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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
File 010
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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 010. 1987-01-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/233.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-30). Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/233

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 010, 1987-01-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/233.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 30, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript ISEEKTUTUREOF NEW SOLUTIONS ANt> NBWIPEASWtt) NEWWSWRS- ■Ntt> NEW CONCEPTS AND NEW REMEDIES AND NEW NOTIONS AND NEW FOMENTS AND- Statewide Rights Organization Idea Rejected at Conference By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice The idea of a statewide "umbrella" organization to coordinate gay rights agenda in Texas cities was soundly rejected at the Texas lesbian/ Gay Community Resource Conference, held Jan. 24-25 in Austin. "The general consensus, during that discussion, was that we don't need another one," said Bill Agosto, moderator of the Houston Gay/ Lesbian Forum, a local interaction group. Agosto explained that most conference delegates felt statewide coordination was already being accomplished through the efforts of Texas Gay/ Lesbian Rights Lobby, Texas Human Rights Foundation, political organizations in the cities and gatherings like the resource conference, a follow-up to the Texas Gay Leadership Conference held in Dallas in September. Annise Parker, president of Houston Gay Political Caucus, agreed on the reason the idea was defeated. "It was felt another organization isn't needed at this time, that the agenda could be coordinated at the state conferences," Parker said. The state already has a forum of organizational representatives, coordinated by TLGRL, which meets on a regular basis to exchange information, Parker said. Additionally, a system of periodic state conferences organized by local groups is emerging, Parker said. Another conference is scheduled for late this summer in Lubbock, with the host organization to set the agenda, she noted. The state organization was the only theoretical issue discussed during what turned out to be a "nuts and bolts" conference, consisting mainly of a series of workshops on practical concerns of gay organizations, Parker reported. Workshops on revitalizing organizations, fundraising techniques, networking with nongay groups, and dealing with homophobia and media relations were included in the conference schedule. Agosto said he was impressed with the "businesslike" structure of this conference, compared with others he had attended. "It was probably one of the most professional formats I have ever seen in gay/ lesbian conferencing. The information was well-structured and very useful," he commented, citing a workshop on organizational management, presented by Don Baker, as an example. "Baker outlined methods of developing goals and motivating people, and set up a means of tracking performance. It was very much like a professional management course you'd expect to pay up to $1000 for," Agosto said. Lovell's workshop focused on finding common ground with organizations working on other causes, as well as working "related" issues intoa common agenda. Mike Martin, an activist who became involved in politics in Fort Worth through joint efforts with local labor groups, spoke on getting involved through other issues. Joe Perez, president of Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidos, participated in a workshop on minority outreach within the gay community. During the workshop, members of minority organizations interacted with members of mainstream gay groups whose members are predominantly white males. "The most important development of the discussion was that (the mainstream gay leaders) agreed to look into existing minority organizations for guidance in minority outreach," Perez said. He noted that predominantly white gay organizations have had difficulties approaching the issues as they relate to minorities, even in areas like AIDS education. "The workshop made a lot of gay white males realize there are some good reasons for low minority participation and turnout for events," Perez said. Minority group representatives attempted to show the organizational leaders how hard it is for minorities, including women, to relate in the "GWM" world of gay community activities, he added. Houston was mentioned as a potential site for the International Gay/ Lesbian People of Color's bi-annual conference. Nominated by the IGLPC steering committee in November, Hous ton was third choice for host city, following Toronto and London. Neither of the other two cities has submitted an application but GLHU may not be allowed to apply for Houston since regulations specify a 501-C3 non-profit organization, Perez noted. He said he would look into the possibility of applying in connection with another local organization. Groups represented at the workshop,, besides GLHU, included Dallas Gay Black Caucus, the Austin Latino Lesbian and Gay Organization and an emerging black group headed by Marvin Prevost. Charlotte Taft spoke on women's issues. About 150 persons attended the weekend conference. Parker, Agosto, Lovell and Perez were among about 12 Houstonians who attended. U.S. Supreme Court Refuses LaRouche Case WASHINGTON (UPI)—The Supreme Court refused Tuesday to become involved in the tangled legal affairs of four groups associated with fringe politician Lyndon LaRouche. The court refused to review a case brought by Caucus Distributors Inc., Campaigner Publications Inc., National Democratic Policy Committee, and Fusion Energy Foundation seeking review of a ruling by the First U.S. District Court of Appeals. The groups were seeking to lift contempt rulings against them for refusing to cooperate with a federal grand jury in Boston and refusing to turn over documents. LaRouche, 64, a four-time presidential candidate who in 1984 collected 78,773 votes, less than 0.09 percent of the total, has been labeled at different times as "ultra-left" and "ultra-right." LaRouche has claimed that Britain's Queen Elizabeth is the "head ofthe drug lobby," and that the International Monetary Fund "is engaged in mass murder" by spreading the disease AIDS through economic policies. JANUARY 30, 1987/MONTROSE VOICE 9 Liberace Home from Hospital but Gravely 111 PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (UPI)— Liberace lay gravely ill at his home Wednesday, two days after being released from a hospital where he was treated for anemia brought on by a bizarre diet of watermelon, aides claimed. A spokeswoman said Tuesday the flamboyant pianist, whose trademark candelabra and outlandish wardrobe marked a spectacular career, was in grave condition with pernicious anemia, emphysema and heart disease. Denise Collier, press agent for the 67- year-old entertainer, said he was at home receiving visits from close friends and relatives. "It is my great regret to inform you that Liberace is gravely ill with pernicious anemia, complicated by advanced emphysema and heart disease," Collier said in a statement read from New York. "His physicians are vigorously treating him for this condition and are hopeful that he will respond to treatment." Born Walter Valentino Liberace in Milwaukee, Wis., on May 16,1919, Liberace was released from Eisenhower Medical Center in nearby Rancho Mirage. Asked why Liberace had been released from the hospital when he was suffering from such serious illnesses, Collier replied: "Since I'm not a doctor I can't make that judgement. He's stable, but he's in grave condition." Associates of Liberace said he entered the hospital on Friday. On Sunday, the hospital confirmed he was there in a brief statement that said, "Mr. Liberace has been admitted ... for evaluation of anemia. His condition is satisfactory." Pernicious anemia results in a reduction of red blood cells and can be fatal if left untreated. Symptoms are paleness, generalized weakness and a lack of . vigor. Liberace's health had been in question for several days. The Las Vegas Sun reported Saturday in a copyrighted front page story quoting "informed sources" that Liberace was terminally ill with AIDS. Seymour Heller, Liberace's personal manager for 36 years, immediately denied the report, demanded a retraction and threatened a libel suit. Sun publisher H.M. (Hank) Greens- pun said, "We stand by our story." A telegram to Greenspun from Liberace's Beverly Hills, Calif, attorney, Joel Strote, said in part: "Mr. Liberace does not have AIDS nor is he terminally ill." Heller on Saturday blamed liberace's condition on a watermelon diet that he said the pianist followed to lose about 20 pounds. "He ate watermelon off and on for a couple of months," Heller said. "We got worried. Doctors told him watermelon did not have enough proteins required by the body and that he would have to stop, and doctors told him he had a slight csae of anemia." Heller on Saturday also said Liberace had postponed his show appearances for the next several months. At one time, Liberace was the highest paid performer in Las Vegas, earning $50,000 a week. He had his own television show for nearly a decade and is credited with discovering Barbra Streisand in the early 1960s. In the 1960s, Liberace won a $15 million libel suit against a London newspaper that claimed in a story that he as homosexual. In December 1986, Liberace settled a palimony suit filed by his former live-in chauffer and travel secretary, Scott Thorson, for $95,000.
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