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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 019. 1987-01-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-30). Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/242

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 019, 1987-01-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 30, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 MONTROSE VOICE/JANUARY 30, 1987 Alley Theatre Sets a Wonderful Trap with 'Glengarry Glen Ross' Live Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Have you ever let a crazy person talk to you? I don't mean a mentally ill person. I mean the kind of person you meet at a bar in the afternoon, or a donut shop in the middle of the night, or, especially, sitting at the counter of a coffeeshop at lunch. If you've really bothered to try to listen to such a person, you know that there is a mesmerizing fascination in the way that they insist upon your ambled along compared with Shelly. Shelly's nickname is "Machine." Willy's play, Death of a Salesman, sails along deliberately, with a grand melancholy. This one jerks around, seemingly spasmodically, with engines racing all the time. There is never any doubt that these are petty little people. There is a lot of humor. You might leave feeling vaguely depressed, just vaguely. I left with the jitters, as if I had just finished three cups of Turkish coffee. "Will you go to lunch!?" John Williamson (Robert Graham, right) hustles George Aaronoe (Tom Klums) out ofthe office as Richard R°™<J"m™ Harper far left) tries to save a real estate deal with James Lingk (Charles Sanders, sitting) from falling apart in Alley Theatre's production of "Glengarry Glen Ross," running through Feb. 22 Willy's play was seen from the perspective of his home. You rarely saw him at work. Shelly'3 play all happens at work, or at coffee breaks down the street in a Chinese restaurant. Shelly attention while monopolizing the conversation and generally ignoring anything you try to say—ignoring you completely if you try to change the subject. It's like a mongoose, it must be, the way that steady stare of its eye spins a snake in place mid-air. You couldn't look away if you wanted to, and you do want to—very desperately at times. But sometimes they're very, very interesting. Then again, you sometimes get hooked into just appreciating the situation. You think, "This would be funny if only I could back away, and watch myself, or someone I don't have to feel embarrassed for, being trapped like this." It is. But sometimes, unnervingly, you find that you're just as trapped as the poor schmuck who is the bull's eye ofthe target. I know because I've gotten to back up and watch it. You can, too. Just go down to the Alley and see Glengarry Glen Ross. The pit of vipers playwright David Mamet captures so unerringly is a group of real estate salesmen. Their voices bob and weave like prizefighters. They lull you into a trusting sleepwalk. They puff up dreams like a brass band. They come in short staccato bursts, like machine gun fire, like a man vomiting forth his soul. The play is about all the men but, it becomes a tragedy for Shelly Levene (played by John Newton). He used to be the top gun, the sales leader. Although no longer number one, he has to keep going. If he's one of two losers in the sales competition, he will be fired. What can he do? It's interesting to compare him to Willy Lohman. Willy was in the same fix. But would he have ever lied to a client? Here everyone does. It's standard operating procedure. Willy sort of mentions his grown daughter several times, but only in bragging how he put her through college. I don't think he ever mentions his wife. This play is stuffed to the gills with undeleted expletives. The language, for all its poetic variety, is very gritty. Coat irritants with excrescences and you get But all these birds of prey must beware of worms. They'll turn, given a chance. Robert Graham plays an office manager good at his job—being a hard nose. Tom Klunis' character is a yes man—or is he? Charles Sanders' character, the only buyer on view, can be easily dominated—but by whom, the salesmen or his wife? And Jim McQueen's cop doesn't take guff from anybody. Pat Brown, the Alley's artistic director, directed this one herself. The first act was written to be visually static. But she got set designer Elva Stewart to give her plenty of mirrors. You can pick from three views of anything. Then she got excellent performances from a lot of long term company members. So who cares if all they do is sit there? This short evening is so fascinating that it seems even shorter than it is. Yeah! n Notes Tonight and tomorrow night's previews of The Normal Heart (Alley) benefit the AIDS Foundation. As if you didn't know. Don't just assume that they're sold out. There's usually room for at least two more. The Feb. 1 performance at the Comedy Workshop is the final for Stages' production of Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You. As Stages' artistic director Ted Swindley put it, "With well over a hundred performances, and an 11-month run in our third production ofthe script, we feel we can safely say this play has to be one of the all-time hits in the history of theater in Houston." The Museum of Fine Arts has acquired two new sculptures for the Cullen Garden: Ellsworth Kelly's "Houston Triptych" and Albert Giaco- metti's "Large Standing Woman I." HSO Composer in Residence Tobias Picker has founded the Houston Composers Alliance. So far, 20 locally-based composers have joined, including such widely-known ones as Carlisle Floyd, Michael Horvit, Ellsworth Milburn, Paul English, Paul Cooper and George Gurt. They're planning a Miller Theater be the Houston premiere of a short ballet set to a commissioned score by Michael Kamen, who composed the score for the movie Brazil. And the world premiere of a full-length ballet based on The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Auditions: Houston Symphony Chorus: Feb. 3, one song, any style, sight- reading, ear-testing, by appointment only, Claudia Leis, 224-4240. d Celebrate! Feb. 1,1893: West Orange, New Jersey: Thomas Alva Edison opened the world's first movie studio. Birthdays: 30—Tammy Grimes, Hal Prince, Vanessa Redgrave. 31— Tallulah Bankhead, Carol Channing, Zane Grey. 1—Clark Gable, Langston Hughes, Garrett Morris. 2— Farah Fawcett, Robert Gluck, Elaine Stritch. "No matter what side of an argument you're on, you always find some people on your side that you wish were on the other side."—Jescha Heifetz (born Feb. 2) a Openings Cimarron Wind Quintet (Heinen, 1)— ONO! Alberts and Nadolski (U. of H. Downtown, O'Kane Gallery, 2)—simple sculpture and meditative drawings Outlaw Talkshow (Blythe Spirits, 2)—hosted this week by comedian Andy Huggins Berlioz, Bizet, Ravel (Jones, 30)— HSO. Second night Boito instead of Ravel The Chieftans (Rockerfeller's, 30)— with world champion step dancer Michael Flatley The Manipulated Environment (Houston Center for Photogrpahy, 30)— work by various artists who alter existing objects or space soley for the photograph Abercrombine & Fitch Fine Arts 5K Run (ends at the MFA sculpture garden, 31,8:00 a.m.) The Baron's Big Sneeze (Company Onstage, 31, 11 & 1:30) Caught in the Act, a new vaudevil lean extravaganza (Jewish Community Center, 31)—new mime company with Linda Graham and Robert Leeds 16th Annual Art Show (Meredith Long Gallery) and Dinner Dance {River Oaks Country Club, 31)—"The Night of the Lotus!" benefits Multiple Sclerosis research. In Montrose, Neatly Everyone Reads the Voice Over 2000 runners lined up for the first annual Fine Arts 5K Run in 1986. This year's race, sponsored by Abercrombie & Fitch and benefitting the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 31 pearls. James Harper plays an oily shark, jerking his neck and slicking back his glossily pomaded hair. Michael M. Ryan plays a human Venus Flytrap. Fall for his honey-coated tongue and he'll snap those steel jaws around you. concert in July. Any composers wishing to join should write Picker at the symphony. Houston Ballet has annouced their 87-88 season. They will be performing each stand for two weekends. There will 1420 Westheimer Houslon. Texas 77006 522-4485 WE DELIVER VIDEOS Heads and folh Above the Rest —Lcrge Selection of All-Male VHS Tapes —Tues.. Thurs and Sun Rentals $2 for Our Members —Now Open Sunday 2 to 8 OPEN 7 DAYS ■ Amex, Visa. MC
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