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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 022. 1987-01-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-30). Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/245

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 022, 1987-01-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/245.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 30, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript JANUARY 30, 1987 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 No Need to Wrestle with 'P.K. & the Kid' ' Ringwald runs away from home in "P.K. and the Kid" About halfway through the show, he comes too close to actually catching her. So the script, without explanation, sets him back on the trail about a half day's worth. He's tracked her to a small motel, but instead of camping in the parking lot he waits until the next morning and asks about her at the front desk. That's way out of character for this man. P.K. hitches a ride with the Kid (Paul LeMat). He's on his way to win that arm wrestling tournament. Will he help her? Of course. Will she nearly make him miss the tournament? Of course. There are no real surprises in this show. The contest is mondo bizarro. First, we see interviews with the other competitors. This doesn't advance the plot, but it does give director Lou Lombardo a chance to insert some footage of a man eating live grasshoppers. When we finally get to the big grudge match, the camera circles and feints trying to add some action to what is really not a sport for sober spectators. That doesn't work, either, but it does make the audience dizzy. John Desonti and Esther Rolle have good cameo bits. Esther is the earth mother we all wish we knew. There's far too little of her here, though. I don't think this film will be in contention for a Golden Turkey award as one of the great laughably bad films of our time. But I could be wrong. This film will be much better late at night, after they add the commercials. Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Scott Cutsinger is in poor health. He has moved back to Houston from Hollywood, but does not feel up to reviewing at the moment. Until such time as he can resume writing, I dedicate this column to him. Super Bowl weekend's new movie was P.K. and the Kid. It's about an oddly matched couple from Denver. The Broncos weren't the only team from the Mile High City that lost last weekend. The sports movie has come a long way recently. Starting back with Chariots of Fire, working up through all those "Rocky" films, past the twin glories of The Karate Kid, has it met its twilight with this movie about arm wrestling? All of the good, visually interesting sports seem to have been taken already (with the possible exception of hang gliding). Perhaps the genre ought to be allowed a few years off before we find ourselves ending a film with a jacks tournament. True, a good writer might find a new twist on a previously used sport. But that would seem" to be beyond the talents of screenwriter Neal Barbera. P.K. is a 15-year-old girl. The Kid is a baby-faced middle-aged man. If that doesn't make you smile, you probably won't like much of the intentional humor in this movie. Molly Ringwald plays P.K. This movie does its best to be a quiet, artsy film. Don't chew your popcorn too loudly or you'll miss parts of the dialogue. But Pretty in Pink or Sixteen Candles it's not! P.K.'s mother is growing older, starting to lose her looks. When she does attract a live-in boyfriend, he puts the moves on her daughter. Mama basically goes along with it, for fear of losing the creep. The less said about Mama the better. Thankfully, the film agrees with me on that one. Papa, however, it gives us in spades. Alex Rocco plays him with many a sneer and leer. If you like sitting on the front row, take along some extra napkins to get this man's drool off your lap. P.K. does the only intelligent thing <-, f)i)pyjjrj&c short of homicide. She runs away. Her "father" follows her. Thanks to a few too many coincidences on Barbera's part (or perhaps he borrowed some kind of radar device from McGuyver), he keeps nearly catching her. His perfectly timed entrances reminded me of Jason or some other hack and slash "hero." They jarred strangely against the rest of this film. Alan Quartermain and the Lost City of Gold Outrageous Fortune— Bette Midler and Shelly Long fighting over a man Black Widow Aliens (River Oaks, 30) La Donna Scimmia (MFA, 30)—part of a festival of Italian comedies. One Night Only At 23, Emilio Estevez became the youngest person to write direct and star in a major motion picture—"Wisdom" Rutger Hauer plays a bounty hunter, grandson to Steve McQueen's old TV bounty hunter, in "Wanted: Dead or Alive." The Gold of Naples (MFA, 31). ONO! Latino (Rice Media Center)—Houston premiere of Harold Wexler film about Nicaragua Giorni D'Amore (MFA, 1). ONO! Sherman's March (River Oaks, 1)— more about the filmmaker's lack of social life than about history. Off-beat comedy Keep Your Present Job and Earn financial freedom in five months as a distributor for the hottest network marketing deal in Houston. I am a 32-year-old woman working in the arts in Houston—and I'm not going hungry. Let me recruit and train you into a really incredible financial opportunity. You'll love using these products. So will your friends. Call me at 868-4608
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