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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
File 025
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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 025. 2000-01-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2586.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-28). Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2586

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 025, 2000-01-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2586.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 24 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE A. I_ /VtALE CAST SHAKESPEARE'S On Stage ADAPTED BY Joe Calarco DIRECTED BY JLyy— Rob Bundy THROUGH FEBRUARY 13 "What could be more dangerous than that first forbidden kiss of literature's most famous lovers? The first forbidden kiss of two schoolboys." Joe Calarco Generously underwritten by Schopf & Weiss STAGES - Continental p3« Airlines S&l Daring, Innovative Professional Theatre RE PE RTORYTHEATRE Tickets 713 52 STAGES www.stagestheatre.com 3201 Allen Parkway @ Waugh Special Guest Speaker Reverend Jimmy Creech Rev. Jimmy Creech has been working diligently to change the laws within the United Methodist Church that discriminate against Lesbians/Gays/Bisexual/Transgenders. After performing a same sex holy union ceremony for two men, the Methodist Church Jury found Creech guilty of violating the rules of the church and withdrew his credentials of ordination. Come hear Rev. Jimmy Creech's remarkable story of faith, hope, and renewal; and how his ministries continue. Sunday, February 6, 2000 9am & 11am services All programs are free and open to the community! Resurrection MCC 713-861-9149 1919 Decatur St., Houston, Texas 77007 www. mccr-hou. com A seat with an artistic view byRlCHARENSCHIELDT One of Houston's exclusively gay and lesbian theaters, The Little Room Downstairs, presents the world premiere of THE SEAT BETWEEN, an original work by its founding Artistic Director, Richard Laub. Other works by Laub include "Buber Malone" and "Looks," musicals "An American Fable," "The Conquest and the Grief," "Dalby and the Sleeping Prince" and "Unhappy Buddha," which opened the theater at its original 13-seat location in 1995. "The Seat Between" is best billed as an autobiographical cabaret, one that explores gaps in relationships that exist between parents, lovers and friends. Throughout the evening of music and narrative, Laub seems like a man with an emotional construction similar to that of Swiss cheese. He offers some standard childhood references we expect to hear— vignettes of strained family relationships, connections made with grandparents rather than with parents, and the general feeling of growing up "misunderstood" ■ by those around him. On top of all of this Laub ads a sizable dose of sexual ambiguity, resulting in a young adulthood which has more paths than any of Houston's three airports. Some of the lines, like "Being born on Valentines Day, one of the ironies of my life," are amusing, others a bit confusing. During a sneak preview last weekend, I was struck by the way in which music is at the center of this artist's life. Song punctuates most important points for the playwright. Many of the characters in the narrative represent some romantic entanglement and Laub's touching lament to "Tom" is one of the show's best moments. Ballads are this songwriter's strong point and "The Seat Between" is filled with them. There are some clever theatrical conventions, as each significant "light" in Laub's life is represented by one. Parents, grandparents, friends and lovers are all evidenced by some lamp, light bulb, night- light or other lighted object. These are lit and dimmed throughout, which keeps the audience focused. These lights sprinkle the set, which unfortunately looks like it was thrown together at the last minute. Exposed wires and speakers add to a generally disheveled look on-stage, one small enough that an audience can see every powerstrip. Laub has utilized this space infinitely better with other productions at the venue. His set design and its usual attention to every detail, has stumbled here. While the idea behind the lighting concept for this show is good, Laub's face is shrouded in darkness for much of the show. While appropriate at times, the lack of lighting from the front of the stage prevents us from seeing many expressions that accompany the script. Laub credits many influences for "The Seat Between," people who have permeated Richard Laub, the founding artistic director of The Little Room Downstairs, provides a deep look into his life with 'The Seat Between.' his life at some point. In addition to family members and paramours, he introduces a cadre of therapists and his "metaphysician," who examines not only his current life, but also those he has lived previously. Each relationship is examined under a different light—some are looked at with wry humor, some with profound sadness and others with utter regret. The dark comedy in this show comes with ease. Laub's deadpan delivery underscores the absurdity of many of life's moments. He speaks of "frustrating his therapist' and you know its true. But the tone of the "The Seat Between" is largely conversational, not theatrical. Having seen Laub offer the gamut of emotions in last season's emphatic portrayal of the songwriter with AIDS in "The Last Session," I know he can give us more. Playing yourself changes dramatic parameters. Perhaps anguish is not required. But an audience still strives to connect emotionally with an actor regardless of the character being portrayed. The show's transitional sequences need to be smoothed and more thoughtfully constructed. Laub offers us a view of an examined life, but to what end and for what purpose? In delving into his world, we seek to know more about him, not just to receive information revealed to us through a litany of truncated relationships. Though there are interesting parts in this show, it has the feel of a work in progress. Like laub's metaphysician, I would be very interested in seeing "The Seat Between" in its next incarnation. The Seat Between Through Feb. 12 The Little Room Downstairs, 2332 Bissonnet 713-522-LRDS
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