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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
File 022
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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 022. 2000-01-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-28). Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2583

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 022, 2000-01-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 featherini ihe winter blues > Continued from page 17 sophisticated fantasy realm known as Cowardland. in this comedy, the oh-so-chic gentility falls on its face, tripping over its own blissful attitude. If you've got to sneeze into your worn handkerchief, make sure it's monogrammed. Houston Ballet WINTER MIXED REPERTORY (Feb. 24 to March 5) Now, here's a dance combo to put you right back on your feet. Something old, "Les Patineurs," and something new, "Sergeant Early's Dream." Something borrowed: Meyerbeer's music from his epic opera "Le Prophete" to set the scene for the ice skating couples in Sir Frederick Ashton's joyous "Patineurs"; and Irish and American folk songs to guide the immigrants into the American promised land by choreographer Christopher Bruce in "Dream." There's also something blue: the glittering, spinning role of the Boy in Blue as he twirls and leaps in the winter wonderland; and in the sad yet stirring theme of Irish immigrants leaving the known for the unknown. CLEOPATRA (March 9-19) Arguably the most famous woman in the world, the Siren of the Nile arrives in Houston by barge, bath, palanquin, rug and, of course, on her toes. Accompanied by the oriental exoticism of Rimsky- Korsakov's music, this eye-popping ballet should out-DeMille them all with its splendid evocations of ancient Alexandria and Rome. Surrounded by evil courtiers, haughty Senators*' wives, slave girls, Caesar, soldiers, vengeful Romans, an impassioned Marc Antony and an appreciative audience, Egypt's last queen will survive kidnapping, an assassinated lover, an orgy scene, a world war and a fabled love affair to end her destiny by her own hand. Houston Grand Opera THE ELIXIR OF LOVE by Donizetti (through Feb. 12) In this bubbly al fresco romp of an opera, the poor peasant (the tenor) loves the rich resourceful girl (the soprano) who owns the farm on which he works. Nothing will get her attention until he buys the snake-oil magic love potion from the traveling salesman and begins acting like a baritone. Although the potion's a take, after many complications and the belting of the justly famous aria, "Una Furtiva Lagnma," the tenor's ardor and sincerity w in the day, and the girl. This sunny, breezy Italian confection is a sterling example ot opera's evergreen power to seduce. TRISTAN AND ISOLDE by Richard Wagner (through Feb. 11) A much more potent, sew elixir figures in Wagner's music-drama. Any staging of this great masterpiece is rare (singers who can survive and prosper from the intense five-hour ordeal don't grow on trees), so expect the Wagner-heads to be out in force. In an acclaimed production designed in primary colors by David Hockney, Danish heldentenor Stig Andersen and Austrian soprano Renate Behle debut in the taxing lead roles, conducted by Christoph Eschenbach. The lush chromaticism of Wagner's tone poem to sex is not for the uninitiated, his murky philosophy of "love as death" is penny-dreadful, but the music is, in a word, sublime. Nothing compares to it—full of lust, passion and eroticism. LITTLE WOMEN by Mark Adamo (March 3-18) If you have any fond memories of RKO's Victorian valentine filmed in 1933 by George Cukor and starring the youthful, over-the- top Katherine Hepburn, this contemporary opera will shred them up and spit them out. Edgy, spiky and dissonant, Adamo's treatment gives Louisa May Alcott's beloved middle-class, family-values' posterior a swift East Village kick and sends her screaming. Unlike the warm comfort the original supplied, this version, with its neo-feminist spin, is unsettling. This musical shock therapy just might be the tonic you need for a post-modern pick-me-up. Stages Repertory Company SHAKESPEARE'S R&J by Joe Calarco (through Feb. 13) In this version, four young men at a parochial school sneak into an unused room and perform "Romeo and Juliet," playing all the parts REFUGE by Jessica Goldberg (Feb. 23 to March 19) Where would drama be without the universal conflict in dysfunctional families? No where. Think Adam and Eve, the House of Atreus, that particular king of Denmark and his son Hamlet, all those Little Foxes, everything by O'Neill, and most work by almost any contemporary dramatist. Goldberg, one of the youngest voices in theater, gets her tum to strut her literary stuff. Her play, the struggle to build a family after Mom and Dad have abandoned their trio of misfit children and hightailed it to Miami, has received the 1999 Susan Smith Blackburn award for outstanding quality. With a heavy metal injection directlv into the brain, the manic, pill-popping, spastic, lets-do-anything-to-prove-we're-alive jolt she gives this (.en X family from Hell is liberating and, ultimately, its saving grace. Theater LaB Houston DIE! MOMMY! DIE! by Charles Busch (through Feb. 13) The first in the theater's three-part "Camp Alamo." The peerless Charles Busch mixes the genders and his metaphors—but the seams in his stockings are always straight—in this screamingly funny collision between "Lleclra" and every movie Bette I In is made alter 1960. A night out at the theater will never seem the same again. THE BLAIR FELL PROJECT by Blair Fell (Feb. 23 to March 26) Commissioned by Theater LaB Houston to supply it with a world premiere, Blair Fell, who wrote "The Tragic and Horrible Life of the Singing Nun," obliged. What he has wrought is anyone's guess, but you can be sure it's going to be wacky, wicked and witty. ZOMBIES FROM THE BEYOND by James Valcq (April 12 to May 28) James Valcq's musical satire skewers 1950s paranoia, cheesy sci-fi flicks, female aliens in D cups and Milwaukee, but not necessarily in that order. The New York critics gushed rhapsodic and gave it better notices than any other musical in years. Houston Symphony AN ALL-AMERICAN EVENING (Feb. 4) The conductor of the Boston Pops, Keith Lockhart, who has set hearts and tongues wagging ever since his lithe figure stepped onto the Beantown podium to replace the rotund John Williams, comes to town. Check him out yourself, and as an added bonus, hear and see the dapper Andre Watts perform the ultra- romantic MacDowell "Piano Concerto No. 2." Other notable concerts include Bruckner's SYMPHONY NO. 7, conducted by Eschenbach (Feb. 12-14), Carl Orff's CARMINA BURANA, conducted by Hans Graf (March 17-20) Verdi's REQUIEM, conducted by Claudio Abbado (May 20-22). Alley Theater 615 Texas Avenue 713-228-8421 www.alleytheatre.com Houston Ballet Wortham Theater Center 713-227-ARTS www.houstonballet.com Houston Grand Opera Wortham Theater Center 713-227-ARTS www.houstongrandopera.com Stages Repertory Theatre 3201 Allen Parkway @ Waugh 713-52-STAGES www.stagestheatre.com Theater LaB Houston 1706 Alamo 713-868-7516 Houston Symphony Jones Hall 615 Louisiana 713-224-4240 office@houstonsymphony.org For expanded coverage: www.houstonvoice:com IS IN THE AIR... cBrlng ^our (Sweefbearf to Ibe Adam's ciMark 'Jiolel and enjoy a Valentine's evening you'll remember for a lifetime! Spend Saturday, February 12th In the luxury of Houston's premier hotel. Enjoy a romantic dinner, complimentary rose for the ladies and dancing to Van Lang in Tiffany Rose, then retire to the privacy of your deluxe guest room. $169 per couple, inclusive. For reservations and information, call 713-978-7400. Dinner begins: 6:30 pm • Entertainment: 8:00 pm adam's mauk rh« horta1 of houston ,$$^ 2900 Briarpark Drive ♦ www.adamsmark.com i.'f,
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