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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
File 020
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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 020. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/19.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/19

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 020, 1983-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/19.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript Nov. 11,1983 / Montrose voice 19 that Neville Marriner, as a conductor, is master of the first two, approaches the third with the greatest reluctance and the fourth by unconscious accident. By modern standards of musical composition and performance, this sort of thing is quite acceptable. , Admittedly, a concert with virtually all the notes played correctly is a rare thing. But is it music? Can these bones live? Starting Next Week in the Voice FREE PERSONALS (up to IS words) See form page 23 Houston's New Gay Theater with an Male 'Private Lives' By Robert Hyde Is Houston's gay community ready for a theatrical repertory company that does nothing but gay plays? Hopefully so, according to two men in the community who are launching their first production next week with an all- male version of Noel Coward's Private Lives, that sophisticated comedy that reunited Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton on Broadway earlier this year. And if this play is successful (and opening night is already promised to be standing room only), the community will be reacquainted with other favorites, such as P.S., You're Cat Is Dead, and Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, as well as introduced to lesser-known but new positive works by American gay playwrights. "I have b hugh social consciousness about gays," said John David Etheredge, the director of Private Lives and co- founder of the newly incorporated Diversity Theater, the non-profit theatrical group which will bring the plays to Houston. "Some people go into politics or become very active in other areas of the community, and this is my way of doing something for us." Etheredge has been involved in theater for most of his life. After graduating from Northwestern University in Natchitoches, he studied as an apprentice at the Alley Theater, supervised a local repertory company in New Orleans for over two years, and has directed over 40 plays in his life, including the recent Skirmishes at Stages. The idea of forming a local gay repertory company occured to Etheredge when he saw the community reaction to last year's production at Stages of Bent when several performances had to be added due to sold-out performances. He was moved when he saw an individual in tears during the play which analyzes the love between gays in a Nazi concentration camp. "I then realized that most members of the community had never seen plays about themselves," Etheredge said. "Gay people spend most of their lives without role models. Most of their first 18 years are invalid," he said. "Maybe someday a psychiatrist will come along and tell a six-year-old kid that it's all right to be gay, but that's a long way off." And it'B with this spirit of forming a comfortable identity that the new gay theater group is being launched. Etheredge feels deeply about his conscious- raising effort for the community, and believes that gay people need to see plays about themselves. And to date, that iden-' tity has been stereotyped, for the most part, by motion pictures and television; only this year have two major gay plays (Torch Song Triology, La Cage aux Folles) made inroads on Broadway and been highly patronized by nongay audiences. (Bent was thought by many to be too depressing; Boys in the Band, too negative.) "There's got to be an audience in Houston for very positive, sensitive gay plays," says co-founder Joe Watts, a long-time acting member of Houston's theatrical com- munity whose most recent performance was in Boys in the Band, which may be revived by Pace at the Tower. Watts made reference to Montrose Activity Theater's production of Women Behind Bars, made popular by drag queen Divine, that brought Houston's gay audiences to the theater, but he feels that plays should not have to be sensational to attract the attention of the community. Even the popular Bent, Watts said, had its sensational element with its nude scenes and its on-stage climax between two men. "But it's time now to do new, positive gay scripts," Watts said. "We shouldn't have to do something sensational or outrageous to get people into the theater." Etheredge goes on to point out that this new repertory company will invite many gay actors to perform, an opportunity that has eluded them simply because they have been gay or effeminate. "And some directors have had to bypass them because of this," Etheredge said. "It's a reality. It's not totally pleasant. I'm sure.it's happened to me. And there are so many talented gay actors." If Private Lives is a success, then, Ethe- redge's goals will come closer to reality in providing this opportunity to local gay thespians. But why Private Lives, rather than some more recognized gay play? "I thought of going with something less established," Etheredge said, "but I didn't know if anyone would have heard of it. Really, this play is just an easy first step for us." Watts agreed with Etheredge and feels that by making thiB an all male production, a lot of people will come to the play just to see if it will work. "I think it's innovative to approach a classic that's been revived on Broadway," Watts said. "We've changed some of the pronouns," he added, regarding the all male cast, "but so far, only our drag queen (who's playing one of the roles and uses camp constantly offstage) is confused by all this." The play's comedy revolves around two married couples (in this case, gay) honeymooning on the French Riviera when two members of the newly weds who were once lovers spy each other from adjoining balconies and realize that they are still in love. They slip away to a private residence where there new mates descend on them in an emotional and hilarious tug of war. One of Houston's oldest gay bars, the Pink Elephant at 1218 Leeland, is donating its new stage area. The Other Side, to this new theater company for its inaugural performances which will be held on Tuesday evenings, beginning November 22, at 8 p.m. Tickets will be $3 to make the evening more accessible to the community- ■ _, . "A lot of people in the community don t support things as much as they should, Watts said, hoping that this will be the exception. „ "And this is something we both want, Etheredge added. "Hopefully all of us can work together to establish.it." ... a Llqkik£.aitza qijt ihotihz C2niLs.tm.ai. aaids., urtah, q<-fts., L7i and i.W£.at inixti, mote, eilttzu and bs.ai± tk an S.UE1'.. Gome. Jbhats. trie. zpv[aalc CrV&Ol* 636 cHauttnoinc—•^Hou.iton rji-xan 770O6-—5SQ-S20Q iDtitn y\i\onJ.a<j tn\u <£atuxJatf tJam-'/pJt Qfxen tiff Ohm on cMonAcy & Odu^Act, THE ALTERNATIVE We have a better way. A better way of putting you in touch with the people that you want to meet. People whose interests are compatible with yours, sensitive people. Attractive people. People who may be interested in lasting relationships. People who understand that you can't depend on the bars to provide you with quality companionship. We have a better way—and we'd like to show it to you. Private selection offers a unique approach to video dating, combining state of the art technology with the dynamics of interpersonal relationships. Call today for your free consultation. SI PRIVATE U PS. 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