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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
File 008
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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 008. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/7.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/7

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 008, 1983-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/7.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript came to us and we said we'd love to work with you, providing that we don't have to work with local TV cameras. You send us a crew from New York City, and we'll give you everything you asked for. And those three men have been absolute gentlemen. They have gone into gay bars, they have respected you because they realize that if they turn a camera on you that you can lose a job, whether it be $5000, $10,000 or $15,000 a year, it's still an income. "And I explained that to the mayor of the City of Houston and she said, 'Well, I'll be willing to come if there are no TV cameras.' "And I said to the mayor, the way I'm supposed to do as president of an organization that delegates responsibility among the board members who represent every background, every group, everyone in this community, I said to her, 'I'll call you back in five minutes.'" After another outburst of applause, Bagneris continued: "Then I took my board outside, and I explained to my board the request of the mayor of the City of Houston, and my board said to me if Kathy Whitmire, who makes $80,000 a year, can't face the NBC cameras the way we did after taking our votes, well, then, we're going to take it to you to let you decide what you want to do with that- "We've been tempted with a taste of freedom!" Bagneris was interupted at this points with shouts of 'recall' from the crowd. "But let me guarantee you that it's an artificial taste of freedom, and now we want the real thing. We want the real thing," he shouted. "We want to have the same rights and privileges and protection under the law." Then quieter, he said, "It's simple. We want to keep our jobs, we want to choose the places we live in, we want to raise our kids if that's our blood. That's the bottom line. "But the real bottom line is that we want for the people we've worked for, we've sweat for, we've suffered for to stand with us side by side until we've accomplished the goal of total freedom for every gay man, for every leabian in the City of Houston," he said to thunderous applause. "I've got four more months as president of this organization, and it would be easy for me to continue to play the facade, but I have had it up to here," he shouted to more applause. "I have no desire whatsoever to play anybody else's facade. If you can find the time to ride in a black day parade, an Irish day parade and a Mexican- American day parade, well damn it, you can find the time—when these people have suffered through an election—to come out and find the time to say thank you." After the crowd quietened, Bagneris propositioned them: "Now what we're going to do is let you decide if you're willing to continue—because we boast all over the country that ... we have a pro-gay mayor—we areelected and dictated by you what you want us to do. Well tonight, we're not going to make the decision. You've done the work. You've stood up and lost your job, and you make the decision. We want to know," he shouted, "we want to see the show of hands of how many of you—now that the TV cameras are gone— would like to see the mayor of the City of Houston." The crowd voted overwhelmingly to see the mayor, and there were shouts of "We want her here!" Bagneris continued: "This is not a mob. We're going to control ourselves like we always have, like ladies and gentlemen. Okay? And we're going to conduct ourselves as adults." Then Bagneris tried his final attempt at voicing his disapproval. "Now I want to know how many of you would like to just call it an evening and when they arrive decide that we've had enough partying and go home and let them come and visit anybody that they want to visit because we're not interested?" The crowd screamed. "No!" "The problem right now is I want you to realize that she's just been elected the mayor of the City of Houston. I want you to promise me, should she come in that front door—because I'm not lying to you— I've never lied to you—I want you to promise me that there'll be no hecklers from the Nov. 11,1983 / Montrose Voice 7 crowd, no shouting, and we'll stand here and listen to what she has to say, and we'll applaud her on the way out. And let me tell you why. Let me tell you why," he shouted. "And the first person that is rude with the mayor of the City of Houston will have to deal with me. Why? Because these members who stand with you tomorrow afternoon at 5:30 ... have a meeting with the mayor of the City of Houston. We have a meeting that's guaranteed. Will you support the Gay Political Caucus by acting like ladies and gentlemen? Will you support us when we go in tomorrow and give her a list of the many things we want done in this city—this her second time around? Will you support us in what we want from the mayor of the City of Houston?" After the crowd promised to cooperate, Bagneris continued: "I have your word, and I've always trusted you." Bagneris then told the crowd to keep their clothes on and not embarrass Houston's gay community the way so many had embarrassed theirB in San Francisco. "I beg you, do not embarass us." It was later reported to the VOICE that Mayor Whitmire listened to Bagneris' speech to the crowd at Numbers via a walkie-talkie in her limousine. Mayor Whitmire's only comment was reported to have been, "I just wish they wouldn't be taking this attitude." Minutes after Bagneris' spoke, the mayor walked onto Numbers' stage to resounding applause. "Hello," she said in her strained voice. "It's great to see all of you." After more applause, she continued: "I just want to say that tonight we had a wonderful experience because they told us that we couldn't do it. They said it was a fluke last time. And I just want to congratulate all the people that worked with us. It takes a lot of work, it takes a lot of dedication. "We had strong opposition this time. We had opposition that spent a million dollars against us. But because you did the work, because you worked with us, we were able to win and were able to win big." After the applause died, she said, "And I think this says a lot about this campaign and the people that worked in it." The mayor then excused herself due to her voice, and introduced George Greanias, "a good friend of mine and a good friend of yours." Then Greanias made a statement that sat uncomfortably on the shoulders of many in the crowd. "These few people up here (the GPC board members) are perhaps the closest to you in terms of representing the community. We don't forget it for a minute that we're in office. And don't let anybody let you think that we ever forget that we welcome, we acknowledge and we respect your support and we ask for it again, and again and again. We thank you. We both thank you. "You all have done wonderful things in the last four years," he continued, 'from '79 when the council changed. There is so much left to do. Don't lose sight of what the goal is. The goal is progress for this community, for this city. Stick with us. We're moving forward. We're gonna get at it. You keep at it. You can't lose. And as long as we stick together, there's no goal we can't accomplish. We are united. We are one." Robots Replace Humans Will the age of robots usher in life after death? Neil Frude thinks so, says a recent issue of Omni. The Welsh psychologist says that after you're gone, your friends may be able to console themselves by having a cup of tea with your mechanical double at the wake. Frude says robot technology will someday produce "look-alike vinyl shells" programmed to mimic speech, gestures and attitudes. They may even be able to "physically interract" with loved ones. Frude admits his notion is "profoundly disturbing," but he says "it's something akin to a bid for immortality." 2700 ALBANY [713] 523-4084 Cum "ALL MY CHILDREN" Monday thru Friday 12 Noon Followed by "One Life to Live" and "General Hospital" Monday Night Maneuvers 9to2-15CDraft Happy Hour Daily, Noon till 8pm 750 Well, 750 Bud, Lite & Stroh's, 900 Schnapps
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