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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 007. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/6.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/6

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 007, 1983-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/6.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 MONTROSE VOICE / NOV. 11, 1983 GPC Not Totally Pleased; Many Not Pleased with GPC continued from page 1 tered Mary's with their bright red stickers urging voters to support the GPC bloc vote, a vote that clearly excluded Hall. Stickers were pasted to cars parked around the bar and on some of Mary's patrons, whether they wanted to wear them or not, reported one of the bar's man- Upon entering the bar, Mary's surprised crowd greeted the mayor with shouts of "Keep Kathy"—the slogan painted on the front of the building—and the shouts of elation continued while the mayor walked through the bar, shaking hands and speaking with its patrons. At the rear of the bar, however. Mayor Whitmire's progress was stopped by members of the GPC who joined together and refused to let the the mayor pass, said the bar manager, until other patrons of the bar forcefully broke the GPC blockade, an event which has received both confirmation and denial from GPC affiliates, as well as the owner and managers of Mary's. Rep. Danburg, an avid supporter of the GPC, addressed the Friday night episode at Mary's: "A few GPC board members were up at the bar getting drinks. They didn't try to block the mayor. They were there to observe. There was no confrontation and no argument." Another GPC member (who wishes to remain anonymous because of her public position) said: "There was no confrontation with the mayor. We have no problem with her. She walked in, saw our GPC bloc vote stickers, but I didn't confront her. I didn't even talk to her." However, another GPC member (Dan- burg's affiliate) mentioned that the mayor offered her her hand and asked, "How are you, (name witheld)?" "I said not one word to her," the GPC member said. "I didn't respond, because I was genuinely hurt." This GPC member further commented that she believed her organization felt abandonded by the mayor because of Mayor Whitmire's refusal to tour the bar with the GPC, rather than with candidate Hall. "But we're not out here to sell candidates," the member added. "We're here to generate votes. But Anthony's her (Whitmire's) man, and that's who she's pushing." It will be a matter of time before the incident at Mary's bar will be made clear to members of the community, an episode many members regard as an embarrassment to the gay community as a whole. Mary's owner, Jim Farmer, did contact the VOICE in an attempt to make public his feelings regarding last Friday's episode: "Mary's would like to apologize to the mayor," he stated, "for the rudeness and actions of certain members of the GPC which occurred at my bar last Friday night." After leaving the bar in her silver Continental limousine, Mayor Whitmire rode with Hall to Bacchus, a popular bar for gay women, where she met with enthusiastic support, and then to The Copa, where she entered the packed disco to Donna Summer's "She Works Hard for the Money." After touring The Copa, much as she had done at the previous bars by walking through the crowd, shaking hands and speaking with its patrons, a video of a male stripper was stopped for the mayor to take center stage. "Remember me next Tuesday," she asked the crowd in a strained voice, brought on by a severe cold and laryngitis, and was applauded by a crowd snouting approval. Then she introduced candidate Hall, who told the crowd, "Let's don't turn the clock back four years," referencing accomplishments made by city council over that period. The following evening, the GPC conducted its bar tour, sans Whitmire, and with what was reported as a considerable success^despit* an unpleasant confronta- Whitmire on tour at Mary's Lounge Friday night—with no GPC umbrella These two people (Nikki Van Hightower and Anthony Hall), both considered friends of the gay community, were the front-runners and are now in a runoff for City Council Pos. 4. Whitmire supported Hall. GPC chose not only to endorse Van Hightower, but to also "target" her race as a necessary win. This angered many in the gay community who felt that that energy should have gone into more clear-cut races. — *r tion with Councilman George Greanias, who, like Mayor Whitmire, supported Hall. GPC's tour consisted of Rep. Danburg and candidates Nikki Van Hightower and Anne Wheeler. Councilman Greanias had been invited by the GPC to go on the tour and had made arrangements to meet the tour at 11:30 Saturday evening at Rascal's, provided that candidate Hightower was not along. "Greanias had been assured by Bagneris that Hightower would not be on the tour," reported one GPC member who was at Rascal's at the time. "Then when he saw her get out of the limo, he went back inside and had a drink." Despite this brief episode which some members of the community see as yet another breach of community trust by the GPC, GPC president Bagneris said, "The tour worked like clockwork. We were supported at every place." Rep. Danburg did not see the Greanias incident as being overly important. "He did not want to appear to be supporting Nikki Van Hightower," she said. "He felt by going on the tour with her that that would implicate his endorsement (of Hall)." The divisions between the mayor, the gay community and the GPC came into sharper focus election night. While the GPC celebrated its victories at Election Central at Numbers 2. 300 Wes- theimer, Mayor Whitmire's supporters gathered downtown at the Sheraton. After her victory speech where she saw her reelection as a referendum "to make this city the greatest city in the world," the mayor held a brief press conference, prior to which time she invited the VOICE for a private interview later in the evening. In her suite at the Sheraton, Mayor Whitmire was hesitant about addressing her relationship with the GPC and was adamant about the confrontation at Mary's which had disturbed many people in the community. "I don't know what you're talking about," she said of Mary's incident. "I really don't even want to talk about any such rumor mongering that you're getting into right now." Asked if she had felt abandoned by the GPC during this race, the mayor replied, "I certainly don't." But the mayor was aware of the uncertainties and of what some deemed a lack of appropriate representation within the community, but she sought to rise above it when addressing the VOICE. "I think in a citywide campaign you have to get votes from every part of the city, and the Montrose area has always been an important part of my constituency," Mayor Whitmire said. "I live in Montrose, and in every election when I've run, I've always gotten a strong vote from Montrose. "I think that the support that I have gotten from that area really transcends any kind of political factions within the area," she added, "and I'm glad about that. I certainly don't involve myself in the fights between the factions." Then Mayor Whitmire turned to the issue of gay rights and how she views her last two years in dealing with the issue. "I have always been a supporter of human rights," she said quietly. "And at times, certainly in my last campaign, that fact was used against me—the fact that I had support within the gay community was used against me—and I think at that time we saw that even though it was a very bitter part of our campaign, we were able to do enough work to overcome it. I think that some progress has been made at developing a larger base across the city of people who see the virtue of supporting ° basic human rights for all people." * Meanwhile, across town at GPC's Elec- 5 tion Central where patrons of Numbers, o the politically minded in the community o and GPC's members and advocates awa- o ited the arrival of the mayor, GPC presi- °- dent Bagneris addressed the crowd in what will probably be his last large-scale address to the gay community as president of the caucus, since officer elections for the organization are scheduled for the first of the year. Bagneris, in a masterpiece of political rhetoric, expressed the disappointment he felt with Mayor Whitmire, and before the mayor arrived, he proposed vacating Numbers in an attempt to have the community mirror his disapproval of her efforts with the gay community over the past two years, despite GPC's endorsement which greatly influenced her reelection. "I just received a telephone call from a successful mayor of the City of Houston who just carried the Montrose precincts to the tune of 90 percent," he told the large gathering junt before liOOa.m. "And I lind a few things I wanted to say to her. I wanted to say, first of all, that accountability begins now—not tomorrow—but now. We will not tolerate retreat of responsibility to our constituency any longer by candidates who receive our support," he said, alluding to the possibility that she might not appear. "In all minority struggles, the task of obtaining basic human rights is diffilcult at best. Our message is clear," he shouted. "Your message and the message to these people who sacrificed week end and week out for the Gay Political Caucus in this community—our message is clear! We're in this for the duration of this fight for equality, because none of us are free until all of us are free. We believe, we really believe," he emphasized, "that a great society is spawned in the sanctity of pri vacy. That's are issue: the right to privacy," he said to applause. "But along with that comes the courage of the individual, the wisdom of tolerance, and most of all, the joy of the human spirit. That's the important line that lies with us," he said emphatically. "And I was going to turn to Kathy Whitmire, and I was going to say that the days of Cinderella are over with. They are over," he shouted. "The clock has struck midnight and reality has become our fairy godmother." After being interrupted by more applause, Bagneris continued: "It should take no compromising to give people their basic human rights. That's what we're about. After working eight years in this organization, after working through Gay Pride Week, after working though an election just like the rest of these people up here," he said, referring to GPC's board, "I had the mayor of the City of Houston say to me, 'I'll come, but I understand that they're some TV cameras there.' I said, 'That's correct.'" "We're proud of the fact that CBS came to us and asked to film a documentary, but we told them to 'go get screwed' because they had done such a bad job with gay power and Gay Pride Week. Then NBC
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