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Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986 - File 007. 1986-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2459/show/2452.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2459/show/2452

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986 - File 007, 1986-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2459/show/2452.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 HOUSTON DAILY VOICE/NOVEMBER 11,1986 John Gutmann's Rhythm Superlative, Choice of Images Depressing By Bill O'Rourke Houston Daily Voice The Houston Center for Photography, 1441 W. Alabama, is currently showing works by John Gutmann. His sense of rhythm is superlative. His use of depth is intriguing. But I find his choice of images quite depressing. His rhythms are most obvious when we see a row of archers or three friends One of his more interesting pieces is merely a menu painted on a window. The way he catches the window's reflections and glimpses of the darkness within make this a real study of varying depths. To a certain extent, the sadness of his images is a product of his times rather than his own personality. At the '37 Mardi Gras, the few, simple costumes "Texas Women. 17. b\ John Cut walking in lock step. It is also is very important to an image he evidently found quite evocative of his time, just before WWII—an irregular line of people waiting for something to happen. There are several of these pictures, from different items and places, throughout the exhibit. Another recurring theme is the picture that focuses on someone in the background. This is especially evident in the pictures from the 1937 Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Often the lurking figures have some authority—a pimp, a father, a national columinist. In one haunting picture taken on an Indian reservation. "The Stranger," the bundled, slightly blurred figure of the unknown person fills the middle foreground. But, the real focus is on the eyes of a young girl beyond him as she sizes up this possible threat. were all on women. There were a lot ot depressed faces trying to look happy. But nearly all of the happy faces he ever found were very young innocents or prisoners. And why the small preoccupation with poor children's graves? Also, there is a certain coldness about his detached viewpoint. Almost all of his pictures of people were taken from a good distance. When he did pull in for a telling close-up, he invariably cut off their heads. The exception to these last two points is the series he took at Spelman College, the first college for black women. There he allowed his lens to finally become closely involved with faces full of hope and joy. I recommend this show to those with a taste for gritty reality. The Center for Photography also has an installation by Walter Hopps "The Pimp in the Background," New Orleans, 1937, by John Gutmann entitled Four Walls. One wall contains treasures from the Menil Colleciton, including some happier Mardi Gras scenes taken by Joshua Mann Pailet. Another wall was filled by Center members bringing one picture apiece during 10 hours on Oct. 14. C. Leigh Farmer spotlights texture. Gary Faye has a fascinating character study of an entertainer. Don T. Rice's kite downed on a beach is a marvel on rhythm and color. Stanley L. Moore has a really funny, well done piece. It's a two-tone bodybuilder superimposed on a full- color sheet in raw, marbled beef. Nice! □ At Missouri Street The Missouri Street Gallery is celebrating the last exhibition of their first year with their first exhibition in their new space. Go back along the side ofthe dental office at 1006 Missouri and you'lll find a ceramics shop with the gallery upstairs. Their hours are 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Monday- Thursday. Their current show is named Shibui. after the Oriental art of combining arts. Two or more disparate arts, in this case painting and ceramics, which might have been expected to clash are paired harmonically to form an artistic synthesis. The ceramics, from which one might have expected smoothness, are alive with depths and textures. Many of these Steve Terry pieces are a very advance form of coil art. The paintings, even when they are on Bill Wooten's excellent kimonos rather than the wall have an inspired flatness. Their smoothness comes from a beautiful use of line. The colors used are the same throughout-gentle and symbolic. The pottery has colors bleeding out from between the coils, echoing the paintings' lines. Ah, but look closely at the lines in the paintings. Lyle E. Barrett has a very unique technique. Everything is done with rubber stamps. The lines are collections of tiny dots. The decorations and what little molding the pieces use are done with the larger rubber stamps. I'd recommend this exhibition to anyone wanting to be comfortable, calm, nearly whimsical and adult in the better sense of the word. □ Notes It takes so many people to make a major symphony orchestra. In the present ceo nomic climate, touring orchestras can hardly be afforded by either the orchestras themselves or the local businesss, individual, or colleges that present them. Yet, as Southwestern Bell Foundation's president Gerald D. Blathewick said, "These artists contribute to the cultural vitality of our region." So, in a precedent setting move, that foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts put in grants of $100,000 each and are using that pooled money to assist the presenters in a five state region to tour two major orchestras for one week each. The orchestra's involved are the St. Louis Symphony and our own Houston Symphony. NEA chairman Frank Hodsoll commended the foundation for "pledging the first substantive support to make possible what had become impossible." Diverse Works Gallery opened "Prisoners of Conscience" this last weekend. It will close Nov. 23 with a live auction of works by 100 artists. Proceeds from that auction will benefit Amnesty International Group 23/ Houston. Talking about Diverse Works, there will be a benefit for the gallery itself this Saturday, Nov. 15, from 3:00-10:00 p.m. at Allen's Landing. There will be all sorts of painting and boating festivities as well s the Shake Russell Band, the Balalaika Society, Hadrian's Wall and Strangelove. ... Houston area Hispanic visual artists may submit five slides of their works for inclusion in Houston Hispanic, a juried show. For more info, call Nicolas Kunel- los of Arte Publico Press, 749-4768. Deadline is Nov. 15. ... Black American artists over 18 who have exhibited in two or more shows are eligible to enter up to two works for inclusion in the Ninth Annual Southwest Art Exhibition. One color slide per work, a $10 entry fee and an entry form are due at the Museum of Africa American Life and Culture in Dallas by Nov. 15. For info in Houston call the CACH, 527-9330. ...
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