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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
File 018
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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 018. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/17.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/17

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 018, 1983-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/17.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript Texas Renegades Presenting Adragna's Carnal Fantasies By Billie Duncan Competent artists depict things, good artist depict thoughts, and great artists depict passion. Perhaps Rober t J. Adragna is not a great artist, but his work evokes a sense of, well, lust from the viewer. Cowboys, horses, guns, leather, outerspace—these all are elements in the works that are now on display at Texas Renegades, 1318 Westheimer. But the overpowering element in Adragna's meticulously crafted paintings is his own awareness of the attraction of the sensual male animal. "I'm fascinated by the way a person wears a pair of pants or a belt," said Adragna. "the way something is shaped to them that best displays their personality." Lest someone should get the wrong impression, a word of clarification: these paintings are not pornographic, they are merely carnal. Adragna's style is a form of theatrical super-realism. His paintings were created, for the most part, as illustratins for books. It seems that a lot of the books took place in the Old West—an area for which Adragna (a native New Yorker) has a great fondness. "One thing I was disappointed in when I came to Houston was that hardly anyone was wearing cowboy hats." Adragna is very attactive to costuming, and, though he uses real people as models, he clothes them in his mind the way he would like to see them. "You know what's the fun thing about painting—people like this, you get to dress people up in your fantasies. And, in a way, they don't know it." He confessed that he has been known to dress for bed, himself. "I have an absolute fettish for blue jeans," he said with a slow smile, and admitted that he thinks jeans have a place in lovemaking "if they're a turn-on for the other person." He paused for a moment, his brown eye searching for the right thought. "The trouble with porno films is that they get undressed too fast." If he were to direct a pomo film, he said that he would have "all the different types. The Village People were perfect for me. But they didn't carry it far enough." As far as plot was concerned, he said, "I would like it if you didn't get to the orgasm until you had explored all the other possibilities. The orgasm would come at the very end of the movie." But his favorite films are western and science fiction, and he said that his art is very influenced by the films he sees. He is pleased with how well his film sense has worked in with his illustrating jobs, but he feels that he would like to have more freedom of expression in his painting than he is allowed working as an illustrator. "I would like to go bolder into the fantasy." Eighteen of the 22 pictures in his Houston show were originally done as illustrations. Of the other four, two are of Adragna'B lover of five years, David. One of them is titled "Number Ten" and is on the list of paintings in the number 10 spot. Adragna explained that he had had no title for the painting, but when he was making out the list, it fell to the number 10 spot. "I thought, 'How appropriate!'" The only painting that does not have at least one male figure in it is called "American Dream" and is an acrylic of the grill of a vintage Cadillac. "A Mercedes Benz is not as sexy as an old Cadillac." There are no paintings of women in the show. He thought of one that he decided Artist Robert Adragna not to bring. "I didn't bring the painting because it's (the show) in a gay bar. And she's dressed in leather, of all things!"' He said he would like to try his hand at painting fantasy images of women, but "most publishers are too conservative, unless it's Playboy or something like that." Adragna's illustrations are generally commissioned by such people as Ace Books, Dell Publishing, Jove Publications, Berkeley Publishing and the American Post Card Company (for whom he has done two cowboys). Several of his pictures recently NOV. 11, 1983/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 Montrose Art appeared in The Advocate, which is where Creative Source, 702 Avondale, and Gor- dana Kristofic of Texas Renegades noticed him. Gordana decided she wanted to bring him to Houston. "I wanted to show how someone from New York saw cowboys," she said. Robert J. Adragna's cowboys (and other men) will be on display at Renegades through Sunday, and the charming artist will be on hand tonight, tomorrow and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. to discuss his work and, hopefully, sell some paintings. It would be nice to keep some of his fantasy cowboys in Texas where they belong! Winter's the Time of Discontent Feeling down? Gaining weight? Sleeping more lately? You're not crazy, you're hibernating, reports Omni. Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have discovered that some of us get bummed out as the days start shortening and don't come out of our blue funks until springtime. "I should have been a bear," complains one sufferer. "Bears are allowed to hibernate; humans aren't." The researchers say they've obtained successful results simply by plunking their patients down under lamps to prolong daylight artificially. For a longer- term cure, they suggest imitating the birds by flying south for the winter. But don't go too far south. Down under, they get depressed, too, from June to November. OPENING SOON HOUSTON 611 HYDE PARK
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