination he hopes to wm, Bradley has stuck to his proposal to amend the 1964 Cml Rights Act, repeating 1t again m his Oct. 27 nationally televised debate Gore. Asked a question about legalizmg samc­sex marnage, wluch all of the major pres1- denll.:il candid.:ites oppose, Gore turned the debate back to Bradley's civil rights amend­ment proposal. "I have supported the [Employment] Non-Discrimination Act in the Congress," Gore countered. "And frankly, you know, most gay .md lesbian le.:iders, and certainly most civil nghts leaders, h.:ive argued agamst openmg up the 1964 Ci\'11 Rights Act." Gore may be nght-at least about the Jack of public support for Bradley's proposal. Of the fi.,e nallonal gav nghts organiz.i­tions that responded to questions from Houston Voice about the issue-the Human Rights Campaign, the Lambda Legal Defense & Educ.:ition Fund, Log Cabm Republicans, ~.:ihonal Stonewall Democratic Federahon, and the Nallonal Latiro/J Lesb1.in & Gay Organiz.ihon­none openly ad.,·ocated dumping ENDA for the amending the Ci\11 Rights Act. Two more national gay rights groups. the Nation.ii Gay & Lesbian Task Force and the ational Black Lesbian & Gay Leadership Forum, did not respond to interview requests about the issue. Yet despite the apparent lack of support for his proposal, Bradley elaborated on both the idea and his comnutment to gay civil nghts in writtm responses released Tuesday to questions subm1tfed by Houston Voice. "The tSsue for me has always been about equality and end ng discrimination m employment, m housing, in public accom­modations. . The5e basic protections should be provided through the Civil Rights Act, through the Fair Housmg Act, or through stand-alone Jeg15lation," Bradley said. Bradley said hlS commitment to gay ov1l nghts, mcludmg amendmg the 1964 Civil Rights Act, came from lr~terung to the con­cerns of "gay and lesbian leaders in many Rep. Barney Frank (O·Mass.), the most senior openly gay member of Congress, has been one of the loudest critics of Bill Bradley's call to add sexual orientation to the Civil Rights Act. commuruties around the country," as well ,1s "what I believe is just plain common Ser!Se." "Half measures just don't work," Bradley said, citing the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" poli­cy, which was supposed to let gays serve in the nuhtary as long as they didn't disclose their sexu.il onent.ition. Bradley has said he would allow gays to serve openly, while Gore has committed only to supporting a more "compassionate" enforcement of DADT. Lnder DADT, Bradley told Houston Votle, "discnmmatton got worse" "That should be a lesson for us in seeking full partiopahon by gays and lesbians in all areas of employment, housing and public accommodatton.~," he said. "It is unfortu· nate that some people have tried to divide the black and gay and lesbian communities when they both have suffered from discrim· m.:ition and both should be united in the effort to end all discnminahon." When Bradley's proposal first made headlines, Gore's press secretary told Associated Press the vice president sup­ports ENDA because "it can actually pass," but the campaign did not respond to a ques­tions from Houston Voice about whether there arc other reasons for Gore's stand. While Bradley has clearly attempted to stake out amending the Civil Rights Act as an example of where he trumps Gore on gay nghts, and Gore has just as clearly .1ttempt· ed to counter the move, some of ENDA's strongest supporters say the current debate betwem the two is, m ~. no deb.1tc at all. "A lot of this has been blown up around a very small pomt" that should make little difference to gay voters, said Chai Feldblum, a Georgetown University Law School professor who helped craft the legis­lation that evolved into ENDA. "Bradley's position is absolutely correct as a matter of general philosophy," Feldblum said. "His position on gay nghts and non-discrimination is clear and correct that there should be federal pi;otechons. "After that, it becomes a very 'inside the Beltwat conversation about whether to [ban d1Scnminahon] through a free-stand­ing bill or amendmg the civil nghts act, but the result is the very same thing." But for others, the question of whether sexual orientation should be covered under the same law as other characteristics target· ed for discrimination strikes at the core of how to view different aspects of identity Martin Ornelas-Quintero, executive director of the National Latino/a Lesbian & Gay Organizatmn (LLEGO), said his organ- 11..ation hasn't taken a position on whether to advocate strictly for &'\DA or to support operung the 1964 Civil Rights Act. But Omelas-Qumtero said the argument that opening the Civil Rights Act to add protection for sexual orientatio~ co~ld weaken protections for other mmonhes places him in a difficult position. "For us as queer people of color, 1t pl.1ct'S us in the position of having to focus either on our ethnicity or our sexual orientation," he said. "For the long-term, it would behoove the LGBT community to be m the CIVIi Rights Act, but is that gomg to happen m the short-term' Not with this Congress. "But I don't want to be in the position of saymg my orientation has to get in the back of the bus, while my ethnicity has every right to sit at the front of the bus," Omelas­Quintero said. 'Separate but equal'? In the interview with the gay magazine Advocate that started the recent debate, Bradley said he supports expanding the Civil Rights Act because "that would clear­ly indicate that discrimination against gays is in the same category as discrimination agamst other protected groups." Yet according to Feldblum, the idea that gay people lose something by not being included in the landmark civil rights bill "is as bullshit an argument as to say that we would gain something major if we were put in." "Does anyone for a second think that discrimination on the basis of disability is different, because it is addressed in the free­standing Americans with Disabilitie~ Act?" she asked. "The key question is, 'Is there a federal policy against discrimination?"' Frank turned hostile.at a question from Houston Voice about whether protecting gays in a separate bill might be interpreted as a "second class" status. "In what sense? You .ire thinking m irrel­evant categories. How docs it make 1t sec­ond. clas:, to g1:e it entirely the same pro· techons? he said. "Did you ever suggest that ENDA was second class status before Bill Bradley decided to run for pre:,ident? Why does Bill Bradley change all of that?" And yet the Lambda lRgal Defense & Education Fund, the national org.inization f1ghtmg for gay civil nghts in the courts, found legal s1gnif1cance in where withm federal legislation gay protecttons are local· ed. "I definitely, on L.:imbda's behalf, have been one vmce in this who h.is balked somewhat at the nolton that you rcal.y send the correct message 1f you take the initiallve to prohibit sexual orient.ition d1scrimina­hon, but then do so in a completely sqia­rate manner than other forms of discrimi· nation," said Beatrice Dohrn, Lambda's legal director. "I have always felt that plays a little to the 'not quite fully equ.11' nollon 1 think unfortunately a lot of people have," she said. Gore 2000 P.O. Box 23250 Nashville, TN 37202 call: 615-340-2000 web: www.algore2000.com Bill Bradley for President 395 Pleasant Val!ey Way West Orange, NJ 07052 call: 888-643·9799 web: www.billbradley.com HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 26, 1999 Flexo logy _ ;.A.;;G;;Ul;.;DE:;.T.;O=Bm~ER"'-'-H=EA.=LT"'-H Beating the holiday blues by GREG HERREN Physically and emotionall}; the big year­end holidays take a toll on our psyches. Traditional imagery fed to American soci­ety by the media frequently focuses on the nuclear family and "traditional" holiday fare: the entire family gathering for a huge celebration, dining tables groaning beneath the weight of enough food to feed a Third World nation, laughter, egg nog, pumpkin pie and "It's a wonderful Life." The intent is to make you want to run out and spend all of your money on food and gifts. Unfortunately, the side effect is that it can lead to severe depression. Not being => able to buy gifts can lead to feelings of fail- -' urt' 'ot being with the family can lead to ~ depression. z runny how what's supposed to be a joy- g ous time hJs the highest suicide rate of the o year [\'l'n thosl' who have the traditional 2 style hohda~· s<'ason cJn end up feeling ~ depressl•d This comes from over-indul- v gence 111 food and Jlcohol. ~ On Dec. 26, peopll' step on their scales ......, _ ___. and start that downward spiral into depres· A little calorie watching and exercise will help sion about tht'ir health. "Mv God, I've keep those unwanted holiday pounds from gamed 10 pounds." And sinc·e the media expanding your waistr.ne. ha\'e successfully lied weight and body image to sl'lf-estt•l•m, naturall1; a weight gain results in lower self-esteem and depression Thb generally leads to 'ew Year's resolutions that lead to higher gym memberships and mor(' p('rsonal training clients-and higher sales of diet books and \'id('os, and get·it-quick empty promises. Fir~t of all, don't buy into the insanity that you aren't going to gain weight during th(' holidays, th.1t there's some fail-safe method to kt>ep pounds off. It's going to happen, unless you watch your calories during the ft•asting. What fun is that? Kel'P in mind, too, that winter is a colder period of the }'l',1r, so metabolisms are slow­ing down in ,111 .ittempt to preserve body fat and keep lhl· organs w.irm and operating. If you ate .i tradihonal, huge family holiday dinner in August, for example, you might g.:un a pound or two, if that. Your met,1boli'm nms faster in the !lot months in an att,•mpt to bum off some fat to keep the body cool E,1ting that same meal in the \\'JOier will add more pounds as the body tril'S to stay w.irm and h(',1lthy The best wa) to keep from gaining weight during this penod is regular exer· c1se. Takl' a long walk after the meal fh1s will kick-st.ut your 1m•tabolism .:ind start burning raloril's th.:it the body might try to presen (' ,111J storl' Do som(' crunches before you go to bed ·1 his will help to bum off caloncs that durmg your sleep might turn mto fot. If )OU ore not with your f.im1ly or lo\'('d ones dunng thl' hohd,1ys, don't bmge ('al. Many Amcnl·ans find comfort m food HO\\ many times have I heard someone say that the only thing that can cheer them up is a gallon of ice cream or a cheesecake? Eat sensibly. If you ha\'e to be alone for the holidays, mak(' sensible meals with special treats that you wouldn't ordinarily have. Rather than focusing on thoughts like "I'm alone; nobody loves me; why am I such a loser," use the time to focus on yourself. Do things for yourself that you wouldn't ordinarily do. Wh('n I us('d to be alone on Thanksgiving or Christmas, I treated mys('lf to what I called a "day of Greg." I ga\·e myself a facial I hot-oil treated my hair. I focused on w.iys to improve the quality of my hfc. I renll•d movil's that none of my friends ever wantl•d to S('e. I caught up on my reading. I looked at the posih\'e things I had going on in my hfe. Just remember: the holidays aren't 1ust about food. The holidays are a time when we should reflect on our h\·es and be grateful for the good, positive things. Don't fonts on the negative The negali\'e fl.ads to dqm•ss1on and unhealthy attitudes. Stay posih\'e. Being ,\lone is not the end of the world. Nt•tlhcr is gaining a few pounds. Take some w,1lks, st.iv posih\'e, and focus on the good in your litP. GreK llerrrn is a personal lramer w/10 lias writ ten on fitness issues for ~everal gay p11b/1catrons He can be reached at alexwkr@aol.com, or througli tl11s publication $1000FF! Sale! in Customer Satisfaction! 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BLJliRWiTCH ~Dad~d Th1SpvW111Shl1DldM1 '19.9S 1. 95 s19.95 ......___ arge selections of previously viewed movies starting at $4. 99 Paperback Romance Novels at $1.99 Greetin ar s All Ratings Available I Big City is Bigger and Better! Don't Settle for the WannaBees! Buy 2 Videos, get a 3rd FREE! HOUSTON VOICE •NOVEMBER 26, 1999 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME by EARL Dirt MA, He may not be J licrusehQld name with movie-goers at the moment, but by the time we collech\'ely usl)er tn the next m11lennium, Philip sq mour Hoffman should be as r 'cogniz.able as Tom Cruise &>twMl now .ind the end of the} ear, the actor best known for htS supporting roles m "Boogie :\ight!," "Patdl Adams" and "Happines.S" \\ill N graang silver SO'CffiS with thn.'CJ&zzling, diverse pcrformJnces in a trio of higlily-anoopated mobon pic­ture;. Paul Thomd!; Anderson's "Magnolia," Anthony Minghella's 'The Thlmtcd Mr. Rip!t:yj and director Joel Schumacher's "Fla\\1$." NoJUSTl(E No reprieve Not even telling the story from his point of view­as in Showtime's new 'Execution of Justice' on Sunday-can redeem the image of double­murderer Dan White by DAVID CO! DMA:\ November 27, 1978, is J date dl'eply burned into the he.irt of gJy history. ThJt day in San Francisco, the nation's first openly gay elected officiJI became lhl' U.S. g.1y mon•ment's first national m.irtyr 1 larvcy Milk (who had united the city's fledging gay cornmunitv to win ,1 scat on the city's board of .supl•n·i· sors) and ~1J1·or Gl'orge Mo~rnne (whose election s1g· naled a shift toward liberalism n city government) were both assassinated in cold blood that Monday morning by former Super\'isor D.m White. Milk had been unknown to most Americans that morning, but by the evening millions ,\cross the country knew his name. Nation.11 news reports included !he • mformat~on that Milk had won \\1th strong backing .- Continued on page 27 1 m sure prop e arr probabh •hmking, 'ls hr the only actor left tn HoUV\'ood'' Hoffman said with a 'ugh "I guess l'\'e 1ust been lucky to ha\£ ht: n ,ast n some m:illv good films And, the fact that thrv re all com•ng out at thr same tune-during v.hat Hollyv.ood calb Oscar Sca.<.\.'n -1Ust mf'ans that a lot of other people ha\ e a fed111g they rr r<ally good p1dul'C'S, too." \'\ilut~ his turrtS m "Magnolia and "The Talented Mr. Riple\" already h.1\r '-Tlhcs touting him as a hkeh Best Supporting Actor nominL'C Jt next\ ear's A,.idlmv Awards, it's his starring role (oppo­site Robert DeN1ro) .is Rusty, a pre-operative transsexual, m "Fl.1wlcss" that has most of Hollyv.ood singing his praise,. "There ha\ e been some greJt male performances thtS year, but nonP ot them e\l~n come do~ to Ph1.1p's portrayal tn 'Flawles,'­he s a totally dtffercnt person," Wilham H Macy, Hoffman's co-star tn "Magnolia" and ' Boogie ights," said. ' rve wn Philip for a long ume now, and he's the traightest, mo_ 'liu guy I know. But, he's so incredibly bche\ able tn the role. Wilen he's up on the ~cen ma dress, I have to ad nut 1 C\ en think he"• woman." 'Flawless," written and directed by ga} Alm ker Joel Schumacher ("Batman nd iRObtn, u A Tim o ~is the ory of a flamboyant, street-hardened drag dub emc~ who rel tly agrees topve 'oi<;e lessons to his ailing Mighbor ul~ the sectiiity guard who has suffered a stroke, 111 help regam his po\\ er of speech It's an endearing, yet, po'l~[ll1.i~ about ttust and acceptance between tv.·o men from 'ast v. orlds-. "ln the simplest tenns 'Fla\\ ts ref.lly abQUt what l~ be a man, regardle'IS of what Yot! ook act• on the Schumacher id. 'In a lot of v. a the two mam charact~ are' en much alike, C\ en though they don t appear that on the surface. They are both lonelv people dl-.::onnected from the rest of the~ orld Although the\' can t stand ont' another tn the begiMing. the stol) progresses, they both realize the) are 'really kindred spmts. From the beginning, humacher knew that Robert Dc:\'iro > Continued on page 26 Peter Coyote as Harvey Milk, the Son Francisco supervisor assassinated in 1978. 20 NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 In addition to the oral solution NORVI aila capsule EASY TO TAKE • NORVIR soft gelatin capsules provide the same convenient, twice-daily dosing as the oral solution.' • NORVIR is recommended to be taken with food, if possible.1 EASY TO TAKE ALONG • Refrigeration of NORVIR soft gelatin capsules by the patient is recommended, but not required if used within 30 days and stored below 77°F', providing flexibility to patients when traveling or at work. • Prior to dispensing to patients, store NORVIR soft gelatin capsules in the refrigerator between 36-46°F.' In consumer focus groups, soft gelatin capsules were perceived as easy to swallow.1 N VIR V 0 A 0 GER, HEALTHIER LIFE • NORVIR is indicated in combination with other antiretroviral medications for the treatment of HIV-infection.' • This indication is based on the results from a study in patients with advanced HIV disease that showed a reduction in both mortality and AIDS-defining clinical events for patients who received NORVIR either alone or in combination with nucleoside analogues.' • NORVIR is not a cure for HIV infection. People treated with NORVIR may continue to acquire illnesses associated with advanced HIV infection, including opportunistic infections. Long-term effects of NORVIR are unknown. NORVIR has not been shown to reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to others.· SAFETY PROFILE NORVIR may not be right for everyone, mduding people with liver disease, hepatitis, or hemophilia. Redistribution/accumulation of body fat has been observed in patients receiving protease inhibitors. Elevated blood sugar levels have been reported in patients taking protease inhibitors. Allergic reactions ranging from mild to severe have been reported. Pancreatitis has been observed in patients receiving NORVIR therapy, including those who developed high triglycerides.' • Common adverse reactions indude fatigue, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, abdominal pain taste disturbance, tingling sensation or numbness in the hands, feet, or around the lips, headache, and dizziness. NORVIR should not be used with certain nonsedating antihistamines, sedative/hypnotics, antiarrhythmics, or ergot alkaloids.' SI NFORM NORVIR should be started at no less than 300 mg twice daily and increased at 2 to 3 day intervals by 100 mg twice daily up to 600 mg twice daily.' If saquinavir and NORVIR are used in combination, the dosage of saquinavir should be reduced to 400 mg twice daily. The optimum dosage for NORVIR (400 mg or 600 mg twice daily), in combination with saquinavir, has not been determined; hoY.leYer, the combination regimen was better tolerated in patients who received NORVIR 400 mg twice daily.1 Take NORVIR every day as prescribed.' 21 22 BRIEF SUMMARY CONSULT PACKAGE INSERT FOR FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION NORVIR lt ol13Vlr capsules Son Gebt oral GOlubon WARNING l CO-ADM lllSTRATION Of NORVIR WITH CERTAIN NONSEDATING ANTll:11STAMINES SEDATM HYPNOTICS ANTIARRllYTHMICS OR ERGOT ALKALOID PREPARA­T 0NS IAAY RESULT IN POTENTIAllY SERIOUS ANO/OR LIFE-THREATEN NG ADVERSE EVENTS DUE TO POSS BLE EFFECTS Of ORVlR ON THE HEPAT C METABOLISM OF CERTAIN DRUGS SEE CONTRAINDICATIONS ANO PRECAUTIONS SECTIOllS CONTRAINDICATIONS NORVIR IS contramdica1ed In pallenls willl known hypersens bvtly 10 rilonavlt or any of Ising~ NORVIR shou1tl not be admmiS!efed concurrent!'/ wl!h Ille druos listed In Table 1 (also see PRECAUTIONS Table 2: Corl'.raindicated Drugs) becauSe eom;>elltJOn tor ~..._ marily CYP3A by <'tonavit could resul! in ilhibltion of Ille metabolism ol lheSe drugs and create Ille potential tor senous and/or fife-threatening reactions such as cardiac arrt1yt!Unias prolonged or increased sedabon, and respiratory depmsJon Postmarlce!Jng riJ)Orts indicate that co-admlnistra!Jon of rttonaw with ergotam!ne or d hydroergotamlne has been assoaated with acute ergol toxicity characterozed by per1pheral vasospasm and ISChemia of the extremities ·- Table 1 DRUGS THAT ARE CONTRAINDICATED WITH NORVIR USE llnlClla °'>II Wib Clla 1'11 Atl COlfTllAJNIHCATlD lfdll- Anllon1lyll!lll __ ........ __ - --...- ~ -1111go1>1m•- -1-"1"."-",""," ---- WARNINGS D,.g Interact- The magr:ll!Jde ol the irlteraCliOnS and therapeutiC consequences between lllonavtr and Ille druQS liSted in Tallie 2 Predicted DF99 Interactions: Ust Willi talllion cannot be predicted wttll any c:etlall'ly When co-adminlS!ertllO lllonavtr with any agent listed in Table 2 Pred1cttd D,.g boltractoou: Ust W1lll taution special attention IS wman!ed Cardiac and neurolOQIC events have been reported wttll rltonavlr when co-admmis· tered wl!h disopyramide mexietme nelazodone ~uoxeune and beb b!OckCfS The pos­Sib ty Of drug lnteraCtJOn cannot be excluded PartJciltlr caution sholltd be used when presaibing slfdenafil In patients rea!MllQ NQIMR Co-admlnlstrabon ol NORVlR with Slldenafil IS expected to SUb$tantially Increase sildenafil conamtrations (11-lokl oncrease In AUC) and may result In an JnCrease Jn SlldenafiH1ssoaated adverse events lncludonq flvpotenSlon. syncope visual cllanges and prOlonged erectQl1. (see PRECAUTIONS Drug lnleractoons Table 2 Est:lbllsbtd Dnog lnteractioas. Alteration In Dose or Regimen Recommended Based on D'llll Interaction Studin and Ille complete prescribing nlormation lor l!ldenafil) Afler;lc Ructions A! ergic riaCIJOns oncludlng urllcana m Id sk n eruploons bronchospasm and angioe<tema have been ~ Rare cases of anaJ)l1ylaxis and Stevens.Jottnson syn-d ome ._ a been ieported Heptlc Ructioas Hepa transa nase eteva ::s uteedmg 5 limes Ille •• pe1 fimlt of normal clilUcaJ t-eiiat• and 13undice have occurred In pa ts rect '1ng NORVIR alone or 111 combi­nation W1lh ot!ler anlirelrovlral drugs see Tallie 4) There may be an oncreased risk I transarnuma eleva In ))3llel!!s willl underlying hepatlti$ B or C Therefore C3UllOn should be exmised wt:ert ad111U11S!tnng NORVlR 10 pat:ents W1lh pre-exiS!lng liver dis eases liver enzyme allnormal'!ies or hepa!JIJS. Increased AST l\LT m ortno ShOuld be tonsJdered in rnese patle!1tS. especJ3fly dunng the ll!SI three months o1 NORVlR treatment niere have been ~ report; of hepatJc dyS1unctlon. Jnclud111g some WI itlCS- TJlese have ~ ocamed in patients tiling 'lluttiple concomJtant medications and/or with advanced AIDS. PaoueatHls Pancrcatllls has been ObseMd in palJent: rectMllg NORVIR therapy oncluding those who ;leveloped hypert!ii;lyceridemia In some cases tltl!i!ies have been observed Patients wl'JI ldmced HIV disease may be at Jncreased nsl< al elevated tnglytor!des and pancreatotis Pancreat tJs should be considered If cfinical symp10ms (nausea. vomiting abdom1- 'lal pain) or abnorm:all!Jes Ill laboratory values (such as oncreased serum ropa;e or amy­lase va ues suggestJve of pancreat tJs ShOuld occur Patients who exhibit these Siii or sym)l10mS should be evaluated and NORVR therapy shoufd be dlscon~nued fa doagllOSIS Of pancrea s made Dlabeln Mell~rglyUtnlll New r.set dlabeleS mefli!US. exacertation of prHXISting d betes mellitus and hyper glycemia have been reported during ioos!llWkellng surveillance 111 H v ected pa'Jents receritng ptOle3Se therapy Some patients reqwred either or dose of onsu!n or Of21 llypog 1'Celllle agents for treatment ol these even In some cases. dlabe!Jc k~ ll3S occurred In those patients who disco t.nued ptQte= ll'lhlbitor 111erapy hype gtycen: persl$ted in some cases. Because lhese events 11ave Ileen reported VOluntarly dunno clinical prxttce estunates of frCfluency cannot be made and a causal relationshiP ~protease 1 fllbftor lhe13PY and lhese Mnts '1as been estalltJshed PRECAllTIONS 61111111 R tonavlr IS prtncipatly metabolized by •ne liver There!ore caution shOUld be exerti5ed wlleJ1 administering !llis drug to pa!Ients With lf11l3!red hepabl: lunctlOn (see WARN· INGS Rnlstanu,truu-mlstuct Yarytng degrees of CtOSS-res1Stance among protease onh bttors have been observed Con wed adminlStratOll o1 r1to::aw therapy IOllOwlng loss of viral suppresslO!l may 1ncte3$e Ille ~ of cross-reslSlanc 10 other protease 111h1bitors HtmapblUa !:lere have been reports ol .ncreased bleed11111. !Xlud11111 spontaneous sk.':1 hematomas and hematlllrOSIS 111 patients with hemoph oa tJpe A and B treated with prcti:ise onlllbilors In some patients add toonal lactor Vlll was g1VC11 In more !loan llal1 ot Ille re;>orted cases lli3tlr.ent with protease lnhilli10rs rm continued or retnlroduced A causal retttJonship has not been estlllJished flt Rtd1llnbtrll .. Rems~ of body fat lnCludi:lg central obeslly dorsowvlcal la! enlargemen1 (llU!!alo hump) peripheral wasting breast enlargemer.l, and "tusllingold appearance· hM been obserled In patients receiving protwe Inhibitors. The mecha· f1ISl1I and ionll-lllml consequences of these events are amenUy ur. nown. A causal retallonship bas nol bten tsli1llAsned Up1d Disonters Treatment wrth NORVIR therapy alone or in combination wrth saqu navir has resufted on sub$tantial mcreases Jn the concentration ol Jotal trlglycendes and cholesterol T111,jlyc­erlde and cholesterol tes~no should be per1ormed prtor 10 on1tiabng NORVIR therapy and at penodic intervals dunno therapy L+pld dosorders should be managed as ct1mcally apprcprtate See PRECAUTIONS Table 2 for add 1141131 Jnlorna!JOn on potenloal drug onteracnons with NORVm and hMG CoA reductase lnh1bttors lnlormabon For Patients Patients should be nformed that NORVIR IS not a cure lor HIV Infection and that they may connnue to acqu re Hloesses essociated with advanced HIV lnfetllon including opportumslll: infec!JOns Pa!lents should be 10ld that the long-term ettects of NORVIR are unknown at lhis ll!ne They sholzld be Informed llla1 NORVIR therapy haS not been shown to reduce Ille risk of transmitting HIV to others lhrauoh sexual contact or blood contam111atoon Patients should be advised lo take NORVl R with !ood. d possible Patients should be informed to lake NORVIR Mty day as prescribed Pa1ients should not after the dose or disconhnue NORVIR without consulting the r doctor II a dose IS mlssed patlents should take the next dose as soon as possible However If a close IS si<ipped, the patient should not double Ille next dose Since NORVIR Interacts wttll some druos when taken together patients should be advised lo report to their doc1or the use ol any omer medications. Jndud111g prescription and nonprescnp!JOll drugs. Pallents should be informed that red1stnbull0n or accumula!JOll of body fat may occur In patients receiving proiease 1nhibttors and that lhe cause and long-term health effects ol lllese condiuons are not known at !hos lime L1boratory Tests Rilonanr l1aS been shown to Increase tnglyterides. Choleslerol. SGOT (AST). SGPT (All). GGT. CPK. and uric acid. Appropriate laboratory testong should be performed prior to 1n1batmg NORVIR therapy and at periodic Intervals or 11 any clinocal signs or symptoms occur during therapy For comprehenSIVe information concernmg laboratory test alterations assoctated with nucleoslde analogues. plrfSlctans should reler to ine complete producl mformat1on for each of these drugs Drog Interactions Rrtoriaw haS been found 10 be an fnhibllor ol cytothrome P450 3A (CYP3A) both In vftm and ., 1171'1>. Agents 1113t are extenslvefy metabolized by CYP3A and have high first pass metabolism appear to be the most susceptllle to large Increases In ALIC (>3-loldJ wl!en ~tered with rltonavl! Ritonavlr alSo lnlllllits CYP206 IO a lesser extent Co-administration ol substrates ot CYP206 wllll rttonavlr could resuft In oncreases (up lo 2-told) in Ille AIJC of the other agent posslbly rCflutrlng a proportional dosage reduc· lion. Ritonavir also appears to Induce CYP3A as well as other trlZ'f1nH lnctud ng glu­curonOsyt transferase. CYP1 A2. and possfbly CYP2C9 Druos that are contraindicated 1pecllically due IO the expected mag- 01 inter· actlon and potentlal for SCflOUS adverse Miits are liSled both 111 CONTRAINDICATIONS Table 1 and undCf Contra1nd1cat1d Dnogs In Table 2 The cfimcal recommelllla!JOns based on Ille results ol lhese studies are listed in Table 2 Eslabhshed Drug lntenc· toons Altention on Dost or Regimen Recommended Based on Drug Interaction Siud· '" A systema!JC revJeW ol over 200 'lledical!Ons prescribed to HIV~nlected patients was perlormed to idenbly potential druo 111teracll0ns wilh n!onavtr There are a num­ber of agents in which CYP3A or CYP206 partially contribute Jo the metaborosm of Ille agent In these cases. lhe magmtude of !he interaction and therapeutic consequences cannot be predlC!ed wilh any certamJy When co-adm mstenno 11tonavlr with caltium Channel blockers, lmmunosuppres­sants. fiMG-CoA reductase mhlbttors. some steroids, or other sub$trates ol CYP3A. or most anlldepressants. certa n antiarrhylhmlcs. and some narcoilC analgesocs which are partially mediated by CYP206 metaboliSm tt Is posSlble 11131 sullslantial lnereases 111 concentrations of lhese other agents may occur ooSSlbl'/ re<iu nng 1 dosaoe •edUC!iOn (>50%) examples are listed n Table 2 Predicted D,.g lntt11ct1ons: Use With Caution. Dost Decrease May Be Needed. When co-admlmstenng ntonavtr Wltll any agent having a 111rrow lherapeU!JC mar gm. sucll as anhcoagulants antlconvulsants. and an!Jarrhylhmlcs $pedal atten!JOn IS warranted W1111 some agents the metabolism may be Induced resu llnQ 111 decreased concentrat:ons (see T•bte 2 Predicted Drug Jatenctloas. Ust Woll! talllion, Dost Increase May Be Needed) Tablt 2 Drug lnt1ractlons With NORVIR CONTRAINDICATED DRUGS fSam1uTable1) --------D-R-UGS THAT ARE CONTRAINDICATED- WITH NORVI-R USE- - Dr>t Clan llnp Willlltl CIJll IUI Alt COlrTllAJNOltATID Wllb l!lllVIA - _.... . ___ llrlnd1ne ~ _...,,.,_ -dl-lly-dr-- 81111D11i1Y- ""'1lidt - - - - NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Predlcled Drug Jnleracllons: Use Wllh Caulion, Dose Decrease ol Coadm1nislered Drug May Be Needed (see WARNINGS) Examples ol Drugs in Which Plasma Concenlral1ons May Be Increased By Co·Adm1n1slralion With NORVIR ~ him•I• ot 01111s "'1tobe -M~~- A_nll,•.~ ~Ide Mncairie mn11mne C1ft)ana11!1WW1'11'1ZD71tru1m~ ~ - --~l':<l-lk\...-...- -- ~ m~ .._., ... -- Clbindln+O- ~ =-mwytnirDlm:& CHypolpoldln.ic\s. -HM-G ~ Ct1tmtltin ICMStJ!ln Sin'Pmtltlft ___ ,..,., ~ttcrotin'l!n ~ ~ -ridont ltltonduint "" tstuollm ··~ ~ St.- - ---- Predicted Drug lnleracllons: Use Wllh C1ullon, Dost Jncrtast ol Coadminlstered Drug May Bt Needed (Ht WARNINGS) Eumplts ol Drugs In Which Plasma Concenlralions May Be Decreased B Co-AdmlnlSJrallon With NORVIR Post-Marteling Eiptntnct w+rh Drogs Listed on Table 2 - Cardiat and neurolOglC events have been reported when ritonavtr l13s been CCHdmln­ISICfed with dosopyramlde meialetme. nelazodone, fluoxetme, and beta blockers The po$S!b ty ot drug lnterac!Jon cannot be exctuded C1ri1nog1n11111nd Mut1gen1111 long-lerm carttnooenlctty studies ol monavtr on animal syslems have not been com­pleted However. rttonavlr was not mutagemc or ctastogemc on a battery ol In "1tro and tr1 mo assays lnclud ng toacter1al reverse mutallon (Ames) using S typh1munum and f eoh, mouse l'/mphOma. mouse mocronucteus. and chromosome aberrations In ~uman lymphocytes Pregnancy. Ftrtol+ty. and Reproduction Pregnancy Category B Rrtonavlr produced no enects on fen +ty In rats at druo e.po­sures apprOXUNtely 40% (male) and 60% (!emale) of that achieved with the proposed lllerapeutoc dose Higher dosages were not feasible due to hepatic Joxiclty No treatment ~elated malformauons were observed when nlonavlr was adm1nls­lered lo pregnant rats or rabbits Deveillpmental loxic.tJ observed In rats (early resorp­tions decreased let.ti body weight and osslf1ca11on delays and developmental variations) occurred at a ma!emally toxic dosage at an exposure eqwvalent to approx­imately 30"· of thal achieved wtth the proposed therapeutic dose A shght increase In the incidence ol cryptolchidlsm was also noted ,n rats at an exposure approximate~/ 22'!1+. ol lhat actueved with Ille proposed therapeu!Jc dose Oevelopmental toooty observed In rabbits (resorptions decreased loner Sile and decr83sed fatal weights) atso occurred at a maternally toJOC dosage equivalent to 1 8 IJlneS Ille proposed lherapeutiC dose baSed on a body surface area conversion '3ctOI There are howevet no ade<iU3te and welkontrolled studies In pregnanl women Because animal reproduct on studies are not always predlC!iVe 01 human response this drug should be used dunng pregnancy only I Clearly needed Nursing Mothers: It IS not known whether lhlS druo IS excreted In human m I<. Because many drugs are excreted In human ml k, cau!JOn should be exercised when onaw IS admlntstered to a nursmg woman However the U S Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises HIV-Infected women not lo breast feed to avoid postnata lrans oon ol HIV 10 a ch Id whO 'll3y not be Infected Ptd1atrlc Ust The salety and pharmacokinetoc prol e of rltol13Vlr 111 pedlatrtc patients below the aoe of 2 years have not been established In HIV-infected patients age 2 lo 16 years. Ille adwrse event pro! e seen durlng a ctlnlCal lrlal and postmarl<et ng experience was sun r to that for ad t patients Tha eva uauon of 'he an!Mral acJMly ol rttonavlr In ped1 atnc patients m ctlnical trials Is ongoing ADVERSE REACTIONS The safely ot NORVIR alone and Jn comb1nat1on w th nucieoside anarogues was 5tud led'" 1270 patients Table 3 losts toeatment-emergent adverse events (at IC-'lst possibly related and ol at least moderate lntensil'f) that occurred 111 2% or greater ol paloents receMng NORVIR aillne or In combl'lltlon with nucleosodes Ill Study 245 or Study 24 7 and m comblnailon with saqu navir In ongoing Study 462 The most frequently repc'1ed clmocal adverse events other than tslhenla among pa11ents receMng NORVIR Established Drog Interactions: Alleratoon In Dost or Regimen Recommended Based on Drug Jn11racilon Siudlu -- ---- HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 were gas1ro1ntesllnal and neurolog1car d1sturtiances lncludmg nausea. diarrhea vomtt­lllQ. anorexia. abdominal pain, taste perversmn. and circumoral and peripheral pares· lhesias Similar adverse event profiles were reported m patients receiving ntonavlr in other trials Table 3 Percentage of Patients with Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events• ol Moderate or Severe lntenstty Occurring In ~ Z% at Patients Receiving NORVtR Slu4y 245 Study 247 Study •62 N11'tl PatiHtl1 A1tf11tctlll Pat11rtts3 Pl- NliWI Pahtnts4 NORVIR NORVIR ZDY NORVIR PIKIH NORYIR Mwtnche'"' + ZDV +h!lllDl•U' • • 111 • • 117 •• 111 •· 5'1 ·· ~ •· 141 Bo-ctyu1w-noae S2 60 S9 13 SI 21 -Aslllenla 28' 10.3 118 1S3 6' 163 - 17 09 17 so 2• 07 ....,,.,.. 7.8 60 67 SS S7 '3 S2 17 3' 07 02 28 Plin (umpedloed) 09 17 oa 22 1.8 '3 ~ Syncope 09 17 08 06 00 21 Vasodibtion 3' 17 08 17 00 3S Olges1M MoreJGI 16 17 '2 78 . '2 '3 Cons!JpatJon 3' 00 08 02 o• " Dlarrllea 250 15• 25 233 79 22 7 Dyspep:ll 26 00 17 S9 15 07 fecal lntonttnenca 00 00 00 00 00 a F~tu!cnce 26 09 17 17 07 3S -loal ThrOll lrrttJtlon 09 11 oa 2..! O• " •66 256 261 298 8• te• Vomlllna 23.3 137 126 17• .. 71 -onCIN<Jt-w ...... 00 0.0 00 2• 17 00 ~- Al1hrilgio 00 00 00 17 07 21 -MyolQia 17 17 0.8 2' 11 21 Nt""Y 09 00 08 17 09 21 Clart1Df1l Pnsfhesla S2 3• 00 67 O• 8• Conloslon 00 09 00 06 06 21 - lleprl!SIOll 17 17 2.5 11 07 71 S2 2Jj 3' 39 11 15 - a• 2.6 o.a 20 18 28 S2 26 00 30 O• 21 ~- 00 60 o.a 50 11 S7 -""' 26 26 00 2• 02 00 Tllinb!Q Allftormal 26 00 08 09 O• 01 flcsl>it>toly PllJ'Y"9'11S 09 26 00 O• O• Sk-in ana ~ndaQ<S " 09 00 08 3S IS 07 Swu!JnO 3• 26 I 7 17 II 28 $peclol5enm T.astel'ermslon 172 111 8• 10 22 so U""lOnil>l Noc1\Jno 0.0 00 00 02 00 28 1 Include$ those adverse events at least possibly related to study drug or ol unknown R' tionshlp and excludes concurrent HIV cond111ons ' The median duratron ol treatmen1 lor patients randomized to regimens conla nlno NORVIR In Study 245 was 9 t months • The median durallon ol treatment for pallents randomized to <eglmens conta1nlno NORVIR., Study 247 was 9 4 months • Tiie median duratton of treatment tor PJ!tents in onoo1no Study 462 was 48 weeks Adverse events occumno In less than 2% ol patients rec:eMno NORVIR In aO phase II/phase Ill studies and collSldered at feas1 possibly rel.lied a< of unknown relationship to treatment and of at least moderate lntenstty are listed below by body system Body 1s a W7Jo/e. Abdomen enlarged. aeddental Injury, allergtc ructron. baci< pain, caehexoa. chest pan, chills, facial edema. facial pain, nu syndrome. hormone level altered, hypothennla. kidney pain, neck pain neck ngid1ty. pelvic pain. photosensllNity reattlOll, and substernal cheSt pain. Caf1110vascu/Jr System. CardtOVaSCUlar dlSOrder. ce1ebral 1schemta. cerebral venous thromboSIS, hypertension. hypotenslon. mioraine, myocardial infarct palp1ta· t1on, pe11pheral vascular dlSOfder. phleb1tis. postural hypotenslon. tachycardia and vasospasm Digestive System. Abnormal &tools. bloody diarmea. Chetfttis. CllotestattC iaundice, coll!JS. dry mouth, dysphagia, eructation. esophageal ulcer. esophag11is. gastntis. gas­troentent1s, gastrointestinal disorder. gastromtesttnal hemorr!tage, g1ngivi11s hepatic coma hepamis. hepa1omegaly, llepatosplenomegaly, 1leus. liver damage, metena mouth ulcer. pancreat1t1s, pseudomembranous coht1s, rectal disorder. rectal hemor· rhage, slaladen1tis. stomat1ttS tenesmus. thlfst. tongue edema. and u1Ceral1ve col1t1s Endocrine System. Adrenal cortex tnsuftlClency and diabetes methtus Htmrc and Lymphatic System Acuto myeloblas11c leukemia. anemia, ecthymosls leukopenla. lymphadenopa1hy, lymphocytoSJS, myeloprolileratrve disorder, and tltrom­bocvtopenia Me/JIJOllC and NIJfrltion31 Oisordtrs Albumlnuria, alcohol Intolerance, avitaminosis. BUN Increased, dehydration. edema, enzymatrc abnormality, glycosuna gout. hyperc­holesteremta. penpheraf edema. and xanthoma!OSJS M11$CU/oske/et31 System ArthnttS. arthrosls, bone cftSOrder. bone pain. extraocular patsy, joint dlSOfdel. leg cramps. muscle cramps. muscle weakness. myosittS, and IWilching Nervous System ~rmal dreams, abnormal gall, agttation. amnesia. aphasia. ataxia coma. coovufslon, dementia. depenona!uahon. d1plopla. emotional labit1ty. euphona. grand mal convutsion. hal!UCtnalionS. hypereSthesla, hyperk nesta. hypesthe­Sta. lncoordinalion. libido decreased. mane reaetion. nervousness, neuralgia. neuropa· thy, paralysis. peripheral neuropatltlc pain, penpheral neuropathy, penpherat sensory neuropathy, personality disorder steep diso<der, sllffCh disorder stupor. subdural hematoma, tremor, ur1111ry retention. vertJoo, and vestibular dtSO<der. Respirafory System. Asthma. bronc!IJtts, dyspnea. eP1Stax1s. hlCCllp, hypovenllla· tlon, Increaser! cough, 111terst1tlal pneumorua larynx edema. lung disordet'. muutts. and smusltis. Skrn and Appendages Acne, contact dermahtts, dry skin, 0C1ema. erythema mult1- lonne, exloftat1ve dermalltts, follicul tis, fungal dermatit1:, lurunculosls. rnaculopapular rash. molluscum contag1osum, OnycllomycoSJS, prurttus. psoriasis. pustular rash, seb­orrhea, skin d1scolorat1on. skin dlSOrder, tk"' hypert1ophy, skin melanoma. urtteana. and vesiculobullous rash Special Senses: Abnormal eleclro-oculogram. abnormal elcctroret1nogram, abnor· mal vision. amblyopta1blurred vision, blepharttts. conjuntlMllS, ear pain, W'(e disorder. eye pain. hearing Impairment tnereased cerumen lnt1S, parosmoa. photophobia. taste loss. tinnrtus. U\'tltJS vtsual field defect. and Vitreous disorder Urogem/JI System Acute kidney failure, breast pam cyslttts, d'(SUtla. hematuna, 1mpc1ence, kidney calculus kidney ta ure. kidney !unction abnorma~ kidney pa n, men· orrtiagia, perus dtSOrder polyuna, urethrilis, umary frequency. urinary tract 11fection. and vag1ntliS Post-M.arlcettng fapenence There have been postmart<ettno reports 01 seaure. Cause and effect rela1ionship has not been eslabf!Shed Oehydration. usually associated with gastro!ntestinal symptoms, and sometimes resutting tn hypolensoon, syncope. or renal inSuffidency has been RPOllOd Syncope. Ol'lllostltlC hypotensiorl and renal insu111Cte11CY have also been reparted willloul known dehydration. Aedtstrlbulior\laccumulation of body bt has been reported (see PRECAUTIONS. flt Red1s1nbution) There have been reports of increased blcedlno In paltents with hemo­p/ lUta A or 8 (see PRECAUTIONS, Hemophtllal L1boralory Ahnarm1htles Table 4 sl10W$ the pettentage of patients wlto developed marl<ed lal>Oralory abnormalities. Table 4 OVEROOSAGE Acuta Oventouge Human Overdost Experience Human exper1ence al acute overdose with NORVIR IS lllll­lted One palJent In clinical trials tool! NORVIR 1500 mg/day for two days The pa!tenl repcrted paresthesias wlliell resolved alter the dose was decreased. A post-ma~ no case ol renal failure with eosinopllilia has been reported with ntonavlr IM!fdose The approximate lethal dose was found to be greater than 20 limes the related human dose Ill rats and 10 umes the related human dose 11 mice Management al Onrdou ge Treatment of overdose With NORVIR constSts of general supportJve measures oncludlllO monnoring of vital Stgns and obseMtJOn of the dinical stttus of the pattent. There IS no specific antJdote ... overdose With NORVIR. If indic:ated. etiminatJon Of unabsorl>ed drug should be aCllleved by emests Of gas!riC tnlge; usual precaulJOns should be observed to ma tatn the auway Admirnstrallon of actrvaled chan::oal may also be used to aid 11 removal of unatJsor!Jed drug Since fi1onaYlr • extensNety l1l$bOljzed by the liver and IS highly protein bound. dialysis IS u ety to be beneftc:W tn 51g ant removal ol the drUQ A Certtfted Poison Control Center should be conslllted bl' up-to­cfatt infonr.allon on the management of overdose with MlRVIR Ref 03-4938-flll-flevised June, 1999 99G-Ot 7 725• MASTER 99G-017 7247 PRl\TED I\ t; s A Percentage ot Patients. by Study 1nd Treatment Group, with Chemtstry and Hem1talogy AbnonnalHles Occumng In> 3% al Patients Rece,.1ng NORVIR Vina•~ Llatt ~ ~ ~ >240 mi;'dl cPI< >10001U/l GGT >3001111. SGOT •AST) ,.,.,U\ SGPT (All) >2151Ull Tritfli<;lr1Cla >IOOmi; Triglj<lridn >1500m;.'Cft.. Trigt\uridlSF- >1500mg."ldl. Uric- >121MML -~ lDt <30'io Hemoglobin clO~ NeulroPIJl!S <115X1o'4 R8C <30 x 101'4 wee c2.5X to'4 ' ULN • upper t1nut of the normal rang~ - lndteates no events reported NOAVlA • ZDV 307 18 11 5.3 S3 16 u 1.5 21 09 u , .. Slufy2'5 SlldyW SW,"2 Nalft ~•tfltl AtrlllcM '"It* Pt--M.llW 1"11611111 NORVIR ZDY I llOl!VIR - I MOIMR •~ •u 93 36.1 ao 152 tt• '1.0 11 6J 99 52 '1 '91 11.3 92 15 25 ,. 70 J II 3• u .. u •12 " 331 " 234 21 12J O• 1.3 1.3 tt 0.3 31 02 " 01 113 22.0 01 31 10 "u S9 111 2'4 09 .. 369 59' 3.5 23 24 Theater LaB Houston stages the American Premiere of a new Gay British Comedy. At the Pearly Gates, Danny waits for the go-ahead to "pass over." Escorted by Judy Garland in her star-lit boat, he must first reconcile unfinished issues left behind. dlfected by Jim Phillips featuring Joel Sandel, Dustin Ross, Tiffani Ginn, James Lane, Scott Bonasso & Susan Shofner Fri days & Saturdays a t 8pm thru Dec. 18 Sundays, Dec . 12th and 19th at 6pm FOR TICKETS CALL (713) 868-7516 NOVEMBER 26, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE CATCH TEXAS SIZED SAVINGS With Nextel's new MVP promotion plans, instant communication is more affordable tJlan ever. No rocniig dicrges on the Nexk!I NaticMial NefWor\Sll Celulcr eds rounded lo the second, ifler the first milute Nexlel Dnct Con~ is the fastest way lo convnunicate Nextel Dir8d Coiin«fM airtime pools OCJOS5 different rate plans Two way rodio, d'igilal celulcr phone en! pager al·in-ooe. Phones starting at only $99 Premier PAGING & WIRELESS 1 2220 Murphy Road 281-575-8500 Pdrvrfr:xi lees ord rtie ploo l?!lndlOllS 00/ cwY Lima! fure ollet: c~ 1999 Nexlel COl!Y!'IJ!lldions, h: All ngln reseried Next~. !lie Ne~ logo, Ne~ Nd~ N~ ord Ne~ Direct Corviect ore ~cxleirah ord/ or serva rrOOi of Nex'd C011VOOnicalion1, lrx: wwwnextel com For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Husinns l:u11ranc:# • u:,.,lrr.s Com11t111atwn (,roup Ura Ith • l ifr ln.•urancr & much nrnrr 6575 W. I.oop So11tl1, Suite 185 Bellaire, 'IX 77401 Zenith Roller Rink 8075 Cook Road 281.575.7655 HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 25 Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEWS Feeding your chip addiction by TRAYCE DISKIN Lodged in the chain-riddled Rice Village Arcade, EL MESON, an authentic and unique Cuban restaurant, is hardly the Ban.1na Republic or Gap of l.Jtin dining. Rather it is upbeat, unpretentious and affordable. Fven on a Sunday night, it might be bustling with tables of stu· dents, friends and families. The multi­colored dining room is both striking and subdul·d-the magenta, teal and violet walls glow warmly under the crisp, fes­tive neon that runs along the ceiling. While the retro 1950s furni-ture would be right at home in a stylish neo­diner, the overall effl'ct of the decor is so cheery and casu­al that it hardly calls attl'nlion to itself. more a meal than a dessert. As for the nachos, the blue tortilla chips managed to stay strong and crisp under the weight, and impressively held the delightful mush Sliced jalepenos in the center of the plate allow the diner to add a sting of pepper to counter the deep, yet mild flavors. I wasn't expecting the Tortilla Espanola ($3.95) lo be one of the stronger dishes, yet the huge chunks of potato and moist egg made it impossible for me to save it for the fridge, as I had original-ly intended once more plates were clamoring for room on our ~ ta~~~1sii~e~ ;~i~~ro~~~; present, lending the dish a sweet, caramelized flavor. The Chorizo Rio1ano al Jerez But what does ($4 95) had a smoky e.:irn your attention is the excellent food Like in the Village pepperoni taste, rich in garlic a n d most Latin American pepper. Although restaurants, a meal at El Meson begins with a basket of warm tortilla chips. The variation of a heated, smoky salsa was no help in staving off the chip addiction, and the thin, almost translucent dip added a perfect peppery bite to each. To stMt, I had the Nachos Cubanos (half order for $3.9S). These six nachos could l'asily pass for a small meal. with gooey dollops of black beans and chunky fried plantains, CO\'Cred in a thin and silky melted ~onterey. Thl' plantains, sen•ed with several ot dishes on the menu, are beautifully cooked-not too sweet, yet glazed with a deep, slightly nutty fl.wor. The plan­tain's meaty chewiness further proved that these fruih may be tropical, but arc 2425 University • 713-522-9306 Food: ~t?t?~~ Service: S.> S> ~SJ Value: 't.:>S>t?t?t? Scene: t_:> ~<t)S_> t fine for most Worth the drive, so live a little As good as 1t gets you could clearly see the sea of grease that accompanies most sausages wherever they go, the liquid tasted more like a fresh oil than stale grease Just when we were gorging ourselves on a meal built entirely of appetizers, two simple, fresh dinner salads arrived to signal the entrees. Although the crispy cucumbers and lettuce were a bit more impressi\'e than the usual side ~lad fare, the white vinegar and oil were slightly dis­appointing as the only choice of dressing. The I:nchiladas <lei Mar ($8.95) con­:; ist of two wheat tortillas stuffed with huge, tightly coiled sautced shrimp. I loved how the buttery saute was still slathered on the shrimp, and the flakes of garlic and pepper made sure that se.ifood dominated this dish, rather than the usual melted cheese. The only complaint I had was that it was virtually impossible to eat enchilada style, perhaps a compliment to the thick meat. Instead, I dined on pieces of shrimp and intermittently reached for a bite of wh.1t bl·came a soggy lorttlla. The accom­p. mying plantains and black beans and nct> worked wonderfully as side dbhe~ com­peting for attention. The Ropa V1c1a ($9.95), shredded beef, w,1s soft and the sauce, a crn's between s.1lsa .ind barbecue sauce, left no part of the me.it unn>Jll•d. Thl' meat was exlreml'ly tender .ind the combination of the meat dish For dPSSl'rt we had the only .w,1ilable choict>, .1 Tres l eches that was certainly respect.1bll', if not spectacular ($2.95). The ze~ty h111t of lemon was soon O\'erpov. ered by its SWl'l'I lla\'or, aggravated further by a thtd.. layer of whipped cream, but ti hardly m.1ttered There wasn't any room left after such ,, comfortable, fabulous meal. ... ..................... : ff\U\f : .;. .....\..f..f.. .'. .......; (_f'fE TOOPEES 1830 W. Alabama (713)522-7662 1209 CAROLINE AT DALLAS 713.759.9323 • FAX 713 759.6812 Lunch: M-F 11am - Spm Donner· M-Th Spm - 9:30pm • Fn & Sat Spm - 10pm "HOME COOKING - ITALIAN STILE" Delivery to all lofts & apartments in Downtown Houston Catering available for lunch and dinner meetings, banquet facilities, and take-out available! Plan your Christmas party with cl?u?N~r3~/.) --1.J~LrTr-' QO.)Pn~ine1.) dlTAUAN" U"R' ISTORANTE \\·ant n1ore t11rkt~,·? o, ..... it? f ~au l'apa .1ot111's! ~ Better Ingredients. . f71!SJH7,1-lftnO Better Pizza ,., :s21n .'\ln nfro"'•' Uh'd. .. ,. ~7 •••• " ·~ ·,. .•. ·•· One• 1~111!4' On.--Topppin;t Pi:u :n . lla ml-Tos."'4'41 o r Thin t ·ru"°l* . \dd u 2-1.ltrr or C 'ol..•• ror onl.• s1.mt mor.-! ................ n.~ "-.. _ ............................. w.. ...... ·-.. ~ ................. .. ..-,....t_. .... .. ._. __ ..._ ......... "'6. ...1 26 :;;- Con tinued from page 19 would be perfect m the role as the closc­mmded, often bigoted security guard but, mihally, the seasoned director had trouble casting the character of Rusty. He audi­tioned hundreds of female impersonators before decid ng on Hoffman Hoffman, however, wasn't as confident he could do the role justtcc "It 1s so easy to play a part like Rusty and completely rum it by going too much over­thc- top," he said. "I didn't w.rnt him to be a caricature or stereotype. I wanted him to be behevablr. Not knowing much about drag queens or transsexuab, I wasn't sure I would be able to pull it off." OUT ON THE BAYOU Apple's top drag emcees in action, Hoffman came away with a whole new appreciation for their craft "They were all fantastic performers, but let me tell you, those drag emcees can be brntal on their audiences-they're a pretty tough bunch," he said with a laugh. "But, I guess that just comes with the territory, because you have to be pret­ty tough to be a man who dresses-up like a woman in pubhc. I think of myself as a fairly rugged guy, but I don't think I'd ever be tough enough or have enough guts to be a drag queen m real life" ~ < ~ bi ~ Q ~ HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 26, 1999 Hoffman wou
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