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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
File 011
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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 011. 1987-01-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-30). Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/234

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 011, 1987-01-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 30, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 MONTROSE VOICE/JANUARY 30. 1987 Dissension May Strengthen Gay Rights Movement, Says Expert By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice Dissension among gay activists regarding political issues may actually have a healthy long-term impact on gay rights, according to a University of Houston- University Park sociologist. Dr. William Simon, a sociology professor whose field of expertise is gay rights, said what some may be viewing as a "split" in community leadership is in fact a reflection of the diversity ofthe culture, sending the important message to society that not all gay people are alike. Short-term problems and image conflicts sometimes arise when internal disagreements in a social movement are made public, as happened recently when gay leaders' differing positions on involvement in the Democratic site selection process were noted in the local press, Simon said. Nevertheless, there is a "net gain" from a free exchange of ideas in a public forum. In response to concerns that negative or controversial views fuel public homophobia, Simon noted that public views constantly change. Homophobes, who are usually set in their opinions, probably aren't influenced either way by things they hear about gays, he said. "Robert Stoller, the psychiatrist, once said that the word 'homosexual' should always be used as an adjective, never as a noun," Simon observed. "Showing diversity helps in our struggle, which is not only for the freedom to be gay, but to be individuals. Our goal is the right to be ourselves. Sometimes, in politics, in the heat of the moment, it is hard to see this," he said. Moreover, the argument of aggressive, confrontationist activism versus low-profile, "work within the system to effect change" diplomacy is far from new, Simon pointed out. As far back as the 1950s, early gay organizations like the Mattachine Society and Daughters of Bilitis struggled with the same type of conflict. "During the '50s, one ofthe big arguments centered on how a gay man should dress," Simon said. "Going to a Mattachine meeting, one would think he was walking into a room full of FBI agents. People were told, 'don't dress gay. Don't be flamboyant,' until some finally said, 'why not?'" The two approaches have been rooted in gay political organizations "since the dawn of Stonewall" and will probably always be around, the professor stated. In practice, the separate drives appear to complement and assist each other, he suggested. Even the most radical representations of activism contribute something to the gay rights movement, according to Simon. "Politics is sort of like a choice between syphilis and cancer ... this is bad, but this is worse. Radical gay lib reminds us of the costs of being taken for granted by the liberals who have won our support," Simon said. By calling attention to themselves, militant activists give politicians the message that they will have to continue working for that support, he added. "There are, for example, some segments of the gay community who are embarrassed by certain contingents in the Gay Pride Parade. The goal of gay liberation is the right to be gay, in all of its forms, without apology," Simon said. "When Richard Wright first presented Native Son for publication, there were protests from the black community that the main character's representation would be damaging ... yet if that book were not published, it would have been a great loss to black culture." In ihe gay community, the militancy of the noisemakers is balanced out by the diplomatic efforts of those who do work with the system. "The good thing is that we do have both," Simon said. The original goal of the gay rights movement is for homosexuality to be publicly perceived as simply another aspect of someone's life and personality, Simon noted. Only by allowing the gay community to be represented as the diverse, wide-ranging social spectrum that it is can stereotypes, in all of their forms, be broken down, he said. Simon is a full professor of sociology at the university. He is currently involved in a study of the sociological and psychological impact of AIDS in Houston's gay community. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose BETTER LAU?nS & QARDEI1S Total laum maintenance Commercial—Residential • Landscape • Trdsh Remoudl • Chimneu. Sweep • Tree Seruice • Stumps Remoued • Complete Sprinkler Systems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN GENERAL REPAIRS Shocks & Front End Work Expert Brake Service 1411 Talt 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers maybe male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call "7°° /^1^'7
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