Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
File 019
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 019. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/18.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/18

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 019, 1983-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/18.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 Montrose voice/ Nov. 11,1983 Night Music's Waltzing Fairytale for Adults By Joe L. Watts Theatre Under the Stars has opened its '83-84 season at the Music Hall with a 10th anniversary production of A Little Night Music, and has brought in Juliet Prowse, Larry Kert and Hermione Gingold to head the cast of this Stephen Sondheim musical billed as a waltzing fairytale for adults. Winner of six 1973 Tony Awards, Night Music is a musical adaptation of Ingmar Bergman's Swedish film classic, Smtlesof a Summer Night. The story is elegantly set in Sweden at the turn of the century when Madame Armfeldt (Gingold) brings together for a midsummer weekend in the country a handful of discontented lovers— her daughter, actress Desiree Armfeldt (Prowse); Desiree's former lover, lawyer Fredrik Egerman (Kert); Fredrik's young wife Anne, still virginal after 11 months of mariage; Fredrik's son Henrik, a divinity student in love with Anne; Desiree's current lover. Court Carl-Magnus; and his unhappy wife, the Countess Charlotte- plus assorted servants and other guests. Amid silver birches and with the "smiles of a summer night," the lovers juggle their ill-matched relationships until finally they fall into proper order. Night Music is a very stylized, innovative musical, and Sondheim's lyrics and music are quite sophisticated. A mood- setting vocal quintet perform before and during many scenes, helping to explain and develop the storyline along with the actors. Night Music's style is considered light operatic, rather than traditional Broadway musical. The quintet, in this production, all seemed to have well-trained lovely voices, but were too hard to understand at times. Hermione Gingold (an international treasure of the English speaking theatre) seemed a bit low key in her performance as Madame Armfeldt, but then she is required to perform the entire production from a wheel chair. However, reported to be an amazing 85 years young, she still had a twinkle in her eyes and seamed a crowd -pleaser. Larry Kert (the original Tony in West Side Story) was secure and fine in his performance as Desiree's former lover—he and Juliet had* some nice moments of inner play. Juliet Prowse (possessing a pair of sror- geous legs) was very capable as Desiiee, and her rendition of Sondheim's classic "Send in the Clowns" had the right emotion, if not the right voice. Early in the play, Madame Armfeldt tells her granddaughter Fredrika "that the night smiles three times." TUTS is fortunate in this production to present three wonderful surprise "smiles." A bright and professional smile comes from Henrik (Stephen Lehew) who laments that all of his advances to his wife are turned away with "Later, Henrik." Lehew deserves respect for his technically fine performance and brings laughter with his character's romantic frustration. The second smile is a wry grin for Countess Charlotte (Barbar Lang) whose narcissistic, philandering husband has driven her to resent men, sex and anyone who is happy. Lang sings beautifully of her woes in the touching "Every Day a Little Death" and is the best actress in the cast Later in Act II comes the "musically best" smile from Petra (Laurie Daniels) the maid who has dreams of grandeur but a grasp of reality that she blends powerfully in the "The Miller's Son." A Little Night Music will play through November 13. □ Stages' Vetting Out' a Powerhouse By Joe L. Watts As it's second offering in the Women's Playwright Series honoring the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Stages is present- production of a young woman's release Juliet Prowse ICHAEL MARON PHOTO from prison and her struggle to cope with "the outside" hits a very powerful cord and is a totally accomplished display of strong, tight direction and honorable first class acting—theatre at its finest! Stages had the honor of Norman's presence at their opening night performance. Norman is the winner of the 1982 Blackburn Prize and the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for her current Broadway success, night, Mother. Surely she must have been moved and proud to have seen her extremely well- written Getting Out given this almost flawless rendering by Stages. At the opening of the play, Arlene (in her late 20s) has just been released from prison after serving an eight-year term for murdering a taxi driver, along with a few incidentals such as robbery and prostitution. She went in a hellion and came out a meek mouse afraid of her own shadow. And in this case, that shadow is her former self (pre-prison) played by a younger actress. Scenes from her past when she was a wild animal ready to tear the world apart occur intermittently along with the present happenings of her life (a clever and quite theatrical device used by playwright Norman). Enter a bag full of selfish members from her past who are not ready or capable of giving her the support she needs to deal with her new freedom: the prison guard, who has retired and has driven her to Kentucky hoping to gain sexual favors; her former pimp/boyfriend who wants to "set her up for business again;" and her mother, a hard and bitter woman who offers nothing but negative talk of how difficult her life is going to be, finding a job, making any good new friends, etc. Then along comes Ruby, Arlene's upstairs neighbor in the run-down building she has just moved into. Ruby (an ex- con, herself) is a cook at a hash house, or as she calls herself, "the queen of grease." She offers Arlene the simple honest truth: you won't make as much cooking and cleaning as you will on your back, but whatever you make, you get to keep all of it. Arlene isn't sure she can accept this philosophy and is completely destitute, considering the options with which she is faced. Dare she hope that her life could someday be a good one? Norman's text is taut and tough, but contains touches of humor in looking at life in the raw. Her delineation of thechar- acters is excellent. Director Ted Swindley deserves much praise for a sharp, compelling production and for bringing together an impeccable ensemble of actors. And Stages' cast is an electric power plant. The energy, intensity and electricity was wonderful to watch. Robin Bradley as Arlene underplays her role with an inner beauty that is very ^Tra^fiJauga as Arfie (the younger Arlene) generates an explosive perfor mance that is often hypnotic—a young actress sure to make a name for herself. Charlie Trotter is right on the mark as Bennie the retired prison guard smitten with Arlene. Jean Proctor presents a well-crafted characterization as Arlene's bitter and callous mother. Dorothy Edwards as Ruby (Arlene's ray of sunshine) is wonderfully warm with good comic timing and delivery. Daniel J. Christiaens as Carl the pimp is the perfect slimy snake, trying to lead Arlene back into a life of crime. Like the values in Norman's drama, the message here is simple and true: you should get out and see Getting Out; it will be time well Berved. Stages' production will run through Nov. 19. □ Women's Chorus Slated for Houston Preview: The Cecilian Singers. Clara Lewis, Conductor; Jack Coldiron. Baritone; Bea Rose, Harpist Program: Purcell. "We Sing to Him," "Evening Hymn;' Barber, "Melodies Passageres:" Theodore Chandler; Ginastera, "Cinco Canzoines Populares;" Britten, "A Ceremony ot Carols," "Rejoice in the Lamb." By Peter Derksen Habitues of symphony and opera often look down upon "amateur" musical groups, judging that they could hot possibly be as good as their professional counterparts. The fact is that not all highly talented and trained musicians are able or willing to lead the concert life, with its extreme demands of time and energy. Groups which perform music for the sheer love of it offer a quality of inspiration sometimes absent among the mercenaries, and also have the freedom to explore lesser-known works by the great composers, as in this program. The Cecilian Singers are a group of 25 women united by their love of serious music and commitment to make it more available to their community. Founded in 1977 by Clara Lewis and Joanne Cox, their purpose is to present choral literature of the highest artistic quality, either previously written or commissioned for them. They are one of the only treble choruses active in this country. Until the last century, it was relatively uncommon for women to perform music in public, particularly in church, so most choral music was intended to be sung by men and/or boys. Some composers, such as Nicolai Porpora and Michael Haydn (younger brother of Joseph Haydn), bucked the trend and wrote extensively for treble voice. The Cecilian Singers have, as far as they have been able to determine, offered the U.S. premieres of three of Michael Haydn's four major works for treble chorus and orchestra, and they are planning to perform the remaining one next year. In general, though, few composers wrote much for treble chorus or understood the musical qualities of the treble voice. Two more recent prominent exceptions are Brahms and Benjamin Britten. Later this season, the Singers will perform Britten's Missa Brevis in a concert with the Westminster Choir and the Forth Worth Chamber Orchestra. Guest artists are an integral part of Cecilian concerts, not only to round out programs, but also to give the singers the opportunity to work with different specialists and better their craft. Past guests have included the Southwest String Quartet (Houston Symphony Orchestra principals), the Fort Worth Chamber Orchestra, the Texas Little Symphony, Charles Nelson (an operatic basso from Dallas), and such varied accompaniments as a harp ensemble, brass quintet and mime troupe. The coming concert features lyric baritone Jack Coldiron, head of vocal music at Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth. He is especially noted for his performances of the'Faure Requiem '< under the direction of Robert Shaw. Aside Montrose Live from the solo works in the first half of the program, he will sing Rejoice in the Lamb. Although Rejoice was not originally written for treble chorus, this transcription was authorized by Britten. This concert, then, will focus on 20th century composers, though not on 20th century music, as most people think of it- ruthless cacaphony. Lovers of vocal music will not want to miss what promises to be an exciting and enthralling concert. The concert will be presented at the John Wesley United Methodist Church on Nov. 19 at 8 p.m. For ticket information and directions, call Clara Lewis at 444- 3545. d Houston Symphony's Valley of Dry Bones Neville Marriner, conductor; Robert Tear, tenor. November 5th Program: Mozart, Symphony No. 35; Britten. Serenade for Tenor. Horn and Strings; Web- em. Im Sommerwind: R. Strauss. Suite from Der Rosen kavalier By Peter Derksen Four vividly emotional works performed with scarcely a trace of feeling should have been slightly surprising even to longtime Marriner fans. He is on the way to becoming (in reputation) the Toscanini of his generation, flooding the market with superb-sounding precision recordings of the classics. In particular, he has brought many fine 18th-century works back into the active repertoire. Mr. Marriner, making his Houston debut, opened the concert with one of his stock items: Mozart's Haffner Symphony. The orchestra was immense by this conductor's standards: 12-10-8-6-4 strings (he has been known to use 6-6-4-4-2). With minute differences, the symphony sounded exactly like it did when he conducted it in Boston five years ago, and as he recorded it on Philips about 10 years ago. (which is a tribute to the Houston Symphony Orchestra's level of playing technique.) Marriner's Mozart is crisp, exact and rather predictable. Robert Tear, one of the world's leading operatic tenors, also made his first Houston appearance Saturday night in Benjamin Britten's Serenade. He sang very well, with almost perfect diction, audible even over full orchestra. Thomas Beacon was a model accompanist and soloist on horn, and contributed most of the vitality of the performance. He played the modal Prologue and Epilogue on natural (valve- less) horn, the pure sound of which, combined with strings, was paradise. Mr. Marriner led the ensemble through the series of songs in a generally restrained and direct manner, letting some Mahlerian intensity loose in the Elegy, set to a poem by Blake. Anton Webern's Im Sommerwind ("In the Summer Wind") is a youthful work with slight premonitions of his later obsession with concise atonality. As a late romantic symphonic poem, it is overshadowed by contemporary works by Richard Strauss, Sibelius and Schoenberg, among others. Nonetheless, it was a pleasure to listen to, evoking images of the high Alps in high summer. Marriner's conduction was, as might be expected, precise and restrained, allowing the music to stand on its own, unembellished. Richard Strauss, ever alert to the commercial potential of his music, extracted an orchestral suite from his popular opera Der Rosenkavalier. The suite has become a popular concert staple, appealing both to opera lovers who seldom get to hear the original, and to Strauss lovers who detest opera. The music captures the brilliant gaiety of the opera, with its lover's intrigues, comic episodes and elegant balls. Though technically excellent, the peformance was too cold and detached for my taste. (This would have pleased Strauss, an unemotional man whose frigidity on the podium was legendary.) Considering music as having four basic types of qualities; physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual, it is apparent
File Name uhlib_22329406_n159_018.jpg